National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hallways lobbies stairways

  1. Lobbying

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Various Federal statutes and regulations prohibit certain "lobbying" and other similar activities by federal employees, as well as federal contractors, cooperative agreement participants, and...

  2. Reminder on Lobbying Restrictions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department's Contracting Officers (CO) are reminded that the use of appropriated funds to lobby Congress, or to influence certain federal contracting and financial transactions, is strictly prohibited by Federal statute and regulation. All DOE and NNSA contracts include FAR 52.203-12, "Limitation on Payments to Influence Certain Federal Transactions," as well as a clause similar to the following Section H clause, "Lobbying Restrictions" in some contracts:

  3. Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland | Department of Energy , 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting in a Federal Employee Fatality at DOE Headquarters Germantown, Maryland On June 28, 2013, an Accident Investigation Board was appointed to investigate an accident at the Department of Energy Germantown Headquarters facility, on June

  4. Successful so far, coal lobby's campaign may run out of steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-15

    The anti-coal lobby has mounted a highly successful campaign that has brought the permitting, financing, and construction of new conventional coal-fired plants to a virtual halt. But the coal lobby is not yet ready to concede defeat. With powerful constituents in coal-mining and coal-burning states and influential utilities, mining companies, and railroads, it continues to fight for its survival using any and all gimmicks and scare tactics in the book. The battle is being waged in courtrooms, public forums, media campaigns, and especially in Congress. The problem with the coal lobby is that it refuses to admit that coal combustion to generate electricity is among the chief sources of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions; unless they address this issue honestly, effectively, and immediately, their efforts are going to win few converts in the courts of law or public opinion.

  5. Museum Lobby

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methodology for Allocating Municipal Solid Waste to Biogenic and Non-Biogenic Energy May 2007 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be

  6. Demonstration Assessment of Light-Emitting Diode (LED) Retrofit Lamps at the Lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Naomi

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the process and results of a demonstration of solid-state lighting (SSL) technology in the lobby of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) headquarters building in Portland, Oregon. The project involved a simple retrofit of 32 track lights used to illuminate historical black-and-white photos and printed color posters from the 1930s and 1940s. BPA is a federal power marketing agency in the Northwestern United States, and selected this prominent location to demonstrate energy efficient light-emitting diode (LED) retrofit options that not only can reduce the electric bill for their customers but also provide attractive alternatives to conventional products, in this case accent lighting for BPA's historical artwork.

  7. Scientists in Portrait grace Ames Lab hallway | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scientific modeling around the Ames Laboratory, we're talking about the science: using visual, mathematical, or operational methods to better understand the chemical and physical...

  8. Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013, Stairway Fall Resulting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    On June 28, 2013, an Accident Investigation Board was appointed to investigate an accident at the Department of Energy Germantown Headquarters facility, on June 1, 2013 that ...

  9. Accident Investigation of the June 1, 2013 Stairway Fall Resulting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    show that examinations were conducted for employees with various illnesses, such as diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, which occurred off the job 9 . The Board believes that if a...

  10. Description and preliminary validation of a model for natural convection heat and air transport in passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, G.F.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    We have proposed a transient, quasi-two-dimensional, numerical model for interzone heat flow and airflow in passive solar buildings. The paths for heat flow and airflow are through connecting apertures such as doorways, hallways, and stairways. The model includes the major features that influence interzone convection as determined from the results of our flow visualization tests and temperature and airflow measurements taken in more than a dozen passive solar buildings. The model includes laminar and turbulent quasi-steady boundary-layer equations at vertical heated or cooled walls which are coupled to a one-dimensional core model for each zone. The cores in each zone exchange air and energy through the aperture which is modelled by a Bernoulli equation. Preliminary results from the model are in general agreement with data obtained in full-scale buildings and laboratory experiments. The model predicts room-core temperature stratification of about 2/sup 0/C/m (1.1/sup 0/ F/ft) and maximum aperture velocities of 0.08 m/s (15 ft/min.) for a room-to-room temperature difference of 1/sup 0/F.

  11. DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Were the stairways able to handle the flow effectively? Did persons with disabilities or special needs report to the nearest Area of Refuge, shelter area, or relocation area? Was...

  12. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Number of Lights by Room by Hours Used, 1993 Hours Used Total Bathroom Bedroom Dining Room Den Family Rec Room Hallway Stairs Kitchen Living Room Laundry Room Other Total...

  13. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the irony always occurs to me as I read an unusual brass plaque on the hallway that commemorates the origin of the Human Genome Project and its champion, Dr. Charles DeLisi. ...

  14. John William (Bill) Ebert Jr. ? Longtime Y-12 Maintenance Manager

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John William (Bill) Ebert Jr. - Longtime Y-12 Maintenance Manager I knew him as "Mr. Ebert" when his office was in Building 9734. I used to park my bicycle in the hallway just...

  15. A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    when filled with 16 feet of water, the corner collector at bonneville dam carries young fish down a wide, smooth hallway to a deep, safe spot in the river below the dam. 1 the...

  16. Y-12 and history of clearance designators

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supposedly ran out of his office and, throwing up his arms, shouted at the top of his lungs as he ran the length of the hallway, "URANIUM, URANIUM, that's what we are making" It...

  17. CX-011142: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Subcontractor Repair of Leaks over Rooms 12, 15, Hallway at 772-25B CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/21/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office

  18. Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Related to Lobbying Activities | Department of Energy Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to Lobbying Activities Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to Lobbying Activities PDF icon Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to Lobbying Activities More Documents & Publications Special Inquiry: DOE/IG-0927 Special Inquiry: DOE/IG-0927 Special Report: OIG-SR-16-01

  19. Use Areas & Availability | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Use Areas & Availability Use Areas & Availability Public Use Area of New Hope Center New Hope Center Lobby New Hope Center Courtyard Public use areas of Y-12's New Hope Center include the auditorium, lobby, business support services area, the Y-12 History Center, luncheon area, and tiered courtyard. Authorization to conduct an event in public areas of NHC does not include permission to access the entire facility. The lobby can be used undependently or as an extension of the auditorium.

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (bl( 6 l lobbying congressional members. ...

  1. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CORPORATION AGREES TO PAY 4.7 MILLION TO RESOLVE ALLEGATIONS RELATED TO LOBBYING ACTIVITIES WASHINGTON - The Justice Department announced today that Sandia Corporation has ...

  2. Preliminary Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research (NRL): Mike Simpson Theory, Modeling, Simulation (NTI): Peter Cummings 12:10 pm Buffet Lunch (selection of box lunches) Pollard Lobby 12.25 pm Bring your...

  3. Financial Assitance Letter FAL 2016-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 501 Lobbying Restrictions Section 735 Any Payment for the Election for a Federal Office or to a Political Committee Section 739 Reporting on Conference Spending Section 743 ...

  4. Alleged Attempts by Sandia National Laboratories to Influence...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In addition, FAR 31.205-22, Lobbying and political activity costs, states that "costs ... "influence on the decision," such as political officials and staffers, and those ...

  5. HUD's Rental Assistance Demonstration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to conservation & point-of-use behavior reminders Provide staff and ... through an area (lobby, rec room, or management office). 1. What makes it difficult or ...

