National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for halogen bulbs bulb

  1. Jacketed lamp bulb envelope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Bass, Gary K.; Dolan, James T.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang; Levin, Izrail; Roy, Robert J.; Shanks, Bruce; Smith, Malcolm; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a partially closed end, the partially closed end defining an aperture, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material at least partially covering a portion of the bulb not abutting the aperture. The reflective ceramic material may substantially fill an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. The ceramic cup may include a structural feature for aiding in alignment of the jacketed lamp bulb envelope in a lamp. The ceramic cup may include an external flange about a periphery thereof. One example of a jacketed lamp bulb envelope includes a ceramic cup having an open end and a closed end, a ceramic washer covering the open end of the ceramic cup, the washer defining an aperture therethrough, a lamp bulb positioned inside the ceramic cup abutting the aperture, and a reflective ceramic material filling an interior volume of the ceramic cup not occupied by the bulb. A method of packing a jacketed lamp bulb envelope of the type comprising a ceramic cup with a lamp bulb disposed therein includes the steps of filling the ceramic cup with a flowable slurry of reflective material, and applying centrifugal force to the cup to pack the reflective material therein.

  2. SuperBulbs Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SuperBulbs, Inc. Place: Rewood City, California Zip: 94065 Product: California-based LED manufacturer and technology developer. References: SuperBulbs, Inc.1 This article is...

  3. Lamp bulb with integral reflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Levin, Izrail; Shanks, Bruce; Sumner, Thomas L.

    2001-01-01

    An improved electrodeless discharge lamp bulb includes an integral ceramic reflector as a portion of the bulb envelope. The bulb envelope further includes two pieces, a reflector portion or segment is cast quartz ceramic and a light transmissive portion is a clear fused silica. In one embodiment, the cast quartz ceramic segment includes heat sink fins or stubs providing an increased outside surface area to dissipate internal heat. In another embodiment, the quartz ceramic segment includes an outside surface fused to eliminate gas permeation by polishing.

  4. Changing How You Choose Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Last month, the Federal Trade Commission announced that light bulbs will have a brand new style of packaging, starting in 2011.

  5. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents November 5, 2014 - 11:39pm Addthis By...

  6. L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient Light Bulbs This September 23, 2008 webcast provided an overview of the Bright Tomorrow Lighting Prize (L Prize) technology competition. The L Prize calls for super-efficient SSL products to replace two of the most common light bulbs used today: the 60-watt incandescent and the PAR-38 halogen reflector. Kelly Gordon, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, kicked off the webcast with an overview of the

  7. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  8. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for light bulbs, a product category covered by ENERGY STAR. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products or FEMP designated products in all product categories covered by these programs and in any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  9. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting ...

  10. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional ... The table below compares a 60 watt (W) traditional ... *Based on 2 hrsday of usage, an electricity rate of 11 ...

  11. Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Westinghouse Pays 50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations Westinghouse Pays 50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations December 13, ...

  12. Purchasing Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coal-burning power plants emit mercury into the environment; using ENERGY ... Get a list of ENERGY STAR certified light bulbs. Make ... By using less electricity from coal-fired power ...

  13. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy EPS Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) High-resolution EPS of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov.' DoE_Billboard_Which_Bulb.eps (11.05 MB) More Documents & Publications Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS

  14. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) HIgh-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov.' DoE_Billboard_Which_Bulb.jpg (1.94 MB) More Documents & Publications Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution JPG

  15. Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy Steps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Purchasing an energy-efficient light bulb doesn't have to be difficult. With these five easy steps, you can find the best energy-efficient light bulb for your home!

  16. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Women | Department of Energy Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women This document, from the Wisconsin Focus on Energy / ENERGY STAR Products Program, is part of the Case Study Series, explaining how "Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women." ENERGY STAR Case Study (307.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Compact Fluorescent Lighting

  17. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  18. A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions A Winning Light Bulb With the Potential to Save the Nation Billions August 4, 2011 - 3:09pm Addthis This 10-watt alternative LED bulb (which glows white when turned on) could save the nation about 35 terawatt-hours of electricity or $3.9 billion in one year and avoid 20 million metric tons of carbon emissions if every 60-watt incandescent bulb in the U.S. was replaced with the L Prize winner. | Photo

  19. Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs December 7, 2015 - 9:23am Addthis Rise and Shine: Lighting the World with 10 Billion LED Bulbs Gabrielle Dreyfus, Ph.D. Gabrielle Dreyfus, Ph.D. Senior Policy Analyst, Office of International Climate and Clean Energy. Chad Gallinat, Ph.D. Chad Gallinat, Ph.D. International Climate Fellow, Office of International Climate and Clean Energy Stand next to a

  20. Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has successfully resolved the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE’s federal efficiency...

  1. DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models and Allows Sale of Another

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a part of DOE's continuing enforcement action against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation, the company must cease sales of two light bulb models - medium based CFL basic model 15GLOBE/65/2 ...

  2. Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low-resolution JPG of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov. DoEBillboardWhichBulbweb.jpg (199.94 KB) More Documents & ...

  3. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  4. What Light Bulbs Do You Use in Your Home? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Neighborhood Program Financing Peer Exchange Call: "What is the Right Rate?" call slides and discussion summary, December 1, 2011. Call Slides and Discussion Summary (606.43 KB) More Documents & Publications Structuring Rebate and Incentive Programs for Sustainable Demand Peer Exchange Call on Financing and Revenue: Bond Funding Financing Small Business Upgrades

    Eric Barendsen posted about the differences in costs between traditional and energy efficient light bulbs. Several

  5. LED lamp or bulb with remote phosphor and diffuser configuration with enhanced scattering properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, Tao; Le Toquin, Ronan; Keller, Bernd; Tarsa, Eric; Youmans, Mark; Lowes, Theodore; Medendorp, Jr., Nicholas W; Van De Ven, Antony; Negley, Gerald

    2014-11-11

    An LED lamp or bulb is disclosed that comprises a light source, a heat sink structure and an optical cavity. The optical cavity comprises a phosphor carrier having a conversions material and arranged over an opening to the cavity. The phosphor carrier comprises a thermally conductive transparent material and is thermally coupled to the heat sink structure. An LED based light source is mounted in the optical cavity remote to the phosphor carrier with light from the light source passing through the phosphor carrier. A diffuser dome is included that is mounted over the optical cavity, with light from the optical cavity passing through the diffuser dome. The properties of the diffuser, such as geometry, scattering properties of the scattering layer, surface roughness or smoothness, and spatial distribution of the scattering layer properties may be used to control various lamp properties such as color uniformity and light intensity distribution as a function of viewing angle.

  6. Instrument uncertainty effect on calculation of absolute humidity using dewpoint, wet-bulb, and relative humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slayzak, S.J.; Ryan, J.P.

    1998-04-01

    As part of the US Department of Energy`s Advanced Desiccant Technology Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is characterizing the state-of-the-art in desiccant dehumidifiers, the key component of desiccant cooling systems. The experimental data will provide industry and end users with independent performance evaluation and help researchers assess the energy savings potential of the technology. Accurate determination of humidity ratio is critical to this work and an understanding of the capabilities of the available instrumentation is central to its proper application. This paper compares the minimum theoretical random error in humidity ratio calculation for three common measurement methods to give a sense of the relative maximum accuracy possible for each method assuming systematic errors can be made negligible. A series of experiments conducted also illustrate the capabilities of relative humidity sensors as compared to dewpoint sensors in measuring the grain depression of desiccant dehumidifiers. These tests support the results of the uncertainty analysis. At generally available instrument accuracies, uncertainty in calculated humidity ratio for dewpoint sensors is determined to be constant at approximately 2%. Wet-bulb sensors range between 2% and 6% above 10 g/kg (4%--15% below), and relative humidity sensors vary between 4% above 90% rh and 15% at 20% rh. Below 20% rh, uncertainty for rh sensors increases dramatically. Highest currently attainable accuracies bring dewpoint instruments down to 1% uncertainty, wet bulb to a range of 1%--3% above 10 g/kg (1.5%--8% below), and rh sensors between 1% and 5%.

  7. Comparing Light Bulbs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In this exercise, students will use a light to demonstrate the difference between being energy-efficient and energy-wasteful, and learn what energy efficiency means.

  8. Fish passage through a simulated horizontal bulb turbine pressure regime: A supplement to "Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, C. S.; Amidan, B. G.; Cada, G. F.

    2003-07-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the worst case pressure conditions (Abernethy et al. 2001) and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized (Abernethy et al. 2002). For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low-head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Tests indicated that for most of the cross-sectional area of a horizontal bulb turbine, pressure changes occurring during turbine passage are not harmful to fall chinook salmon and only minimally harmful to bluegill. However, some areas within a horizontal bulb turbine may have extreme pressure conditions that would be harmful to fish. These scenarios were not tested because they represent a small cross-sectional area of the turbine compared to the centerline pressures scenarios used in these tests.

  9. Fish Passage Through a Simulated Horizontal Bulb Turbine Pressure Regime: A Supplement to"Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernethy, Cary S. ); Amidan, Brett G. ); Cada, G F.

    2003-07-31

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River Basin are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage. The responses of fall chinook salmon and bluegill sunfish to rapid pressure change was investigated at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Previous test series evaluated the effects of passage through a vertical Kaplan turbine under the"worst case" pressure conditions and under less severe conditions where pressure changes were minimized. For this series of tests, pressure changes were modified to simulate passage through a horizontal bulb turbine, commonly installed at low head dams. The results were compared to results from previous test series. Both fish species were acclimated for 16-22 hours at either surface (101 kPa; 1 atm) or 30 ft (191 kPa; 1.9 atm) of pressure in a hyperbaric chamber before exposure to a pressure scenario simulating passage through a horizontal bulb turbine. The simulation was as follows: gradual pressure increase to about 2 atm of pressure, followed by a sudden (0.4 second) decrease in pressure to either 0.7 or 0.95 atm, followed by gradual return to 1 atm (surface water pressure). Following the exposure, fish were held at

  10. CALiPER Snapshot Report: Light Bulbs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Snapshot reports use data from DOE's LED Lighting Facts product list to compare the LED performance to standard technologies, and are designed to help lighting retailers, distributors, designers, utilities, energy efficiency program sponsors, and other stakeholders understand the current state of the LED market and its trajectory.

  11. School Energy Survey Teacher Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Student Guide Page 20 INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Number of bulbs to get 25,000 hours 25 8.3 2.5 1 Cost of bulbs for 25,000...

  12. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will also keep a room cooler, an extra benefit in the summer. Halogen Lighting While halogens are more efficient than traditional incandescent bulbs, they use the same technology...

  13. Why Did the LED Light Bulb Cross the Road?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Could using humor as a marketing strategy make energy efficiency a bit more digestible? One Illinois grant recipient thinks it could be.

  14. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Both Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla experimented with fluorescent lamps in the 1890s, but neither ever commercially produced them. Instead, it was Peter Cooper Hewitt's ...

  15. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pioneer Charles Proteus Steinmetz (center in light-colored suit) poses with Albert Einstein (immediate left) and other inventors at the RCA Brunswick, New Jersey,...

  16. Untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 Bulb Type Incandescent Fluorescent Other Room Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other unknown Total 4,196 431...

  17. School Energy Survey Student Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 40 new power plants. INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Brightness 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens Life of Bulb 1,000...

  18. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The new energy-saving lightbulbs -- halogen incandescents, CFLs, and LEDs -- could save you about 50 per year when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. ...

  19. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J. LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  20. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (US)","USDOE","LED; light-emitting diode; CFL; incandescent; halogen; lamp; bulb; TCLP; STLC; TTLC; WET; hazardous waste; electronic...

  1. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bellows, Richard J.; Kantner, Edward

    1988-08-23

    It has now been discovered that reduction in the coulombic efficiency of metal halogen cells can be minimized if the microporous separator employed in such cells is selected from one which is preferably wet by the aqueous electrolyte and is not wet substantially by the cathodic halogen.

  2. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Jr., Kent S.

    2008-11-11

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. An illustrative method includes adding an electron donor for microbe-mediated anaerobic reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents, which electron donor enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative electron donors include C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2-C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof, of which lactic acid, salts of lactic acid--such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof are particularly illustrative. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the electron donor.

  3. Halogenated solvent remediation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sorenson, Kent S.

    2004-08-31

    Methods for enhancing bioremediation of ground water contaminated with nonaqueous halogenated solvents are disclosed. A preferred method includes adding a composition to the ground water wherein the composition is an electron donor for microbe-mediated reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated solvents and enhances mass transfer of the halogenated solvents from residual source areas into the aqueous phase of the ground water. Illustrative compositions effective in these methods include surfactants such as C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, salts thereof, esters of C.sub.2 -C.sub.4 carboxylic acids and hydroxy acids, and mixtures thereof. Especially preferred compositions for use in these methods include lactic acid, salts of lactic acid, such as sodium lactate, lactate esters, and mixtures thereof. The microbes are either indigenous to the ground water, or such microbes can be added to the ground water in addition to the composition.

  4. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, Paul K. (Los Alamos, NM); Abney, Kent D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10' positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron.

  5. Halogenation of cobalt dicarbollide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurlburt, P.K.; Abney, K.D.; Kinkead, S.A.

    1997-05-20

    A method for selectively adding chlorine, bromine, or iodine to cobalt dicarbollide anions by means of electrophilic substitution reactions. Halogens are added only to the B10 and B10{prime} positions of the anion. The process involves use of hypohalous acid or N-halosuccinimide or gaseous chlorine in the presence of iron. 1 fig.

  6. DOE Requires Westinghouse to Cease Sales of Two Light Bulb Models...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Company to allow the companies to resume sales of an incandescent reflector lamp ... issued Notices allowing Fuzhou and Westinghouse to resume distribution of those products. ...

  7. Studying some mechanical properties of MgO with used neon bulb glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Issa, Tarik Talib; Khaleel, Saba Mahdi; Abdul Kareem, Noura Ammar

    2013-12-16

    Ceramic compact of MgO +WT% of UNBG were sintered at different sintering temperature (700, 900, 1100, 1300)°c, under static air for 3 hours. X-ray diffraction and some mechanical properties were conducted. The maximum sintered density, compression; fracture strength and hardness were indicated for the compilation of MgO −20 WT % UNBG, sintered at 1300 °c.

  8. Westinghouse and Fuzhou Permitted to Restart Distribution of Light Bulb Products

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department has issued Notices of Allowance to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company determining, based on corrected test data provided by...

  9. DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Washington, DC - On January 25th, the General Counsel notified 25 manufacturers that the Department of Energy has withdrawn their right to use the Energy Star label on 34 different models of...

  10. This Month on Energy Savers: February 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    incandescent light bulbs in your home could save you about 50 per year. New lighting standards take effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, ...

  11. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Jason R Hollomon Brad Dillon Heather E Snowden Swan Lesley J LED light emitting diode CFL incandescent halogen lamp bulb TCLP STLC TTLC WET hazardous waste electronic waste e...

  12. METHOD FOR PRODUCING ISOTOPIC METHANES AND PARTIALLY HALOGENATED DERIVATIVES THEROF

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frazer, J.W.

    1959-08-18

    A method is given for producing isotopic methanes and/ or partially halogenated derivatives. Lithium hydride, deuteride, or tritide is reacted with a halogenated methane or with a halogenated methane in combination with free halogen. The process is conveniently carried out by passing a halogenated methane preferably at low pressures or in an admixture with an inert gas through a fixed bed of finely divided lithium hydride heated initially to temperatures of 100 to 200 deg C depending upon the halogenated methane used.

  13. Lighting Choices - White Background | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    all_bulbs_hires_web.eps (32.46 MB

  14. Energy efficient alternatives to halogen torchieres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, M.; Marr, L.; Mitchell, J.; Page, E.

    1997-03-01

    A series of novel energy efficient torchiere systems have been developed using compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). These systems were studied photometrically and compared with the performance of traditional commercially available tungsten halogen sources. Gonio-photometric data and power assessments indicate that significant lighting energy savings can be obtained by utilizing CFL sources instead of standard tungsten halogen sources. This energy savings is jointly due to the higher source efficacy of the CFLs and the surprisingly poor performance of the imported 300 Watt halogen lamps. Experimental data shows that a 50 to 60 Watt CFL will effectively lumen match a variety of 300 Watt tungsten halogen sources with 5 to 10 times the efficacy. CFL torchieres have additional benefits of higher power quality and cooler lamp operating temperature, making them safer fixtures.

  15. Method and apparatus for low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William Kevin; Janikowski, Stuart Kevin

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for decomposing halogenated hydrocarbons are provided. The halogenated hydrocarbon is mixed with solvating agents and maintained in a predetermined atmosphere and at a predetermined temperature. The mixture is contacted with recyclable reactive material for chemically reacting with the recyclable material to create dehalogenated hydrocarbons and halogenated inorganic compounds. A feature of the invention is that the process enables low temperature destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons.

  16. Passivation of quartz for halogen-containing light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falkenstein, Zoran

    1999-01-01

    Lifetime of halogen containing VUV, UV, visible or IR light sources can be extended by passivating the quartz or glass gas containers with halogens prior to filling the quartz with the halogen and rare gas mixtures used to produce the light.

  17. Retention of Halogens in Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.

    2010-05-01

    In spite of their potential roles as melting rate accelerators and foam breakers, halogens are generally viewed as troublesome components for glass processing. Of five halogens, F, Cl, Br, I, and At, all but At may occur in nuclear waste. A nuclear waste feed may contain up to 10 g of F, 4 g of Cl, and ?100 mg of Br and I per kg of glass. The main concern is halogen volatility, producing hazardous fumes and particulates, and the radioactive iodine 129 isotope of 1.7x10^7-year half life. Because F and Cl are soluble in oxide glasses and tend to precipitate on cooling, they can be retained in the waste glass in the form of dissolved constituents or as dispersed crystalline inclusions. This report compiles known halogen-retention data in both high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) glasses. Because of its radioactivity, the main focus is on I. Available data on F and Cl were compiled for comparison. Though Br is present in nuclear wastes, it is usually ignored; no data on Br retention were found.

  18. Method and apparatus for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monagle, Matthew (Los Alamos, NM); Coogan, John J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A halogenated hydrocarbon (HHC) detector is formed from a silent discharge (also called a dielectric barrier discharge) plasma generator. A silent discharge plasma device receives a gas sample that may contain one or more HHCs and produces free radicals and excited electrons for oxidizing the HHCs in the gas sample to produce water, carbon dioxide, and an acid including halogens in the HHCs. A detector is used to sensitively detect the presence of the acid. A conductivity cell detector combines the oxidation products with a solvent where dissociation of the acid increases the conductivity of the solvent. The conductivity cell output signal is then functionally related to the presence of HHCs in the gas sample. Other detectors include electrochemical cells, infrared spectrometers, and negative ion mobility spectrometers.

  19. Oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rohrmann, Charles A. (Kennewick, WA); Fullam, Harold T. (Richland, WA)

    1985-01-01

    A process for oxidizing hydrogen halides having substantially no sulfur impurities by means of a catalytically active molten salt is disclosed. A mixture of the subject hydrogen halide and an oxygen bearing gas is contacted with a molten salt containing an oxidizing catalyst and alkali metal normal sulfates and pyrosulfates to produce an effluent gas stream rich in the elemental halogen and substantially free of sulfur oxide gases.

  20. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, H.S.; Sather, N.F.

    1987-08-21

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gas and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  1. Process for removal of hydrogen halides or halogens from incinerator gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Hann S.; Sather, Norman F.

    1988-01-01

    A process for reducing the amount of halogens and halogen acids in high temperature combustion gases and through their removal, the formation of halogenated organics at lower temperatures, with the reduction being carried out electrochemically by contacting the combustion gas with the negative electrode of an electrochemical cell and with the halogen and/or halogen acid being recovered at the positive electrode.

  2. Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Halogen eAppraisal - Performance Appraisals 2015 Performance Appraisal Process 211 - 220: Employee writes self-appraisal. 221 - 310: Evaluating Supervisor writes appraisals for...

  3. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow ...

  4. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani, Jr.; Theresa M. Bomstad

    2003-07-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) is continuing work toward the development of new screening methodology and a test kit to measure halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Heated diode and corona discharge sensors are commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. They are both selective to the presence of halogens. In prior work, the devices were tested for response to carbon tetrachloride, heptane, toluene, and water vapors. In the current work, sensor response was evaluated with sixteen halogenated VOCs relative to carbon tetrachloride. The results show that the response of the various chlorinated VOCs is within an order of magnitude of the response to carbon tetrachloride for each of the sensors. Thus, for field screening a single response factor can be used. Both types of leak detectors are being further modified to provide an on-board LCD signal readout, which is related to VOC concentration. The units will be fully portable and will operate with 115-V line or battery power. Signal background, noise level, and response data on the Bacharach heated diode detector and the TIF corona discharge detector show that when the response curves are plotted against the log of concentration, the plot is linear to the upper limit for the particular unit, with some curvature at lower levels. When response is plotted directly against concentration, the response is linear at the low end and is curved at the high end. The dynamic ranges for carbon tetrachloride of the two devices from the lower detection limit (S/N=2) to signal saturation are 4-850 vapor parts per million (vppm) for the corona discharge unit and 0.01-70 vppm for the heated diode unit. Additional circuit modifications are being made to lower the detection limit and increase the dynamic response range of the corona discharge unit. The results indicate that both devices show potential utility for future analytical method development work toward

  5. Method for halogenating or radiohalogenating a chemical compound

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kabalka, George W.

    2006-05-09

    A method for obtaining a halogenated organic compound, whereby an organotrifluoroborate compound is reacted with a halide ion in the presence of an oxidizing agent to produce the corresponding halogenated organic compound. The method may be used for producing radiohalogenated organic compounds.

  6. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  7. Metal halogen battery construction with improved technique for producing halogen hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fong, Walter L.; Catherino, Henry A.; Kotch, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    An improved electrical energy storage system comprising, at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode separated by aqueous electrolyte, a store means wherein halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material having a liquid level near the upper part of the store, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell, conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate forming apparatus associated with the store, said hydrate forming apparatus including, a pump to which there is introduced quantities of the halogen gas and chilled water, said pump being located in the store and an outlet conduit leading from the pump and being substantially straight and generally vertically disposed and having an exit discharge into the gas space above the liquid level in the store, and wherein said hydrate forming apparatus is highly efficient and very resistant to plugging or jamming. The disclosure also relates to an improved method for producing chlorine hydrate in zinc chlorine batteries.

  8. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs,...

  9. Energy Saving Gift Ideas for Dad this Father's Day | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old incandescent bulbs ...

  10. Share the Love (and Energy Savings) This Mother's Day | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10-20 times longer than traditional incandescent light bulbs. Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. ...

  11. Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Technologies for Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... bulbs 60 watts 2,820 watts CFL bulbs 14 watts 658 watts LED bulbs 9.5 watts 446.5 watts Lighting using kilowatt price of 12 cents * Monthly Cost of Using Incandescent Light ...

  12. Alliant Energy Interstate Power and Light (Gas and Electric)...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Heat Pumps: 1,600 - 3,200 Lighting Fixtures: varies, up to 100fixture Light bulbs and lighting: varies, up to 15bulb LED Fixtures: 30 LED Bulbs: 10 FanMotor...

  13. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, M.M.; Faraj, B.

    1999-07-06

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  14. Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines for mapping serotonin transporter sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Faraj, Bahjat

    1999-01-01

    Halogenated naphthyl methoxy piperidines having a strong affinity for the serotonin transporter are disclosed. Those compounds can be labeled with positron-emitting and/or gamma emitting halogen isotopes by a late step synthesis that maximizes the useable lifeterm of the label. The labeled compounds are useful for localizing serotonin transporter sites by positron emission tomography and/or single photon emission computed tomography.

  15. Departments of Energy and Defense Launch ENERGY STAR® Operation Change Out- the Military Challenge Campaign to Promote the Use of Energy Efficient Light Bulbs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    CAMP LEJEUNE, NC - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman on Earth Day launched a joint Department of Energy (DOE) and Defense campaign to challenge military bases nationwide to change their...

  16. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1997-03-18

    A process is described for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes. 3 figs.

  17. Treatment of halogen-containing waste and other waste materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1997-01-01

    A process for treating a halogen-containing waste material. The process provides a bath of molten glass containing a sacrificial metal oxide capable of reacting with a halogen in the waste material. The sacrificial metal oxide is present in the molten glass in at least a stoichiometric amount with respect to the halogen in the waste material. The waste material is introduced into the bath of molten glass to cause a reaction between the halogen in the waste material and the sacrificial metal oxide to yield a metal halide. The metal halide is a gas at the temperature of the molten glass. The gaseous metal halide is separated from the molten glass and contacted with an aqueous scrubber solution of an alkali metal hydroxide to yield a metal hydroxide or metal oxide-containing precipitate and a soluble alkali metal halide. The precipitate is then separated from the aqueous scrubber solution. The molten glass containing the treated waste material is removed from the bath as a waste glass. The process of the invention can be used to treat all types of waste material including radioactive wastes. The process is particularly suited for separating halogens from halogen-containing wastes.

  18. Metal halogen battery system with multiple outlet nozzle for hydrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bjorkman, Jr., Harry K.

    1983-06-21

    A metal halogen battery system, including at least one cell having a positive electrode and a negative electrode contacted by aqueous electrolyte containing the material of said metal and halogen, store means whereby halogen hydrate is formed and stored as part of an aqueous material, means for circulating electrolyte through the cell and to the store means, and conduit means for transmitting halogen gas formed in the cell to a hydrate former whereby the hydrate is formed in association with the store means, said store means being constructed in the form of a container which includes a filter means, said filter means being inoperative to separate the hydrate formed from the electrolyte, said system having, a hydrate former pump means associated with the store means and being operative to intermix halogen gas with aqueous electrolyte to form halogen hydrate, said hydrate former means including, multiple outlet nozzle means connected with the outlet side of said pump means and being operative to minimize plugging, said nozzle means being comprised of at least one divider means which is generally perpendicular to the rotational axes of gears within the pump means, said divider means acting to divide the flow from the pump means into multiple outlet flow paths.

  19. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    install energy efficiency measures in Xcel service territory. Rebates are available for evaporative cooling systems, LED light bulbs, and CFL light bulbs. All equipment must meet...

  20. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women This document,...

  1. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for households to see a simple payback from compact fluorescent bulbs depends on the price of electricity. Assuming a 26-watt compact fluorescent bulb that costs 22 dollars,...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Xcel service territory. Rebates are available for evaporative cooling systems, LED light bulbs, and CFL light bulbs. All equipment must meet program requirements....

  3. Entergy Arkansas- Agricultural Energy Solutions Program Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Presecriptive Option offers predetermined incentives on a wide variety of energy efficiency measures including Compact Flourescent Light Bulbs and high performance flourescent bulb replacemen...

  4. Ablamp Limited | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Manufacturer of energy-saving Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs, solar-powered lights, LED bulbs, auto lamps and other speciality lamps. Coordinates: 23.049681, 113.173737...

  5. Small Wind Guidebook/First, How Can I Make My Home More Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by 25% to 50%. Replacing 15 incandescent light bulbs with energy efficient bulbs can save approximately 50 per year. When shopping for appliances, look for the Energy Star...

  6. General Service LED Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A U.S. DOE SSL technology fact sheet that compares general service LED light bulbs with incandescent and CFL bulbs.

  7. Tips: Shopping for Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    When shopping for lighting, you can now use the Lighting Facts label and lumens to compare bulbs and purchase a bulb with the amount of brightness you want.

  8. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  9. Symmetric and asymmetric halogen-containing metallocarboranylporphyrins and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Wu, Haitao

    2013-05-21

    The present invention is directed to low toxicity boronated compounds and methods for their use in the treatment, visualization, and diagnosis of tumors. More specifically, the present invention is directed to low toxicity halogenated, carborane-containing 5,10,15,20-tetraphenylporphyrin compounds and methods for their use particularly in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of tumors of the brain, head and neck, and surrounding tissue. The invention is also directed to using these halogenated, carborane-containing tetraphenylporphyrin compounds in methods of tumor imaging and/or diagnosis such as MRI, SPECT, or PET.

  10. Method for selective dehalogenation of halogenated polyaromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina; Petrosius, Steven C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for dehalogenating halogenated polyaromatic compounds is provided wherein the polyaromatic compounds are mixed with a hydrogen donor solvent and a carbon catalyst in predetermined proportions, the mixture is maintained at a predetermined pressure, and the mixture is heated to a predetermined temperature and for a predetermined time.

  11. Process for oxidation of hydrogen halides to elemental halogens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyke, Stephen E.