  6. CX-100078: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STM Parking Structure Stairway Restoration – NREL Tracking No. 14-023 Award Number: DE-AC36-08GO28308 CX(s) Applied: DOE/EA 1440 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date: 10/02/2014 Location(s): Colorado Office(s): Golden Field Office

  7. Critical Question #2: What are the Best Practices for Ventilation Specific to Multifamily Buildings?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    What is the best practice to address ASHRAE 62.2 Addendum J (multifamily)? Why is exhaust only (with supply in hallway) the current standard practice? Are there options to avoid air exchange with neighbors? How do stack and wind pressures affect ventilation performance in multifamily homes? What systems actually function as intended and can be implemented by builders and contractors?

  8. MLM-462 Contract Number AT-33-l-GtiN-53 MOUND LABORATCRY Operatsd...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... north Wall east Wall south Wall west Lighting flxture Ughtlng fixture . 11,780 12,863 ... N,Do 0 Non.2 0 NODE 0 PIaD. 0 N-D, CSSllED lIdI.&451 Location Hallway off of Room ...

  9. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-029.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 SECTION A. Project Title: Central Facilities Area (CFA) Live Fire Range Elevated Platform SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The proposed action would install an elevated platform to perform tactical training, such as roof access simulation, hatch/ladder/stairway access, fast rope training and elevated height sniper or shooter target training, for Protective Force personnel. The environmental aspects associated with this training are consistent with activities currently authorized at

  10. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-047.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 SECTION A. Project Title: Idaho Falls (IF)-682 (University Boulevard [UB]3) Mezzanine Expansion SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: The proposed action would install a new mezzanine to meet the need for additional security space for research, testing, and evaluation of specialized cyber and control systems, located at building IF-682 (UB3) in Idaho Falls. The scope of work includes modification of the west end of IF-682 (UB3), including installation of structural steel, metal stairway,

  11. LARGE-AREA EPITAXIAL GRAPHENE LAYER. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: LARGE-AREA EPITAXIAL GRAPHENE LAYER. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: LARGE-AREA EPITAXIAL GRAPHENE LAYER. Abstract not provided. Authors: Ohta, Taisuke Publication Date: 2015-01-01 OSTI Identifier: 1244915 Report Number(s): SAND2015-0261D 562156 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 2F hallway, building 897 in Albuquerque, NM. Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM),

  12. NREL: Energy Systems Integration - NREL Research Proves Wind Can Provide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancillary Grid Fault Response Research Proves Wind Can Provide Ancillary Grid Fault Response April 1, 2016 Interior of the controllable grid interface test facility, showing a long hallway and shelves full of electronic equipment. The controllable grid interface test facility at the National Wind Technology Center makes it possible to research the effectiveness of wind energy in providing ancillary grid services such as frequency control. Photo by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 27442 Image of a

  13. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … Ducts in Conditioned Space

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A duct chase in a dropped hallway ceiling provides an affordable way to put ducts in conditioned space, a technique that saves energy and improves indoor air quality. Moving ductwork into the home's conditioned space can save 8%-15% on homeowner air-conditioning bills. Thousands of homes are now applying this important best practice promoted by Building America research. BUILDING AMERICA TOP INNOVATIONS HALL OF FAME PROFILE INNOVATIONS CATEGORY: 1. Advanced Technologies and Practices 1.1

  14. Appendix PORSURF: Porosity Surface

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PORSURF-2014 Porosity Surface United States Department of Energy Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Carlsbad Field Office Carlsbad, New Mexico Compliance Recertification Application 2014 Appendix PORSURF-2014 Table of Contents PORSURF-1.0 Introduction PORSURF-2.0 Creep Closure Method PORSURF-3.0 Conceptual Model for Porosity Surface PORSURF-4.0 SANTOS Numerical Analyses PORSURF-5.0 Implementation of Porosity Surface in BRAGFLO PORSURF-6.0 Dynamic Closure of the North End and Hallways PORSURF-7.0

  15. bowers_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RESNICK INSTITUTE + LMI-EFRC SEMINAR 101 Guggenheim Lab, Lees-Kubota Hall Refreshments at 2:45 in the lobby resnick.caltech.edu + lmi.caltech.edu John E. Bowers Energy e ciency is...

  16. What To Bring On Your First Day

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Unless otherwise directed, you should plan on reporting to the Main Lobby Visitor Area at your duty station by 8:30 a.m. on your first day of work. You will be greeted by an HR representative and...

  17. TEAM CUMBERLAND Kentucky Dam Village State Resort Park

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    attendees are invited to gather in the lobby of the lodge at 5:30 PM CDT prior to traveling to a Dutch-treat group dinner at Patti's 1880's Settlement, 1793 JH O'Bryan Avenue, ...

  18. 501(c)(4) Representation

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Revenue Code of 1986 and engage in lobbying activities after December 31, 1995 shall not be eligible for the receipt of Federal funds constituting an award, grant, or loan. ...

  19. SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL POWER ALLIANCE Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Building 77 Forsyth Street SW, Atlanta, GA 30303 November 6, 2014 November 5, 2014: Meet at the Glenn Hotel lobby at 6:00 p.m. to walk to...

  20. Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay 4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to Lobbying Activities Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay 4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to ...

  1. --No Title--

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NA) Poster Lobby 15:15 - 15:45 Break Break Break Break Session 381,383,385 Phillips Hall 15:45 - 17:00 Discussion Discussion Discussion Discussion Welcome Dinner Dinner...

  2. Microsoft Word - 20140908_ACAPEX Travel Information ARM.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 Gates 6 - 11 3rd Level Walkway 3rd Level Walkway TICKETING CHECK-IN U.S. CUSTOMS and BORDER PROTECTION CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL 2 LOBBY CITY BUS LOUNGE HONOLULU...

  3. STEAB Meeting Agenda November 2009

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center Lobby for Tour of Solar Center and McKinnon Campus ... AM - Break 10:20 AM - Panel Discussion Moderated by Jim ... * Steve Chalk in a new position in the front office * Gil ...

  4. Microsoft Word - LMI_Kickoff_Agenda_2014-09-23_forweb5.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6:00 Dinner Jorgensen Lobby 7:00 Climate Change and the Future of Photovoltaics Nate Lewis (Caltech) 8:15pm Shuttle from Caltech to Hilton Wednesday, September 24, 2014 Winnett...

  5. Department of Energy Construction Safety Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    DOE has adopted the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) regulations Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1926 ``Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,`` and related parts of 29 CFR 1910, ``Occupational Safety and Health Standards.`` This nonmandatory reference guide is based on these OSHA regulations and, where appropriate, incorporates additional standards, codes, directives, and work practices that are recognized and accepted by DOE and the construction industry. It covers excavation, scaffolding, electricity, fire, signs/barricades, cranes/hoists/conveyors, hand and power tools, concrete/masonry, stairways/ladders, welding/cutting, motor vehicles/mechanical equipment, demolition, materials, blasting, steel erection, etc.

  6. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-11-01

    Natural convection between spaces in a building which play a major role in energy transfer are discussed. Two situations are investigated: Convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway sizing equation is given for the single door case. Data from airflow monitoring in one two-story house and summary data for five others are presented. The nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  7. Convective heat transfer inside passive solar buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.W.; Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  8. Heat distribution by natural convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Yamaguchi, K.

    1983-01-01

    Natural convection between spaces in a building can play a major role in energy transfer. Two situations are investigated: convection through a single doorway into a remote room, and a convective loop in a two-story house with a south sunspace where a north stairway serves as the return path. A doorway-sizing equation is given for the single-door case. Detailed data are given from the monitoring of airflow in one two-story house and summary data are given for five others. Observations on the nature of the airflow and design guidelines are presented.

  9. Construction safety program for the National Ignition Facility, Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerruti, S.J.

    1997-06-26

    Topics covered in this appendix include: General Rules-Code of Safe Practices; 2. Personal Protective Equipment; Hazardous Material Control; Traffic Control; Fire Prevention; Sanitation and First Aid; Confined Space Safety Requirements; Ladders and Stairways; Scaffolding and Lift Safety; Machinery, Vehicles, and Heavy Equipment; Welding and Cutting-General; Arc Welding; Oxygen/Acetylene Welding and Cutting; Excavation, Trenching, and Shoring; Fall Protection; Steel Erection; Working With Asbestos; Radiation Safety; Hand Tools; Electrical Safety; Nonelectrical Work Performed Near Exposed High-Voltage Power-Distribution Equipment; Lockout/Tagout Requirements; Rigging; A-Cranes; Housekeeping; Material Handling and Storage; Lead; Concrete and Masonry Construction.

  10. Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind to Launch Lighting Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For over a century, students at the Alabama Institute for Deaf and Blind (AIDB) have proudly displayed the school colors—blue and red—in the hallways, classrooms and dorm rooms. But this school year, they’re “Going Green.” The 152-year-old institute is replacing almost 2,900 lights in 19 buildings across its Talladega, Ala., campuses with energy-efficient fixtures, an upgrade expected to save the institute over $20,000 a year on utility bills.

  11. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Speeding access to science information from DOE and Beyond Technology Topic DOE Research Clearing the Way for Medical Solutions by Sam Rosenbloom 01 Oct, 2013 in Technology The Randolph-Sheppard Act was signed into law by President Roosevelt in 1936. The act established a priority for blind vendors on Federal property. Nearly 77 years later, walking toward the snack stand operated by a blind vendor, the irony always occurs to me as I read an unusual brass plaque on the hallway that

  12. WIPP Computers Get New Life in Jal Schools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computers Get New Life in Jal Schools CARLSBAD, N.M., July 11, 2001 - When R.C. Griffin walks the hallways of Jal schools, he's greeted with smiles from teachers and students alike. Griffin, the computer technology coordinator for the Jal School District, is a popular man. He's a scavenger of sorts, and his hunting grounds are agencies such as the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Griffin has a knack for finding uses for excess equipment such as old or broken computers and office supplies.

  13. Wind Turbine Showcased in Energy Department Headquarters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Turbine Showcased in Energy Department Headquarters Wind Turbine Showcased in Energy Department Headquarters February 26, 2016 - 9:23am Addthis A Pika Energy wind turbine is the newest addition to the Department of Energy's headquarters lobby in Washington, D.C. | Photo by Mike Mueller, The Hannon Group A Pika Energy wind turbine is the newest addition to the Department of Energy's headquarters lobby in Washington, D.C. | Photo by Mike Mueller, The Hannon Group Unlike utility-scale

  14. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, A.M.; Ward, C.R.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.; Harpring, L.J.; Collins, M.X.; Anderson, E.K.

    1999-08-10

    A mobile robotic system is described that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console. 4 figs.

  15. Mobile autonomous robotic apparatus for radiologic characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dudar, Aed M.; Ward, Clyde R.; Jones, Joel D.; Mallet, William R.; Harpring, Larry J.; Collins, Montenius X.; Anderson, Erin K.

    1999-01-01

    A mobile robotic system that conducts radiological surveys to map alpha, beta, and gamma radiation on surfaces in relatively level open areas or areas containing obstacles such as stored containers or hallways, equipment, walls and support columns. The invention incorporates improved radiation monitoring methods using multiple scintillation detectors, the use of laser scanners for maneuvering in open areas, ultrasound pulse generators and receptors for collision avoidance in limited space areas or hallways, methods to trigger visible alarms when radiation is detected, and methods to transmit location data for real-time reporting and mapping of radiation locations on computer monitors at a host station. A multitude of high performance scintillation detectors detect radiation while the on-board system controls the direction and speed of the robot due to pre-programmed paths. The operators may revise the preselected movements of the robotic system by ethernet communications to remonitor areas of radiation or to avoid walls, columns, equipment, or containers. The robotic system is capable of floor survey speeds of from 1/2-inch per second up to about 30 inches per second, while the on-board processor collects, stores, and transmits information for real-time mapping of radiation intensity and the locations of the radiation for real-time display on computer monitors at a central command console.

  16. Guidance for Procurement Officials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Procurement Officials Guidance for Procurement Officials Acquisition Regulations Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) Acquisition Policy Acquisition Letters Acquisition Guidance Acquisition Guide Contracting for Support Services Department of Energy Acquisition System - A Guide for Executives Ethics in Procurement Lobbying Brochure Procurement Integrity Brochure Unsolicited Proposals Balanced scorecard Balanced Scorecard performance

  17. Guided Self-Assembly of Gold Thin Films

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Procurement Officials Guidance for Procurement Officials Acquisition Regulations Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) Acquisition Policy Acquisition Letters Acquisition Guidance Acquisition Guide Contracting for Support Services Department of Energy Acquisition System - A Guide for Executives Ethics in Procurement Lobbying Brochure Procurement Integrity Brochure Unsolicited Proposals Balanced scorecard Balanced Scorecard performance

  18. Finding the cheapest Clean power options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casten, Thomas R.; Smith, Jeffrey A.

    2009-12-15

    Speculation about why policies favor high-cost low-carbon generation options could fill a book. Vested interests? Lack of knowledge? Industry lobbying? Cost-plus regulatory mentality? Regardless of reasons, the data show that efficient generation that uses energy twice is largely ignored. While all other generation, both clean and dirty, receives large subsidies, energy recycling is ignored. (author)

  19. Certifications and Assurances for Use with SF-424

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    05 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE CERTIFICATIONS AND ASSURANCES FOR USE WITH SF 424 Applicant: Solicitation No.: DE- The following certifications and assurances must be completed and submitted with each application for financial assistance. The name of the person responsible for making the certifications and assurances must be typed in the signature block on the forms. Certifications Regarding Lobbying; Debarment, Suspension and Other Responsibility Matters; and Drug Free

  20. Financial Assistance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assistance Financial Assistance Financial Assistance Regulations Governmentwide Uniform Regulations for Financial Assistance (Omnicircular; Issued 12/26/2013) DOE Financial Assistance Regulations (which Implement and Amend the Omnicircular; Issued 12/19/2014) New Restrictions on Lobbying, 10 CFR Part 601 Epidemiology & Other Health Studies, 10 CFR Part 602 Technology Investment Agreements, 10 CFR 603 Office of Science Financial Assistance Program, 10 CFR Part 605 Previous Financial