    1992-01-01

    An improved process for generating an elemental halogen selected from chlorine, bromine or iodine, from a corresponding hydrogen halide by absorbing a molten salt mixture, which includes sulfur, alkali metals and oxygen with a sulfur to metal molar ratio between 0.9 and 1.1 and includes a dissolved oxygen compound capable of reacting with hydrogen halide to produce elemental halogen, into a porous, relatively inert substrate to produce a substrate-supported salt mixture. Thereafter, the substrate-supported salt mixture is contacted (stage 1) with a hydrogen halide while maintaining the substrate-supported salt mixture during the contacting at an elevated temperature sufficient to sustain a reaction between the oxygen compound and the hydrogen halide to produce a gaseous elemental halogen product. This is followed by purging the substrate-supported salt mixture with steam (stage 2) thereby recovering any unreacted hydrogen halide and additional elemental halogen for recycle to stage 1. The dissolved oxygen compound is regenerated in a high temperature (stage 3) and an optical intermediate temperature stage (stage 4) by contacting the substrate-supported salt mixture with a gas containing oxygen whereby the dissolved oxygen compound in the substrate-supported salt mixture is regenerated by being oxidized to a higher valence state.

  12. Hydroprocessing with a catalyst containing non-hydrolyzable halogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moorehead, E.L.

    1989-07-04

    This patent describes a method for hydroprocessing a hydrocarbon oil. The method comprises contacting a hydrocarbon oil containing asphaltenes under hydroprocessing conditions with a particulate catalyst to convert at least a portion of the asphaltenes in the hydrocarbon oil so as to produce a product oil of reduced asphaltene content, the particulate catalyst comprising at least one active hydrogenation metal component on a support material comprising a zeolite or molecular sieve containing at least one non-hydrolyzable halogen component.

  13. Zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition with lead additive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henriksen, Gary L.

    1981-01-01

    This disclosure relates to a zinc halogen battery electrolyte composition containing an additive providing improved zinc-on-zinc recyclability. The improved electrolyte composition involves the use of a lead additive to inhibit undesirable irregular plating and reduce nodular or dendritic growth on the electrode surface. The lead-containing electrolyte composition of the present invention appears to influence not only the morphology of the base plate zinc, but also the morphology of the zinc-on-zinc replate. In addition, such lead-containing electrolyte compositions appear to reduce hydrogen formation.

  14. Investigating the Effects of Temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Investigating the Effects of Temperature on Power Output Objective: Students will use concepts learned in class to explore the many variables that effect the efficiency of solar panels in regards to power output. Materials: * PV Array or Solar Panel * 2 Multimeter * Frozen Ice Packs * Low Power DC Bulb * Halogen Lamp (500 Watts) * 4 or 5 Alligator clip wires * Timer Investigative Question: How does the power output change as the temperature of the PV system changes. Procedure: 1) Attach the

  15. Halogen-free benzoxazine based curable compositions for high TG applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan

    2015-03-10

    The present invention provides a halogen-free curable composition including a benzoxazine monomer, at least one epoxy resin, a catalyst, a toughening agent and a solvent. The halogen-free curable composition is especially suited for use in automobile and aerospace applications since the composition, upon curing, produces a composite having a high glass transition temperature.

  16. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerant | Department of Energy Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic

  17. 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    helps you understand your purchase. The label has the lumens - or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warm/yellow, to white, to cool/blue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range of colors. energysavers.gov/lumens Lumens tell you how bright a bulb is. More lumens mean brighter light. When replacing a 60-watt traditional incandescent bulb, look for a new bulb that gives you about 800 lumens. Choose your next light bulb for

  18. Which Models Matter: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy EPS Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution EPS Billboard) High-resolution EPS of billboard reading, 'Which bulb is right for you? Save energy, save money. Energysaver.gov.' DoE_Billboard_Which_Bulb.eps (11.05 MB) More Documents & Publications Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is Right for You? (Low-Resolution JPG Billboard) Goodbye, Watts. Hello, Lumens. (High-Resolution EPS of Energy

    JPG Billboard) Which Bulb Is

  19. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, Michael G.; Turner, Brian; Wooten, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to a) rotate the bulb and b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooling for providing cooler gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement.

  20. Microwave lamp with multi-purpose rotary motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, M.G.; Turner, B.; Wooten, R.D.

    1999-02-02

    In a microwave powered electrodeless lamp, a single rotary motor is used to (a) rotate the bulb and (b) provide rotary motion to a blower or pump means for providing cooling fluid to the magnetron and/or to a forced gas cooler for providing cooling gas to the bulb. The blower may consist of only of an impeller without the usual blower housing. The motor, bulb stem and bulb, or motor, bulb stem, bulb and blower may be formed as an integral unit so as to facilitate replacement. 8 figs.

  1. TipCard_Front_back_final_rev2.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    helps you understand your purchase. The label has the lumens - or brightness - of the bulb, the estimated operating cost and life, and the color of the light (from warm/yellow, to white, to cool/blue). Energy-saving bulbs come in a wide range of colors. energysavers.gov/lumens Lumens tell you how bright a bulb is. More lumens mean brighter light. When replacing a 60-watt traditional incandescent bulb, look for a new bulb that gives you about 800 lumens. Choose your next light bulb for

  2. Deciphering Halogen Competition in Organometallic Halide Perovskite Growth

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Keum, Jong Kahk; Ovchinnikova, Olga S.; Chen, Shiyou; Du, Mao-Hua; Ivanov, Ilia N; Rouleau, Christopher; Geohegan, David B.; Xiao, Kai

    2016-03-01

    Organometallic halide perovskites (OHPs) hold great promise for next-generation, low-cost optoelectronic devices. During the chemical synthesis and crystallization of OHP thin films a major unresolved question is the competition between multiple halide species (e.g. I-, Cl-, Br-) in the formation of the mixed halide perovskite crystals. Whether Cl- ions are successfully incorporated into the perovskite crystal structure or alternatively, where they are located, is not yet fully understood. Here, in situ X-ray diffraction measurements of crystallization dynamics are combined with ex situ TOF-SIMS chemical analysis to reveal that Br- or Cl- ions can promote crystal growth, yet reactive I- ionsmore » prevent them from incorporating into the lattice of the final perovskite crystal structure. The Cl- ions are located in the grain boundaries of the perovskite films. These findings significantly advance our understanding of the role of halogens during synthesis of hybrid perovskites, and provide an insightful guidance to the engineering of high-quality perovskite films, essential for exploring superior-performance and cost-effective optoelectronic devices.« less

  3. Analysis of Halogen-Mercury Reactions in Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paula Buitrago; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Brydger Van Otten

    2010-01-01

    Oxidized mercury species may be formed in combustion systems through gas-phase reactions between elemental mercury and halogens, such as chorine or bromine. This study examines how bromine species affect mercury oxidation in the gas phase and examines the effects of mixtures of bromine and chlorine on extents of oxidation. Experiments were conducted in a bench-scale, laminar flow, methane-fired (300 W), quartz-lined reactor in which gas composition (HCl, HBr, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2}) and temperature profile were varied. In the experiments, the post-combustion gases were quenched from flame temperatures to about 350 C, and then speciated mercury was measured using a wet conditioning system and continuous emissions monitor (CEM). Supporting kinetic calculations were performed and compared with measured levels of oxidation. A significant portion of this report is devoted to sample conditioning as part of the mercury analysis system. In combustion systems with significant amounts of Br{sub 2} in the flue gas, the impinger solutions used to speciate mercury may be biased and care must be taken in interpreting mercury oxidation results. The stannous chloride solution used in the CEM conditioning system to convert all mercury to total mercury did not provide complete conversion of oxidized mercury to elemental, when bromine was added to the combustion system, resulting in a low bias for the total mercury measurement. The use of a hydroxylamine hydrochloride and sodium hydroxide solution instead of stannous chloride showed a significant improvement in the measurement of total mercury. Bromine was shown to be much more effective in the post-flame, homogeneous oxidation of mercury than chlorine, on an equivalent molar basis. Addition of NO to the flame (up to 400 ppmv) had no impact on mercury oxidation by chlorine or bromine. Addition of SO{sub 2} had no effect on mercury oxidation by chlorine at SO{sub 2} concentrations below about 400 ppmv; some increase in mercury oxidation

  4. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  5. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Travaglini, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  6. Saving Energy and Saving Money in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Oliver, LeAnn; Gajewski, Katherine; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain

    2011-01-01

    Philadelphia is using a portion of its EECBG grant, to change out over 50,000 traffic bulbs with energy-efficient LED bulbs and save $1 million per year in energy savings.

  7. Saving Energy and Saving Money in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Nutter, Michael; Oliver, LeAnn; Gajewski, Katherine; Williams, Doug; Best, DeLain

    2013-05-29

    Philadelphia is using a portion of its EECBG grant, to change out over 50,000 traffic bulbs with energy-efficient LED bulbs and save $1 million per year in energy savings.

  8. New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25, 2012 - ...

  9. Getting CFLs Home in Longview, Texas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Inefficient light bulbs can drive up electricity bills and drain homeowners' wallets. With that in mind, government officials in the east Texas city of Longview established a light bulb swap program that is projected to save participating households $242.

  10. 50 middle-schoolers are wowed by science at PPPL's My Brother...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 4. Gallery: Ankita Jariwala uses a Tesla coil to light up a blue fluorescent bulb. ... of Communications) Ankita Jariwala uses a Tesla coil to light up a blue fluorescent bulb. ...

  11. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    You Money The savings can add up. Upgrading 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home could save you about 50 per year. Since most of the bulbs also have longer life spans, ...

  12. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    bulbs and can last up to three times longer than traditional incandescent light bulbs. ... ENERGY STAR-qualified CFLs use about 75% less energy and last up to 10 times longer than ...

  13. Save Energy this Independence Day | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on lighting costs. Replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs in your home with energy-saving bulbs could save you about 50 per year. For the greatest savings, replace your old...

  14. Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylidene-2,3-dihydro-1,4-oxazino[2,3,4- ij ]quinolin-4-ium triiodide Two kinds of

  15. Department of Energy Announces Philips Lighting North America as Winner of L Prize Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Philips Product Delivers on Department's Challenge to Replace Common Light Bulb with Energy-Saving Lighting Alternative

  16. Another Side of Light - D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Three quantum phenomena In fluorescence, matter absorbs light waves of a high frequency and then emits light of the same or lower frequency. This process was studied and named by George Gabriel Stokes in the mid-19th century. Today, fluorescence is familiar to us from fluorescent light bulbs. A fluorescent bulb's filament produces ultraviolet light, which is absorbed by the bulb's inner coating, which then emits lower-frequency visible light-more visible light than an incandescent bulb

  17. How Gender Affects Negotiation and What We Should All Do About It | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  18. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LIFE CYCLE; LIGHT BULBS; ...

  19. Method of increments for the halogen molecular crystals: Cl, Br, and I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steenbergen, Krista G.; Gaston, Nicola; Müller, Carsten; Paulus, Beate

    2014-09-28

    Method of increments (MI) calculations reveal the n-body correlation contributions to binding in solid chlorine, bromine, and iodine. Secondary binding contributions as well as d-correlation energies are estimated and compared between each solid halogen. We illustrate that binding is entirely determined by two-body correlation effects, which account for >80% of the total correlation energy. One-body, three-body, and exchange contributions are repulsive. Using density-fitting (DF) local coupled-cluster singles, doubles, and perturbative triples for incremental calculations, we obtain excellent agreement with the experimental cohesive energies. MI results from DF local second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (LMP2) yield considerably over-bound cohesive energies. Comparative calculations with density functional theory and periodic LMP2 method are also shown to be less accurate for the solid halogens.

  20. Spectral irradiance model for tungsten halogen lamps in 340-850 nm wavelength range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojanen, Maija; Kaerhae, Petri; Ikonen, Erkki

    2010-02-10

    We have developed a physical model for the spectral irradiance of 1 kW tungsten halogen incandescent lamps for the wavelength range 340-850 nm. The model consists of the Planck's radiation law, published values for the emissivity of tungsten, and a residual spectral correction function taking into account unknown factors of the lamp. The correction function was determined by measuring the spectra of a 1000 W, quartz-halogen, tungsten coiled filament (FEL) lamp at different temperatures. The new model was tested with lamps of types FEL and 1000 W, 120 V quartz halogen (DXW). Comparisons with measurements of two national standards laboratories indicate that the model can account for the spectral irradiance values of lamps with an agreement better than 1% throughout the spectral region studied. We further demonstrate that the spectral irradiance of a lamp can be predicted with an expanded uncertainty of 2.6% if the color temperature and illuminance values for the lamp are known with expanded uncertainties of 20 K and 2%, respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the spectral irradiance may be derived from resistance measurements of the filament with lamp on and off.

  1. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  2. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2000-01-01

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  3. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J.; Curry, Randy Dale; Clevenger, Thomas E.; Golden, Jeffry

    2003-05-27

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  4. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  5. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, R.T.; Jackson, K.J.; Duba, A.G.; Chen, C.I.

    1998-05-19

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants are described. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating. 21 figs.

  6. In situ thermally enhanced biodegradation of petroleum fuel hydrocarbons and halogenated organic solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Robert T.; Jackson, Kenneth J.; Duba, Alfred G.; Chen, Ching-I

    1998-01-01

    An in situ thermally enhanced microbial remediation strategy and a method for the biodegradation of toxic petroleum fuel hydrocarbon and halogenated organic solvent contaminants. The method utilizes nonpathogenic, thermophilic bacteria for the thermal biodegradation of toxic and carcinogenic contaminants, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, from fuel leaks and the chlorinated ethenes, such as trichloroethylene, chlorinated ethanes, such as 1,1,1-trichloroethane, and chlorinated methanes, such as chloroform, from past solvent cleaning practices. The method relies on and takes advantage of the pre-existing heated conditions and the array of delivery/recovery wells that are created and in place following primary subsurface contaminant volatilization efforts via thermal approaches, such as dynamic underground steam-electrical heating.

  7. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  8. What Is NQa-1?

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Violations | Department of Energy Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations Westinghouse Pays $50,000 Civil Penalty to Resolve Light Bulb Efficiency Violations December 13, 2010 - 2:12pm Addthis The Department of Energy has successfully resolved the enforcement case against Westinghouse Lighting Corporation for failure to certify its light bulbs as compliant with DOE's federal efficiency requirements and for the sale of at least 29,000 general

  9. Consumer Views on Transportation and Advanced Vehicle Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers (2.08 MB) More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  10. Kinetics of the transformation of halogenated aliphatic compounds by iron sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, E.C.; Hayes, K.F.

    2000-02-01

    The objectives of the experiments described here were 2-fold: first, to assess the relative rates and products of transformation of a variety of halogenated aliphatics by the soil mineral FeS under a uniform set of experimental conditions and, second, to establish whether there exists a relationship between rate constants for these transformations and free energy or molecular parameters. The transformation of nine halogenated aliphatic compounds by 10 g/L (0.5 m{sup 2}/L) FeS at pH 8.3 was studied in batch experiments. These compounds were as follows: pentachloroethane (PCA), 1,1,2,2- and 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethanes (1122-TeCA and 1112-TeCA), 1,1,1- and 1,1,2-trichloroethanes (111-TCA and 112-TCA), 1,1- and 1,2-dichloroethanes (11-DCA and 12-DCA), carbon tetrachloride (CT), and tribromomethane (TBM). 11-DCA, 12-DCA, and 112-TCA showed no appreciable transformation by FeS over approximately 120 days, but the other compounds were transformed with half-lives of hours to days. PCA and 1122-TeCA underwent dehydrohalogenation faster than FeS-mediated reductive dehalogenation reactions under the conditions of these experiments. The remaining compounds for which significant transformation was observed underwent FeS-mediated reactions more rapidly than hydrolysis or dehydrohalogenation. For 1112-TeCA, the dihaloelimination product (1,1-dichloroethylene) was the only reaction product detected. For 111-TCA, CT, and TBM, hydrogenolysis products were the only products detected, although their mass recoveries were considerably less than 100%. Two simple log-linear correlations between rate constants and either one-electron reduction potentials or homolytic bond dissociation enthalpies were developed, with coefficients of determination (R{sup 2} values) of 0.48 and 0.82, respectively. These findings are consistent with a rate-limiting step involving homolytic bond dissociation. However, neither correlation accurately described the reactivity of all the compounds that were studied

  11. Outdoor Solar Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... solar heating and cooling Active solar heating Follow Us followontwitter.png followonfacebook.png Lighting Blogs Buying the Perfect Energy-Efficient Light Bulb in 5 Easy ...

  12. New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bulbs | Department of Energy Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25, 2012 - 5:52am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory If you're like me, it sometimes feels overwhelming standing at the store and staring at a big wall of light bulbs, trying to understand all the lighting choices. With new lighting standards taking

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Plant (CMLP) offers rebates to commercial customers for a variety of appliances, ETS heating systems, general lighting upgrades, CFL bulbs, and exit sign retrofit kits. A......

  14. GoodwinNUG2013.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! Goodbye, Watts. Hello, LUMENS! May 17, 2012 - 2:21pm Addthis John Chu John Chu Communications Specialist with the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy For years, I bought light bulbs based on watts, or energy use. Like many light bulb consumers, I looked for a traditional 40, 60, 75, or 100 watt incandescent bulb. Now that stores today carry more and more energy efficient lighting choices, I wanted to replace my old incandescents with new bulbs to save

  15. Save Energy With A Picnic! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for...

  16. California Maritime Academy: Business Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Solving Energy Poverty With Solar Light Bulbs: Nokero Product Review. CleanTechnica. Retrieved January 2, 2014, from http:cleantechnica.com20131016solving- energy-poverty-wit...

  17. Fabrication of Emissible Metallic Layer-by-Layer Photonic Crystals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting technologies, such as compact fluorescent bulbs or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have gained increasing interest with energy security becoming an important national...

  18. Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that...

  19. Lighting the Way to Serious Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    These energy-efficient light bulbs are available in stores now and are already helping American families and businesses save money by saving energy. The lighting webpage also ...

  20. Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent ...

  1. TOMORROW: Department of Energy to Announce Philips Lighting North...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Department of Energy's L Prize challenged the lighting industry to strive to develop high performance, energy-saving replacements for conventional light bulbs that will save ...

  2. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC units, room air conditioners, compact fluorescent light bulbs, refrigerators, clothes washers, dehumidifiers, and dishwashers. Some restrictions apply to this program. All...

  3. Videocon Industries Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in consumer electronics and home appliances; foraying into CFL bulb and solar inverters. Coordinates: 24.60642, 88.06496 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappi...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    air conditioning system upgrades, and the purchase of LED bulbs. Eligibility: Construction, Residential Savings Category: Air conditioners, CaulkingWeather-stripping,...

  5. Recycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recycle LANL innovates recycling paths for various materials. Aerosol cans Asphalt Batteries Cardboard Concrete Light bulbs Metal Pallets Paper Tires Toner cartridges Vegetation...

  6. Upholding Dr. King's Dream and Inspiring the Next Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    connected to light bulbs to learn how their physical power can generate electricity, conduct a plasma energy experiment, and participate in many more unique science experiments. ...

  7. Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy Website http:www.hawaiienergy.comrebates State Hawaii Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount CFL Bulbs: Instant in-store rebates Heat Pump Water...

  8. EA-2017: Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine...

  9. Concord Municipal Light Plant- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Concord Municipal Light Plant (CMLP) offers residential customers rebates on home weatherization, air conditioning system upgrades, and the purchase of LED bulbs.

  10. LEDs: The Future of Lighting is Here | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    phone, a street light, an exit sign, and the common household light bulb have in common? ... carbon, and decrease the electricity consumption equivalent to powering 24 million homes. ...

  11. Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the production of clean energy technologies like electric vehicles, LED bulbs and solar panels. The Department is also working with manufacturers to increase their energy...

  12. Puget Sound Energy - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    System: 250 Clothes Washers: 50 Refrigerator: 50 Freezers: 25 Refrigerator Recycling: 25 CFLs: Up to 4 LED Bulbs: 8 LED Fixtures: 15 FloorAtticWall Insulation: 50%...

  13. Civilight | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Civilight Place: Shenzhen, Guangdong Province, China Zip: 518108 Product: LED light bulb and streetlight maker. References: Civilight1 This article is a stub. You...

  14. DOE-LM-GJ1021-2005.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... traps with photo sensors Extra bulbs Battery chargers (2) Chest wadersHip boots... Ensure that battery is charged and photoelectric sensor is operating. 3. Record location ...

  15. Daylighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for natural lighting and temperature regulation-is one building strategy that can save ... Bulbs Turning Off Lights Design Controls Daylighting Lighting Standards Vehicles & Fuels

  16. Black Hills Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Water Heater: 450 Refrigerator: 30unit Freezer: 30unit Dishwasher: 30unit Television: 25unit CFLLED Bulbs: In-store rebates Summary Black Hills Energy (BHE) offers...

  17. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Although they can initially cost more than traditional incandescent bulbs, during their lifetime they save you money, because they use less energy. Energy-Saving (also called ...

  18. Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Increase Sales of Energy Saving Light Bulbs Among Women Evaluation Helps Program ... the Case Study Series, explaining how "Evaluation Helps Program Increase Sales of Energy ...

  19. DOE Announces Winners of Lighting for Tomorrow 2010 Competition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004. This year, the SSL competition was expanded beyond fixtures to include light-emitting diode (LED) replacement bulbs as well as lighting control devices that are compatible...

  20. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fluorescent lighting fixtures rather than replace them. Dimmers and LEDs Some light-emitting diode (LED) lightbulbs can be used with dimmers. LED bulbs and fixtures must be...

  1. HUD's Rental Assistance Demonstration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Questionnaire Staff Commitment and Resident Awareness ... Bill How Much Electricity do I Use? "Switch-a-bulb" during annual unit inspections Point-of-use ...

  2. Teacher and Students Bring Renewables to Utah

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The light bulb went off for high school teacher Andy Swapp in 1999 when he realized he could do something good with Milford, Utah's powerful wind.

  3. New Lighting Standards Began in 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    save you about 50 per year when you replace 15 traditional incandescent bulbs in your home. Measuring Light in Lumens The new efficiency standards require lightbulbs to consume...

  4. Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and prioritize your larger needs. November 26, 2014 We're thankful for energy-efficient light bulbs, home energy audits, ENERGY STAR appliances, and using public transportation....

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hawaii Energy provides rebates to residences for heat pump water heaters, central air conditioning systems, washers, refrigerators, ceiling fans, CFL light bulbs and equipment...

  6. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    position of the fixture affect the actual output of compact fluorescent bulbs, and the quality of the light may differ between compact fluorescents and incandescents....

  7. New Liquid Salt Electrolytes Could Lead to Cost-Effective Flow Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bulbs | Department of Energy Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25, 2012 - 5:52am Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory If you're like me, it sometimes feels overwhelming standing at the store and staring at a big wall of light bulbs, trying to understand all the lighting choices. With new lighting standards taking

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebates to residences for heat pump water heaters, central air conditioning systems, washers, refrigerators, ceiling fans, CFL light bulbs and equipment maintenance. These...

  9. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Replace...

  10. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics--Glossary--Lighting...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow, or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  11. DOE/EIA-E-0109 Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    produces light by passing electricity through mercury vapor, causing the fluorescent coating to glow or fluoresce. Excluded are compact fluorescent light bulbs, which are listed...

  12. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, <a href="/node/772396">learn more</a> about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and

  13. Improving Reuse & Recycling | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Improving Reuse & Recycling series of images of recycling: trash heap, light bulbs, circuit boards diagram for focus area three, improving reuse and recycling (A click on the org...

  14. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    bulbs and equipment maintenance. These rebates are available to residential electric utility ratepayers on Hawaii Island, Lanai, Maui, Molokai and Oahu only. In order to be...

  15. Halogenation and proteolysis of complement component C3 on Salmonella typhimurium during phagocytosis by human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joiner, K.A.; Schweinle, J.E.

    1989-05-01

    We examined the fate of C component C3 on the surface of Salmonella typhimurium during ingestion by human neutrophils. Initial experiments showed that C3 fragments and C3-acceptor complexes were the major serum ligands which were surface iodinated by canine myeloperoxidase on serum-incubated rough and smooth isolates of S. typhimurium. In contrast, labeled C3 was not identified when the same organisms were ingested by neutrophils in the presence of 125I-Na, a situation previously shown to iodinate particulate targets via the neutrophil myeloperoxidase-halide-H2O2 system. Pretreatment of neutrophils before phagocytosis with the lipid-soluble protease inhibitor diisopropylfluorophosphate (DFP), but not with other protease inhibitors (p-nitrophenylguanidinobenzoate, leupeptin, pepstatin), substantially blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 on S. typhimurium strain RG108 during ingestion by neutrophils. Purification of neutrophil phagosomes containing S. typhimurium-bearing 125I-C3 showed that DFP but no other protease inhibitors blocked proteolysis of 125I-C3 within phagosomes. Iodinated C3-acceptor complexes were identified by immunoprecipitation from the detergent-insoluble fraction of phagosomes prepared from DFP-treated cells ingesting S. typhimurium in the presence of 125I-Na. These results show that C3 fragments on the surface of S. typhimurium are the major serum ligands which are halogenated and degraded by proteolysis during phagocytosis by human neutrophils, and suggest that the majority of proteolysis on the ingested target occurs within the neutrophil phagosome.

  16. Performance of Coupled Cluster Theory in Thermochemical Calculations of Small Halogenated Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feller, David F. ); Peterson, Kirk A.; De Jong, Wibe A. ); Dixon, David A. )

    2003-02-23

    Atomization energies at 0 K and heats of formation at 298 K were obtained for a collection of small halogenated molecules from coupled cluster theory including noniterative, quasi-perturbative triple excitations calculations with large basis sets (up through augmented septuple zeta quality in some cases). In order to achieve near chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mol) in the thermodynamic properties, we adopted a composite theoretical approach which incorporated estimated complete basis set binding energies based on frozen core coupled cluster theory energies and (up to) five corrections: (1) a core/valence correction; (2) a Douglas-Kroll-Hess scalar relativistic correction; (3) a first order atomic spin-orbit correction; (4) a second order spin-orbit correction for heavy elements and (5) an approximate correction to account for the remaining correlation energy. The last of these corrections is based on a recently proposed approximation to full configuration interaction via a continued fraction approximant for coupled cluster theory (CCSD(T)-cf). Failure to consider corrections (1) to (4) can introduce errors significantly in excess of the target accuracy of 1 kcal/mol. Although some cancellation of error may occur if one or more of these corrections is omitted, such a situation is by no means universal and cannot be relied upon for high accuracy. The accuracy of the Douglas-Kroll-Hess approach was calibrated against both new and previously published 4-component Dirac Coulomb results at the coupled cluster level of theory. In addition, vibrational zero point energies were computed at the coupled cluster level of theory for those polyatomic systems lacking an experimental anharmonic value.

  17. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, Edward J.; Anderson, Brian L.; Wijesinghe, Ananda M.; Viani, Brian E.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced.

  18. Separation of toxic metal ions, hydrophilic hydrocarbons, hydrophobic fuel and halogenated hydrocarbons and recovery of ethanol from a process stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kansa, E.J.; Anderson, B.L.; Wijesinghe, A.M.; Viani, B.E.

    1999-05-25

    This invention provides a process to tremendously reduce the bulk volume of contaminants obtained from an effluent stream produced subsurface remediation. The chemicals used for the subsurface remediation are reclaimed for recycling to the remediation process. Additional reductions in contaminant bulk volume are achieved by the ultra-violet light destruction of halogenated hydrocarbons, and the complete oxidation of hydrophobic fuel hydrocarbons and hydrophilic hydrocarbons. The contaminated bulk volume will arise primarily from the disposal of the toxic metal ions. The entire process is modular, so if there are any technological breakthroughs in one or more of the component process modules, such modules can be readily replaced. 3 figs.

  19. Energy Efficiency Wins Top Prize at EPA App Contest

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The winner of best overall app at the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Apps for the Environment is called Light Bulb Finder, a free iOS and Android application that helps a user choose the energy efficient bulbs that best match their home’s current lighting conditions.

  20. Distinguished Lecture Series - Balancing the Energy & Climate Budget

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    The average American uses 11400 Watts of power continuously. This is the equivalent of burning 114 x100 Watt light bulbs, all the time. The average person globally uses 2255 Watts of power, or a little less than 23 x100 Watt light bulbs.