  1. Jefferson Lab Hosts Science Poster Session | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 31, 2009 Time: 11:45 a.m. - 2 p.m. Place: CEBAF Center Lobby, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA Event: High school and college interns and middle school science teachers that participated in Jefferson Lab's summer science enrichment programs will share their summer experiences and projects during a Poster Session. Participating in this summer's poster session are: Seven (7) Hampton Roads-area high school seniors who participated in the Lab's Summer Honors internship program;

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Getting better all the time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Getting better all the time By Amy Treece Photography By Randy Montoya Thursday, April 28, 2016 Payroll Services and Accounting Services win Quality New Mexico Performance Excellence Awards Members of the Accounting Services and Payroll Services teams gather in the lobby of the IPOC building for a family portrait. The two teams were recognized at the annual Quality New Mexico Learning Summit and Performance Excellence Awards ceremony with Piñon-level awards for strides they have made on their

  3. Articles about Distributed Wind | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Distributed Wind Articles about Distributed Wind Below are stories about distributed wind featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program. February 26, 2016 A Pika Energy wind turbine is the newest addition to the Department of Energy's headquarters lobby in Washington, D.C. | Photo by Mike Mueller, The Hannon Group Wind Turbine Showcased in Energy Department Headquarters The Energy Department supported wind turbine innovation with Pika Energy-developing a process that cut the cost

  4. Norris Bradbury

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Museum Lobby » Norris Bradbury Norris Bradbury Our second director Norris Bradbury played an important role in the success of Los Alamos National Laboratory. In 1970, the Museum was renamed the Norris E. Bradbury Science Museum, honoring the Laboratory's second director. Norris Bradbury Norris Bradbury was the director of Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory for 25 years. He immediately succeeded J. Robert Oppenheimer at a time immediately after WWII when many people thought the lab was going to be

  5. Jefferson Lab Human Resources - Initial Lab Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    first day 8:00 Arrive in Support Service Center (bldg 28) Lobby; met by Training Consultant 9:00 Initial Paperwork 10:00 JLab's Mission, Culture, Policies 11:00 Training begins SAF100 ES&H Orientation (30 min) GEN101Standards of Conduct (30 min) GEN034 Security Awareness (30 min) 12:00 Release for lunch 1:00 Benefits Orientation 2:00 Badges 3:00 Begin Windshield tour of Campus/Site

  6. Directions to Wilson Hall, Fermilab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions Both the Fermilab box office and Ramsey Auditorium are located in Wilson Hall, the central laboratory building of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, as shown on the map below. Ramsey Auditorium is located at the south end of Wilson Hall. Enter through the Auditorium lobby doors on the ground level at the south end of Wilson Hall. Wilson Hall is clearly visible from the Pine Street entrance. From I-88, exit north at Farnsworth, which becomes Kirk north of Butterfield road. We also

  7. Lockheed Martin Agrees to Pay $5 Million to Settle False Claims Act

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Allegations | Department of Energy Lockheed Martin Agrees to Pay $5 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations Lockheed Martin Agrees to Pay $5 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations PDF icon Lockheed Martin Agrees to Pay $5 Million to Settle False Claims Act Allegations More Documents & Publications Sandia Corporation Agrees to Pay $4.7 Million to Resolve Allegations Related to Lobbying Activities IG Investigation with DOJ Results in over $10million Settlement Savannah River

  8. Hudson Valley Clean Energy Office and Warehouse

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Rhinebeck, NY Hudson Valley Clean Energy's new head office and warehouse building in Rhinebeck, New York, achieved proven net-zero energy status on July 2, 2008, upon completing its first full year of operation. The building consists of a lobby, meeting room, two offices, cubicles for eight office workers, an attic space for five additional office workers, ground- and mezzanine-level parts and material storage, and indoor parking for three contractor trucks.

  9. From: Mary Mauch To: Congestion Study Comments Subject:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mary Mauch To: Congestion Study Comments Subject: Comments on NEITC and Congestion Study Date: Friday, October 03, 2014 5:07:39 PM I am vehemently opposed to NEITCs- under any guise. Until we have exhausted all alternatives, such as local distributed generation, it is ludicrous and wrong to take private, productive, non-renewable land for unnecessary transmission corridors- probably being lobbied for by private companies for private gain. "Clean" Line Energy Partners and their 14 LLC's

  10. Energy Department Earth Week 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To celebrate Earth Week and Earth Day, the Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is participating in several Energy Department activities! Look for us inside the lobby of the U.S. Department of Energy Forrestal Building in Washington, D.C., from April 13–17. Then, on Earth Day, April 22, everyone is welcome to join us outside on the Forrestal West Plaza for Community Day!

  11. Media Advisory - Jefferson Lab Hosts Summer Intern Science Poster Session |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab July 30, 2010 Time: 11:45 a.m. - 2 p.m. Place: Jefferson Lab, CEBAF Center Lobby, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 Event: More than 35 high school and college interns that participated in Jefferson Lab's summer science enrichment programs will share their summer experiences and projects during a Poster Session. Participating in this summer's poster session are: Six (6) Hampton Roads-area high school students who participated in the laboratory's Summer Honors

  12. Media Advisory: Poster Session Highlights Projects, Research Carried Out by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Interns at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab Aug. 1, 2014 Time: 11:45 a.m. - 1 p.m. Place: The CEBAF Center lobby at Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 Event: More than 40 high school students and college undergraduates who participated in summer science internship programs at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or Jefferson Lab, will share with invited guests and members of the lab community results from their respective

  13. Organizations and associations serving the Waste-To-energy industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1998-12-01

    Professional organizations can provide leadership in disseminating information and answering questions about, and in providing support for, the industry. Eleven such organizations and association that directly, or in part, promote or provide technical assistance in the waste-to-energy field are listed and described briefly. Some actively lobby on waste-to-energy issues. Some provide useful publications and newsletters for those interested in keeping up with changes in the field.

  14. Agenda82108 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 21, 2008 Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) NSAC Home Meetings NSAC Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (78KB) NP Committees of Visitors Federal Advisory Committees NP Home Meetings August 21, 2008 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page DOE/NSF Nuclear Science Advisory Committee Meeting August 21, 2008 Where: Marriott Crystal Gateway Hotel, 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA. (Crystal City Metro Stop can be accessed from hotel lobby) Telephone Number: 703-920-3230

  15. Tech Forum_Agenda Updated_Final April 5 (Title Change)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Registration Lobby, USCA Convocation Center Welcome & Safety Topic Carol Johnson President and CEO, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions Objectives Dr. Terry Michalske Director, Savannah River National Laboratory 8:40 AM EM & SRS Overview Jack Craig DOE-SR Manager 8:50 AM SRNL Overview Dr. Jeff Griffin Associate Director for Environmental Stewardship, SRNL 9:10 AM Liquid Waste Mark Schmitz Acting President and Project Manager, Savannah River Remediation 9:30 AM Solid Waste Lee Fox Manager,

  16. Jefferson Lab Hosts Science Poster Session | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    August 1, 2008 Time: 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Place: CEBAF Center Lobby, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA Event: Participants in Jefferson Lab's summer science enrichment programs will share their summer experiences and projects during a Poster Session. Participating in this summer's poster session are: Six (6) Hampton Roads-area high school seniors who participated in the Lab's Summer Honors internship program; Twenty-three (23) college students, including those who took part in the

  17. Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory : 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subscribe to TUNL Seminars| Duke Colloquia| UNC Colloquia| NC-State Colloquia| TNT Seminars| All talks are on Thursday at 2:00 pm in Room 298 of the Physics Building, unless otherwise noted. There is a reception prior to the talk at 1:45 pm in the TUNL lobby. If you have questions about the seminars, you can email the TUNL secretary or call (919)-660-2600. Chairman: John Kelley. Thomas Langford Yale University Thursday, 02/04/2016, 02:00:PM, Physics 298 TBA Read the Abstract Steve Wender LANL

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Sandia needs 'Zero Heroes' to meet 2025

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    goal Sandia needs 'Zero Heroes' to meet 2025 goal By Lindsey KIbler Thursday, April 28, 2016 Sandia is looking for Zero Heroes! It's hard to miss the kiosks prominently displayed at turnstiles and in lobbies around Sandia: a Zero Hero proudly displaying the "Z" emblem through a neatly pressed business shirt and tie. He represents the power each person has to reduce waste at Sandia - thus becoming a Zero Hero - and is part of a newly launched Zero Waste campaign by Sandia's

  19. The ABC's of Atomic Nuclei: The Modern Alchemist

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation April 24, 2015 - 9:00am Addthis The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation img-1294_crop.jpg It's been hard to miss in the media and on its almost non-stop road tour, but AMO wanted you to know that our 3D-printed EV version of the 50th anniversary Shelby Cobra just left the Forrestal building lobby after visiting for two weeks. Secretary Moniz dropped in for a

  20. INTEGRATED SCIENCE BUILDING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONKLIN, SHANE

    2013-09-30

    Shell space fit out included faculty office advising space, student study space, staff restroom and lobby cafe. Electrical, HVAC and fire alarm installations and upgrades to existing systems were required to support the newly configured spaces. These installations and upgrades included audio/visual equipment, additional electrical outlets and connections to emergency generators. The project provided increased chilled water capacity with the addition of an electric centrifugal chiller. Upgrades associated with chiller included upgrade of exhaust ventilation fan, electrical conductor and breaker upgrades, piping and upgrades to air handling equipment.

  1. Microsoft Word - FAL2004-01.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Financial Assistance Letters (FALs) that remain in effect are identified below. All other previously issued FALs have been superseded by a formal rulemaking, incorporated into other guidance, and/or canceled. *************** Financial Assistance Letters Remaining in Effect Number Date Subject 96-01 03/08/96 Implementation Guidance on Sections 3001 and 3002 of EPAct 96-02 08/01/96 Implementation Guidance on Section 2306 of EPAct 97-05 12/18/97 Merit Review/Lobbying 2001-02 07/30/01 Preservation

  2. The ARRA EAP En

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation "He said he’d get in if he could drive." "He said he'd get in if he could drive." It's been hard to miss in the media and on its almost non-stop road tour, but AMO wanted you to know that our 3D-printed EV version of the 50th anniversary Shelby Cobra just left the Forrestal building lobby after visiting for two weeks. Secretary Moniz dropped in for a

  3. Jefferson Lab Human Resources - Initial Lab Orientation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    second day - New Employee International Orientation (foreign nationals only) 8:00 New foreign national employees arrives in Support Service Center Lobby 8:05 Communications liaison introduced - Language Class Information 8:15 Introduction to International Services Staff - Types of Visas 9:30 "What to do First," Social Security Numbers 10:15 Bank Accounts, Driving, Buying a Car 11:15 Tax Information and General Questions 12:00 Supervisors arrive and escort new employees back to work

  4. TEAM CUMBERLAND Tennessee Valley Authority 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, TN 37902

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TEAM CUMBERLAND Tennessee Valley Authority 400 West Summit Hill Drive, Knoxville, TN 37902 March 24 & 25, 2015 On Tuesday, March 24 th , at 1:00 PM EST, in a conference room located TVA's West Tower, an analysis of Corps O&M expenditures will be discussed. At 3:00 PM EST, TVA will provide a tour of their River Scheduling Operations Center. Afterward, we'll meet in the Knoxville Marriott lobby at 6:15 PM EST and depart for Calhoun's for dinner (Dutch-treat). The meeting on Wednesday,

  5. The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation It’s been hard to miss in the media and on its almost non-stop road tour, but AMO wanted you to know that our 3D-printed EV version of the 50th anniversary Shelby Cobra just left the Forrestal building lobby after visiting for two weeks. Secretary Moniz dropped in for a quick tour around the car with Mark Johnson, AMO’s Director and David Danielson, EERE’s Assistant Secretary on Tuesday April 7th.

  6. m244

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    4 Page 2 of 6 1. Section H, Clause H-24, Home Office and Other Corporate Support, is revised to remove the provisional FY 2006 ceiling amount of $882,000.00 and incorporate the FY 2006 estimated budget for home office and other corporate support services by adding the following as the first sentence of paragraph (d): The total FY 2006 estimated budget for these services is $2,029,400.00. 2. Section H, Clause H-35 is added as follows: LOBBYING RESTRICTION (ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT

  7. STEAB Meeting Agenda August 2007

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Arrive at Laboratory Welcome and Introductions / Continental Breakfast Meeting Agenda State Energy Advisory Board Meeting ♦ August 14-16, 2007 Hotel Durant ♦ 2600 Durant Ave. ♦ Berkeley, CA 94704 Phone (510) 845-8981 Time Proceeding Venue/Presenter Monday, August 13 7:00 p.m. Kick-Off Dinner / Adagia Restaurant Meet in Hotel Lobby at 6:45 p.m. Tuesday, August 14 LBNL 8:00 a.m. Depart Hotel for LBNL LBNL shuttle bus to be provided 8:15 a.m. 8:45 a.m. STEAB Overview and Reason for Lab Visit

  8. STEAB Meeting Agenda August 2008

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheraton Denver West Hotel 360 Union Blvd. Denver, CO August 12 - 14, 2008 Monday - August 11 6:00 - 6:15 Members Meet in Hotel Lobby 6:15 Members Walk to Jose O'Shea's 6:30 Dutch Treat Group Dinner and Socializing Tuesday - August 12 8:00 Breakfast Buffet (in meeting room) 8:30 Welcome: Rita Wells, Manager, DOE Golden Field Office 8:45 NREL Exec Mgmt Overview with Q&A: Bobi Garrett Current NREL political environment, climate directions, fossil fuel depletion, the challenge facing us in the

  9. Media Advisory - Jefferson Lab Hosts Summer Intern Science Poster Session |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab August 3, 2012 Time: 11:45 a.m. - 2 p.m. Place: The CEBAF Center lobby at Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 Event: More than 35 high school and college interns that participated in Jefferson Lab's summer science enrichment programs will share their summer experiences and projects during a Poster Session. News Media representatives are invited to attend. Participating in this summer's poster session are: Twelve (12) Hampton Roads-area high school