  1. PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pope, K.E.

    1959-12-15

    This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

  2. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  3. Catching the role of anisotropic electronic distribution and charge transfer in halogen bonded complexes of noble gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartocci, Alessio; Cappelletti, David; Pirani, Fernando; Belpassi, Leonardo; Falcinelli, Stefano; Grandinetti, Felice; Tarantelli, Francesco

    2015-05-14

    The systems studied in this work are gas-phase weakly bound adducts of the noble-gas (Ng) atoms with CCl{sub 4} and CF{sub 4}. Their investigation was motivated by the widespread current interest for the intermolecular halogen bonding (XB), a structural motif recognized to play a role in fields ranging from elementary processes to biochemistry. The simulation of the static and dynamic behaviors of complex systems featuring XB requires the formulation of reliable and accurate model potentials, whose development relies on the detailed characterization of strength and nature of the interactions occurring in simple exemplary halogenated systems. We thus selected the prototypical Ng-CCl{sub 4} and Ng-CF{sub 4} and performed high-resolution molecular beam scattering experiments to measure the absolute scale of their intermolecular potentials, with high sensitivity. In general, we expected to probe typical van der Waals interactions, consisting of a combination of size (exchange) repulsion with dispersion/induction attraction. For the He/Ne-CF{sub 4}, the analysis of the glory quantum interference pattern, observable in the velocity dependence of the integral cross section, confirmed indeed this expectation. On the other hand, for the He/Ne/Ar-CCl{sub 4}, the scattering data unravelled much deeper potential wells, particularly for certain configurations of the interacting partners. The experimental data can be properly reproduced only including a shifting of the repulsive wall at shorter distances, accompanied by an increased role of the dispersion attraction, and an additional short-range stabilization component. To put these findings on a firmer ground, we performed, for selected geometries of the interacting complexes, accurate theoretical calculations aimed to evaluate the intermolecular interaction and the effects of the complex formation on the electron charge density of the constituting moieties. It was thus ascertained that the adjustments of the potential

  4. Demonstration Assessment of Light Emitting Diode (LED) Residential Downlights and Undercabinet Lights in the Lane County Tour of Homes, Eugene, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ton, My K.; Richman, Eric E.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-11-10

    In August 2008 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a light emitting diode (LED) residential lighting demonstration project for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Building Technologies, as part of DOE’s Solid State Lighting (SSL) Technology Demonstration Gateway Program. Two lighting technologies, an LED replacement for downlight lamps (bulbs) and an LED undercabinet lighting fixture, were tested in the demonstration which was conducted in two homes built for the 2008 Tour of Homes in Eugene, Oregon. The homes were built by the Lane County Home Builders Association (HBA), and Future B Homes. The Energy Trust of Oregon (ETO) also participated in the demonstration project. The LED downlight product, the LR6, made by Cree LED Lighting Solutions acts as a screw-in replacement for incandescent and halogen bulbs in recessed can downlights. The second product tested is Phillips/Color Kinetics’ eW® Profile Powercore undercabinet fixture designed to mount under kitchen cabinets to illuminate the countertop and backsplash surfaces. Quantitative and qualitative measurements of light performance and electrical power usage were taken at each site before and after initially installed halogen and incandescent lamps were replaced with the LED products. Energy savings and simple paybacks were also calculated and builders who toured the homes were surveyed for their responses to the LED products. The LED downlight product drew 12 Watts of power, cutting energy use by 82% compared to the 65W incandescent lamp and by 84% compared to the 75W halogen lamp. The LED undercabinet fixture drew 10 watts, cutting energy use by 83% to 90% compared to the halogen product, which was tested at two power settings: a low power 60W setting and a high power 105W setting. The LED downlight consistently provided more light than the halogen and incandescent lamps in horizontal measurements at counter height and floor level. It also outperformed in vertical

  5. VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, J.M.

    1958-11-01

    A vlsual alarm system, particularly a system incorporating a gas-fllled diode glow bulb, for indicating a minor alarm and also a major alarm is presented. In operation, the disclosed system responds to a signal indlcative of a caution condition by applying a d-c voltage across the glow bulb to induce a glow at one electrode. If a signal indicative of a critlcal condition is received, the system applies an a-c voltage across tbe glow bulb to produce a glow discharge at each electrode.

  6. Energy 101: Lumens | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lumens Energy 101: Lumens March 8, 2012 - 2:46pm Addthis When you're shopping for light bulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light -- or level of brightness -- you want. Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs How does it work? Lumens measure how much light you get from a bulb. More lumens means it's a brighter light; fewer lumens means it's a dimmer light. Look for the Lighting Facts label on light bulb packages

  7. Argonne History - 1950's | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50's EBR-I light bulbs 1 of 22 EBR-I light bulbs This simple string of four 100-watt light bulbs is powered by the first useful electricity ever produced by nuclear power, generated on Dec. 20, 1951, by Argonne's Experimental Breeder Reactor 1. The next day, 100 watts were generated. About the power plant: The Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) achieved many benchmarks during its 14 years of operation. In 1953, it was the first reactor to demonstrate the breeder principle -- generating, or

  8. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",4657,4172,2193,3778,607,430,572 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  9. Metal halogen electrochemical cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, F.M.

    1986-06-03

    An electrochemical cell is described having a metal anode selected from the group consisting of zinc and cadmium; a bromine cathode; and, an aqueous electrolyte containing a metal bromide, the metal having the same metal as the metal of the anode, the improvement comprising: a bromine complexing agent in the aqueous metal bromide electrolyte consisting solely of a tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt, which salt is soluble of water and forms and substantially water immiscible liquid bromine complex at temperatures in the range of about 10/sup 0/C. to about 60/sup 0/C. and wherein the tetraorgano substituted ammonium salt is selected from asymmetric quaternary ammonium compounds.

  10. Energy-Efficient Holiday Decorating Tips | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In addition to using 70% less energy than traditional bulbs, they're brighter, eco-friendly, and are safer, as they are much cooler than incandescent lights. In addition, they...

  11. Nicor Gas- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Nicor Gas services 129,000 customers and is the largest natural gas distributor in northern Illinois. Certain energy efficient products are eligible for Nicor Gas rebates such as light bulbs,...

  12. Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Newer lighting choices are available to save you money. Q: When will the new bulbs be phased in? A: Newer energy-saving lightbulb choices that save about 25% to 75% in energy costs ...

  13. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    lighbulbs - high-resolution JPG (3.85 MB) More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard)

  14. Final_Testimony(20).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of four Americans say they have replaced inefficient bulbs with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) over the last few years, and 84 percent of...

  15. Secretary Chu's Remarks at Vogtle Nuclear Power Plant -- As Prepared...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 years ago, scientists in Arco, Idaho successfully used nuclear energy to power four light bulbs. They laid the groundwork for decades of clean electricity and put the U.S. at...

  16. LED Lighting on the National Mall | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Using energy-efficient LED light bulbs is an important way Americans can save money by saving energy," said Secretary Chu. "Investing in an American economy that is built to ...

  17. Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    be available to save you money. Q: When will the new bulbs be phased in? A: Newer energy-saving lightbulb choices that save about 25% to 75% in energy costs are on the market...

  18. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save 75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options...

  19. Geek-Up[12.23.2010]: Muons at the South Pole and Dr. Nick Holoynak...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LED lights can also last 50 times longer than incandescents and if a bulb on a string of LED lights does go out, the rest of the lights in the string will still work. All this talk ...

  20. Energy 101: Lumens

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Description: In this edition of Energy 101, we talk about Lumens. When you're shopping for light bulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want.

  1. We've Got Saving Energy All Wrapped Up | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Save Energy this Holiday Season How do You Save Energy During the Holidays? Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Holiday Gifts for Energy ...

  2. Slideshow: Flipping the Switch on LED Lighting for the National...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "Using energy-efficient LED light bulbs is an important way Americans can save money by saving energy," said Secretary Chu. "Investing in an American economy that is built to ...

  3. Salazar, Chu Flip Switch on 65% Energy Savings | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "Using energy-efficient LED light bulbs is an important way Americans can save money by saving energy," said Secretary Chu. "Investing in an American economy that is built to last ...

  4. This Month on Energy Savers: August 2011 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Learn about today's energy efficient light bulbs and how they can save you money at home. On the Blog, In Case You Missed It...This Month "Saving Money by Saving Energy" Goes ...

  5. QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ QUIZ: Test your Home Energy IQ Test your Home Energy IQ Find out if you are the brightest bulb when it comes to home energy use trivia 1. What ...

  6. Quiz: Test Your Home Energy IQ | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Home Energy IQ Quiz: Test Your Home Energy IQ October 7, 2015 - 12:38pm Addthis Test your Home Energy IQ Find out if you are the brightest bulb when it comes to home energy use ...

  7. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... for Lamps (Light Bulbs), available at: https:www.energystar.govsitesdefaultfilesENERGY%20STAR%20Lamps%20V1%201Specification.pdf 8 The RRL3 summary report is available at: ...

  8. Text-Alternative Version: L Prize(tm): The Race for Super Efficient...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    most commonly used incandescent light sources: the 60W A19 screw in light bulb and the ... So looking at what is the highest potential energy savings here, we ran some numbers, and ...

  9. Aero-Tech: Order (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and closed this case against Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co., without civil penalty, after DOE found that Aero-Tech manufactured and/or privately labeled incandescent reflector lamps, but did not violate DOE regulations.

  10. North Shore Gas- Single Family Direct Install

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Owners of single-family homes, condos, townhomes and two-flats may be eligible for a free installation of new programmable thermostats, pipe insulation, showerheads, Compact Fluorescent Bulbs (CFLs...

  11. Pumpkin Patterns

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and lasts 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb that puts out the same amount of light. Biomass is material made from plants and animals, and contains stored energy from the...

  12. EECBG Success Story: Getting CFLs Home in Longview, Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    City of Longview, Texas is establishing a light bulb swap program that is projected to save participating households about $242, thanks to an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Grant (EECBG). Learn more.

  13. Randolph EMC- Commercial and Industrial Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Commercial and industrial members who upgrade to energy-efficient light bulbs which meet Randolph EMC's standards are eligible for a prescriptive incentive payment. The cooperative will provide a...

  14. Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power offers incentives to electric customers who wish to install energy efficient equipment in participating homes. Incentives are available for CFL and LED light bulbs,...

  15. Debt extension on small project yields real savings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 MW Idaho Falls Bulb Turbine Project, nameplate capacity 27 MW DworshakClearwater Small Hydro Power, nameplate capacity 5.4 MW Rocky Brook of Mason PUD No. 1, nameplate...

  16. Home | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs? MIT News highlighted work in the S3TEC center led by Marin Soljacic which... Read the full story The S3TEC Center aims at advancing ...

  17. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a similar shape to traditional incandescent bulbs. CFLs contain a very small amount of mercury and require special handling if they are broken. CFLs should be recycled at the end...

  18. Exhibit F-3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1 General Instructions for Counting Lights Count any and all lights in home A light is defined as every light bulb turned on by a single light switch. A fixture or lamp with two...

  19. Aero-Tech: Proposed Penalty (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co. failed to certify a variety of incandescent reflector lamps as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Sales Tax Exemption for Energy-Efficient Products (Sales Tax Holiday)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Virginia allows a four-day sales tax* exemption for dishwashers, clothes washers, air conditioners, ceiling fans, light bulb, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostat and refrigerators that meet fe...

  1. Energy Efficiency Tricks to Stop Your Energy Bill from Haunting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    used is given off as heat. By replacing 15 inefficient incandescent bulbs with energy-saving lights, you can save about 50 per year -- all while repelling vampires. Learn more...

  2. Randolph EMC- Agricultural Efficient Lighting Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Agricultural members of Randolph EMC (REMC) who upgrade to energy-efficientCFL bulbs in agricultural facilities are eligible for an incentive to help cover the initial cost of installation. The...

  3. Brighter Lights, Safer Streets | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The new lights will also cut greenhouse gas emissions by 719 tons. Mayor Vincent Gray, ... traffic signals with LED bulbs, and Mayor Gray said their new goal is to use the energy ...

  4. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and...

  5. Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    have to be difficult. With these five easy steps, you can find the best energy-efficient light bulb for your home September 9, 2014 Living the college lifestyle doesn't mean you...

  6. Vu1 Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Efficiency Product: Aims to develop an efficient light bulb without containing mercury Website: www.vu1.com Coordinates: 47.6254325, -122.3460778 Show Map Loading...

  7. ARM - Datastreams - sondewnpn

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    % rh ( time ) Atmospheric temperature Dry Bulb Temperature C tdry ( time ) Time offset from midnight seconds since 2003-07-07 00:00:00 0:00 time ( time ) Time offset from...

  8. Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    *Efficacy refers to the overall energy efficiency of light and is measured in lumens (measure of light output) per watt (measure of power input). The efficacy of a typical incandescent light bulb...

  9. Retrofitting the Streetlights in Boise, Idaho

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Young, Clay; Oliver, LeAnn; Bieter, David; Johnson, Michael; Oldemeyer, Neal

    2013-05-29

    Boise, Idaho is using an energy efficiency grant to retrofit hundreds of streetlights throughout the downtown area with energy-efficient LED bulbs, which will save money and improve safety and local quality of life.

  10. Tips: Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tips: Lighting Tips: Lighting Lighting choices save you money. Energy-efficient light bulbs are available in a wide variety of sizes and shapes. Lighting choices save you money....

  11. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of ... Although CFLs cost a bit more than comparable incandescent bulbs, they last 6-15 times as ...

  12. Search results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in the classroom and, ultimately, our energy needs as a nation. Students will use a photovoltaic (PV) cell to measure the energy from the sun. Using a light bulb with a known...

  13. Lighting Controls | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LED bulbs and fixtures must be designed for dimming, and you may need to replace existing dimmer switches with ones that are compatible with an LED lighting product. The packaging ...

  14. Building America January 2015 Webinar: Multifamily Central Heat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    sensor placement - Non-optimal setpoints * 140F heat ... of power and capacity to outdoor dry bulb and entering water temperature. Monitored data: Avg. inlet 125.4 F, Flow rate ...

  15. Energy-Efficient College Life | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    You can still save money and energy in a dorm or off-campus, by using ENERGY STAR appliances, LED light bulbs, and "green" transportation. Joining or creating an energy-efficiency ...

  16. Chris Stewart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Savers Mobile Site March 16 New Lighting Facts Label: Takes the Guess Work Out of Shopping for Light Bulbs January 25 Top 10 Most Popular Energy Savers Web Pages of 2011 December 2

  17. Photovoltaics and Solar Energy (2 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    This module addresses issues dealing with the energy from the sun, the energy needs of students in the classroom and, ultimately, our energy needs as a nation. Students will use a photovoltaic (PV) cell to measure the energy from the sun. Using a light bulb with a known wattage, the students will illuminate the bulb using a PV cell. This way the students will know the approximate energy coming from the PV cell.

  18. Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replacing Lightbulbs and Ballasts Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Replace frequently used bulbs with more energy efficient options to save money and energy. Matching replacement lightbulbs to existing fixtures and ballasts can be tricky, especially with older fixtures. Using new fixtures made for new lightbulbs gives you the greatest energy savings, reliability, and

  19. Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day assembly, learning firsthand about energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Did you know:

  20. Hollandsworth_1963.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency Holiday Gifts for Energy Efficiency December 18, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Energy-efficient light bulbs can make great energy-saving stocking stuffers. Erik Hyrkas Erik Hyrkas Media Relations Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy How can I participate? Look for these energy-saving gifts while doing your holiday shopping this year. As the days get colder and

  1. Development of the design climatic data for the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook -- Fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colliver, D.G.; Burks, T.F.; Gates, R.S.; Zhang, H.

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes the process used to revise the design weather data tables in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals. Design conditions were determined for 509 US, 134 Canadian, 339 European, 293 Asian, and 169 other worldwide locations. Thirty-three years of hourly weather data were used for approximately half of the US and all of the Canadian locations. Twelve years of data were used for the other locations. The data went through quality checking and short-term linear interpolation filling processes. Months that had sufficient data were then used in the analysis. The data were analyzed to produce annual frequency-of-occurrence design dry-bulb (DB), wet-bulb (WB), and dew-point (DP) temperatures with mean coincident values at the design conditions. A comparison with the previous design values indicated that the new dry-bulb and wet-bulb design conditions are slightly less extreme than the values previously published. However, the new design dew-point values indicate the potential for significantly more extreme dehumidification design conditions than would be found by using the old extreme dry-bulb temperature with mean coincident wet-bulb temperature. Software was also developed so users could extract the design values, cumulative frequencies, and DB/DP, DB/WB, DB/H, and DB/WS coincident matrices for 1444 locations from a CD-ROM.

  2. Evaluation of vost and semivost methods for halogenated compounds in the Clean Air Act amendments title III. Validation study at fossil fuel plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, M.D.; Knoll, J.E.; Midgett, M.R.; McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA), Title III, present a need for stationary source sampling and analytical methods for the list of 189 toxic air pollutants. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has used VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods for a wide variety of volatile and semivolatile organic compounds in the past, but these methodologies have been completely validated for only a few of the organic compounds. The applicability of VOST and SemiVOST techniques to the halogenated organic compounds listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 has been evaluated under laboratory conditions for chromatographic separation, mass spectrometric response, sorbent recovery and analytical method detection limit. Dynamic spiking techniques for the sampling trains (both gaseous and liquid dynamic spiking) were also evaluated in the laboratory. In the study, the VOST and SemiVOST methods were evaluated in the field at a fossil fuel power plant. The source was selected to provide actual stationary source emissions with the compounds of interest present in trace amounts or not present. The paper presents the results of the field validation of the VOST and SemiVOST sampling and analytical methods.

  3. Comparison of Bacillus atrophaeus spore viability following exposure to detonation of C4 and to deflagration of halogen-containing thermites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tringe, J. W.; Letant, S. E.; Dugan, L. C.; Levie, H. W.; Kuhl, A. L.; Murphy, G. A.; Alves, S. W.; Vandersall, K. S.; Pantoya, M. L.

    2013-12-17

    We found that energetic materials are being considered for the neutralization of spore-forming bacteria. In this study, the neutralization effects of a monomolecular explosive were compared to the effects of halogen-containing thermites. Bacillus atrophaeus spores were exposed to the post-detonation environment of a 100 g charge of the military explosive C-4 at a range of 50 cm. These tests were performed in the thermodynamically closed environment of a 506-l barometric calorimeter. Associated temperatures were calculated using a thermodynamic model informed by calculations with the Cheetah thermochemicalcode. Temperatures in the range of 2300–2800 K were calculated to persist for nearly themore » full 4 ms pressure observation time. After the detonation event, spores were characterized using optical microscopy and the number of viable spores was assessed. These results showed live spore survival rates in the range of 0.01%–1%. For the thermite tests, a similar, smaller-scale configuration was employed that examined the spore neutralization effects of two thermites: aluminum with iodine pentoxide andaluminum with potassium chlorate. Only the former mixture resulted in spore neutralization. Our results indicate that the detonation environment produced by an explosive with no chemical biocides may provide effective spore neutralization similar to a deflagrating thermite containing iodine.« less

  4. Immunomodulation in C57Bl/6 mice following consumption of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) from Lake Ontario

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, G.B.; McElroy, P.J.; Sonstegard, R.A. )

    1989-01-01

    This report describes studies designed to assess the immunomodulatory effects associated with the consumption of coho salmon containing halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) and other compounds naturally bioaccumulated from Lake Ontario. Diets containing 33% coho salmon from Lake Ontario or the Pacific Ocean were fed to juvenile C57Bl/6 mice for 2-4 mo. Following 60 d, the mice that consumed Lake Ontario salmon had reduced IgM, IgG, and IgA plaque-forming cell responses to sheep erythrocytes. No changes were observed in total numbers of spleen lymphocytes, total T-lymphocytes or T-lymphocyte subsets as determined by flow cytometry. Cellular immunity, assessed by the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to allogeneic tumor target cells, was not altered following dietary exposure to Lake Ontario coho salmon for 4 mo. The observed humoral immunomodulation correlated with elevated PCB levels in the Lake Ontario salmon diets. The levels of pollutants such as mercury, tin compounds and other metals, PCDDs, and PCDFs were not examined.

  5. Toxic effects in C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice following consumption of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbon-contaminated Great Lakes coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, G.B.; Leatherland, J.F.; Sonstegard, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    Diets containing coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch Walbaum) from the Pacific Ocean or from Lakes Erie, Michigan, and Ontario (containing a gradation from low to high of halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, (HAHs)) were fed to C57B1/6 and DBA/2 mice. Following a 4-month dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon, both strains of mice demonstrated hepatomegaly. The ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (ERR) enzyme levels were elevated in livers of C57B1/6 mice fed diets of salmon from all of the Great Lakes studied, with exceptionally high levels detected in C57B1/6 mice fed Lake Ontario salmon. Induction of ERR enzyme levels was detected in DBA/2 mice only following dietary exposure to Lake Ontario salmon. Serum levels of L-thyroxine (T4) and triiodo-L-thryonine (T3) were suppressed in C57B1/6 mice following consumption of Lake Ontario coho salmon, but T3 and T4 levels remained unchanged in DBA/2 mice. In general, pathobiological effects correlated with both dietary HAH exposure level and Ah receptor status.

  6. Applications of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral particles on ITO glass in photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants under a halogen tungsten lamp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhai, Wei; Sun, Fengqiang; Chen, Wei; Zhang, Lihe; Min, Zhilin; Li, Weishan

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photocatalytic activity of Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals on ITO glass was studied. • They showed high abilities in degradation of methylene blue in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount could affect the degradation efficiency. • Such particles could be easily recycled and still kept high activity. • Many dye pollutants and their mixtures could be efficiently degraded. - Abstract: Cu{sub 2}O octahedral microcrystals were prepared on the ITO glass by galvanostatic electrodeposition in CuSO{sub 4} solution with poly(vinylpryrrolidone) as the surfactant. By controlling the electrodeposition time, the microcrystals could be randomly distributed on the ITO glass and separated from each other, resulting in as many as possible (1 1 1) crystalline planes were exposed. Such microcrystals immobilized on ITO glass were employed in photodegradation of dye pollutants in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under a 150 W halogen tungsten lamp. The photodegradation of methylene blue was taken as an example to evaluate the photocatalytic activities of the octahedral Cu{sub 2}O microcrystals. Effects of electrodeposition time and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} amount on the degradation efficiency was discussed, giving the optimum conditions and the corresponding degradation mechanism. The catalyst showed high ability in degradation of methylene blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, eosin B and their mixtures under identical conditions.

  7. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for all measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.

  8. Photomultiplier tube failure under hydrostatic pressure in future neutrino detectors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chambliss, K.; Diwan, M.; Simos, N.; Sundaram, S. K.

    2014-10-09

    Failure of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) under hydrostatic pressure is a concern in neutrino detection, specifically, in the proposed Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment project. Controlled hydrostatic implosion tests were performed on prototypic PMT bulbs of 10-inch diameter and recorded using high speed filming techniques to capture failures in detail. These high-speed videos were analyzed frame-by-frame in order to identify the origin of a crack, measure the progression of individual crack along the surface of the bulb as it propagates through the glass, and estimate crack velocity. Crack velocity was calculated for each individual crack, and an average velocity was determined for allmore » measurable cracks on each bulb. Overall, 32 cracks were measured in 9 different bulbs tested. Finite element modeling (FEM) of crack formation and growth in prototypic PMT shows stress concentration near the middle section of the PMT bulbs that correlates well with our crack velocity measurements in that section. The FEM model predicts a crack velocity value that is close to the terminal crack velocity reported. Our measurements also reveal significantly reduced crack velocities compared to terminal crack velocities measured in glasses using fracture mechanics testing and reported in literature.« less

  9. The translucency of dental composites investigated by UV-VIS spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dumitrescu, L. Silaghi; Pastrav, O.; Prejmerean, C.; Prodan, D.; Boboia, S.; Codruta, S.; Moldovan, M.

    2013-11-13

    Translucency is the property of a material to partially transmit and diffuse incident light, and can be described as a partial opacity or a state between complete opacity and complete transparency. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the translucency index of resin composites according to their chemical structure and to the light source used for curing. Our study was achieved on four commercial composite samples (30 mm × 2 mm) cured with two different lamps (Optilux - halogen bulb and Ultralight - LED). Measurements were made with a UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the reflection spectrum was recorded in the 380-770 nm region on white and black, compared with a SPECTRALON standard white. For all materials cured with the LED lamp on the glossy sides, the best results were given by Tetric Evo Ceram followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril{sup RO} and Premise. The measurements made on samples cured with an Optilux lamp, to the smooth and rough sides of the samples, revealed that the highest index of translucency is provided by Tetric Evo Ceram on the smooth side, followed by Filtek Supreme, Restacril{sup RO} and Premises. We can say that the translucency of the composites is mostly determined by the chemical composition of the material, which is observed from transmittance values recorded for each sample, and by the source of radiation applied on the sample.

  10. CALiPER Report 20.2: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED PAR38 Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2014-03-31

    This report focuses on the flicker and power quality performance of the Series 20 lamps at full output and various dimmed levels. All of the Series 20 PAR38 lamps that manufacturers claimed to be dimmable (including all halogen lamps) were evaluated individually (one lamp at a time) both on a switch and under the control of a phase-cut dimmer designed for use with "all classes of bulbs." Measurements of luminous flux, flicker, and power quality were taken at 10 target dimmed settings and compared with operation on a switch. Because only a single unit of each product was evaluated on a single dimmer that may or may not have been recommended by its manufacturer, this report focuses on the performance of the products relative to each other, rather than the best-case performance of each lamp or variation in performance delivered from each lamp. Despite these limitations, the results suggest that LED performance is improving, and performance trends are beginning to emerge, perhaps due in part to the identification of preferred LED driver strategies for lamp products.

  11. Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona Light Shines on Better Budget for Glendale, Arizona July 20, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Ariz.'s traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale A LED light bulb is installed in one of Glendale, Ariz.'s traffic signals. | Photo courtesy of Glendale Glendale, Ariz., like many other cities, was facing several problems: a tight budget and aging buildings using outdated lighting - making repairs difficult and

  12. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  13. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Rubenstein, Francis M.; Whitman, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  14. Guide to Energy Efficient Lighting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CFLs Although CFLs have been available for residential use since the 1980s, they have made signifcant strides in quality and popularity in recent years. Today, CFLs are the most cost-effective, energy-effcient choice readily available on the market. A CFL produces the same amount of light as a comparable incan- descent, but uses 75% less energy, produces 75% less heat, and lasts up to 10 times longer than an incandescent bulb. CFLs come in many sizes and shapes. Three-way CFL bulbs and dimmer-

  15. Honors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Homes Homes From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the <a href="/node/772396">long history of the light bulb</a> and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of the light bulb and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. Our homes are a major source of energy use

  16. Chou_1980.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money May 30, 2012 - 11:58am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy If you've been to a home improvement store lately, you've probably noticed more and more energy-saving light bulbs available on the shelves. Traditional incandescent light bulbs give off about 90% of the energy they use in the form of heat,

  17. Inquiring Minds - Questions About Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost of Operating Light Bulbs Dear Webmaster, My wife and I are having a friendly dispute over the cost of operating electric light bulbs and I am hoping that perhaps a physicist might settle things for us. It is not lightly that I turn to such a prestidigious resource, but all other sources (ie. Com Ed customer relations - local electricians) have all demonstrated the recent phenomenon of the dimming down of America. I am pretty sure that in my high school physics class we were taught that

  18. Energy 101: Lumens | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lumens Energy 101: Lumens Addthis Description In this edition of Energy 101, we talk about Lumens. When you're shopping for light bulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lumens video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lumens: The new way to shop for light." This is followed by various shots of a store aisle featuring a variety of light bulbs, including close-ups of

  19. Homes | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes Homes From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the <a href="/node/772396">long history of the light bulb</a> and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. From the incandescent to CFLs to LEDs, we're exploring the long history of the light bulb and how it led to new technology breakthroughs that are helping consumers save money on their energy bills. Our homes are a major source of energy use

  20. Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money Choosing Energy-Saving Lighting Products Saves You Money May 30, 2012 - 11:58am Addthis Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy If you've been to a home improvement store lately, you've probably noticed more and more energy-saving light bulbs available on the shelves. Traditional incandescent light bulbs give off about 90% of the energy they use in the form of heat, and only

  1. Assessing the Impact of Heat Rejection Technology on CSP Plant Revenue: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

    2010-10-01

    This paper explores the impact of cooling technology on revenue for hybrid-cooled plants with varying wet cooling penetration for four representative locations in the American Southwest. The impact of ACC design-point initial temperature difference (ITD - the difference between the condensing steam temperature and ambient dry-bulb) is also included in the analysis.

  2. Hybrid and Advanced Air Cooling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Program Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will identify and analyze advanced air cooling strategies thatallow air-cooled geothermal power plants to maintain a high electric power output during periods of high air dry bulb temperatures while minimizing water consumption.

  3. CX-004338: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Photovoltaic Panels, Light Bulb Replacement and Light-Emitting Diode Street LightsCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 10/28/2010Location(s): Draper City, UtahOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

  4. Geothermal Demonstration Plant

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... wet bulb temper- ature Selection of motor or turbine drives for process pumps Method ... S e r i e s andor p a r a l l e l flow 0 Motor andor turbine d r i v e 0 Number of pumps ...