  10. Media Advisory: Poster Session Highlights Projects, Research Carried Out by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summer Interns at Jefferson Lab | Jefferson Lab July 31, 2015 Time: 11:45 a.m. - 1:15 p.m. Place: The CEBAF Center lobby at Jefferson Lab, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 Event: More than 30 high school students and college undergraduates who participated in summer, science internship programs at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, or Jefferson Lab, will share with invited guests and members of the lab community results from their work

  11. All Required: Safety Training - Chris Westerfeldt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL Summer 2013 Lectures & Tutorials Thursday May 30 st - 9 AM - 3:30 PM (LSRC Room A247) All Required: Safety Training - Chris Westerfeldt Friday May 31 st - 9 AM REU Required: TUNL, LENA & FEL Tour - (Meet in TUNL Lobby) Monday June 10 th - 10 AM - 11:30 AM (DFELL Conference Room, 117) REU Required: Building Blocks of Nuclei - Mohammad Ahmed Monday June 10 th - 2 PM - 3:30 PM (DFELL Conference Room, 117) REU Required: N-N Interactions and Local Accelerators - Mohammad Ahmed Wednesday

  12. National Bioenergy Day 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bioenergy, the use of agricultural waste and forestry byproducts to generate heat and energy, will be celebrated during the third annual National Bioenergy Day on October 22, 2014. This is an opportunity to showcase bioenergy facilities and the bioenergy supply chain around the United States. The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) will celebrate National Bioenergy Day with an educational display about the bioenergy supply chain and the bioeconomy in the lobby of the Energy Department’s Forrestal building in downtown Washington, D.C.

  13. The Adequacy of DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Goals from an Accident Analysis Perspective

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation The 3D-Printed Shelby Cobra: Defining Rapid Innovation "He said he’d get in if he could drive." "He said he'd get in if he could drive." It's been hard to miss in the media and on its almost non-stop road tour, but AMO wanted you to know that our 3D-printed EV version of the 50th anniversary Shelby Cobra just left the Forrestal building lobby after visiting for two weeks. Secretary Moniz dropped in for a

  14. Vendor Fair April 14 in CEBAF Center | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vendor Fair April 14 in CEBAF Center Check out the Vendor Fair April 14 in CEBAF Center All members of the Jefferson Lab community are invited to the 2016 Small Business Vendor Fair on Thursday, April 14, in CEBAF Center from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Come and go as works best for your schedule. More than two dozen vendors will have displays and tables set up in the CEBAF Center lobby and in Conference Room F113. Check out the newest gadgets and wares. Pick up free samples, giveaways and information.

  15. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  16. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogate measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.

  17. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy`s Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE`s Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  18. Analysis of federal policy options for improving US lighting energy efficiency: Commercial and residential buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atkinson, B.A.; McMahon, J.E.; Mills, E.; Chan, P.; Chan, T.W.; Eto, J.H.; Jennings, J.D.; Koomey, J.G.; Lo, K.W.; Lecar, M.; Price, L.; Rubinstein, F.; Sezgen, O.; Wenzel, T.

    1992-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has recognized the opportunity to achieve energy, economic, and environmental benefits by promoting energy-efficient lighting through federal policies, including lighting standards, financial incentives, and information programs. To assist in this process, the Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy's Office of Codes and Standards invited Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to assess prospective national impacts for a variety of policy options. Some progress has already been made in developing lighting policies at both the federal and state levels. The US DOE's Office of Building Technologies has evaluated lighting efficiency incentives as part of its analysis for the National Energy Strategy. Fluorescent and incandescent lamp standards are included in the national Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102-486, October 24, 1992). A few states have analyzed or implemented lamp and luminaire standards. Many policy-related issues merit further investigation. For example, there is considerable debate over issues such as mandatory or voluntary standards versus component labeling and other education-oriented strategies. Several different technologies are involved that interact with each other-lamps (incandescent, compact fluorescent, and HID), ballasts (for fluorescent and HID lamps), and fixtures with reflectors and lenses. Control systems and operation patterns must also be considered (timers, automated dimming, or occupancy sensors). Lighting applications are diverse, ranging from offices, restaurants, hallways, hospital operating rooms, to exterior lights. Lighting energy use influences heating and cooling requirements in buildings. Successful lighting system design must also address interactions between architectural design elements and daylighting availability. Proper system installation and ongoing operation and maintenance are crucial. The economic aspects of the preceding points must also be considered for policy making.

  19. Spatial and temporal variations in indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics in a new hospital building

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ramos, Tiffanie; Dedesko, Sandra; Siegel, Jeffrey A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Stephens, Brent

    2015-03-02

    The dynamics of indoor environmental conditions, human occupancy, and operational characteristics of buildings influence human comfort and indoor environmental quality, including the survival and progression of microbial communities. A suite of continuous, long-term environmental and operational parameters were measured in ten patient rooms and two nurse stations in a new hospital building in Chicago, IL to characterize the indoor environment in which microbial samples were taken for the Hospital Microbiome Project. Measurements included environmental conditions (indoor dry-bulb temperature, relative humidity, humidity ratio, and illuminance) in the patient rooms and nurse stations; differential pressure between the patient rooms and hallways; surrogatemore » measures for human occupancy and activity in the patient rooms using both indoor air CO₂ concentrations and infrared doorway beam-break counters; and outdoor air fractions in the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems serving the sampled spaces. Measurements were made at 5-minute intervals over consecutive days for nearly one year, providing a total of ~8×10⁶ data points. Indoor temperature, illuminance, and human occupancy/activity were all weakly correlated between rooms, while relative humidity, humidity ratio, and outdoor air fractions showed strong temporal (seasonal) patterns and strong spatial correlations between rooms. Differential pressure measurements confirmed that all patient rooms were operated at neutral pressure. The patient rooms averaged about 100 combined entrances and exits per day, which suggests they were relatively lightly occupied compared to higher traffic environments (e.g., retail buildings) and more similar to lower traffic office environments. There were also clear differences in several environmental parameters before and after the hospital was occupied with patients and staff. Characterizing and understanding factors that influence these building dynamics is vital for hospital environments, where they can impact patient health and the survival and spread of healthcare associated infections.« less

  20. Vehicular fuels and additives for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Interest in automotive fuel is resurging. Automobile fuels must increasingly deal with clean air regulations and ozone problems. Furthermore, feedstocks become heavier,as refinery production changes, as more unleaded is produced, and as an increasing number of pollution regulations must be satisfied greater attention will be paid to better mixtures, solvents, additives, and neat methanol. BCC report analyzes developments technologies, markets, players and the political/regulations aspects of this important market. Study also assesses the advantages and drawbacks of methanol, ethanol, MTBE and other additives which have their place as octane enhancers and fuel substitutes-all now deeply involved in the gasoline modification battle. Other issues addressed are subsidies, farm lobbying, imports, pricing, economics, Detroit's response, neat fuel testing projects, volatility problems vs. fewer ozone-forming hydrocarbon species, and emission ratings.