  5. ORISE: Enhancing Energy Efficiency Through Peer Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancing Energy Efficiency ORISE scientific peer review helps evaluate technologies that advance renewable energy ORISE Reviews and Evaluates Technologies that Advance Energy Efficiency In addition to renewable energy and changes in individual behavior, energy efficiency is generally achieved through the development of more efficient technologies. Buildings are being constructed with more energy efficient systems, fluorescent light bulbs are replacing incandescent lights, and new vehicle

  6. Promising Technology: Retrofit Lights to Light-Emitting Diodes in Refrigerators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LEDs increase in efficacy at lower temperatures, in contrast with conventional fluorescents. The low temperatures in display cases, therefore, make this an attractive application of LEDs to reduce energy consumption. In addition to saving lighting energy, an LED retrofit can potentially reduce the cooling load in a display case because LEDs emit less heat than do fluorescent bulbs.

  7. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  8. EBR-I Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28

    Sixty years ago, the first light bulb to be lit with nuclear energy got its juice right here in Idaho. Here's a virtual tour of the place where it all happened. To learn more visit http://www.inl.gov/ebr.

  9. Multipole expansion method for supernova neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, Huaiyu; Shalgar, Shashank, E-mail: duan@unm.edu, E-mail: shashankshalgar@unm.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate a multipole expansion method to calculate collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae using the neutrino bulb model. We show that it is much more efficient to solve multi-angle neutrino oscillations in multipole basis than in angle basis. The multipole expansion method also provides interesting insights into multi-angle calculations that were accomplished previously in angle basis.

  10. Microwave-driven ultraviolet light sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manos, Dennis M.; Diggs, Jessie; Ametepe, Joseph D.

    2002-01-29

    A microwave-driven ultraviolet (UV) light source is provided. The light source comprises an over-moded microwave cavity having at least one discharge bulb disposed within the microwave cavity. At least one magnetron probe is coupled directly to the microwave cavity.

  11. Product Standards Team Saves American Consumers Energy, Money

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The latest issue of EERE's Amped Up! magazine takes a closer look at the standards developed for home and work products – ranging from light bulbs, to kitchen appliances, to laundry equipment, to heating and cooling systems – that are saving Americans more energy and money every year.

  12. Lumens: The new way to shop for light

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    r a d i t i o n a l I n c a n d e s c e n t W a t t s L u m e n s ( B r i g h t n e s s ) LUMENS: THE NEW WAY TO SHOP FOR LIGHT Choose Your Next Light Bulb for the Brightness You ...

  13. Research on optimization of cooling structure of LED element (The 2nd report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sakate, Y.; Hashimoto, R.; Takashina, T.; Kanematsu, H.; Utsumi, Y.

    2014-02-20

    This report shows a design guideline on the parts dimension of LED light bulb for heat transfer. LED light bulb is popular owing to the high efficiency and long life. However, LED element is a point heat source. Therefore, LED light bulb has some problems about heat transfer when it is used for lighting. It sometimes causes deterioration by the raise of local temperature, resulting in lowering of efficiency and shorter life. Thus the thermal analysis focused on the number of element, all parts thickness, length, and radiant heat was studied, as systematic report on the points has not been found. In this report, heat radiation was taken into account in the thermal analysis in addition to natural heat convection. Furthermore the temperature of a heat sink model for LED light bulb was measured with thermocouples and thermo-viewer to verify the calculation. The emissivity of aluminum used for the calculation was 0.4. As the result of analysis, it was found that the maximum temperature was mainly influenced by ring length, ring diameter and disk thickness as a design guideline. Concretely, longer length, larger diameter and thicker disk gave lower temperature of LED element. The temperatures of the best and worst model were around 70 °C and 120 °C respectively in the above condition. The temperatures calculated were consistent with those in experiment.

  14. Chapter 21: Residential Lighting Evaluation Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimetrosky, S.; Parkinson, K.; Lieb, N.

    2015-02-01

    In recent years, residential lighting has represented a significant share of ratepayer-funded energy-efficiency electricity savings. Utilities have achieved the majority of these savings by promoting the purchase and installation of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), both standard 'twister' bulbs and specialty CFLs such as reflectors, A-Lamps, globes, and dimmable lights.

  15. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    metals: On enabling the rapid assessment of agent defeat formulations You ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, ...

  16. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ...

  17. Determining thermochemical properties of halogenated metals:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text preview image File ...

  18. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.

    2002-10-22

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  19. Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Market | Department of Energy Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market This report reviews efforts to increase market acceptance of CFLs and barriers to that acceptance. cfl_lessons_learned_web.pdf (922.25 KB) More Documents & Publications Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of

  20. Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Determine the amount of power you will need-How much power do you need to operate equipment and appliances connected to the generator? Portable generators made for household use can provide temporary power to a small number of selected appliances or lights. For example, light bulb wattage indicates the power needed

  1. Revolutionizing the Touch Screen | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Revolution Now Revolution Now Thanks to decades of these policies and investments, the clean energy future has already arrived for five key technologies: wind turbines, utility scale solar PV, distributed solar PV, electric vehicles, and LED light bulbs, each of which has seen drops in cost and growth in consumer demand over the past six years, as highlighted in Revolution Now: The Future Arrives for Five Clean Energy Technologies The technologies in this report are already making a big impact

  2. Market Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SSL Basics » Market Challenges Market Challenges Solid-state lighting (SSL) has the potential to significantly reduce lighting energy use and slash greenhouse-gas emissions. By 2030, DOE estimates that SSL could potentially cut national lighting electricity use nearly in half, but a number of challenges stand in the way of achieving the full energy saving potential of SSL. Although SSL products now appear to be competitive in many applications-from bulbs sold in grocery stores to street lights

  3. News | Solid State Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Sponge creates steam using ambient sunlight MIT engineers have invented a bubble-wrapped, sponge-like device that soaks up natural sunlight and heats water to boiling temperatures, generating steam through its pores. Read full news Physicists predict previously unseen phenomena in exotic materials MIT News highlighted work in the S3TEC center led by Liang Fu investigating topological semimetals. Read full news A nanophotonic comeback for incandescent bulbs? MIT News highlighted work in the

  4. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  5. Lightning strokes can probe the ionosphere

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting the Way to Serious Savings Lighting the Way to Serious Savings April 1, 2013 - 6:02pm Addthis Smart lighting choices can save you money. Smart lighting choices can save you money. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy How can I participate? Make educated choices when buying light bulbs to save energy and money. Pretty much everybody these days uses electric lighting to keep their households and businesses running during the

  6. 09-2013 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 NETL's Supercomputer Addresses Energy Issues on Two Fronts Massive Computing Power with Minimal Energy Consumption Helps Scientists Design Smarter Fossil Energy Systems Most of us do our part to reduce energy consumption by some minuscule measure, even if the goal is to save a few bucks rather than save the planet. Switching to high-efficiency light bulbs, driving fuel-efficient cars, and adjusting the thermostat are just a few examples of the small steps we can all take that, collectively,

  7. Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting April 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert There is a major push today to get homeowners to adopt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. They have been on the market for nearly three decades, and many homeowners still do not use them widely. But the tide is definitely turning. Their availability and the percentage of homeowners familiar with the technology and purchasing them for their

  8. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  9. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  10. Ultra Violet Waterworks (UVW)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultra Violet Waterworks Water Disinfecting Device Saves Lives Resources with Additional Information Ultra Violet Waterworks (UVW) device Ultra Violet Waterworks (UVW) is a small-scale, energy-efficient, and low-maintenance mechanism that uses ultraviolet light to cheaply disinfect water. It is a uniquely effective device that operates using the equivalent of a 60-Watt light bulb at a cost of as low as 4 cents/ton of water treated, treating 15 liters/minute, and providing enough drinking water

  11. Industrial Facility Best Practice Scorecard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again July 27, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent light without electrodes or filaments, the items that frequently cause other bulbs to burn out quickly. Thus, many induction lighting units have an extremely long life of up

  12. How Are You Planning To Save Energy This Halloween? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Elizabeth talked about her annual effort to keep her thermostat low through fall and winter. When it gets too chilly and she's tempted to turn up the heat, this year she's planning to crochet some blankets instead to keep warm! Kristin gave us some great ideas for saving energy on Halloween while keeping the spirit of the holiday appropriately creepy. She included tips for operating the fireplace efficiently, using candles instead of light bulbs, and even composting those expired pumpkins. How

  13. EA-2017: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Environmental Assessment EA-2017: Final Environmental Assessment Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) at the existing Braddock Locks and Dam. The installation would be part of a larger project that would include the design

  14. EA-2017: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2017: Finding of No Significant Impact Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project Based upon the review of the EA prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and adopted by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE has determined that authorizing the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT), which

  15. CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI at Mines Hosts 160 Sixth Graders Colorado School of Mines graduate student Mandi Hutchinson shows a compact fluorescent light bulb as she discusses the use of critical materials and rare earths in current technologies. The Denver School of Science and Technology's (DSST) College View sixth graders visited the Colorado School of Mines campus on Wednesday, July 8, for their fourth annual visit. More than 160 students enjoyed critical materials and energy presentations delivered by the Critical

  16. EA-2041: DOE Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-2017: Finding of No Significant Impact Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project Based upon the review of the EA prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and adopted by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), DOE has determined that authorizing the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT), which

  17. Janitor | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Janitor Department: Facilities Supervisor(s): Margaret King Staff: MSU 2 Requisition Number: 1600682 Clean and sanitize bathrooms and restrooms including showers, sinks, mirrors, fixtures and other similar equipment. Fills paper towel, toilet tissue and soap dispensers. Maintain established standards of cleanliness. Clean water fountains/coolers,light fixtures, and change light bulbs if fixtures can be reached with a six foot ladder. Empty and clean wastepaper bins and recycling bins. Deposits

  18. Kristin Persson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory A Google for Materials?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kristin Persson Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory A Google for Materials? security visualization infrastructure transportation health communication Engineered Materials Enable Society consumption How are New Materials Invented? "Edison Style" When looking for a light bulb filament, Edison tried about 3,000 materials ... And he didn't find the best one ...! Materials Design: Hollywood Style Need to replace this video? Teflon Titanium Velcro 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000

  19. A New Model to Simulate Energy Performance of VRF Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Tianzhen; Pang, Xiufeng; Schetrit, Oren; Wang, Liping; Kasahara, Shinichi; Yura, Yoshinori; Hinokuma, Ryohei

    2014-03-30

    This paper presents a new model to simulate energy performance of variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems in heat pump operation mode (either cooling or heating is provided but not simultaneously). The main improvement of the new model is the introduction of the evaporating and condensing temperature in the indoor and outdoor unit capacity modifier functions. The independent variables in the capacity modifier functions of the existing VRF model in EnergyPlus are mainly room wet-bulb temperature and outdoor dry-bulb temperature in cooling mode and room dry-bulb temperature and outdoor wet-bulb temperature in heating mode. The new approach allows compliance with different specifications of each indoor unit so that the modeling accuracy is improved. The new VRF model was implemented in a custom version of EnergyPlus 7.2. This paper first describes the algorithm for the new VRF model, which is then used to simulate the energy performance of a VRF system in a Prototype House in California that complies with the requirements of Title 24 ? the California Building Energy Efficiency Standards. The VRF system performance is then compared with three other types of HVAC systems: the Title 24-2005 Baseline system, the traditional High Efficiency system, and the EnergyStar Heat Pump system in three typical California climates: Sunnyvale, Pasadena and Fresno. Calculated energy savings from the VRF systems are significant. The HVAC site energy savings range from 51 to 85percent, while the TDV (Time Dependent Valuation) energy savings range from 31 to 66percent compared to the Title 24 Baseline Systems across the three climates. The largest energy savings are in Fresno climate followed by Sunnyvale and Pasadena. The paper discusses various characteristics of the VRF systems contributing to the energy savings. It should be noted that these savings are calculated using the Title 24 prototype House D under standard operating conditions. Actual performance of the VRF systems for real

  20. EA-2024-FONSI-2015.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7: Final Environmental Assessment EA-2017: Final Environmental Assessment Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) at the existing Braddock Locks and Dam. The installation would be part of a larger project that would include the design

  1. Slide 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    06, Itron Inc. 1 Under the Bright Lights: Energy Efficiency Programs Energy Information Administration Annual Conference April 27, 2011 Joe Loper © 2006, Itron Inc. Boom Times for Energy Efficiency  EISA (2007) > Most significant EE legislation in previous 3 decades > Incandescent light bulb phase out starting 2012 > Vehicle fuel economy standards increased for first time since 1980s > Numerous program budget authorizations  Federal Stimulus Funding  Ratepayer Funded

  2. Office Energy Checklist | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Energy Checklist Office Energy Checklist This checklist outlines actions that conserve energy at the office. Checkbox Replace incandescent lights with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for desk lamps and overhead lighting. Using CFLs instead of comparable incandescent bulbs can save about 50% on your lighting costs. CFLs use only one-fourth the energy and last up to 10 times longer. Checkbox Switch off all unnecessary lights. Use dimmers, motion sensors, or

  3. DOE Science Showcase - Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research | OSTI,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US Dept of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information Light-emitting Diode (LED) Lighting Research Light-emitting diode (LED) lighting is a type of solid-state lighting that uses a semiconductor to convert electricity to light. LED lighting products are beginning to appear in a wide variety of home, business, and industrial products such as holiday lighting, replacement bulbs for incandescent lamps, street lighting, outdoor area lighting and indoor ambient lighting. Over the past

  4. The first mixed-halide zirconium cluster compounds: Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.6}I{sub 10.4}Be, Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.3}I{sub 10.7}B, and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Matrix effects and halogen substitution in compact network structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeckerling, M.; Qi, R.Y.; Corbett, J.D.

    1996-03-13

    Investigations of the effect of halogen size on structure stability have been conducted in well-reduced and heavily interbridged zirconium chloride-iodide cluster systems. The title compounds are obtained in good yields from reactions of Zr, ZrCl{sub 4}, ZrI{sub 4}, and B or Be in sealed Ta tubes for {approximately} 4 weeks at 850 {degrees}C. Single-crystal diffraction at room temperature established these as Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.65(4)}I{sub 10.35(4)}Be and Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 1.27/(3)}. These are derivatives of the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C and orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13}B structures, respectively, the latter containing unusual linear chains of clusters interbridged by Cl{sup i-i} that are in turn interconnected by three-bonded Cl{sup a-a-a} atoms. The random substitution of fractional Cl at specific I sites in the first two, and I for certain Cl in the third, was positionally resolved in all cases. The replacement always occurs at two-bonded X{sup i}, so that single types of halogen are left in sites that interconnected clusters and generate the three-dimensional array. Structural changes seen in both structures are specifically related to relief of X{hor_ellipsis}X crowding in the parent structure (matrix effects). Substitution of Cl for I{sup i} in the Zr{sub 6}I{sub 12}C type greatly reduces intercluster I{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions and allows, among other things, a 0.20 {Angstrom} (5.8*5) reduction in Zr-I{sup 1-i} intercluster bond lengths. Increased Cl{hor_ellipsis}I repulsions caused by I substitution in orthorhombic Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 11.5}I{sub 1.5}B. Phase widths found are 0{le} x {le} 1.4 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub x}I{sub 12-x}Z (Z=B, Be) and 0 {le} x {le} 1.5 for Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 13-x}I{sub x}B. The limit for iodine substitution in the chlorine-rich rhombohedral Zr{sub 6}Cl{sub 12-x}I{sub x}Be is about x=2.5.

  5. Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    South Ural State Univ., Chelyabinsk (Russia) Karpov Inst. of Physical Chemistry, Moscow ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Acta Crystallographica. Section C, Structural Chemistry ...

  6. Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Find in Google Scholar Find in Google Scholar Search WorldCat Search WorldCat to find libraries that may hold this journal Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these ...

  7. Insensitive explosive composition of halogenated copolymer and triaminotrinitrobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benziger, Theodore M.

    1976-01-01

    A highly insensitive and heat resistant plastic-bonded explosive containing 90 wt % triaminotrinitrobenzene and 10 wt % of a fully saturated copolymer of chlorotrifluoroethylene and vinylidene fluoride is readily manufactured by the slurry process.

  8. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  9. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  10. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  11. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-03-18

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  12. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, Michiko; Slatkin, Daniel N.

    1997-08-05

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized. by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na.sub.4 B.sub.12 I.sub.11 SSB.sub.12 I.sub.11, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy.

  13. Halogenated sulfidohydroboranes for nuclear medicine and boron neutron capture therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miura, M.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1995-10-03

    A method for performing boron neutron capture therapy for the treatment of tumors is disclosed. The method includes administering to a patient an iodinated sulfidohydroborane, a boron-10-containing compound. The site of the tumor is localized by visualizing the increased concentration of the iodine labelled compound at the tumor. The targeted tumor is then irradiated with a beam of neutrons having an energy distribution effective for neutron capture. Destruction of the tumor occurs due to high LET particle irradiation of the tissue secondary to the incident neutrons being captured by the boron-10 nuclei. Iodinated sulfidohydroboranes are disclosed which are especially suitable for the method of the invention. In a preferred embodiment, a compound having the formula Na{sub 4}B{sub 12}I{sub 11}SSB{sub 12}I{sub 11}, or another pharmaceutically acceptable salt of the compound, may be administered to a cancer patient for boron neutron capture therapy. 1 fig.

  14. Max Tech Electric HPWH with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and ...

  15. Inert gas rejection device for zinc-halogen battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Michael J.; Arendell, Mark W.

    1981-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for separating chlorine gas from other (foreign) gases, having an anode, a cathode assembly, an aqueous electrolyte, a housing, and a constant voltage power supply. The cathode assembly is generally comprised of a dense graphite electrode having a winding channel formed in the face opposing the anode, a gas impermeable (but liquid permeable) membrane sealed into the side of the cathode electrode over the channel, and a packing of graphite particles contained in the channel of the cathode electrode. The housing separates and parallelly aligns the anode and cathode assembly, and provides a hermetic seal for the cell. In operation, a stream of chlorine and foreign gases enters the cell at the beginning of the cathode electrode channel. The chlorine gas is dissolved into the electrolyte and electrochemically reduced into chloride ions. The chloride ions disfuse through the gas impermeable membrane, and are electrochemically oxidized at the anode into purified chlorine gas. The foreign gases do not participate in the above electrochemical reactions, and are vented from the cell at the end of the cathode electrode channel.

  16. Gas Phase Reactions between Fuel Molecules and Halogens: A Review...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Annual Report Combustion Energy Frontier Research Center Princeton, NJ Sept. 23, 2010 Truhlar group University of Minnesota Practical methods for including torsional anharmonicity ...

  17. Nuclear Physics Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training Requirements for Experimental Areas Ladder safety is one of the most cited hazards at Jefferson Lab. It stands to reason that something as familiar to all of us as a ladder could easily be taken for granted. However, here, you are not changing a bulb in the middle of your kitchen. There are many unique circumstances at JLab that you may not be aware of. For this reason prior to using a ladder at Jefferson Lab you are required to take SAF 307 Ladder Safety Awareness. The class is only

  18. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1961-12-26

    A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

  19. NNSA's missions get a boost from brain-inspired, radically different

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    computer design | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) missions get a boost from brain-inspired, radically different computer design Friday, April 15, 2016 - 9:54am NNSA Blog The first computers to contribute to the nation's nuclear security work used thousands of vacuum tubes-which resembled fat light bulbs that gave off lots of heat-and consumed 125 kW of power to perform around 1,900 operations per second. This month NNSA's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

  20. Newark Neighbors Saving Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Newark Neighbors Saving Energy Newark Neighbors Saving Energy April 2, 2010 - 2:32pm Addthis Joshua DeLung Rosa and Francisco Sanchez are ecstatic about the weatherization work done to their Newark, N.J., home. When Francisco explains the changes they have seen, his smile beams from ear to ear. "They replaced my boiler, put in some new CFL light bulbs and gave me some carbon monoxide detectors," he says. "I was happy when I got approved after filling out the application for

  1. Incandescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps consist of a wire filament inside a glass bulb that is usually filled with inert gas, and they produce light when an electric current heats the filament to a high temperature. Incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options-because most of the energy released is in the form of heat rather than light-and a short average operating life

  2. Faces of Science: Roger Wiens

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roger Wiens March 4, 2015 Wiens' passion for space has no limits At nine years old, Roger Wiens built a telescope to sketch the features of Mars. 1:23 Faces of Science: Roger Wiens - 2 - Forty years later he returned to the Red Planet, this time as part of a team that invented ChemCam, a device aboard the rover Curiosity. Using a laser that packs the energy of a million light bulbs into a spot the size of a pinhead, ChemCam blasts pieces of Martian rock in search of elements like carbon and

  3. Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About LEDs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Things You Didn't Know About LEDs Top 8 Things You Didn't Know About LEDs June 4, 2013 - 9:20am Addthis Using funding from the Energy Department, Philips Lumileds developed the LUXEON S1000 -- a commercial LED product used in outdoor street and parking lot lighting. While small, this chip is the heart of the light and as of June 2012 was brighter than a 60-watt light bulb. | Photo courtesy of Philips Lumileds. Using funding from the Energy Department, Philips Lumileds developed the LUXEON

  4. EA-2017: Real-World Demonstration of a New, American Low-Head Hydropower Turbine, Monongahela River, approximately ten miles east of Pittsburg, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts associated with a DOE proposal to provide federal funding to Hydro Green Energy (HGE) to fabricate and install one (1) interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) and supporting civil infrastructure as part of a larger project that would include the design and installation of seven MBTs to create a 5.2 megawatt, low head hydropower system that would be integrated into the existing Braddock Locks and Dam.

  5. Exhibit Set Up | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications, Exhibits, & Logos » Exhibit Set Up Exhibit Set Up Follow these step-by step instructions in order to set up your exhibit. 1. The exhibit case. Photo of a man opening an exhibit case. 2. Inside the top of the case, you will find shipping labels, extra bulbs, and contact information. Photo of an open exhibit case. 3. Expand the display frame by pulling the center piece apart gently. Red feet should be at bottom front. Photo of a man unfolding an exhibit display frame. 4. Fully

  6. Edison vs. Tesla

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2013-11-20

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  7. Edison vs. Tesla

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hogan, Kathleen; Wallace, Hal; Ivestor, Rob

    2014-01-07

    As Edison vs. Tesla week heats up at the Energy Department, we are exploring the rivalry between Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla and how their work is still impacting the way we use energy today. Whether you're on Team Tesla or Team Edison, both inventors were key players in creating things like batteries, power plants and wireless technologies -- all innovations we still use today. And as we move toward a clean energy future, energy efficient lighting, like LED bulbs, and more efficient electric motors not only help us save money on electricity costs but help combat climate change. For this, Tesla and Edison both deserve our recognition.

  8. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WELL INSPECTION CAMERA Project Objective Develop a 250 o C wellbore camera that... 1. Requires no well cooling, allowing inspection of active production and injection wells 2. Uses conventional, single conductor, 600 o F wireline up to 12,000 ft long to greatly reduce deployment cost and triple the depth capability of existing cameras 3. Provides imagining of either the wellbore wall or downhole Figure 6, 250 o C Oven Lighting Test: (Left) SiC LEDs, 0.02A:3V; (Right) Oven Bulb 1A@7V Thermal

  9. DOE Launches Change a Light, Change the World Campaign | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Change a Light, Change the World Campaign DOE Launches Change a Light, Change the World Campaign October 3, 2007 - 2:50pm Addthis Encourages Americans to Pledge to Change One Light to an Efficient Compact Fluorescent Lightbulb WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today launched the 2007 Change a Light, Change the World campaign encouraging every American to change at least one light at home to an ENERGY STAR® Compact Fluorescent Light bulb

  10. 10 2013 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    October 2013 NETL's Morgantown Supercomputer Sets a High Bar for Energy Efficiency Most of us do our part to reduce energy consumption by some minuscule measure, even if it's to simply save a few bucks rather than save the planet. Consider this: a single Google search consumes electricity equivalent to turning on a 60W light bulb for 17 seconds. In 2011, datacenters were estimated to be responsible for 1.3 percent of the world's total electrical consumption. The engines that run these staples of

  11. LERF Key People Contact List | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » LED Lighting LED Lighting LED Lighting The light-emitting diode (LED) is one of today's most energy-efficient and rapidly-developing lighting technologies. Quality LED light bulbs last longer, are more durable, and offer comparable or better light quality than other types of lighting. Check out the top 8 things you didn't know about LEDs to learn more. Energy Savings LED is a highly energy efficient lighting technology, and has the potential to fundamentally

  12. Fusion Basics | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Basics What is Plasma? Plasma is a state of matter along with solids, liquids and gases. It consists of a partially-ionized gas, containing ions, electrons, and neutral atoms. So what does that mean? In a plasma, some electrons are freed from their atoms, allowing current and electricity to flow. In fact, one of the few naturally-occurring plasmas found here on Earth is lightning! Can you think of other plasmas? Fluorescent light bulbs contain mercury plasma. Stars, such as the sun are

  13. Lighting Developments to 2030

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. An average household dedicates about 5% of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY

  14. Luminescent Concentration of Diffuse Light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lumens and the Lighting Facts Label Lumens and the Lighting Facts Label Energy 101 Lumens: The new way to shop for light lighting_sub.jpg When you're shopping for lightbulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. The Lighting Facts Label will help. This new label will make it easy to compare bulb brightness, color, life, and estimated operating cost for the year. Buy Lumens, Not Watts In the past, we bought lightbulbs based on how much

  15. Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    : Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Addthis Description In this edition of Energy 101, we discuss lighting choices. People have been using the same light bulb since Thomas Edison invented it about 130 years ago. Today, there are more lighting options in stores that will save you energy and money. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lighting Choices video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lighting Choices." This is followed by shots of a variety of

  16. When to Turn Off Your Lights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » When to Turn Off Your Lights When to Turn Off Your Lights The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of lights and the price of electricity. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/kyoshino. The cost effectiveness of when to turn off lights depends on the type of bulb and the

  17. I T E L I N E S S

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Saving Money and Energy I Love Saving Money and Energy February 14, 2011 - 2:11pm Addthis Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory Valentine's Day is all about love-and I love all the quick and easy ways to save money and energy at home! How much do I love saving energy and money? Let me count the ways... Energy Savers lists many tips to save money and energy at home, including: Use compact fluorescent light bulbs with the ENERGY STAR®label. Air dry dishes

  18. Incentive Fee Determination Summary Contractor: Washington Closure Hanford LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps consist of a wire filament inside a glass bulb that is usually filled with inert gas, and they produce light when an electric current heats the filament to a high temperature. Incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options-because most of the energy released is in the form of heat rather than light-and a short average operating life

  19. Thomas Edison | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    62 likes Thomas Edison Inventor Known as "The Wizard of Menlo Park," Edison was an American inventor who developed the first commercially practical incandescent light bulb. A savvy businessman, he invented a number of other technologies that are still in use today -- including the an early stock ticker, a sound-recording phonograph and a two-way telegraph -- and holds the record for the most patents, ever. Learn more interesting facts about Edison in our Top 8 Things You Didn't Know

  20. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of advanced reactor concepts: The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjac, V.; Heger, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    The Gas Core Nuclear Rocket (GCNR), a design first proposed in the 1960s for fast round-trip missions to Mars and the outer planets, is generally considered to be the most advanced, and therefore the most complex, iteration of the fission reactor concept. The GCNR technology involves the extraction of fission energy, by means of thermal radiation, from a high-temperature plasma core to a working fluid. A specific derivative of GCNR technology is the nuclear fight bulb (NLB) rocket engine, first proposed by the then United Aircraft Research Laboratories (UARL) in the early 1960s. The potential operating parameters provided the motivation for a detailed thermal hydraulics analysis.

  1. World Record White OLED Performance Exceeds 100 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has successfully demonstrated a record-breaking white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 102 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using its proprietary, high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED technology. This achievement represents a significant milestone for OLED technology, demonstrating performance that surpasses the power efficacy of incandescent bulbs with less than 15 lm/W and fluorescent lamps at 60-90 lm/W. Funded in part by DOE, UDC's achievement is a major step toward DOE's roadmap goal of a 150 lm/W commercial OLED light source by 2015.

  2. 43939 EASY ENERGY ACTION PLAN CHECKLIST W PATUA TITLE REVISED 20130926

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SIMPLE WAYS TO USE ENERGY WISELY Turn off lights. CHECK THE BOX Shut off computers. Use energy-saving light bulbs. Unplug chargers when not in use. Use natural light, heat and cooling. Use "smart" power strips. Talk to your parents about programmable digital thermostats. Talk to your parents about home improvements to save energy such as windows, doors, and roofs. http://go.usa.gov/DVuQ Turn off entertainment devices when not in use (TV, game systems, etc.). Energy Efficiency &

  3. 37 - Comment from URENCO USA.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ways to save energy and money-right now! STATE OF HAWAII ACTIONS THAT WILL TAKE SOME PLANNING AND/OR HOME REMODELING: 1 Shut off lights and appliances when you leave the room. 2 Use task lighting and shut off general and overhead lighting. 3 Change incandescent bulbs to compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). 4 If you are near a window, use natural daylight, not electric lighting. 5 Use the ENERGY STAR settings in your computers, printers, copiers, and appliances to power down when idle. But remember

  4. WBGT Calculator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-05-22

    This software calculates a Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT) using standard measurements from a meteorological station. WBGT is used by Industrial Hygenists (IH) to determine heat stress potential to outdoor workers. Through the mid 1990''s, SRS technicians were dispatched several times daily to measure WBGT with a custom hand held instrument and results were dessiminated via telephone. Due to workforce reductions, the WSRC IH Department asked for the development of an automated method to simulatemore » the WBGT measurement using existing real time data from the Atmospheric Technologies Group''s meteorological monitoring network.« less

  5. This Month on Energy Savers: January 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 This Month on Energy Savers: January 2012 February 2, 2012 - 8:31am Addthis In the coldest parts of winter, we've turned our thoughts toward the best seasonal tips, conservation of water and lighting power, and what's new in 2012. If you've missed any of January's posts, here's a recap. What's New in 2012 Are you looking for an easy way to save energy in your home quickly? Learn about the New Lighting Facts Label to compare efficient light bulb choices and determine which ones may

  6. Shedding new light on LEDs | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    new light on LEDs By Louise Lerner * April 18, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint LEDs, or light-emitting diodes, are the secret behind your iPhone screen, flatscreen TVs, Christmas lights and crosswalk signals. They can last longer and save more energy than traditional incandescent bulbs. But there is one thing they aren't very good at: efficiently emitting light in the yellow-green spectrum. Argonne and Purdue researchers are peering deep into the atomic structure and composition of LED lights in order to

  7. Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Addthis Description In this edition of Energy 101, we discuss lighting choices. People have been using the same light bulb since Thomas Edison invented it about 130 years ago. Today, there are more lighting options in stores that will save you energy and money. Text Version Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lighting Choices video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lighting Choices." This is followed by shots of a variety of

  8. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Choices to Save You Money Lighting Choices to Save You Money This Energy 101 video explores the different lighting options available to consumers. Light your home using the same amount of light for less money. An average household dedicates about 5% of its energy budget to lighting. Switching to energy-efficient lighting is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bills. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY

  9. WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? WHO SAID IT: Tesla or Edison? Who said it, Nikola Tesla or Thomas Edison? Test your knowledge of these two important energy inventors with our downloadable quote quiz cards. Four cards feature a quote only; the corresponding cards reveal the answer. Want to learn more about Tesla and Edison? Check out our top things you didn't know about Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison. Learn the history of the light bulb -- from incandescent to LED -- in our interactive timeline.

  10. Studies on Temperature Dependence of Rubidium Lamp for Atomic Frequency Standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosal, Bikash; Banik, Alak; Vats, Vaibhav; Pal, Sukamal; Bahl, R. K

    2011-10-20

    Rb lamp is a very critical component of the Rb atomic clock's Physics Package. The Rb lamp's performance is very sensitive to temperature and its stability. In this paper we discuss the behaviors of Rb Lamp with temperature. The Rb lamp exciter power and temperature of Rb bulb are very important parameters in controlling the performance of the Rb Lamp. It is observed that at temperatures beyond 110 deg. C, the lamp mode changes from the ring to red mode resulting in abnormal broadening of emission lines and self reversal. The results of our studies on spectral analysis of Rb lamp under various operating conditions are reported in the paper.

  11. Lumens and the Lighting Facts Label | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lumens and the Lighting Facts Label Lumens and the Lighting Facts Label Energy 101 Lumens: The new way to shop for light lighting_sub.jpg When you're shopping for lightbulbs, compare lumens to be sure you're getting the amount of light, or level of brightness, you want. The Lighting Facts Label will help. This new label will make it easy to compare bulb brightness, color, life, and estimated operating cost for the year. Buy Lumens, Not Watts In the past, we bought lightbulbs based on how much

  12. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume III. Western United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 24 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  13. WeatherMaker: Weather file conversion and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1999-07-01

    WeatherMaker is a weather-data utility for use with the ENERGY-10 design-tool computer program. The three main features are: Convert--Weather files can be converted from one format to another. For example, a TMY2 format file can be converted to an ENERGY-10 binary file that can be used in a simulation. This binary file can then be converted to a text format that allows it to be read and/or manipulated in WordPad or Excel. Evaluate--ENERGY-10 weather files can be studied in great detail. There are 8 graphical displays of the data that provide insight into the data, and a summary tables that presents results calculated from the hourly data. Adjust--Hourly temperature data can be adjusted starting with hourly data from a nearby TMY2 site. Dry-bulb and wet-bulb temperatures are adjusted up or down as required to match given monthly statistics. This feature can be used to generate weather files for any of 3,958 sites in the US where such monthly statistics are tabulated. The paper shows a variety of results, explains the methods used, and discusses the rationale for making the adjustments. It is anticipated that WeatherMaker will be released by the time of the ASES Solar 99 conference.

  14. Goode Gym Energy Renovation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, Andrena

    2014-12-11

    The Ida H. Goode Gymnasium was constructed in 1964 to serve as a focal point for academics, student recreation, and health and wellness activities. This 38,000 SF building contains a gymnasium with a stage, swimming pool, eight classrooms, a weight room, six offices and auxiliary spaces for the athletic programs. The gym is located on a 4-acre greenfield, which is slated for improvement and enhancement to future athletics program at Bennett College. The available funding for this project was used to weatherize the envelope of the gymnasium, installation of a new energy-efficient mechanical system, and a retrofit of the existing lighting systems in the building’s interior. The envelope weatherization was completed without disturbing the building’s historic preservation eligibility. The existing heating system was replaced with a new high efficiency condensing system. The new heating system also includes a new Building Automation System which provides additional monitoring. Proper usage of this system will provide additional energy savings. Most of the existing interior lighting fixtures and bulbs were replaced with new LED and high efficiency T-8 bulbs and fixtures. Occupancy sensors were installed in applicable areas. The Ida Goode Gymnasium should experience high electricity and natural gas savings as well as operational/maintenance efficiency increases. The aesthetics of the building was maintained and the overall safety was improved.

  15. Technology Solutions Case Study: Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) team monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74-80F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

  16. Impacts of rotation on three-dimensional hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Kotake, Kei [Division of Theoretical Astronomy, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Takiwaki, Tomoya [Center for Computational Astrophysics, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2014-09-20

    We perform a series of simplified numerical experiments to explore how rotation impacts the three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics of core-collapse supernovae. For our systematic study, we employ a light-bulb scheme to trigger explosions and a three-flavor neutrino leakage scheme to treat deleptonization effects and neutrino losses from the proto-neutron-star interior. Using a 15 M {sub ?} progenitor, we compute 30 models in 3D with a wide variety of initial angular momentum and light-bulb neutrino luminosity. We find that the rotation can help the onset of neutrino-driven explosions for the models in which the initial angular momentum is matched to that obtained in recent stellar evolutionary calculations (?0.3-3 rad s{sup 1} at the center). For the models with larger initial angular momentum, the shock surface deforms to be more oblate due to larger centrifugal force. This not only makes the gain region more concentrated around the equatorial plane, but also makes the mass larger in the gain region. As a result, buoyant bubbles tend to be coherently formed and rise in the equatorial region, which pushes the revived shock toward ever larger radii until a global explosion is triggered. We find that these are the main reasons that the preferred direction of the explosion in 3D rotating models is often perpendicular to the spin axis, which is in sharp contrast to the polar explosions around the axis that were obtained in previous two-dimensional simulations.

  17. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume I. Eastern United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  18. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume IV. United States: WYEC data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 23 cities using Weather Year for Energy Calculations (WYEC) source weather data. Considerable overlap is present in cities (21) covered by both the TRY and WYEC data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  19. Weather data for simplified energy calculation methods. Volume II. Middle United States: TRY data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, A.R.; Moreno, S.; Deringer, J.; Watson, C.R.

    1984-08-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a source of weather data for direct use with a number of simplified energy calculation methods available today. Complete weather data for a number of cities in the United States are provided for use in the following methods: degree hour, modified degree hour, bin, modified bin, and variable degree day. This report contains sets of weather data for 22 cities in the continental United States using Test Reference Year (TRY) source weather data. The weather data at each city has been summarized in a number of ways to provide differing levels of detail necessary for alternative simplified energy calculation methods. Weather variables summarized include dry bulb and wet bulb temperature, percent relative humidity, humidity ratio, wind speed, percent possible sunshine, percent diffuse solar radiation, total solar radiation on horizontal and vertical surfaces, and solar heat gain through standard DSA glass. Monthly and annual summaries, in some cases by time of day, are available. These summaries are produced in a series of nine computer generated tables.

  20. Identifying the Effects on Fish of Changes in Water Pressure during Turbine Passage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, James M.; Abernethy, Cary S.; Dauble, Dennis D.

    2003-09-01

    Migratory and resident fish in the Columbia River are exposed to stresses associated with hydroelectric power production, including pressure changes during turbine passage and dissolved gas supersaturation. We investigated the responses of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus) to these two stresses, singly and in combination, in the laboratory. Fish were exposed to total dissolved gas levels of 100%, 120%, or 135% of saturation while being held at either surface or 30 ft of pressure. Some of these fish were then subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a Kaplan turbine under worst case (to 0.1 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 0.5 atmospheres) scenarios. Surface- and depth-acclimated Chinook salmon and bluegill, with no exposure to dissolved gas above ambient levels, were subjected to decreases in pressure simulating passage through a bulb turbine under worst case (to 0.68 atmospheres) or more fish friendly (to 1.0 atmospheres) scenarios. Bluegill, the most pressure-sensitive among the three species, incurred injuries that ranged from mild (internal hemorrhaging) (bulb turbine) to death (Kaplan turbine). For each type of turbine passage, bluegill acclimated to 30 ft depth and subjected to the more severe pressure nadir were more susceptible to injury/death. However, even control bluegill (i.e., not subjected to simulated turbine passage) experienced mild to moderate injury from rapidly ascending from 30 ft of pressure to surface pressure. The dissolved gas level had only a small additive effect on the injury/death rate of bluegill subjected to simulated Kaplan turbine passage. Thus, while physoclistous fish, such as bluegill, appear to be susceptible to injury from any rapid pressure decrease, those that are most severe (e.g., Kaplan turbine passage) are likely to be most injurious. Chinook salmon and rainbow trout were much less susceptible

  1. Activation of water soluble amines by halogens for trapping methyl radioactive iodine from air streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deitz, Victor R.; Blachly, Charles H.

    1977-01-01

    Gas adsorbent charcoals impregnated with an aqueous solution of the reaction product of a tertiary amine and elemental iodine or bromine are better than 99 per cent efficient in trapping methyl iodine.sup.131. The chemical addition of iodine or bromine to the tertiary amine molecule increases the efficiency of the impregnated charcoal as a trapping agent, and in conjunction with the high flash point of the tertiary amine raises the ignition temperature of the impregnated charcoal.

  2. Treatment and prevention systems for acid mine drainage and halogenated contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jin, Song; Fallgren, Paul H.; Morris, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-31

    Embodiments include treatments for acid mine drainage generation sources (10 perhaps by injection of at least one substrate (11) and biologically constructing a protective biofilm (13) on acid mine drainage generation source materials (14). Further embodiments include treatments for degradation of contaminated water environments (17) with substrates such as returned milk and the like.

  3. Model studies in cytochrome P-450 mediated toxicity of halogenated compounds: radical processes involving iron porphyrins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brault, D.

    1985-12-01

    Haloalkane toxicity originates from attack on biological targets by reactive intermediates derived from haloalkane metabolism by a hemoprotein, cytochrome P-450. Carbon-centered radicals and their peroxylderivatives are most likely involved. The reactions of iron porphyrin - a model for cytochrome P-450 - with various carbon-centered and peroxyl radicals generated by pulse radiolysis are examined. Competition between iron porphyrin and unsaturated fatty acids for attack by peroxyl radicals is pointed out. These kinetic data are used to derive a model for toxicity of haloalkanes with particular attention to carbon tetrachloride and halothane. The importance of local oxygen concentration and structural arrangement of fatty acids around cytochrome P-450 is emphasized. 56 references.

  4. Processes for preparing carbon fibers using sulfur trioxide in a halogenated solvent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Patton, Jasson T.; Barton, Bryan E.; Bernius, Mark T.; Chen, Xiaoyun; Hukkanen, Eric J.; Rhoton, Christina A.; Lysenko, Zenon

    2015-12-29

    Disclosed here are processes for preparing carbonized polymers (preferably carbon fibers), comprising sulfonating a polymer with a sulfonating agent that comprises SO.sub.3 dissolved in a solvent to form a sulfonated polymer; treating the sulfonated polymer with a heated solvent, wherein the temperature of the solvent is at least 95.degree. C.; and carbonizing the resulting product by heating it to a temperature of 500-3000.degree. C. Carbon fibers made according to these methods are also disclosed herein.

  5. Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.

    2013-09-01

    Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home. Even cutting internal moisture gains in half to 6.05 lbs/day, the dew point of the tight home was more than 15 degrees F higher than the outside dry bulb temperature. The homes have single pane glass representative of older Central Florida homes.

  6. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  7. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with amore » statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.« less

  8. Nanoscale temperature mapping in operating microelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mecklenburg, Matthew; Hubbard, William A.; White, E. R.; Dhall, Rohan; Cronin, Stephen B.; Aloni, Shaul; Regan, B. C.

    2015-02-05

    We report that modern microelectronic devices have nanoscale features that dissipate power nonuniformly, but fundamental physical limits frustrate efforts to detect the resulting temperature gradients. Contact thermometers disturb the temperature of a small system, while radiation thermometers struggle to beat the diffraction limit. Exploiting the same physics as Fahrenheit’s glass-bulb thermometer, we mapped the thermal expansion of Joule-heated, 80-nanometer-thick aluminum wires by precisely measuring changes in density. With a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), we quantified the local density via the energy of aluminum’s bulk plasmon. Rescaling density to temperature yields maps with a statistical precision of 3 kelvin/hertz₋1/2, an accuracy of 10%, and nanometer-scale resolution. Lastly, many common metals and semiconductors have sufficiently sharp plasmon resonances to serve as their own thermometers.

  9. EA-2017: Braddock Locks and Dam Hydro Electric Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to Hydro Green Energy, LLC to fabricate, install, and operate one interchangeable Modular Bulb Turbine (MBT) which would be inserted in a Large Frame Module (LFM) at the existing Braddock Locks and Dam. The installation would be part of a larger project that would include the design and installation of seven MBTs to create a 5.2 megawatt, low head hydropower system at Braddock Locks and Dam. An Environmental Assessment (EA) previously prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has been adopted by DOE pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).

  10. Belleville powerhouse electrical systems and controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemen, D.M.

    1995-12-31

    The 42 MW Belleville Hydroelectric Project is a run-of-river plant located on the West Virginia side of the existing Corps of Engineers Belleville Lock and Dam on the Ohio River. The plant consists of two 21 MW bulb units with 7.3 meter diameter runners manufactured by Voest Alpine Machinery Construction Engineering (VAMCE). The plant will generate approximately 245 GWhr of electricity each year. Many unique features associated with the electrical power equipment at the Belleville Hydroelectric Project are a direct result of the FERC license requirement that allows flood waters to run over the top of the powerhouse. Consequently, no exterior decks, roofs, or adjacent lands were available as equipment areas for the Generator Step-Up (GSU) transformers or the 138 kV SF6 substation.

  11. Method and apparatus for mounting a dichroic mirror in a microwave powered lamp assembly using deformable tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, Michael; Sowers, Frank; Harper, Curt; Love, Wayne

    1998-01-01

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector secured at the juncture of the two sections to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. The reflector is mounted in the cavity by tabs formed in the screen unit and bendable into the cavity to define support planes abutting respective surfaces of the reflector. The mesh section and tabs are preferably formed by etching a thin metal sheet.

  12. One piece microwave container screens for electrodeless lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Brian; Ury, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. Replacing mesh material by solid metal material as part of the screen unit significantly reduces leakage of microwave energy from the lamp. The solid section has multiple compliant fingers defined therein for engaging the periphery of a flange on the waveguide unit so that a hose clamp can easily secure the screen to the assembly. Screen units of this type having different mesh section configurations can be interchanged in the lamp assembly to produce different respective illumination patterns.

  13. Method and apparatus for mounting a dichroic mirror in a microwave powered lamp assembly using deformable tabs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ury, M.; Sowers, F.; Harper, C.; Love, W.

    1998-11-24

    A microwave powered electrodeless lamp includes an improved screen unit having mesh and solid sections with an internal reflector secured at the juncture of the two sections to reflect light into a light-transmitting chamber defined in the lamp microwave cavity by the reflector and the mesh section. A discharge envelope of a bulb is disposed in the light-transmitting chamber. Light emitted from the envelope is prevented by the reflector from entering the cavity portion bounded by the solid section of the screen. The reflector is mounted in the cavity by tabs formed in the screen unit and bendable into the cavity to define support planes abutting respective surfaces of the reflector. The mesh section and tabs are preferably formed by etching a thin metal sheet. 7 figs.

  14. Lighting: The Killer App of Village Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This paper looks at lighting systems as the major market for village level power generation. To the consumer it is something which is needed, could come from a much friendlier source, and the issues of affordability, convenience, and reliability are important. To the supplier lighting has an enormous range of potential customers, it opens the opportunity for other services, and even small demand can give big returns. Because the efficiency of the light source is critical to the number of lights which a fixed power supply can drive, it is important to pick the proper type of bulb to use in this system. The paper discusses test results from an array of fluorescent and incadescent lamps, compared with a kerosene lamp. Low wattage fluorescents seem to perform the best.

  15. Basic Research Needs for Solid-State Lighting. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solid-State Lighting, May 22-24, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J. M.; Burrows, P. E.; Davis, R. F.; Simmons, J. A.; Malliaras, G. G.; So, F.; Misewich, J.A.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Smith, D. L.; Tsao, J. Y.; Kung, H.; Crawford, M. H.; Coltrin, M. E.; Fitzsimmons, T. J.; Kini, A.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Kitts, S.; Shapard, L.; Brittenham, P. W.; Vittitow, M. P.

    2006-05-24

    The workshop participants enthusiastically concluded that the time is ripe for new fundamental science to beget a revolution in lighting technology. SSL sources based on organic and inorganic materials have reached a level of efficiency where it is possible to envision their use for general illumination. The research areas articulated in this report are targeted to enable disruptive advances in SSL performance and realization of this dream. Broad penetration of SSL technology into the mass lighting market, accompanied by vast savings in energy usage, requires nothing less. These new ?good ideas? will be represented not by light bulbs, but by an entirely new lighting technology for the 21st century and a bright, energy-efficient future indeed.

  16. Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 120-F-1 Glass Dump Waste Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2008-028

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Capron

    2008-06-27

    The 120-F-1 waste site consisted of two dumping areas located 660 m southeast of the 105-F Reactor containing laboratory equipment and bottles, demolition debris, light bulbs and tubes, small batteries, small drums, and pesticide contaminated soil. It is probable that 108-F was the source of the debris but the material may have come from other locations within the 100-F Area. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

  17. Effects of vaporizer and evaporative condenser pinch points on geofluid effectiveness and cost of electricity for geothermal binary power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1984-01-01

    A brief study was conducted in support of the DOE/DGHT Heat Cycle Research Program to investigate the influences of minimum approach temperature differences occurring in supercritical-heater/vaporizer and evaporative-condenser heat rejection systems on geothermal-electric binary power plant performance and cost of electricity. For the systems investigated optimum pinch points for minimizing cost of electricity were estimated to range from 5 to 7/sup 0/F (3 to 4/sup 0/C) for the heater vaporizer. The minimum approach of condensing temperature to wet-bulb temperature for evaporative condensers was estimated to be about 15/sup 0/F (8/sup 0/C) in order to achieve the highest plant net geofluid effectiveness, and approximately 30/sup 0/F (17/sup 0/C) to attain the minimum cost of electricity.

  18. Improving Comfort in Hot-Humid Climates with a Whole-House Dehumidifier, Windermere, Florida (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-11-01

    Maintaining comfort in a home can be challenging in hot-humid climates. At the common summer temperature set point of 75 degrees F, the perceived air temperature can vary by 11 degrees F because higher indoor humidity reduces comfort. Often the air conditioner (AC) thermostat set point is lower than the desirable cooling level to try to increase moisture removal so that the interior air is not humid or "muggy." However, this method is not always effective in maintaining indoor relative humidity (RH) or comfort. In order to quantify the performance of a combined whole-house dehumidifier (WHD) AC system, researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Building America team Consortium of Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) monitored the operation of two Lennox AC systems coupled with a Honeywell DH150 TrueDRY whole-house dehumidifier for a six-month period. By using a WHD to control moisture levels (latent cooling) and optimizing a central AC to control temperature (sensible cooling), improvements in comfort can be achieved while reducing utility costs. Indoor comfort for this study was defined as maintaining indoor conditions at below 60% RH and a humidity ratio of 0.012 lbm/lbm while at common dry bulb set point temperatures of 74 degrees -80 degrees F. In addition to enhanced comfort, controlling moisture to these levels can reduce the risk of other potential issues such as mold growth, pests, and building component degradation. Because a standard AC must also reduce dry bulb air temperature in order to remove moisture, a WHD is typically needed to support these latent loads when sensible heat removal is not desired.

  19. An hourglass model for the flare of HST-1 in M87

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wen-Po; Zhao, Guang-Yao; Chen, Yong Jun; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Chun-Cheng

    2013-12-01

    To explain the multi-wavelength light curves (from radio to X-ray) of HST-1 in the M87 jet, we propose an hourglass model that is a modified two-zone system of Tavecchio and Ghisellini (hereafter TG08): a slow hourglass-shaped or Laval-nozzle-shaped layer connected by two revolving exponential surfaces surrounding a fast spine through which plasma blobs flow. Based on the conservation of magnetic flux, the magnetic field changes along the axis of the hourglass. We adopt the result of TG08the high-energy emission from GeV to TeV can be produced through inverse Compton by the two-zone system, and the photons from radio to X-ray are mainly radiated by the fast inner zone system. Here, we only discuss the light curves of the fast inner blob from radio to X-ray. When a compressible blob travels down the axis of the first bulb in the hourglass, because of magnetic flux conservation, its cross section experiences an adiabatic compression process, which results in particle acceleration and the brightening of HST-1. When the blob moves into the second bulb of the hourglass, because of magnetic flux conservation, the dimming of the knot occurs along with an adiabatic expansion of its cross section. A similar broken exponential function could fit the TeV peaks in M87, which may imply a correlation between the TeV flares of M87 and the light curves from radio to X-ray in HST-1. The Very Large Array (VLA) 22 GHz radio light curve of HST-1 verifies our prediction based on the model fit to the main peak of the VLA 15 GHz radio one.

  20. Estimate of federal relighting potential and demand for efficient lighting products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shankle, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Richman, E.E.; Grover, S.E.

    1993-11-01

    The increasing level of electric utility rebates for energy-efficient lighting retrofits has recently prompted concern over the adequacy of the market supply of energy-efficient lighting products (Energy User News 1991). In support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has developed an estimate of the total potential for energy-efficient lighting retrofits in federally owned buildings. This estimate can be used to address the issue of the impact of federal relighting projects on the supply of energy-efficient lighting products. The estimate was developed in 1992, using 1991 data. Any investments in energy-efficient lighting products that occurred in 1992 will reduce the potential estimated here. This analysis proceeds by estimating the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings. The lighting technology screening matrix is then used to determine the minimum life-cycle cost retrofit for each type of existing lighting fixture. Estimates of the existing stock are developed for (1) four types of fluorescent lighting fixtures (2-, 3-, and 4-lamp, F40 4-foot fixtures, and 2-lamp, F96 8-foot fixtures, all with standard magnetic ballasts); (2) one type of incandescent fixture (a 75-watt single bulb fixture); and (3) one type of exit sign (containing two 20-watt incandescent bulbs). Estimates of the existing stock of lighting fixtures in federally owned buildings, estimates of the total potential demand for energy-efficient lighting products if all cost-effective retrofits were undertaken immediately, and total potential annual energy savings (in MWh and dollars), the total investment required to obtain the energy savings and the present value of the efficiency investment, are presented.

  1. Method of dehalogenation using diamonds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Roslyn Harbor, NY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Lafayette, LA); Ladner, Edward P. (Pittsburgh, PA); Anderson, Richard R. (Brownsville, PA)

    2000-01-01

    A method for preparing olefins and halogenated olefins is provided comprising contacting halogenated compounds with diamonds for a sufficient time and at a sufficient temperature to convert the halogenated compounds to olefins and halogenated olefins via elimination reactions.

  2. Resonance Raman and far-infrared studies of isotopically disordered and mixed-halide halogen-bridged platinum chain solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, S.P.; Worl, L.A.; Donohoe, R.J.; Huckett, S.C.; Saxena, A.; Huang, X.Z.; Bishop, A.R.; Swanson, B.I.

    1992-12-31

    The MX chain solids [Pt(en){sub 2}][Pt(en){sub 2}X{sub 2}](CIO{sub 4}){sub 4}, (en = C{sub 2}H{sub 8}N{sub 2} and X=Cl, Br), referred to as ``PtX,`` are used to explore some of the surprising spectral consequences of disorder in 1-D systems, first for pure PtCl, where the disorder arises from randomly distributed Cl isotopes, then for the more drastic case of the mixed-halide materials PtCl{sub 1minusx}Br{sub x}. Lattice dynamics and Peierls-Hubbard modelling are used to analyze the observed spectral behavior. In both cases, the complex structure seen in the Raman and IR spectra is found to arise from strongly localized vibrational modes residing on chain segments, defined by sequences of Cl isotopes for PtCl, and by sequences of Cl and Br for PtCl{sub 1minusx}Br{sub x}. 4 figs, 8 refs.

  3. Body burdens of brominated flame retardants and other persistent organo-halogenated compounds and their descriptors in US girls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windham, Gayle C.; Pinney, Susan M.; Sjodin, Andreas; Lum, Raymond; Jones, Richard S.; Needham, Larry L.; Biro, Frank M.; Hiatt, Robert A.; Kushi, Lawrence H.

    2010-04-15

    Background: Levels of brominated flame retardants are increasing in US populations, yet little data are available on body burdens of these and other persistent hormonally active agents (HAAs) in school-aged children. Exposures to such chemicals may affect a number of health outcomes related to development and reproductive function. Objective: Determine the distribution of biomarkers of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and organo-chlorinated pesticides (OCPs), such as DDT/DDE, in children, and their variation by key descriptor variables. Methods: Ethnically diverse cohorts of girls 6-8 y old at baseline are being followed for growth and pubertal development in a multi-site, longitudinal study. Nearly 600 serum samples from the California and Ohio sites were analyzed for lipids, 35 PCB congeners, 11 PBDE congeners, and 9 OCPs. The biomarker distributions were examined and geometric means compared for selected analytes across categories of age, race, site, body mass index (BMI), parental education, maternal age at delivery, and breast feeding in adjusted models. Results: Six PBDE congeners were detected among greater than 70% of samples, with BDE-47 having the highest concentration (median 42.2, range 4.9-855 ng/g lipid). Girls in California had adjusted geometric mean (GM) PBDE levels significantly higher than girls in Ohio. Furthermore, Blacks had significantly higher adjusted GMs of all six PBDE congeners than Whites, and Hispanics had intermediate values. GMs tended to be lower among more obese girls, while other variables were not strongly associated. In contrast, GMs of the six PCB congeners most frequently detected were significantly lower among Blacks and Hispanics than Whites. PCBs and the three pesticides most frequently detected were also consistently lower among girls with high BMI, who were not breast-fed, whose mothers were younger, or whose care-givers (usually parents) were less educated. Girls in California had higher GMs than in Ohio for the pesticides and most PCB congeners, but the opposite for CB-99 and -118. Conclusions: Several of these potential HAAs were detected in nearly all of these young girls, some at relatively high levels, with variation by geographic location and other demographic factors that may reflect exposure pathways. The higher PBDE levels in California likely reflect differences in fire regulation and safety codes, with potential policy implications.