  1. DiTour

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-05

    it is common for facilities to have a lobby with a display loop while also requiring an option for guided tours. Existing solutions have required expensive hardware and awkward software. Our solution is relative low cost as it runs on an iPad connected to an external monitor, and our software provides an intuitive touch interface. The media files are downloaded from a web server onto the device allowing a mobile option (e.g. displays at conferences).more » Media may include arbitrary sequences of images, movies or PDF documents. Tour guides can select different tracks of slides to display and the presentation will return to the default loop after a timeout.« less

  2. EC proposals still have a long way to go

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, I.

    1993-01-27

    The European Commission's plans to create a single market within the European Community (EC) - supported by most of Europe's chemical industry - still appear far from being realized. When the commission agreed on draft directives to pen up europe's gas and eletricity networks to greater competition, they were scheduled to be implemented on January 1, 1993. However, following intense lobbying by energy suppliers throughout the EC, the European Energy Council, meeting on November 30, 1992, asked the commission to modify its plans. The UK government, during its EC presidency in second-half 1992, campaigned hard to ensure that progress was made toward energy liberalization but met strong opposition from other EC members, including France, the Netherlands, Italy, and Spain. The main bone of contention is third-party access (TPA), which would allow larger energy users to buy their electricity and gas from suppliers anywhere in the EC, seen by consumers as the key element in the commission proposals. The Energy Council, at its November meeting, made particular note of the reservations that had been expressed about the proposed TPA mechanisms.

  3. Recent developments: Washington focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-02-01

    Congress reconvened on January 23, but most of Washington`s January new involves the Administration. DOE sent two letters to USEC customers, awarded a contract for the independent financial review of the enrichment program, and released a plan for demonstrating AVLIS by 1992. A General Accounting Office (GAO) report investigating the impact of imports of Soviet EUP into the US was made public. Both Congress and the administration are reportedly considering a full-scope US-Soviet Agreement for Nuclear Cooperation. Finally, published reports indicate Congress may consider ending the customs user fee which levies a charge of 0.17% on the value of all imported goods. The fee is felt to violate the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) and is not based on recovering actual Customs costs for processing a good. The fee brings the Treasury over $700 million per year, but the business community plans to lobby hard for its outright elimination or a change in authority to collect the fee based on actual costs.

  4. PORTNUS Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loyal, Rebecca E.

    2015-07-14

    The objective of the Portunus Project is to create large, automated offshore ports that will the pace and scale of international trade. Additionally, these ports would increase the number of U.S. domestic trade vessels needed, as the imported goods would need to be transported from these offshore platforms to land-based ports such as Boston, Los Angeles, and Newark. Currently, domestic trade in the United States can only be conducted by vessels that abide by the Merchant Marine Act of 1920 – also referred to as the Jones Act. The Jones Act stipulates that vessels involved in domestic trade must be U.S. owned, U.S. built, and manned by a crew made up of U.S. citizens. The Portunus Project would increase the number of Jones Act vessels needed, which raises an interesting economic concern. Are Jones Act ships more expensive to operate than foreign vessels? Would it be more economically efficient to modify the Jones Act and allow vessels manned by foreign crews to engage in U.S. domestic trade? While opposition to altering the Jones Act is strong, it is important to consider the possibility that ship-owners who employ foreign crews will lobby for the chance to enter a growing domestic trade market. Their success would mean potential job loss for thousands of Americans currently employed in maritime trade.

  5. SINGLE-FACED GRAYQB{trademark} - A RADIATION MAPPING DEVICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, J.; Farfan, E.; Immel, D.; Phillips, M.; Bobbitt, J.; Plummer, J.

    2013-12-12

    GrayQb{trademark} is a novel technology that has the potential to characterize radioactively contaminated areas such as hot cells, gloveboxes, small and large rooms, hallways, and waste tanks. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} is to speed the process of decontaminating these areas, which reduces worker exposures and promotes ALARA considerations. The device employs Phosphorous Storage Plate (PSP) technology as its primary detector material. PSPs, commonly used for medical applications and non-destructive testing, can be read using a commercially available scanner. The goal of GrayQb{trademark} technology is to locate, quantify, and identify the sources of contamination. The purpose of the work documented in this report was to better characterize the performance of GrayQb{trademark} in its ability to present overlay images of the PSP image and the associated visual image of the location being surveyed. The results presented in this report are overlay images identifying the location of hot spots in both controlled and field environments. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been mainly tested in a controlled environment with known distances and source characteristics such as specific known radionuclides, dose rates, and strength. The original concept for the GrayQb{trademark} device involved utilizing the six faces of a cube configuration and was designed to be positioned in the center of a contaminated area for 3D mapping. A smaller single-faced GrayQb{trademark}, dubbed GrayQb SF, was designed for the purpose of conducting the characterization testing documented in this report. This lighter 2D version is ideal for applications where entry ports are too small for a deployment of the original GrayQb version or where only a single surface is of interest. The shape, size, and weight of these two designs have been carefully modeled to account for most limitations encountered in hot cells, gloveboxes, and contaminated areas. GrayQb{trademark} and GrayQb{trademark} SF share the same fundamental detection system design (e.g., pinhole and PSPs). Therefore, performance tests completed on the single face GrayQB in this report is also applicable to the six- faced GrayQB (e.g., ambient light sensitivity and PSP response). This report details the characterization of the GrayQb{trademark} SF in both an uncontrolled environment; specifically, the Savannah River Site (SRS) Plutonium Fuel Form Facility in Building 235-F (Metallurgical Building) and controlled testing at SRSs Health Physics Instrument Calibration Facility and SRSs R&D Engineering Imaging and Radiation Systems Building. In this report, the resulting images from the Calibration Facility were obtained by overlaying the PSP and visual images manually using ImageJ. The resulting images from the Building 235-F tests presented in this report were produced using ImageJ and applying response trends developed from controlled testing results. The GrayQb{trademark} technology has been developed in two main stages at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL): 1) the GrayQb{trademark} development was supported by SRNLs Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program and 2) the GrayQb{trademark} SF development and its testing in Building 235-F were supported by the Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13), U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management.

  6. Community empowerment needs in the struggle for environmental justice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.

    1995-12-01

    The paper addresses the specific empowerment needs of communities and workers fighting for environmental justice. Thousands of people of color and poor communities throughout the United States are victimized by policies and practices of environmental racism which resulted in the disproportionate burden of exposure to environmental contamination where they live, work and play. Powerful interests who own and operate polluting industries and waste disposal facilities prey on poor, low income and non-white communities because they view them as areas of least resistance and {open_quotes}sacrifice zones.{close_quotes} Leaders and members of organizations from communities threatened or already devastated by contamination are waging determined, courageous and heroic struggles against giant corporate polluters. In many instances, the leaders and members of these grassroots environmental groups are literally sick and dying from contamination as they seek to organize for clean, safe and healthy communities. A key issue for communities and workers fighting for environmental justice is realizing true empowerment. Communities and workers must develop empowerment and capacity building skills in the areas of community and labor organizing; media relations and public education; legal advocacy; legislative and regulatory tracking; lobbying; health monitoring and health services; research; scientific technical needs (eg. air, water and soil testing); fundraising and economic sustainable development; institutional and organizational development; voter education and electoral politics; and youth and adult leadership training. When these empowerment skills are combined with a clear vision of justice for the future, communities will be able to fight cooporations armed with high-powered lawyers, lobbyists, public relations firms and bought-off politicians.