  4. Analysis of Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards for Residential General Service Lighting in Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie E.; McNeil, Michael A.; Leiva Ibanez, Francisco Humberto; Ruiz, Ana Maria; Pavon, Mariana; Hall, Stephen

    2011-06-01

    Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards (MEPS) have been chosen as part of Chile's national energy efficiency action plan. As a first MEPS, the Ministry of Energy has decided to focus on a regulation for lighting that would ban the sale of inefficient bulbs, effectively phasing out the use of incandescent lamps. Following major economies such as the US (EISA, 2007) , the EU (Ecodesign, 2009) and Australia (AS/NZS, 2008) who planned a phase out based on minimum efficacy requirements, the Ministry of Energy has undertaken the impact analysis of a MEPS on the residential lighting sector. Fundacion Chile (FC) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) collaborated with the Ministry of Energy and the National Energy Efficiency Program (Programa Pais de Eficiencia Energetica, or PPEE) in order to produce a techno-economic analysis of this future policy measure. LBNL has developed for CLASP (CLASP, 2007) a spreadsheet tool called the Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) that allows for evaluation of costs and benefits at the consumer level but also a wide range of impacts at the national level, such as energy savings, net present value of savings, greenhouse gas (CO2) emission reductions and avoided capacity generation due to a specific policy. Because historically Chile has followed European schemes in energy efficiency programs (test procedures, labelling program definitions), we take the Ecodesign commission regulation No 244/2009 as a starting point when defining our phase out program, which means a tiered phase out based on minimum efficacy per lumen category. The following data were collected in order to perform the techno-economic analysis: (1) Retail prices, efficiency and wattage category in the current market, (2) Usage data (hours of lamp use per day), and (3) Stock data, penetration of efficient lamps in the market. Using these data, PAMS calculates the costs and benefits of efficiency standards from two distinct but related perspectives: (1) The Life

  5. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of

  6. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873

  7. Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durrant, Oliver W.; Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R.; Mandel, Sheldon W.

    1987-01-01

    A reflux condensing start-up system includes a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

  8. Start-up control system and vessel for LMFBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Durrant, Oliver W.; Kakarala, Chandrasekhara R.; Mandel, Sheldon W.

    1987-01-01

    A reflux condensing start-up system comprises a steam generator, a start-up vessel connected parallel to the steam generator, a main steam line connecting steam outlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel to a steam turbine, a condenser connected to an outlet of the turbine and a feedwater return line connected between the condenser and inlets of the steam generator and start-up vessel. The start-up vessel has one or more heaters at the bottom thereof for heating feedwater which is supplied over a start-up line to the start-up vessel. Steam is thus generated to pressurize the steam generator before the steam generator is supplied with a heat transfer medium, for example liquid sodium, in the case of a liquid metal fast breeder reactor. The start-up vessel includes upper and lower bulbs with a smaller diameter mid-section to act as water and steam reservoirs. The start-up vessel can thus be used not only in a start-up operation but as a mixing tank, a water storage tank and a level control at low loads for controlling feedwater flow.

  9. Multi-componenet diffusion analysis and assessment of Gamma code and improved RELAP5 code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Oh

    2007-05-01

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has been considered a critical event for very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). Following helium depressurization, it is anticipated that unless countermeasures are taken, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure. Thus, without any mitigating features, a LOCA will lead to an air ingress event, which will lead to exothermic chemical reactions of graphite with oxygen, potentially resulting in significant increases of the core temperature. New and safer nuclear reactors (Generation IV) are now in the early planning stages in many countries throughout the world. One of the reactor concepts being seriously considered is the VHTR. To achieve public acceptance, these reactor concepts must show an increased level of inherent safety over current reactor designs (i.e., a system must be designed to eliminate any concerns of large radiological releases outside the site boundary). A computer code developed from this study, gas multi-component mixture analysis (GAMMA) code, was assessed using a two-bulb experiment and in addition the molecular diffusion behavior in the prismatic-core gas-cooled reactor was investigated following the guillotine break of the main pipe between the reactor vessel and the power conversion unit. The RELAP5 code was improved for the VHTR air ingress analysis and was assessed using inverse U-tube and NACOK natural circulation data.

  10. Cutting-edge issues of core-collapse supernova theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotake, Kei; Nakamura, Ko; Kuroda, Takami; Takiwaki, Tomoya

    2014-05-02

    Based on multi-dimensional neutrino-radiation hydrodynamic simulations, we report several cutting-edge issues about the long-veiled explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe). In this contribution, we pay particular attention to whether three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamics and/or general relativity (GR) would or would not help the onset of explosions. By performing 3D simulations with spectral neutrino transport, we show that it is more difficult to obtain an explosion in 3D than in 2D. In addition, our results from the first generation of full general relativistic 3D simulations including approximate neutrino transport indicate that GR can foster the onset of neutrino-driven explosions. Based on our recent parametric studies using a light-bulb scheme, we discuss impacts of nuclear energy deposition behind the supernova shock and stellar rotation on the neutrino-driven mechanism, both of which have yet to be included in the self-consistent 3D supernova models. Finally we give an outlook with a summary of the most urgent tasks to extract the information about the explosion mechanisms from multi-messenger CCSN observables.

  11. Energy Efficiency Adult Tracking Report - Final

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson-Grant, Amy

    2014-09-30

    Postwave tracking study for the Energy Efficiency Adult Campaign This study serves as measure of key metrics among the campaign’s target audience, homeowners age 25+. Key measures include: Awareness of messages relating to the broad issue; Recognition of the PSAs; Relevant attitudes, including interest, ease of taking energy efficient steps, and likelihood to act; Relevant knowledge, including knowledge of light bulb alternatives and energy efficient options; and Relevant behaviors, including specific energy-saving behaviors mentioned within the PSAs. Wave 1: May 27 – June 7, 2011 Wave 2: May 29 – June 8, 2012 Wave 3: May 29 – June 19, 2014 General market sample of adults 25+ who own their homes W1 sample: n = 704; W2: n=701; W3: n=806 Online Survey Panel Methodology Study was fielded by Lightspeed Research among their survey panel. Sample is US Census representative of US homeowners by race/ethnicity, income, age, region, and family status. At least 30% of respondents were required to have not updated major appliances in their home in the past 5 years (dishwasher, stove, refrigerator, washer, or dryer).

  12. The Belleville Hydroelectric Project - An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemperline, E.J.; Konstantellos, C.; Meier, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Belleville Hydroelectric Project, a 42 MW project on the Ohio River at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Belleville Locks and Dam was licensed to the City of Jackson, Ohio in 1989. In 1993 a joint venture of 42 Ohio municipal electric suppliers was formed to develop the project - known as Ohio Municipal Electric Generation Agency Joint Venture 5. Design of the project, including procurement of the turbines and generators, began the same year. At the time this paper is being published project construction is beginning with development of the cofferdams. Completion of the project is scheduled for late 1997. The project will be located on the east bank of the Ohio River. Energy will be generated by two identical 24.6 ft (7.5 m) runner diameter 21 MW bulb turbines, among the world`s largest. Each unit will operate over a head range of from 5 ft to 22 ft (1.5 m to 6.7 m), and discharges from 3000 ft{sup 3}/sec (cfs) to 20,000 cfs (85 m{sup 3}/s to 566 m{sup 3}/s). This paper includes discussions of project history, operation, siting, layout, design and other considerations.

  13. Frost heave test being expanded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Northwest Alaskan Pipeline Co. is expanding its frost-heave testing program by adding seven test sites along the planned Alaskan gas transmission pipeline route. The test results will demonstrate the behavior of chilled pipe buried in unfrozen soils. To protect the permafrost in which the pipe will be buried, the pipeline operators will chill the gas in the line to below 32/sup 0/F. In thawed soils, however, frost heave may occur when moisture freezes on the chilled pipe, creates a frost bulb, expands the soil, and causes the chilled pipe to heave upward. Two methods being tested for preventing or minimizing frost heave are (1) insulation, and (2) replacement of frost-susceptible unfrozen soil with a selected bedding material. Each test site will consist of two 80-ft sections of 48 in-diam pipe - one bare, the other with insulation (urethane foam) or insulation plus a bedding-material replacement. The sites will have their own power-generation and refrigeration equipment, as well as data-acquisition systems that will automatically collect information from 800 sensors twice a week.

  14. Thermal Issues Associated with the Lighting Systems, Electronics Racks, and Pre-Amplifier Modules in the National Ignition System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. C. Owen; J. D. Bernardin; K. L. Lam

    1998-08-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the thermal issues related to the National Ignition Facility. The influence of heat sources such as lighting fixtures, electronics racks, and pre-amplifier modules (PAMs) on the operational performance of the laser guide beam tubes and optical alignment hardware in the NE laser bays were investigated with experiments and numerical models. In particular, empirical heat transfer data was used to establish representative and meaningful boundary conditions and also serve as bench marks for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. Numerical models, constructed with a commercial CFD code, were developed to investigate the extent of thermal plumes and radiation heat transfer from the heat sources. From these studies, several design modifications were recommended including reducing the size of all fluorescent lights in the NIF laser bays to single 32 W bulb fixtures, maintaining minimum separation distances between light fixtures/electronics racks and beam transport hardware, adding motion sensors in areas of the laser bay to control light fixture operation during maintenance procedures, properly cooling all electronics racks with air-water heat exchangers with heat losses greater than 25 W/rack to the M1 laser bay, ensuring that the electronics racks are not overcooked and thus maintain their surface temperatures to within a few degrees centigrade of the mean air temperature, and insulating the electronic bays and optical support structures on the PAMs.

  15. High output lamp with high brightness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Bass, Gary K.; Copsey, Jesse F.; Garber, Jr., William E.; Kwong, Vincent H.; Levin, Izrail; MacLennan, Donald A.; Roy, Robert J.; Steiner, Paul E.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

  16. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  17. Failure Mechanisms and Color Stability in Light-Emitting Diodes during Operation in High- Temperature Environments in Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Zhang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-05-26

    The energy efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED) technology compared to incandescent light bulbs has triggered an increased focus on solid state luminaries for a variety of lighting applications. Solid-state lighting (SSL) utilizes LEDs, for illumination through the process of electroluminescence instead of heating a wire filament as seen with traditional lighting. The fundamental differences in the construction of LED and the incandescent lamp results in different failure modes including lumen degradation, chromaticity shift and drift in the correlated color temperature. The use of LED-based products for safety-critical and harsh environment applications necessitates the characterization of the failure mechanisms and modes. In this paper, failure mechanisms and color stability has been studied for commercially available vertical structured thin film LED (VLED) under harsh environment conditions with and without the presence of contaminants. The VLED used for the study was mounted on a ceramic starboard in order to connect it to the current source. Contamination sources studied include operation in the vicinity of vulcanized rubber and adhesive epoxies in the presence of temperature and humidity. Performance of the VLEDs has been quantified using the measured luminous flux and color shift of the VLEDs subjected to both thermal and humidity stresses under a forward current bias of 350 mA. Results indicate that contamination can result in pre-mature luminous flux degradation and color shift in LEDs.

  18. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Dymond, Jr., Lauren E.; Gitsevich, Aleksandr; Grimm, William G.; Kipling, Kent; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Ola, Samuel A.; Simpson, James E.; Trimble, William C.; Tsai, Peter; Turner, Brian P.

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and I or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to adjust the driving frequency of the oscillator.

  19. High frequency inductive lamp and power oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Dolan, James T.; Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Leng, Yongzhang

    2000-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency. Various control circuits may be employed to match the driving frequency of the oscillator to a plurality of tuning states of the lamp.

  20. The evolving price of household LED lamps: Recent trends and historical comparisons for the US market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerke, Brian F.; Ngo, Allison T.; Alstone, Andrea L.; Fisseha, Kibret S.

    2014-10-14

    In recent years, household LED light bulbs (LED A lamps) have undergone a dramatic price decline. Since late 2011, we have been collecting data, on a weekly basis, for retail offerings of LED A lamps on the Internet. The resulting data set allows us to track the recent price decline in detail. LED A lamp prices declined roughly exponentially with time in 2011-2014, with decline rates of 28percent to 44percent per year depending on lumen output, and with higher-lumen lamps exhibiting more rapid price declines. By combining the Internet price data with publicly available lamp shipments indices for the US market, it is also possible to correlate LED A lamp prices against cumulative production, yielding an experience curve for LED A lamps. In 2012-2013, LED A lamp prices declined by 20-25percent for each doubling in cumulative shipments. Similar analysis of historical data for other lighting technologies reveals that LED prices have fallen significantly more rapidly with cumulative production than did their technological predecessors, which exhibited a historical decline of 14-15percent per doubling of production.

  1. The role of customized computational tools in product development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinstein, Martin Wilhelm; Kempka, Steven Norman; Tikare, Veena

    2005-06-01

    Model-based computer simulations have revolutionized product development in the last 10 to 15 years. Technologies that have existed for many decades or even centuries have been improved with the aid of computer simulations. Everything from low-tech consumer goods such as detergents, lubricants and light bulb filaments to the most advanced high-tech products such as airplane wings, wireless communication technologies and pharmaceuticals is engineered with the aid of computer simulations today. In this paper, we present a framework for describing computational tools and their application within the context of product engineering. We examine a few cases of product development that integrate numerical computer simulations into the development stage. We will discuss how the simulations were integrated into the development process, what features made the simulations useful, the level of knowledge and experience that was necessary to run meaningful simulations and other details of the process. Based on this discussion, recommendations for the incorporation of simulations and computational tools into product development will be made.

  2. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regnier, Cindy

    2012-08-31

    Historically thermal comfort in buildings has been controlled by simple dry bulb temperature settings. As we move into more sophisticated low energy building systems that make use of alternate systems such as natural ventilation, mixed mode system and radiant thermal conditioning strategies, a more complete understanding of human comfort is needed for both design and control. This guide will support building designers, owners, operators and other stakeholders in defining quantifiable thermal comfort parameters?these can be used to support design, energy analysis and the evaluation of the thermal comfort benefits of design strategies. This guide also contains information that building owners and operators will find helpful for understanding the core concepts of thermal comfort. Whether for one building, or for a portfolio of buildings, this guide will also assist owners and designers in how to identify the mechanisms of thermal comfort and space conditioning strategies most important for their building and climate, and provide guidance towards low energy design options and operations that can successfully address thermal comfort. An example of low energy design options for thermal comfort is presented in some detail for cooling, while the fundamentals to follow a similar approach for heating are presented.

  3. Preliminary assessment of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine as a geothermal total-flow expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine (VPRT) as a total flow expander in a geothermal-electric conversion cycle. Values of geofluid effectiveness of VPRT systems were estimated for conditions consisting of: a 360/sup 0/F geothermal resource, 60/sup 0/F wet-bulb ambient temperature, zero and 0.003 mass concentrations of dissolved noncondensible gas in the geofluid, 100 and 120/sup 0/F condensing temperature, and engine efficiencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.0. Achievable engine efficiencies were estimated to range from 0.47 to 0.77, with plant geofluid effectivenss values ranging as high as 9.5 Watt hr/lbm geofluid. This value is competitive with magnitudes of geofluid effectiveness projected for advanced binary plants, and is on the order of 40% higher than estimates for dual-flash steam systems and other total flow systems reviewed. Because of its potentially high performance and relative simplicity, the VPRT system appears to warrant further investigation toward its use in a well-head geothermal plant. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Preliminary assessment of the velocity pump reaction turbine as a geothermal total-flow expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demuth, O.J.

    1984-06-01

    A preliminary evaluation was made of the Velocity Pump Reaction Turbine (VPRT) as a total flow expander in a geothermal-electric conversion cycle. Values of geofluid effectiveness of VPRT systems were estimated for conditions consisting of: a 360/sup 0/ geothermal resource, 60/sup 0/F wet-bulb ambient temperature, zero and 0.003 mass concentrations of dissolved noncondensible gas in the geofluid, 100 and 120/sup 0/F condensing temperatures, and engine efficiencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.0. Achievable engine efficiencies were estimated to range from 0.47 to 0.77, with plant geofluid effectiveness values ranging as high as 9.5 Watt hr/lbm geofluid for the 360/sup 0/F resource temperature. This value is competitive with magnitudes of geofluid effectiveness projected for advanced binary plants, and is on the order of 40% higher than estimates for dual-flash steam and other total flow systems reviewed. Because of its potentially high performance and relative simplicity, the VPRT system appears to warrant further investigation toward its use in a well-head geothermal plant.

  5. Energy conservation is a waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inhaber, H.

    1998-07-01

    Energy conservation is virtually always a bust. Governments around the world continually trot out new schemes to reduce energy use and promote efficiency. The prime American example of this futility is government regulation of automobile gas mileage. Prompted by the Arab oil embargo of 1973, Congress mandated a doubling of gas mileage. What happened? Gasoline consumption rose from 1973 to the 1990s, as the roads were flooded with energy-efficient cars. Huge sport-utility vehicles crowd parking lots, also thanks to more efficient engines. Conservation fails because it takes no account of economics of human nature. The combination of greater engine efficiency and rising disposable income has produced a true golden age of motoring. In the same way, what is saved by installing special light bulbs is often wasted on new hot tubs, exterior lighting and a host of other energy uses, as homeowners assume that their electric bills will drop off substantially. In spite of these and dozens of other clear failures, the claims for conservation to solve virtually all the national energy dilemmas continue. Few if any are valid. While each of us can reduce energy use in one or two areas, one finds that the nation gradually uses more.

  6. Half Moon Cove Tidal Project. Feasibility report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-11-01

    The proposed Half Moon Cove Tidal Power Project would be located in a small cove in the northern part of Cobscook Bay in the vicinity of Eastport, Maine. The project would be the first tidal electric power generating plant in the United States of America. The basin impounded by the barrier when full will approximate 1.2 square miles. The average tidal range at Eastport is 18.2 feet. The maximum spring tidal range will be 26.2 feet and the neap tidal range 12.8 feet. The project will be of the single pool-type single effect in which generation takes place on the ebb tide only. Utilizing an average mean tidal range of 18.2 feet the mode of operation enables generation for approximately ten and one-half (10-1/2) hours per day or slightly in excess of five (5) hours per tide. The installed capacity will be 12 MW utilizing 2 to 6 MW units. An axial flow, or Bulb type of turbine was selected for this study.

  7. The gas phase emitter effect of lanthanum within ceramic metal halide lamps and its dependence on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruhrmann, C.; Hoebing, T.; Bergner, A.; Groeger, S.; Awakowicz, P.; Mentel, J.; Denissen, C.; Suijker, J.

    2015-08-07

    The gas phase emitter effect increases the lamp lifetime by lowering the work function and, with it, the temperature of the tungsten electrodes of metal halide lamps especially for lamps in ceramic vessels due to their high rare earth pressures. It is generated by a monolayer on the electrode surface of electropositive atoms of certain emitter elements, which are inserted into the lamp bulb by metal iodide salts. They are vaporized, dissociated, ionized, and deposited by an emitter ion current onto the electrode surface within the cathodic phase of lamp operation with a switched-dc or ac-current. The gas phase emitter effect of La and the influence of Na on the emitter effect of La are studied by spatially and phase-resolved pyrometric measurements of the electrode tip temperature, La atom, and ion densities by optical emission spectroscopy as well as optical broadband absorption spectroscopy and arc attachment images by short time photography. An addition of Na to the lamp filling increases the La vapor pressure within the lamp considerably, resulting in an improved gas phase emitter effect of La. Furthermore, the La vapor pressure is raised by a heating of the cold spot. In this way, conditions depending on the La vapor pressure and operating frequency are identified, at which the temperature of the electrodes becomes a minimum.

  8. Survey and Analysis of Weather Data for Building Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Shrestha, Som S; New, Joshua Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, calibrated energy modeling of residential and commercial buildings has gained importance in a retrofit-dominated market. Accurate weather data plays an important role in this calibration process and projected energy savings. It would be ideal to measure weather data at the building location to capture relevant microclimate variation but this is generally considered cost-prohibitive. There are data sources publicly available with high temporal sampling rates but at relatively poor geospatial sampling locations. To overcome this limitation, there are a growing number of service providers that claim to provide real time and historical weather data for 20-35 km2 grid across the globe. Unfortunately, there is limited documentation from 3rd-party sources attesting to the accuracy of this data. This paper compares provided weather characteristics with data collected from a weather station inaccessible to the service providers. Monthly average dry bulb temperature; relative humidity; direct, diffuse and horizontal solar radiation; and wind speed are statistically compared. Moreover, we ascertain the relative contributions of each weather variable and its impact on building loads. Annual simulations are calculated for three different building types, including a closely monitored and automated energy efficient research building. The comparison shows that the difference for an individual variable can be as high as 90%. In addition, annual building energy consumption can vary by 7% while monthly building loads can vary by 40% as a function of the provided location s weather data.

  9. A new equation of state with light nuclei and their weak interactions in core-collapse supernova simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furusawa, Shun; Yamada, Shoichi [Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Nagakura, Hiroki [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Sumiyoshi, Kohsuke [Numazu College of Technology, Ooka 3600, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8501 (Japan); Suzuki, Hideyuki [Faculty of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, Yamazaki 2641, Noda, Chiba 278-8510 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    We perform numerical experiments to investigate the influence of inelastic neutrino reactions with light nuclei on the standing accretion shock instability. The time evolutions of shock waves are calculated with a simple light-bulb approximation for the neutrino transport and a multi-nuclei equation of state. The neutrino absorptions and inelastic interactions with deuterons, tritons, helions and alpha particles are taken into account in the hydrodynamical simulations in addition to the ordinary charged-current interactions with nucleons. Axial symmetry is assumed but no equatorial symmetry is imposed. We show that the heating rates of deuterons reach as high as ? 10% of those of nucleons around the bottom of the gain region. On the other hands, alpha particles heat the matter near the shock wave, which is important when the shock wave expands and density and temperature of matter become low. It is also found that the models with heating by light nuclei have different evolutions from those without it in non-linear evolution phase. The matter in the gain region has various densities and temperatures and there appear regions that are locally rich in deuterons and alpha particles. These results indicate that the inelastic reactions of light nuclei, especially deuterons, should be incorporated in the simulations of core-collapse supernovae.

  10. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturer specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.

  11. Occupant Perceptions and a Health Outcome in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Mingjie; Kim, Yang-Seon; Srebric, Jelena

    2015-11-02

    Indoor Environmental Quality (IEQ) in commercial buildings, such as retail stores, can affect employee satisfaction, productivity, and health. This study administered an IEQ survey to retail employees and found correlations between measured IEQ parameters and the survey responses. The survey included 611 employees in 14 retail stores located in Pennsylvania (climate zone 5A) and Texas (climate zone 2A). The survey questionnaire featured ratings of different aspects of IEQ, including thermal comfort, lighting and noise level, indoor smells, overall cleanness, and environmental quality. Simultaneously with the survey, on-site physical measurements were taken to collect data of relative humidity levels, air exchange rates, dry bulb temperatures, and contaminant concentrations. This data was analyzed using multinomial logit regression with independent variables being the measured IEQ parameters, employees’ gender, and age. This study found that employee perception of stuffy smells is related to formaldehyde and PM10 concentrations. Furthermore, the survey also asked the employees to report an annual frequency of common colds as a health indicator. The regression analysis showed that the cold frequency statistically correlates with the measured air exchange rates, outdoor temperatures, and indoor PM concentrations. Overall, the air exchange rate is the most influential parameter on the employee perception of the overall environmental quality and self-reported health outcome.

  12. Comparison of Vaisala radiosondes RS41 and RS92 at the ARM Southern Great Plains Site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jensen, M. P.; Holdridge, D.; Survo, P.; Lehtinen, R.; Baxter, S.; Toto, T.; Johnson, K. L.

    2015-11-02

    In the fall of 2013, the Vaisala RS41-SG (4th generation) radiosonde was introduced as a replacement for the RS92-SGP radiosonde with improvements in measurement accuracy of profiles of atmospheric temperature, humidity and pressure. Thus, in order to help characterize these improvements, an intercomparison campaign was undertaken at the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Facility site in north Central Oklahoma USA. During 3–8 June 2014, a total of 20 twin-radiosonde flights were performed in a variety of atmospheric conditions representing typical midlatitude continental summertime conditions. The results suggest that the RS92 and RS41 measurements generally agree within manufacturermore » specified tolerances with notable exceptions when exiting liquid cloud layers where the "wet bulbing" effect is mitigated in the RS41 observations. The RS41 measurements also appear to show a smaller impact from solar heating. These results suggest that the RS41 does provide important improvements, particularly in cloudy conditions, but under most observational conditions the RS41 and RS92 measurements agree within the manufacturer specified limits and so a switch to RS41 radiosondes will have little impact on long-term observational records.« less

  13. Calculation of variable-base degree-days and degree-nights from monthly average temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonderegger, R.; Cleary, P.; Dickinson, B.

    1985-01-01

    The Computerized Instrumented Residential Audit (CIRA), a micro-computer building energy analysis program developed at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, uses a monthly variable-base degree-day method to calculate heating and cooling loads. The method's unique feature is its ability to model thermostat setbacks and storage of solar gain. The program accomplishes this by dividing each day into two periods, ''average day'' (8 a.m. to 8 p.m.) and ''average night'' (8 p.m. to 8 a.m.), with different base temperatures. For each mode (heating or cooling) and for each period (day or night), the program reconstructs degree-days as a function of average monthly day or night temperature using three empirical coefficients specific to the location. A comparison is made between degree-days computed from hourly weather tapes and those predicted using this method. The root mean square error between predicted and actual degree days is typically between 3 and 12 degree-days per month. Tables of the coefficients are given for over 150 locations in the United States, computed from hourly dry-bulb temperatures on TRY and TMY tapes. Seasonal predictions of heating and cooling energy budgets using this method show good correspondence to the DOE-2 hourly simulation method.

  14. Projected Benefits of New Residential Evaporative Cooling Systems: Progress Report #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kutscher, C.; Eastment, M.; Hancock, E.; Reeves, P.

    2006-10-01

    The use of conventional evaporative cooling has rapidly declined in the United States despite the fact that it has high potential for energy savings in dry climates. Evaporative systems are very competitive in terms of first cost and provide significant reductions in operating energy use, as well as peak-load reduction benefits. Significant market barriers still remain and can be addressed through improved systems integration. This report investigates the first of these approaches, exploring innovative components. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America research teams are investigating the use of two promising new pieces of residential cooling equipment that employ evaporative cooling as a part of their system design. The OASys unit, which is a combination of direct and indirect evaporative cooling stages developed by Davis Energy Group (DEG) and manufactured by Speakman CRS, is used to ultimately provide outside air to the living space. The outdoor air provided is indirectly and directly evaporatively cooled in two stages to a condition that can be below the wet-bulb (wb) temperature of the outside air, thus outperforming a conventional single-stage direct evaporative cooler.

  15. Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to copper: Neurophysiological and histological effects on the olfactory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, J.A.; Rose, J.D.; Jenkins, R.A.; Gerow, K.G.; Bergman, H.L.

    1999-09-01

    Olfactory epithelial structure and olfactory bulb neurophysiological responses were measured in chinook salmon and rainbow trout in response to 25 to 300 {micro}g copper (Cu)/L. Using confocal laser scanning microscopy, the number of olfactory receptors was significantly reduced in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g cu/L for 1 h. The number of receptors was significantly reduced in both species following exposure to 25 {micro}g Cu/L for 4 h. Transmission electron microscopy of olfactory epithelial tissue indicated that the loss of receptors was from cellular necrosis. Olfactory bulk electroencephalogram (EEG) responses to 10{sup {minus}3} M L-serine were initially reduced by all Cu concentrations but were virtually eliminated in chinook salmon exposed to {ge}50 {micro}g Cu/L and in rainbow trout exposed to {ge}200 {micro}g Cu/L within 1 h of exposure. Following Cu exposure, EEG response recovery rates were slower in fish exposed to higher Cu concentrations. The higher sensitivity of the chinook salmon olfactory system to Cu-induced histological damage and neurophysiological impairment parallels the relative species sensitivity observed in behavioral avoidance experiments. This difference in species sensitivity may reduce the survival and reproductive potential of chinook salmon compared with that of rainbow trout in Cu-contaminated waters.

  16. Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle; Lu, Fred G.; Lerch, Jason P.; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Wong, C. Shun; Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto; Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto ; Nieman, Brian J.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

  17. Metacapacitors for LED Lighting: Metacapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-09-02

    ADEPT Project: The CUNY Energy Institute is developing less expensive, more efficient, smaller, and longer-lasting power converters for energy-efficient LED lights. LEDs produce light more efficiently than incandescent lights and last significantly longer than compact fluorescent bulbs, but they require more sophisticated power converter technology, which increases their cost. LEDs need more sophisticated converters because they require a different type of power (low voltage direct current, or DC) than what's generally supplied by power outlets. The CUNY Energy Institute is developing sophisticated power converters for LEDs that contain capacitors made from new, nanoscale materials. Capacitors are electrical components that are used to store energy. CUNY's unique capacitors are configured with advanced power circuits to more efficiently control and convert power to the LED lighting source. They also eliminate the need for large magnetic components, instead relying on networks of capacitors that can be easily printed on plastic substrate. CUNY's prototype LED power converter already meets DOE's 2020 projections for the energy efficiency of LED power converters.

  18. From Energy Audits to Home Performance: 30 Years of Articles in Home Energy Magazine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, Alan

    2014-08-11

    Home Energy Magazine has been publishing articles about residential energy efficiency for 30 years. Its goal has been to disseminate technically reliable and neutral information to the practitioners, that is, professionals in the business of home energy efficiency. The articles, editorials, letters, and advertisements are a kind of window on the evolution of energy conservation technologies, policies, and organizations. Initially, the focus was on audits and simple retrofits, such as weatherstripping and insulation. Instrumentation was sparse sometimes limited to a ruler to measure depth of attic insulation and a blower door was exotic. CFLs were heavy, awkward bulbs which might, or might not, fit in a fixture. Saving air conditioning energy was not a priority. Solar energy was only for the most adventurous. Thirty years on, the technologies and business have moved beyond just insulating attics to the larger challenge of delivering home performance and achieving zero net energy. This shift reflects the success in reducing space heating energy and the need to create a profitable industry by providing more services. The leading edge of the residential energy services market is becoming much more sophisticated, offering both efficiency and solar systems. The challenge is to continue providing relevant and reliable information in a transformed industry and a revolutionized media landscape.

  19. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... K needed for common equipment types 62 candidates: 1 halogenated alkane (R-152a) 39 halogenated olefins (e... DC Janusz Wojtusiak, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA Chemical ...

  20. Field test of a generic method for halogenated hydrocarbons: Semivost test at a chemical manufacturing facility. Final project report, August 1992-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGaughey, J.F.; Bursey, J.T.; Merrill, R.G.

    1996-11-01

    The candidate methods for semivolatile organic compounds are SW-846 Sampling Method 0010 and Analytical Method 8270, which are applicable to stationary sources. Two field tests were conducted using quadruple sampling trains with dynamic spiking were performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. The first field test was performed at a site with low levels of moisture. The second test reported here was conducted at a chemical manufacturing facility where chemical wastes were burned in a coal-fired boiler. Poor recoveries obtained for the spiked analytes at the second test were attributed to wet sorbent from the sampling train, use of methanol to effect complete transfer of wet sorbent from the sampling module, and use of extraction techniques which did not effect a complete separation of methylene chloride from methanol. A procedure to address problems with preparation of samples from Method 0010 is included in the report.

  1. EDDY RESOLVING NUTRIENT ECODYNAMICS IN THE GLOBAL PARALLEL OCEAN PROGRAM AND CONNECTIONS WITH TRACE GASES IN THE SULFUR, HALOGEN AND NMHC CYCLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. CHU; S. ELLIOTT

    2000-08-01

    Ecodynamics and the sea-air transfer of climate relevant trace gases are intimately coupled in the oceanic mixed layer. Ventilation of species such as dimethyl sulfide and methyl bromide constitutes a key linkage within the earth system. We are creating a research tool for the study of marine trace gas distributions by implementing coupled ecology-gas chemistry in the high resolution Parallel Ocean Program (POP). The fundamental circulation model is eddy resolving, with cell sizes averaging 0.15 degree (lat/long). Here we describe ecochemistry integration. Density dependent mortality and iron geochemistry have enhanced agreement with chlorophyll measurements. Indications are that dimethyl sulfide production rates must be adjusted for latitude dependence to match recent compilations. This may reflect the need for phytoplankton to conserve nitrogen by favoring sulfurous osmolytes. Global simulations are also available for carbonyl sulfide, the methyl halides and for nonmethane hydrocarbons. We discuss future applications including interaction with atmospheric chemistry models, high resolution biogeochemical snapshots and the study of open ocean fertilization.

  2. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska�s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska�s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009

  3. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for

  4. Definition and visualisation of regions of interest in post-prostatectomy image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Linda J Cox, Jennifer; Eade, Thomas; Rinks, Marianne; Kneebone, Andrew

    2014-09-15

    Standard post-prostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT) image verification uses bony anatomy alignment. However, the prostate bed (PB) moves independently of bony anatomy. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) can be used to soft tissue match, so radiation therapists (RTs) must understand pelvic anatomy and PPRT clinical target volumes (CTV). The aims of this study are to define regions of interest (ROI) to be used in soft tissue matching image guidance and determine their visibility on planning CT (PCT) and CBCT. Published CTV guidelines were used to select ROIs. The PCT scans (n = 23) and CBCT scans (n = 105) of 23 post-prostatectomy patients were reviewed. Details on ROI identification were recorded. Eighteen patients had surgical clips. All ROIs were identified on PCTs at least 90% of the time apart from mesorectal fascia (MF) (87%) due to superior image quality. When surgical clips are present, the seminal vesicle bed (SVB) was only seen in 2.3% of CBCTs and MF was unidentifiable. Most other structures were well identified on CBCT. The anterior rectal wall (ARW) was identified in 81.4% of images and penile bulb (PB) in 68.6%. In the absence of surgical clips, the MF and SVB were always identified; the ARW was identified in 89.5% of CBCTs and PB in 73.7%. Surgical clips should be used as ROIs when present to define SVB and MF. In the absence of clips, SVB, MF and ARW can be used. RTs must have a strong knowledge of soft tissue anatomy and PPRT CTV to ensure coverage and enable soft tissue matching.

  5. Sonde Adjust Value-Added Product Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troyan, D

    2012-01-09

    The Sonde Adjust (SONDEADJUST) value-added product (VAP) creates a file that includes all fields from original Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM Facility) radiosonde files and contains several value-added fields that provide adjustments related to well-known humidity issues. SONDEADJUST produces data that correct documented biases in radiosonde humidity measurements. Previous efforts towards applying some of these corrections are available via the discontinued PI product sgpsondecorr1miloC1. Unique fields contained within this datastream include smoothed original relative humidity, dry bias corrected relative humidity, and final corrected relative humidity. The smoothed RH field refines the relative humidity from integers-the resolution of the instrument-to fractions of a percent. This profile is then used to calculate the dry bias corrected field. The final correction fixes the time-lag problem and uses the dry-bias field as input into the algorithm. In addition to dry bias, solar heating is another correction that is encompassed in the final corrected RH field. Output from SONDEADJUST differs from the previous RH-corrected datastreams in important ways. First, all three types of ARM radiosondes-Vaisala RS-80, RS-90, and RS-92-are corrected using dedicated procedures and/or parameters. Second, the output variables include all of those found in the original radiosonde file: dry bulb temperature, dewpoint temperature, wind speed, wind direction, eastward wind component, northward wind component, wind status (a Vaisala-produced field used in conjunction with the Loran system), ascent rate, and original relative humidity. Additional humidity fields are smoothed relative humidity, dry biased corrected relative humidity, final ambient relative humidity, and scaled adjusted relative humidity. Third, quality control (QC) flags of the fields from the original radiosonde datastream are brought into the SONDEADJUST output file. Additional QC

  6. Hybrid Solar Lighting Provides Energy Savings and Reduces Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapsa, Melissa Voss; Maxey, L Curt; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Beshears, David L; Ward, Christina D; Parks, James Edgar

    2006-01-01

    ABSTRACT Artificial lighting is the largest component of electricity use in commercial U.S. buildings. Hybrid solar lighting (HSL) provides an exciting new means of reducing energy consumption while also delivering significant ancillary benefits associated with natural lighting in buildings. As more than half of all federal facilities are in the Sunbelt region (defined as having an average direct solar radiation of greater than 4 kWh/m2/day) and as more than half of all square footage available in federal buildings is also in the Sunbelt, HSL is an excellent technology fit for federal facilities. The HSL technology uses a rooftop, 4-ft-wide dish and secondary mirror that track the sun throughout the day (Fig. 1). The collector system focuses the sunlight onto 127 optical fibers. The fibers serve as flexible light pipes and are connected to hybrid light fixtures that have special diffusion rods that spread out the light in all directions. One collector powers about eight hybrid light fixtures-which can illuminate about 1,000 square feet. The system tracks at 0.1 accuracy, required by the two-mirror geometry to keep the focused beam on the fiber bundle. When sunlight is plentiful, the optical fibers in the luminaires provide all or most of the light needed in an area. During times of little or no sunlight, a sensor controls the intensity of the artificial lamps to maintain a desired illumination level. Unlike conventional electric lamps, the natural light produces little to no waste heat and is cool to the touch. This is because the system's solar collector removes the infrared light-the part of the spectrum that generates a lot of the heat in conventional bulbs-from the sunlight.

  7. Hydrological conditions at the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, T.L.; Pearl, R.H.; Tsai, S.Y.

    1990-08-01

    This study examined the hydrological conditions of the glacial till underlying the 317/319 Area at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) near Lemont, Illinois. The study's purpose was to review and summarize hydrological data collected by ANL's Environment, Safety, and Health Department and to characterize, based on these data, the groundwater movement and migration of potential contaminants in the area. Recommendations for further study have been made based on the findings of this review. The 317/319 Area is located between Meridian Road and the southern border of ANL. The 317 Area was commissioned in the late 1940s for the temporary storage of radioactive waste. Low- and high-level solid radioactive waste is stored in partially buried concrete vaults. Low-level radioactive waste awaiting shipment for off-site disposal is stored in aboveground steel bins north of the vaults. The 319 Area is an inactive landfill, located east of the 317 Area that was used for the disposal of general refuse, demolition debris, and laboratory equipment. Fluorescent light bulbs, chemical containers, and suspect waste were also placed in the landfill. Liquid chemical wastes were disposed of at each site in gravel-filled trenches called French drains.'' The 317/319 Area is underlain by a silty clay glacial till. Dolomite bedrock underlies the till at an average depth of about 19.5m. Organic contaminants and radionuclides have been detected in groundwater samples from wells completed in the till. Fractures in the clay as well as sand and gravel lenses present in the till could permit these contaminants to migrate downward to the dolomite aquifer. At the time of this report, no chemical quality analyses had been made on groundwater samples from the dolomite. The study found that existing information about subsurface characteristics at the site is inadequate to identify potential pathways for contaminant migration. 14 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. ADDRESSING POLLUTION PREVENTION ISSUES IN THE DESIGN OF A NEW NUCLEAR RESEARCH FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, Michael E.; Corpion, Juan; Nelson, Timothy O.

    2003-02-27

    The Chemistry and Metallurgical Research (CMR) Facility was designed in 1949 and built in 1952 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to support analytical chemistry, metallurgical studies, and actinide research and development on samples of plutonium and other nuclear materials for the Atomic Energy Commission's nuclear weapons program. These primary programmatic uses of the CMR Facility have not changed significantly since it was constructed. In 1998, a seismic fault was found to the west of the CMR Facility and projected to extend beneath two wings of the building. As part of the overall Risk Management Strategy for the CMR Facility, the Department of Energy (DOE) proposed to replace it by 2010 with what is called the CMR Facility Replacement (CMRR). In an effort to make this proposed new nuclear research facility environmentally sustainable, several pollution prevention/waste minimization initiatives are being reviewed for potential incorporation during the design phase. A two-phase approach is being adopted; the facility is being designed in a manner that integrates pollution prevention efforts, and programmatic activities are being tailored to minimize waste. Processes and procedures that reduce waste generation compared to current, prevalent processes and procedures are identified. Some of these ''best practices'' include the following: (1) recycling opportunities for spent materials; (2) replacing lithium batteries with alternate current adaptors; (3) using launderable contamination barriers in Radiological Control Areas (RCAs); (4) substituting mercury thermometers and manometers in RCAs with mercury-free devices; (5) puncturing and recycling aerosol cans; (6) using non-hazardous low-mercury fluorescent bulbs where available; (7) characterizing low-level waste as it is being generated; and (8) utilizing lead alternatives for radiological shielding. Each of these pollution prevention initiatives are being assessed for their technical validity, relevancy

  9. Sexual Function After Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Results of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegner, Ellen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@stanford.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To study the sexual quality of life for prostate cancer patients after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC)-validated quality-of-life questionnaire, the sexual function of 32 consecutive patients who received prostate SBRT in a prospective Phase II clinical trial were analyzed at baseline, and at median times of 4, 12, 20, and 50 months after treatment. SBRT consisted of 36.25 Gy in five fractions of 7.25 Gy using the Cyberknife. No androgen deprivation therapy was given. The use of erectile dysfunction (ED) medications was monitored. A comprehensive literature review for radiotherapy-alone modalities based on patient self-reported questionnaires served as historical comparison. Results: Median age at treatment was 67.5 years, and median follow-up was 35.5 months (minimum 12 months). The mean EPIC sexual domain summary score, sexual function score, and sexual bother score decreased by 45%, 49%, and 25% respectively at 50 months follow-up. These differences reached clinical relevance by 20 months after treatment. Baseline ED rate was 38% and increased to 71% after treatment (p = 0.024). Use of ED medications was 3% at baseline and progressed to 25%. For patients aged <70 years at follow-up, 60% maintained satisfactory erectile function after treatment compared with only 12% aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.008). Penile bulb dose was not associated with ED. Conclusions: The rates of ED after treatment appear comparable to those reported for other modalities of radiotherapy. Given the modest size of this study and the uncertainties in the physiology of radiotherapy-related ED, these results merit further investigations.

  10. Load determination for long cable bolt support using computer aided bolt load estimation (CABLE) program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bawden, W.F.; Moosavi, M.; Hyett, A.J.

    1996-12-01

    In this paper a numerical formulation is presented for determination of the axial load along a cable bolt for a prescribed distribution of rock mass displacement. Results using the program CABLE indicate that during excavation, the load distribution that develops along an untensioned fully grouted cable bolt depends on three main factors: (i) the properties of the cable itself, (ii) the shear force that develops due to bond at the cable-grout interface (i.e. bond stiffness), and (iii) the distribution of rock mass displacement along the cable bolt length. in general, the effect of low modulus rock and mining induced stress decreases in reducing bond strength as determined from short embedment length tests, is reflected in the development of axial loads significantly less than the ultimate tensile capacity even for long cable bolts. However, the load distribution is also dependent on the deformation distribution in the reinforced rock mass. Higher cable bolt loads will be developed for a rock mass that behaves as a discontinuum, with deformation concentrated on a few fractures, than for one which behaves as a continuum, either due to a total lack of fractures or a very high fracture density. This result suggests that the stiffness of a fully grouted cable bolt is not simply a characteristic of the bolt and grout used, but also of the deformation behavior of the ground. In other words, the same combination of bolt and grout will be stiffer if the rock behaves as a discontinuum than if it behaves as a continuum. This paper also explains the laboratory test program used to determine the constitutive behavior of the Garford bulb and Nutcase cables bolts. Details of the test setup as well as the obtained results are summarized and discussed.

  11. EXPLOSIVE NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE NEUTRINO-DRIVEN ASPHERICAL SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION OF A NON-ROTATING 15 M{sub sun} STAR WITH SOLAR METALLICITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Shin-ichiro; Kotake, Kei; Hashimoto, Masa-aki; Ono, Masaomi; Ohnishi, Naofumi

    2011-09-01

    We investigate explosive nucleosynthesis in a non-rotating 15 M{sub sun} star with solar metallicity that explodes by a neutrino-heating supernova (SN) mechanism aided by both standing accretion shock instability (SASI) and convection. To trigger explosions in our two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we approximate the neutrino transport with a simple light-bulb scheme and systematically change the neutrino fluxes emitted from the protoneutron star. By a post-processing calculation, we evaluate abundances and masses of the SN ejecta for nuclei with a mass number {<=}70, employing a large nuclear reaction network. Aspherical abundance distributions, which are observed in nearby core-collapse SN remnants, are obtained for the non-rotating spherically symmetric progenitor, due to the growth of a low-mode SASI. The abundance pattern of the SN ejecta is similar to that of the solar system for models whose masses range between (0.4-0.5) M{sub sun} of the ejecta from the inner region ({<=}10, 000 km) of the precollapse core. For the models, the explosion energies and the {sup 56}Ni masses are {approx_equal} 10{sup 51}erg and (0.05-0.06) M{sub sun}, respectively; their estimated baryonic masses of the neutron star are comparable to the ones observed in neutron-star binaries. These findings may have little uncertainty because most of the ejecta is composed of matter that is heated via the shock wave and has relatively definite abundances. The abundance ratios for Ne, Mg, Si, and Fe observed in the Cygnus loop are reproduced well with the SN ejecta from an inner region of the 15 M{sub sun} progenitor.

  12. Bridgman Growth of Large SrI2:Eu2+ Single Crystals: A High-performance Scintillator for Radiation Detection Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boatner, Lynn A; Ramey, Joanne Oxendine; Kolopus, James A; Hawrami, Rastgo; Higgins, William; Van Loef, Edgar; Glodo, J.; Shah, Kanai; Bhattacharya, P.; Tupitsyn, E; Groza, Michael; Burger, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    Single-crystal strontium iodide (SrI2) doped with relatively high levels (e.g., 3 - 6 %) of Eu2+ exhibits characteristics that make this material superior, in a number of respects, to other scintillators that are currently used for radiation detection. Specifically, SrI2:Eu2+ has a light yield that is significantly higher than LaBr3:Ce3+ -a currently employed commercial high-performance scintillator. Additionally, SrI2:Eu2+ is characterized by an energy resolution as high as 2.6% at the 137Cs gamma-ray energy of 662 keV, and there is no radioactive component in SrI2:Eu2+ - unlike LaBr3:Ce3+ that contains 138La. The Ce3+-doped LaBr3 decay time is, however, faster (30 nsec) than the 1.2 sec decay time of SrI2:Eu2+. Due to the relatively low melting point of strontium iodide (~515 oC), crystal growth can be carried out in quartz crucibles by the vertical Bridgman technique. Materials-processing and crystal-growth techniques that are specific to the Bridgman growth of europium-doped strontium iodide scintillators are described here. These techniques include the use of a porous quartz frit to physically filter the molten salt from a quartz antechamber into the Bridgman growth crucible and the use of a bent or bulb grain selector design to suppress multiple grain growth. Single crystals of SrI2:Eu2+ scintillators with good optical quality and scintillation characteristics have been grown in sizes up to 5.0 cm in diameter by applying these techniques. Other aspects of the SrI2:Eu2+ crystal-growth methods and of the still unresolved crystal-growth issues are described here.

  13. Nuclear Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkins-Duffin, C E

    2008-12-10

    With an explosion equivalent of about 20kT of TNT, the Trinity test was the first demonstration of a nuclear weapon. Conducted on July 16, 1945 in Alamogordo, NM this site is now a Registered National Historic Landmark. The concept and applicability of nuclear power was demonstrated on December 20, 1951 with the Experimental Breeder Reactor Number One (EBR-1) lit four light bulbs. This reactor is now a Registered National Historic Landmark, located near Arco, ID. From that moment forward it had been clearly demonstrated that nuclear energy has both peaceful and military applications and that the civilian and military fuel cycles can overlap. For the more than fifty years since the Atoms for Peace program, a key objective of nuclear policy has been to enable the wider peaceful use of nuclear energy while preventing the spread of nuclear weapons. Volumes have been written on the impact of these two actions on the world by advocates and critics; pundits and practioners; politicians and technologists. The nations of the world have woven together a delicate balance of treaties, agreements, frameworks and handshakes that are representative of the timeframe in which they were constructed and how they have evolved in time. Collectively these vehicles attempt to keep political will, nuclear materials and technology in check. This paper captures only the briefest abstract of the more significant aspects on the Nonproliferation Regime. Of particular relevance to this discussion is the special nonproliferation sensitivity associated with the uranium isotope separation and spent fuel reprocessing aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  14. Eco-efficient waste glass recycling: Integrated waste management and green product development through LCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blengini, Gian Andrea, E-mail: blengini@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); CNR-IGAG, Institute of Environmental Geology and Geo-Engineering, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Busto, Mirko, E-mail: mirko.busto@polito.it [DISPEA - Department of Production Systems and Business Economics, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fantoni, Moris, E-mail: moris.fantoni@polito.it [DITAG - Department of Land, Environment and Geo-Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Fino, Debora, E-mail: debora.fino@polito.it [DISMIC - Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new eco-efficient recycling route for post-consumer waste glass was implemented. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integrated waste management and industrial production are crucial to green products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Most of the waste glass rejects are sent back to the glass industry. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recovered co-products give more environmental gains than does avoided landfill. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Energy intensive recycling must be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled. - Abstract: As part of the EU Life + NOVEDI project, a new eco-efficient recycling route has been implemented to maximise resources and energy recovery from post-consumer waste glass, through integrated waste management and industrial production. Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used to identify engineering solutions to sustainability during the development of green building products. The new process and the related LCA are framed within a meaningful case of industrial symbiosis, where multiple waste streams are utilised in a multi-output industrial process. The input is a mix of rejected waste glass from conventional container glass recycling and waste special glass such as monitor glass, bulbs and glass fibres. The green building product is a recycled foam glass (RFG) to be used in high efficiency thermally insulating and lightweight concrete. The environmental gains have been contrasted against induced impacts and improvements have been proposed. Recovered co-products, such as glass fragments/powders, plastics and metals, correspond to environmental gains that are higher than those related to landfill avoidance, whereas the latter is cancelled due to increased transportation distances. In accordance to an eco-efficiency principle, it has been highlighted that recourse to highly energy intensive recycling should be limited to waste that cannot be closed-loop recycled.

  15. Analysis of climatic conditions and preliminary assessment of alternative cooling strategies for houses in California transition climate zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.J.; Zhang, H.

    1995-07-01

    This is a preliminary scoping study done as part of the {open_quotes}Alternatives to Compressive Cooling in California Transition Climates{close_quotes} project, which has the goal of demonstrating that houses in the transitional areas between the coast and the Central Valley of California do not require air-conditioning if they are properly designed and operated. The first part of this report analyzes the climate conditions within the transitional areas, with emphasis on design rather than seasonal conditions. Transitional climates are found to be milder but more variable than those further inland. The design temperatures under the most stringent design criteria, e.g. 0.1 % annual, are similar to those in the Valley, but significantly lower under more relaxed design criteria, e.g., 2% annual frequency. Transition climates also have large day-night temperature swings, indicating significant potential for night cooling, and wet-bulb depressions in excess of 25 F, indicating good potential for evaporative cooling. The second part of the report is a preliminary assessment using DOE-2 computer simulations of the effectiveness of alternative cooling and control strategies in improving indoor comfort conditions in two conventional Title-24 houses modeled in various transition climate locations. The cooling measures studied include increased insulation, light colors, low-emissivity glazing, window overhangs, and exposed floor slab. The control strategies studied include natural and mechanical ventilation, and direct and two-stage evaporative cooling. The results indicate the cooling strategies all have limited effectiveness, and need to be combined to produce significant improvements in indoor comfort. Natural and forced ventilation provide similar improvements in indoor conditions, but during peak cooling periods, these will still be above the comfort zone. Two-stage evaporative coolers can maintain indoor comfort at all hours, but not so direct evaporative coolers.

  16. Nuclear Solid Waste Processing Design at the Idaho Spent Fuels Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dippre, M. A.

    2003-02-25

    A spent nuclear fuels (SNF) repackaging and storage facility was designed for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), with nuclear solid waste processing capability. Nuclear solid waste included contaminated or potentially contaminated spent fuel containers, associated hardware, machinery parts, light bulbs, tools, PPE, rags, swabs, tarps, weld rod, and HEPA filters. Design of the nuclear solid waste processing facilities included consideration of contractual, regulatory, ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) exposure, economic, logistical, and space availability requirements. The design also included non-attended transfer methods between the fuel packaging area (FPA) (hot cell) and the waste processing area. A monitoring system was designed for use within the FPA of the facility, to pre-screen the most potentially contaminated fuel canister waste materials, according to contact- or non-contact-handled capability. Fuel canister waste materials which are not able to be contact-handled after attempted decontamination will be processed remotely and packaged within the FPA. Noncontact- handled materials processing includes size-reduction, as required to fit into INEEL permitted containers which will provide sufficient additional shielding to allow contact handling within the waste areas of the facility. The current design, which satisfied all of the requirements, employs mostly simple equipment and requires minimal use of customized components. The waste processing operation also minimizes operator exposure and operator attendance for equipment maintenance. Recently, discussions with the INEEL indicate that large canister waste materials can possibly be shipped to the burial facility without size-reduction. New waste containers would have to be designed to meet the drop tests required for transportation packages. The SNF waste processing facilities could then be highly simplified, resulting in capital equipment cost savings, operational

  17. Energy Efficiency Through Lighting Upgrades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berst, Kara; Howeth, Maria

    2013-02-26

    Lighting upgrades including neon to LED, incandescent to CFL's and T-12 to T-8 and T-5's were completed through this grant. A total of 16 Chickasaw nation facilities decreased their carbon footprint because of these grant funds. Calculations used were based on comparing the energy usage from the previous year's average and the current energy usage. For facilities without a full year's set of energy bills, the month after installation was compared to the same month from the previous year. Overall, the effect the lighting change-outs had for the gaming centers and casinos far exceeded expectations. For the Madill Gaming Center; both an interior and exterior upgrade was performed which resulted in a 31% decrease in energy consumption. This same reduction was seen in every facility that participated in the grant. Just by simply changing out light bulbs to newer energy efficient equivalents, a decrease in energy usage can be achieved and this was validated by the return on investment seen at Chickasaw Nation facilities. Along with the technical project tasks were awareness sessions presented at Chickasaw Head Starts. The positive message of environmental stewardship was passed down to head start students and passed along to Chickasaw employees. Excitement was created in those that learned what they could do to help reduce their energy bills and many followed through and took the idea home. For a fairy low cost, the general public can also use this technique to lower their energy consumption both at home and at work. Although the idea behind the project was somewhat simple, true benefits have been gained through environmental awareness and reductions of energy costs.

  18. Preliminary research on overmoded high-power millimeter-wave Cerenkov generator with dual-cavity reflector in low guiding magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Hu; Wu, Ping; Chen, Changhua; Ning, Hui; Tan, Weibing; Teng, Yan; Shi, Yanchao; Song, Zhimin; Cao, Yibing; Du, Zhaoyu

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents preliminary research on a V-band overmoded Cerenkov generator with dual-cavity reflector operating in a low guiding magnetic field. It is found that the fluctuation of the electron envelope in the low guiding magnetic field can be predicted using an equivalent coaxial model of a foilless diode, and a dual-cavity reflector based on the model matching method can provide strong reflection at the front end of the overmoded structures so that any microwave power that leaks into the diode region can be effectively suppressed. Numerical simulations indicate that the control of the beam envelope and the use of the dual-cavity reflector ease generator operation in the low guiding magnetic field. In the experimental research, the fluctuation of the annular electron beam with the outer radius of 7.5 mm measures approximately 0.7 mm, which is in good agreement with the theoretical results. The disturbance caused by power leaking from the overmoded slow wave structure is eliminated by the dual-cavity reflector. With accurate fabrication and assembly processes, an operating frequency of 61.6 GHz is attained by the fifth harmonic heterodyne method, and the output power is measured to be approximately 123 MW by the far-field measurement method at a diode voltage of 445 kV, a beam current of 4.45 kA, and under a guiding magnetic field of 1.45 T. The output mode is measured using an array of neon flash bulbs, and the pulse shortening phenomenon is both observed and analyzed.

  19. Occupational exposure in the fluorescent lamp recycling sector in France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmermann, François Lecler, Marie-Thérèse; Clerc, Frédéric; Chollot, Alain; Silvente, Eric; Grosjean, Jérome

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Chemical risks were assessed in the five fluorescent lamp recycling facilities. • The main hazardous agents are mercury vapors and dust containing lead and yttrium. • Exposure and pollutant levels were correlated with steps and processes. • All the stages and processes are concerned by worrying levels of pollutants. • We suggest recommendations to reduce chemical risk. - Abstract: The fluorescent lamp recycling sector is growing considerably in Europe due to increasingly strict regulations aimed at inciting the consumption of low energy light bulbs and their end-of-life management. Chemical risks were assessed in fluorescent lamp recycling facilities by field measurement surveys in France, highlighting that occupational exposure and pollutant levels in the working environment were correlated with the main recycling steps and processes. The mean levels of worker exposure are 4.4 mg/m{sup 3}, 15.4 μg/m{sup 3}, 14.0 μg/m{sup 3}, 247.6 μg/m{sup 3}, respectively, for total inhalable dust, mercury, lead and yttrium. The mean levels of airborne pollutants are 3.1 mg/m{sup 3}, 9.0 μg/m{sup 3}, 9.0 μg/m{sup 3}, 219.2 μg/m{sup 3}, respectively, for total inhalable dust, mercury, lead and yttrium. The ranges are very wide. Surface samples from employees’ skin and granulometric analysis were also carried out. The overview shows that all the stages and processes involved in lamp recycling are concerned by the risk of hazardous substances penetrating into the bodies of employees, although exposure of the latter varies depending on the processes and tasks they perform. The conclusion of this study strongly recommends the development of a new generation of processes in parallel with more information sharing and regulatory measures.

  20. Western Area Power Administration annual site environmental report for calendar year 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-12-31

    This document outlines the accomplishments and status of the environmental program of the Western Area Power Administration (Western) for calendar year 2005. In 2005, Western submitted 190 reports to state and local emergency response personnel and had 60 California Hazardous Materials Business Plans in place as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act. These reports identify the hazardous substances contained at these sites. At sites where potential oil spills could harm surrounding ecosystems and waterways, Western prepares Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure (SPCC) plans. These plans identify measures to prevent spills from harming the environment, such as identifying the need for secondary containment at facilities. Western currently has SPCC plans for 154 facilities in 13 states. In 2005, Western updated 19 SPCC plans and prepared one new plan. Western operated under 107 environmental permits in 2005. Western evaluates the impact of its planned actions on the environment by preparing National Environmental Policy Act documentation. In 2005, Western completed or was working on 60 categorical exclusions, 18 environmental assessments and eight environmental impact statements, issued six Findings of No Significant Impact, and prepared four Mitigation Action Plans. Western held several public workshops/meetings and consulted with 70 American Indian Tribes for various projects. In 2005, Western was working on or had completed 11 Section 7 consultations under the Endangered Species Act. In 2005, Western recycled more than 3,600 metric tons of electrical equipment, mineral oil dielectric fluid, asphalt, fluorescent and metal halide light bulbs, wood poles and crossarms, and other items as well as office waste. Western made $437,816 worth of purchases containing recovered content materials. Western met the requirement of Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government through Leadership in Environmental Management to have its

  1. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is

  2. Solid bromine complexers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ)

    1987-01-20

    The cell of the invention comprises a housing, a zinc or cadmium anode, a chemically non-reactive counterelectrode and cathodic halogen. The cathodic halogen is selected from chlorine and bromine, and preferably is bromine. The cell also is provided with an aqueous metal halide containing electrolyte in which the metal ions are of the same metal as the metal of the anode and halide anions are of the same halogen as the cathodic halogen material. Importantly, in the present invention, anion exchange resins provide a convenient means for storing the halogen generated during charging of the cell and providing a source of halogen to be used in the discharge of the cell.

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/18-VT-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Rebuttable presumption for used oil. Used oil containing more than 1000 ppm total halogens is presumed to be a hazardous waste because it has been mixed with halogenated...

  4. Georgia Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    or halogen: 6.50 LED lamp replacing incandescent or halogen: 9 Lighting Occupancy Sensor: 7 Lighting Daylight Sensor: 25 SplitPackaged Air Conditioners: 20-30ton Split...

  5. Potential trace element emissions from the gasification of Illinois...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MATERIALS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; DIAGRAMS; EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GASIFICATION; GREAT LAKES REGION; HALOGENS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; METALS; ...

  6. Reducing the environmental impact on solid wastes from a fluidized...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHLORIDES; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; COMBUSTION; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; MANAGEMENT; OXIDATION; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; ...

  7. Basic energy properties of electrolytic solutions database. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY; VISCOSITY; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; CHLORIDES; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; DISPERSIONS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; MIXTURES; SODIUM COMPOUNDS; SOLUTIONS; ...

  8. Thermal conductivity of aqueous NaCl solutions from 20°C to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; ... FLUIDS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MIXTURES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; ...

  9. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; AIR CONDITIONING; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DEMONSTRATION PROGRAMS; DESIGN; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; FEEDBACK; HALOGENS; ...

  10. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z.; Zhamu, Aruna

    2011-02-22

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  11. Method of producing nano-scaled graphene and inorganic platelets and their nanocomposites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jang, Bor Z.; Zhamu, Aruna

    2012-02-14

    Disclosed is a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., graphite and graphite oxide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm, and often between 0.34 nm and 1.02 nm. The method comprises: (a) subjecting the layered material in a powder form to a halogen vapor at a first temperature above the melting point or sublimation point of the halogen at a sufficient vapor pressure and for a duration of time sufficient to cause the halogen molecules to penetrate an interlayer space of the layered material, forming a stable halogen-intercalated compound; and (b) heating the halogen-intercalated compound at a second temperature above the boiling point of the halogen, allowing halogen atoms or molecules residing in the interlayer space to exfoliate the layered material to produce the platelets. Alternatively, rather than heating, step (a) is followed by a step of dispersing the halogen-intercalated compound in a liquid medium which is subjected to ultrasonication for exfoliating the halogen-intercalated compound to produce the platelets, which are dispersed in the liquid medium. The halogen can be readily captured and re-used, thereby significantly reducing the impact of halogen to the environment. The method can further include a step of dispersing the platelets in a polymer or monomer solution or suspension as a precursor step to nanocomposite fabrication.

  12. Prediction of Lumen Output and Chromaticity Shift in LEDs Using Kalman Filter and Extended Kalman Filter Based Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Wei, Junchao; Davis, J Lynn

    2014-06-24

    Abstract— Solid-state lighting (SSL) luminaires containing light emitting diodes (LEDs) have the potential of seeing excessive temperatures when being transported across country or being stored in non-climate controlled warehouses. They are also being used in outdoor applications in desert environments that see little or no humidity but will experience extremely high temperatures during the day. This makes it important to increase our understanding of what effects high temperature exposure for a prolonged period of time will have on the usability and survivability of these devices. Traditional light sources “burn out” at end-of-life. For an incandescent bulb, the lamp life is defined by B50 life. However, the LEDs have no filament to “burn”. The LEDs continually degrade and the light output decreases eventually below useful levels causing failure. Presently, the TM-21 test standard is used to predict the L70 life of LEDs from LM-80 test data. Several failure mechanisms may be active in a LED at a single time causing lumen depreciation. The underlying TM-21 Model may not capture the failure physics in presence of multiple failure mechanisms. Correlation of lumen maintenance with underlying physics of degradation at system-level is needed. In this paper, Kalman Filter (KF) and Extended Kalman Filters (EKF) have been used to develop a 70-percent Lumen Maintenance Life Prediction Model for LEDs used in SSL luminaires. Ten-thousand hour LM-80 test data for various LEDs have been used for model development. System state at each future time has been computed based on the state space at preceding time step, system dynamics matrix, control vector, control matrix, measurement matrix, measured vector, process noise and measurement noise. The future state of the lumen depreciation has been estimated based on a second order Kalman Filter model and a Bayesian Framework. Life prediction of L70 life for the LEDs used in SSL luminaires from KF and EKF based models have

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 224: Decon Pad and Septic Systems, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2007-10-01

    the form of fluorescent light bulbs; and approximately 0.5 yd{sup 3} of low-level waste in the form of a radiologically impacted fire hose rack were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of laboratory analysis and field screening to guide the extent of excavations, were employed during the performance of closure work.

  14. WE-D-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; Naqa, I El

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It has been realized that inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability is a multifactorial process involving dosimetric, clinical, and genetic factors. Therefore, we explore a new framework to integrate physical, clinical, and biological data denoted as radiogenomic modeling. In demonstrating the feasibility of this work, we investigate the association of genetic variants (copy number variations [CNVs] and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) with radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) while taking into account dosimetric and clinical variables in prostate cancer patients treated with curative irradiation. Methods: A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) was retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs25489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Dosevolume metrics were extracted from treatment plans of 54 patients who had complete dosimetric profiles. Treatment outcomes were considered to be a Result of functional mapping of radiogenomic input variables according to a logit transformation. Model orders were estimated using resampling by leave-one out cross-validation (LOO-CV). Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and LOO-CV. For continuous univariate dosimetric and clinical variables, Spearmans rank coefficients were calculated and p-values reported accordingly. In the case of binary variables, Chi-squared statistics and contingency table calculations were used. Results: Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ2=14.6 [p<0.001] and ED: χ2=4.88[p=0.0272]) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ2=0.278[p=0.599] and ED: χ2=0.112[p=0.732]). LOO-CV identified penile bulb D60 as the only significant QUANTEC predictor (rs=0.312 [p=0.0145]) for ED. Radiogenomic modeling yielded statistically significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (rs=0.243[p=0.0443], AUC=0.665) and ED (rs=0.276[p=0

  15. Thermokarst lake methanogenesis along a complete talik profile

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heslop, J. K.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Bondurant, A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, M. C.

    2015-07-24

    Thermokarst (thaw) lakes emit methane (CH4) to the atmosphere formed from thawed permafrost organic matter (OM), but the relative magnitude of CH4 production in surface lake sediments vs. deeper thawed permafrost horizons is not well understood. We assessed anaerobic CH4 production potentials from various depths along a 590 cm long lake sediment core that captured the entire sediment package of the talik (thaw bulb) beneath the center of an interior Alaska thermokarst lake, Vault Lake, and the top 40 cm of thawing permafrost beneath the talik. We also studied the adjacent Vault Creek permafrost tunnel that extends through ice-rich yedomamore » permafrost soils surrounding the lake and into underlying gravel. Our results showed CH4 production potentials were highest in the organic-rich surface lake sediments, which were 151 cm thick (mean ± SD: 5.95 ± 1.67 μg C–CH4 g dw-1 d-1; 125.9 ± 36.2 μg C–CH4 g C−1org d-1). High CH4 production potentials were also observed in recently thawed permafrost (1.18 ± 0.61 μg C–CH4g dw-1 d-1; 59.60± 51.5 μg C–CH4 g C−1org d-1) at the bottom of the talik, but the narrow thicknesses (43 cm) of this horizon limited its overall contribution to total sediment column CH4 production in the core. Lower rates of CH4 production were observed in sediment horizons representing permafrost that has been thawing in the talik for a longer period of time. No CH4 production was observed in samples obtained from the permafrost tunnel, a non-lake environment. Our findings imply that CH4 production is highly variable in thermokarst lake systems and that both modern OM supplied to surface sediments and ancient OM supplied to both surface and deep lake sediments by in situ thaw and shore erosion of yedoma permafrost are important to lake CH4 production.« less

  16. SU-E-T-77: Comparison of 2D and 3D Gamma Analysis in Patient-Specific QA for Prostate VMAT Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clemente, F; Perez, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Patient-specific QA procedures for IMRT and VMAT are traditionally performed by comparing TPS calculations with measured single point values and plane dose distributions by means of gamma analysis. New QA devices permit us to calculate 3D dose distributions on patient anatomy as redundant secondary check and reconstruct it from measurements taken with 2D and 3D detector arrays. 3D dose calculations allow us to perform DVH-based comparisons with clinical relevance, as well as 3D gamma analysis. One of these systems (Compass, IBA Dosimetry) combines traditional 2D with new anatomical-based 3D gamma analysis. This work shows the ability of this system by comparing 2D and 3D gamma analysis in pre-treatment QA for several VMAT prostate plans. Methods: Compass is capable of calculating dose as secondary check from DICOM TPS data and reconstructing it from measurements taken by a 2D ion chamber array (MatriXX Evolution, IBA Dosimetry). Both 2D and 3D gamma tests are available to compare calculated and reconstructed dose in Compass with TPS RT Dose. Results: 15 VMAT prostate plans have been measured with Compass. Dose is reconstructed with Compass for these plans. 2D gamma comparisons can be done for any plane from dose matrix. Mean gamma passing rates for isocenter planes (axial, coronal, sagittal) are (99.70.2)%, (99.90.1)%, (99.90.1)% for reconstructed dose planes. 3D mean gamma passing rates are (98.51.7)% for PTVs, (99.11.5)% for rectum, (100.00.0)% for bladder, (99.60.7)% for femoral heads and (98.14.1)% for penile bulb. Conclusion: Compass is a powerful tool to perform a complete pre-treatment QA analysis, from 2D techniques to 3D DVH-based techniques with clinical relevance. All reported values for VMAT prostate plans are in good agreement with TPS values. This system permits us to ensure the accuracy in the delivery of VMAT treatments completing a full patient-specific QA program.

  17. Thermokarst-lake methanogenesis along a complete talik profile

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Heslop, J. K.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.; Bondurant, A.; Grosse, G.; Jones, M. C.

    2015-03-24

    Thermokarst (thaw) lakes emit methane (CH4) to the atmosphere formed from thawed permafrost organic matter (OM), but the relative magnitude of CH4 production in surface lake sediments vs. deeper thawed permafrost horizons is not well understood. We assessed anaerobic CH4 production potentials from various depths along a 590 cm long lake sediment core that captured the entire sediment package of the talik (thaw bulb) beneath the center of an interior Alaska thermokarst lake, Vault Lake, and the top 40 cm of thawing permafrost beneath the talik. We also studied the adjacent Vault Creek permafrost tunnel that extends through ice-rich yedomamore » permafrost soils surrounding the lake and into underlying gravel. Our results showed CH4 production potentials were highest in the organic-rich surface lake sediments, which were 151 cm thick (mean ± SD 5.95 ± 1.67 μg C-CH4 g dw-1 d-1; 125.9± 36.2 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1). High CH4 production potentials were also observed in recently-thawed permafrost (1.18± 0.61 μg C-CH4g dw-1 d-1; 59.60± 51.5 μg C-CH4 g C-1org d-1) at the bottom of the talik, but the narrow thicknesses (43 cm) of this horizon limited its overall contribution to total sediment column CH4 production in the core. Lower rates of CH4 production were observed in sediment horizons representing permafrost that has been thawed in the talik for longer periods of time. No CH4 production was observed in samples obtained from the permafrost tunnel, a non-lake environment. Our findings imply that CH4 production is highly variable in thermokarst-lake systems and that both modern OM supplied to surface sediments and ancient OM supplied to both surface and deep lake sediments by in situ thaw as well as shore erosion of yedoma permafrost are important to lake CH4 production.« less

  18. B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Guidelines...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emitting Diodes, most commonly referred to as CFLs and LEDs, respectively. Although Halogens are more efficient than incandescents, we ultimately want to turn customers towards...

  19. Microwave Plasma Monitoring System For Real-Time Elemental Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis The invention apparatus can also be used to monitor for the presence of halogens, sulfur and silicon. Available for Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Microwave...

  20. DOE Publishes GATEWAY Report on Successful LED Wall Washer Retrofit...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    while retaining the quality of light when LED modules replaced 87 halogen lamps in existing wall washers at the University of Maryland's (UMD) Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. ...

  1. Savannah River Site - Sanitary Landfill | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Name: Sanitary Landfill Remediation Contractor: Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present?: Yes ...

  2. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L3

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All...

  3. Incan-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Area Lit by Each Type of Light Floorspace (million square feet) Incan- descent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  4. Incan-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Floorspace (million square feet) Incan- descent Standard Fluor- escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  5. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All...

  6. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Table L2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Any Lighting Lighted Area Only Area Lit by Each Type of Light Incan- descent Standard Fluor-escent Compact Fluor- escent High Intensity Discharge Halogen All Buildings*...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (1) deposition (1) elements (1) encapsulation (1) fabrication (1) films (1) gold (1) gold chlorides (1) gold compounds (1) halides (1) halogen compounds (1) iron alloys (1) ...

  8. Sorbents for the oxidation and removal of mercury (Patent) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The sorbent comprises a new modified carbon form containing reactive forms of halogen and halides. Optional components may be added to increase reactivity and mercury capacity. ...

  9. http://www.em.doe.gov/Pages/groundwaterReport.aspx?plumeCode...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plume) Remediation Contractor: SM Stoller Corp Report Last Updated: 2009 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present? Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver Cleanup...

  10. A-1 APPENDIX A DEFINITION OF TERMS AND ACRONYMS Acronyms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of radioactive materials; each radionuclide has a characteristic constant half-life. Halogenated Hydrocarbons: Organic compounds containing atoms such as chlorine, fluorine,...

  11. Savannah River Site - A/M Area Groundwater | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Nuclear Solutions, LLC PBS Number: 30 Report Last Updated: 2013 Contaminants Halogenated VOCsSVOCs Present?: Yes VOC Name Concentration (ppb) Regulatory Driver...

  12. A Key Enzyme to the Potency of an Anticancer Agent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    structural similarities between SalL and flurorinase could lead to new halogenation pathways and more effective drug treatment strategies. Closeup view of SalL's...

  13. Crystal Structure of Iron-dependent Halogenase

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agents (rebeccamycin and calichemycin), and human thyroid hormone (thyroxine).2 Halogenation is essential to the biological activity and chemical reactivity of such compounds,...

  14. Microsoft Word - SyrB2.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    agents (rebeccamycin and calichemycin), and human thyroid hormone (thyroxine). 2 Halogenation is essential to the biological activity and chemical reactivity of such compounds,...

  15. Particle generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  16. Optimal Synthesis of a Pulverized Coal Power Plant with Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash R. Kotecha; Juan M. Salazar; Stephen Zitney

    2009-01-01

    is the closed-loop steam-based (Rankine) power cycles. These plants need to condense large quantities of low-pressure steam back to water so that it can be reused to produce high pressure steam. However, this requires the removal of large quantities of heat from the low pressure steam in the condensation process. This is usually done by transferring the heat to cooling water, which in turn transfers this heat to the environment by evaporation to the atmosphere. Also, the inclusion of a carbon capture process can increase the raw water usage by as much as 95 percent. In this work, we use heat exchanger network synthesis followed by an optimization approach to process synthesis for developing strategies for reducing water use in a supercritical PC power plant with a carbon capture and compression system. Uncertainties associated with dry bulb temperature, relative humidity, and demand will also be considered in this analysis.

  17. Failure Mode Classification for Life Prediction Modeling of Solid-State Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakalaukus, Peter Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Since the passing of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, the U.S. government has mandated greater energy independence which has acted as a catalyst for accelerating and facilitating research efforts toward the development and deployment of market-driven solutions for energy-saving homes, buildings and manufacturing, as well as sustainable transportation and renewable electricity generation. As part of this effort, an emphasis toward advancing solid-state lighting technology through research, development, demonstration, and commercial applications is assisting in the phase out of the common incandescent light bulb, as well as developing a more economical lighting source that is less toxic than compact fluorescent lighting. This has led lighting manufacturers to pursue SSL technologies for a wide range of consumer lighting applications. An SSL luminaire’s lifetime can be characterized in terms of lumen maintenance life. Lumen maintenance or lumen depreciation is the percentage decrease in the relative luminous flux from that of the original, pristine luminous flux value. Lumen maintenance life is the estimated operating time, in hours, when the desired failure threshold is projected to be reached at normal operating conditions. One accepted failure threshold of SSL luminaires is lumen maintenance of 70% -- a 30% reduction in the light output of the luminaire. Currently, the only approved lighting standard that puts forth a recommendation for long-term luminous flux maintenance projections towards a specified failure threshold of an SSL luminaire is the IES TM-28-14 (TM28) standard. iii TM28 was derived as a means to compare luminaires that have been tested at different facilities, research labs or companies. TM28 recommends the use of the Arrhenius equation to determine SSL device specific reaction rates from thermally driven failure mechanisms used to characterize a single failure mode – the relative change in the luminous flux output or

  18. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 566: EMAD Compound, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada with ROTC-1, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Krauss

    2011-06-01

    lead shot • PCB-contaminated soil • Radiologically contaminated filters and equipment • Fuels, lubricants, engine coolants, and oils • Lead debris • Electrical and lighting components assumed to be potential source materials, including - fluorescent light bulbs - mercury switches (thermostats) - circuit boards - PCB-containing ballasts Closure of CAU 566 was achieved through a combination of removal activities and closure in place. Corrective actions to remove COCs, and known and assumed potential source materials, were implemented as was practical. The PCBs remaining at the site are bounded laterally, but not vertically, within CAS 25-99-20 based upon step-out sampling; the sources (e.g., PCB transformer oils, diesel fuel from locomotive reservoirs) have been removed; the practice of the application of PCB-containing oils for soil stabilization has ceased; and the COCs are not readily mobile in the environment. Closure in place is necessary, and future land use of the site will be restricted from intrusive activities. This will effectively eliminate inadvertent contact by humans with the contaminated media. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: • No further corrective action is required at CAS 25-99-20. • Closure in place of CAS 25-99-20. • A use restriction is required at CAU 566. • A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 566. • Corrective Action Unit 566 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

  19. Analysis of the Chinese Market for Building Energy Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Shi, Qing

    2014-03-20

    China will account for about half of the new construction globally in the coming decade. Its floorspace doubled from 1996 to 2011, and Chinese rural buildings alone have as much floorspace as all of U.S. residential buildings. Building energy consumption has also grown, increasing by over 40% since 1990. To curb building energy demand, the Chinese government has launched a series of policies and programs. Combined, this growth in buildings and renovations, along with the policies to promote green buildings, are creating a large market for energy efficiency products and services. This report assesses the impact of China’s policies on building energy efficiency and on the market for energy efficiency in the future. The first chapter of this report introduces the trends in China, drawing on both historical analysis, and detailed modeling of the drivers behind changes in floorspace and building energy demand such as economic and population growth, urbanization, policy. The analysis describes the trends by region, building type and energy service. The second chapter discusses China’s policies to promote green buildings. China began developing building energy codes in the 1980s. Over time, the central government has increased the stringency of the code requirements and the extent of enforcement. The codes are mandatory in all new buildings and major renovations in China’s cities, and they have been a driving force behind the expansion of China’s markets for insulation, efficient windows, and other green building materials. China also has several other important policies to encourage efficient buildings, including the Three-Star Rating System (somewhat akin to LEED), financial incentives tied to efficiency, appliance standards, a phasing out of incandescent bulbs and promotion of efficient lighting, and several policies to encourage retrofits in existing buildings. In the third chapter, we take “deep dives” into the trends affecting key building components

  20. Use Patterns of LED Flashlights in Kenya and a One-Year Cost Analysis of Flashlight Ownership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tracy, Jennifer; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-02-16

    Flashlight usage is widespread across much of sub-Saharan Africa.1 In Kenya in particular, over half of all households report owning a flashlight (Kamfor, 2002). Aside from household use, flashlights are also widely used to perform income-earning jobs in Kenya. Lumina Research Note No.4, the first report in this series documenting flashlight use in Kenya, highlights flashlight use patterns of night watchmen and bicycle taxi drivers. Both of these are occupations that rely on the use of flashlights on a nightly basis (Tracy et al., 2009). Also highlighted by Research Note No.4, flashlight users in Kenya have reported being highly dissatisfied with the quality of the low-cost LED flashlights that are available, and they identify several reoccurring problems they have faced as flashlight end-users (Tracy et al., 2009). The fact that there exists a substantial dependency upon flashlights in Kenya and that users are disgruntled with the available products suggests reasons for concern about flashlight quality. This concern is present despite two recent technological transitions in the flashlight market. First, LED technology has quickly emerged as the dominant source of portable lighting in Kenya, outpacing incandescent flashlights (Johnstone et al., 2009). LED technology has the potential to provide efficiency and performance benefits relative to incandescent bulbs, and low-cost LEDs have achieved price levels that make them cost competitive with conventional lighting sources for a number of applications (Mills, 2005). Second, rechargeable sealed-lead acid (SLA) batteries are also becoming more prevalent alternatives to disposable dry cell batteries. Flashlights using rechargeable SLA batteries tend to have a lower total cost of ownership over a two-year period than a flashlight using dry cell batteries (Radecsky, 2009); however, as this current report highlights, this may vary depending on the intensity of use patterns. To avoid a potential market spoiling effect for

  1. Pyrrolo isoquinolines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goodman, Mark M.; Shi, Bing Z.

    2000-01-01

    Compounds of the formula: ##STR1## wherein X, Y, and R, independently of one another, is each a H; halogen, wherein said halogen is selected from the group consisting of .sup.123 I, .sup.124 I, .sup.125 I, .sup.131 I, .sup.75 Br, .sup.76 Br, .sup.77 Br, .sup.82 Br, .sup.18 F, or .sup.210 At; small alkyl, small alkenyl, or small alkynyl, any of which contains from one to about six carbon atoms and optionally having a carbon atom replaced by an O or S; or halogen substituted-small alkyl, halogen substituted-small alkenyl, or halogen substituted-small alkynyl wherein said compound contains at least one radioacitve halogen. The compounds bind to the serotonin transporter. Depending upon the choice of halogen substituent, the compounds are useful for PET or SPECT imaging, diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and other conditions associated with defects of serotonin transporter function.

  2. METHOD AND MEANS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shulte, J.W.; Suttle, J.F.

    1958-02-18

    This patent relates to a method and device for determining quantities of gamma radiation and x radiation by exposing to such radiation a mature of a purified halogenated hydrocarbon chosen from the class consisting of chloroform, bromoform, tetrachloroethane and 1,1,2trichloroethane, and a minor quantity of a sensitizer chosen from the class consisting of oxygen, benzoyl peroxide, sodium peroxide, and nitrobenzene, the proportion of the sensitizer being at least about 10/sup -5/ moles per cubic centimeter of halogenated hydrocarbon, the total amount of sensitizer depending upon the range of radiation to be measured, and chemically measuring the amount of decomposition generated by the irradiation of the sensitized halogenated hydrocarbon.

  3. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderlaan, M.; Watkins, B.E.; Stanker, L.H.

    1991-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described. 14 figures.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies for the separate detection of halodeoxyuridines and method for their use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.; Stanker, Larry H.

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are described which have specific affinities for halogenated nucleoside analogs and are preferentially selective for one particular halogen. Such antibodies, when incorporated into immunochemical reagents, may be used to identify and independently quantify the cell division character of more than one population or subpopulation in flow cytometric measurements. Independent assessment of division activity in cell sub-populations facilitates selection of appropriate time and dose for administration of anti-proliferative agents. The hybridomas which secrete halogen selective antibodies and the method of making them are described.

  5. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  6. DOE SSL Postings: February 18, 2015, issue

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    94%, compared with 68% for the CFLs and 62% for the ceramic metal halide (all of the halogens failed, after typically reaching about 80% of initial output). However, while the...

  7. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - BIO-Inspired...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    phase contrast optics (bottom) and either top or bottom illumination using 12W halogens lamps. A 12 bit Retiga color CCD camera is mounted on the microsope for image...

  8. SSL GATEWAY UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DANCE SHOWCASE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video showing side-by-side dance performances with halogen and LED sidelighting as part of the Solid-State Lighting GATEWAY demonstration at the University of Florida.

  9. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STAR, you can save 75 each year. New lighting standards took effect in 2012, and money-saving options such as halogen incandescent, CFL, and LED lightbulbs are available today. ...

  10. Non-aqueous electrolyte for lithium-ion battery (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and R.sup.4 are each independently hydrogen, halogen, alkyl, alkenyl, alkynyl, ... of R.sup.5, and R.sup.6 are other than hydrogen, alkyl, or alkenyl; and if the ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... A major impetus to the work is that there is growing support for the view that two related ... Nontypical iodine-halogen bonds in the crystal structure of (3 E )-8-chloro-3-iodomethylid...

  12. Method for synthesizing boracities

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolf, Gary A [Kennewick, WA

    1982-01-01

    A method for producing boracites is disclosed in which a solution of divalent metal acetate, boric acid, and halogen acid is evaporated to dryness and the resulting solid is heated in an inert atmosphere under pressure.

  13. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Accent Lighting at the Field Museum in Chicago, IL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2010-12-10

    This report reviews a demonstration of light-emitting diode (LED) accent lighting compared to halogen (typical) accent lighting in a gallery of the Field Museum in Chicago, IL.

  14. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Mary; Chwastyk, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings in nine applications where LEDs compete with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and certain types of fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  15. A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plane. BiTeX compounds consist of alternating layers of bismuth, tellurium, and a halogen atom, like chlorine, bromine, or iodine. The layer sequence is such that the axis...

  16. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Other Hours Used Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other Unknown Total 4,196 431 2,811 409 14 159 173 34 24 141 Unknown 104 11 58 19 0...

  17. SAMPLE EMAIL FROM EVALUATING SUPERVISOR TO DIRECT REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to particular sections of the form. Please complete these tasks by logging into Halogen eAppraisal; your self-appraisal is due Friday, February 20 th . Getting Started...

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory employees receive Pollution Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    helium being captured and reused producing an annual savings of more than 1 million. Halogen leak detection at DAHRT: Using a 1,000 pollution prevention grant, Rudy Valdez of...

  19. Released: June 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...27571,"Q",3456,9855,14115 "High Intensity Discharge .....",455,"Q",61,147,238,20643,"Q",1947,7153,11234 "Halogen ......",565,"Q",99,174,286,17703,"Q",2425,6112,9110 ...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41 51 61 INCANDESCENT HALOGEN CFL LED 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 COUNCIL BASELINE MARKET AVERAGE TYPE: CURRENT PRACTICE BASELINE EFFICACY Linear Fluorescent Lamps, 4ft...