  7. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Renee; Cunniff, Lori

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power generation accessible for public viewing on an interactive kiosk located in the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s lobby where visitors can review “real time” power generation, cost savings and environmental benefits of the system. Site commissioning with the software program was delayed due to Internal Security Software issues within Orange County that needed to be resolved, therefore the “real time” capture of the production data for the solar array using the software program commenced on May 1, 2015. In addition an educational flyer was developed and is available in the Orange County Education Center’s main lobby. The project completed under this grant award assisted Orange County in demonstrating leadership by installing the application of a renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs for the Orange County University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center, and helping Orange County citizens and visitors move towards the goals of greater energy independence and climate protection. The addition of the new Solar Demonstration and Research Facility has advanced the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center’s mission of extending, educating and providing research-based information to residents and visitors of Orange County by demonstrating the application of renewable energy technology combined with energy efficiency measures; resulting in reduced energy costs, and helping Orange County move towards the goal of greater energy independence and climate protection. In 2014, the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center hosted nearly 10,800 visitors to their on-site Exploration Gardens plus 12,686 walk-in visitors to their office plant clinic and other services. The Education Center held 2,217 educational events that were attended by 46,434 adults and youth, but about half of those events occurred off-site. Based on the visitation numbers in 2014 the Orange County Cooperative Extension Center Education is a vital partner to Orange County’s continued outreach and education efforts concerning renewable energy technologies and greenhouse gas emission reduction well in the current 2015 year and future years of operation of the solar array to the future visitors of the Center which help stimulate market demand that will continue to advance the commercialization and the widespread application and use of renewable energy technologies in Orange County and the state of Florida. The project period performance date for this grant was November 1, 2009 through March 1, 2015. The Final Project costs to complete the project as reported in the FINAL SF 425 were $195,512.50 (50% recipient cost share was satisfied as required by grant terms and conditions).

  8. Definition of Capabilities Needed for a Single Event Effects Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemer, Bernie; Gallmeier, Franz X.

    2014-12-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is contemplating new regulations mandating testing of the vulnerability of flight-critical avionics to single event effects (SEE). A limited number of high-energy neutron test facilities currently serve the SEE industrial and institutional research community. The FAA recognizes that existing facilities have insufficient test capacity to meet new demand from such mandates; it desires more flexible irradiation capabilities to test complete, large systems and would like capabilities to address greater concerns for thermal neutrons. For this reason, the FAA funded this study by Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) staff with the ultimate aim of developing options for SEE test facilities using high-energy neutrons at the SNS complex. After an investigation of current SEE test practices and assessment of future testing requirements, three concepts were identified covering a range of test functionality, neutron flux levels, and fidelity to the atmospheric neutron spectrum. The costs and times required to complete each facility were also estimated. SEE testing is generally performed by accelerating the event rate to a point where the effects are still dominated by single events and double event causes of failures are negligible. In practice, acceleration factors of as high as 106 are applicable for component testing, whereas for systems testing acceleration factors of 104 seem to be the upper limit. It is strongly desirable that the irradiation facility be tunable over a large range of high-energy neutron fluxes of 102 - 104 n/cm²/s for systems testing and from 104 - 107 n/cm²/s for components testing. The most capable, most flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station named the High-Energy neutron Test Station (HETS). It is also the most expensive option, with a cost to complete of approximately $100 million. Dual test enclosures would allow for simultaneous testing activity effectively doubling overall test capacity per HETS operating hour. Using about 1 kilowatt (kW) of proton power extracted from the accelerator before injection in the accumulator ring, its operation would be unnoticeable by neutron scattering users at the SNS target station. The H beam laser stripping technique would allow for control of beam power on the HETS target independent from power delivered to the SNS. Large systems with frontal areas of up to 1 x 2 m² could be accommodated with integral high-energy flux values (above 10 megaelectron-volt, or MeV) to at most 104 n/cm²/s; components could also be tested with flux levels to at most 107 n/cm²/s on beam sizes of up to 0.2 x 0.2 m². Selectable moderating material and neutron filters would allow tailoring of the neutron spectrum to user demands; charged particle deflectors could be switched to allow or deflect protons, pions, and muons. It is estimated that HETS would take 5 years to complete after award of contract, including engineering design and construction. Commissioning would take at least another 6 months. Interference with SNS principal operations was not considered in the construction time estimate; connection of the proton transport line and tunnel from the accelerator high energy beam transport (HEBT) and construction around existing site utilities would require careful planning and coordination with beam operations at the SNS. A high-energy (HE) neutron test facility using an available beam line on the SNS target station is a technically and financially attractive option. Inspired by the new ChipIR instrument on the ISIS TS 2 spallation source in the UK, a similar facility could be placed on an unused beam line in the SNS instrument hall [e.g., on beam line 8 (both A and B channels would be needed) or on beam line 10]. The performance would approach that of an HETS (~80%), but it would be operationally more limited, with only a single user at a time. Space is more limited, so the maximum system size would be about half of that in an HETS. Flexibility to tailor the spectrum would be somewhat more limited. While this concept was not as fully developed and characterized, preliminary work indicates very high HE flux levels should be possible, with ample thermal neutrons as well. Flux control would be more difficult than at HETS because proton power on target be whatever the SNS was operating at for neutron scattering. Neutron attenuation devices would have to be employed with as-yet undetermined control resolution. However, no new buildings would be needed, and the necessary utilities are already present in the SNS Experiment Hall. The estimated cost for a beam line option is around $15 million; the time to complete would be 3 years after award of contract, plus at least 6 months for commissioning. Interference of construction activities with SNS operations should be negligible. This option would require negotiation with the Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office -- the primary stakeholder of SNS -- for an application outside the usual scope of neutron scattering sciences. Furthermore, these presently open beam lines are highly desirable locations for proposed neutron scattering instruments and obtaining one of them for an SEE test facility will come only with persuasive and timely arguments to SNS leadership and the DOE BES. The third option is a tunnel extension/target cave facility providing the most basic system-level irradiation capability with minimal flexibility. Again not as well developed a concept as HETS, it would use a laser-stripping technique like an HETS, redirecting protons to a tunnel similar to the initial HETS proton transport tunnel. Indeed, this concept is intended to be upgradable to a full HETS facility. Only a small fraction of a watt of proton power would be used in this basic configuration, though. An uncooled target and primitive shielding arrangement would provide beam on modestly sized systems that must be placed in close proximity to the target. The neutron fluence would be less uniform over the system than with the HETS or the beam line option. A data acquisition room and support area would be located on the ground level; access to the target cave would be via elevator and/or stairway. As a result of the required excavation, new tunnel construction, shielding, data acquisition building, utilities, and other items, the estimated cost is $30 million. The time to complete is expected be more than 3 years; here again construction interference with SNS operations has not been accounted for, but it could have a significant impact.

  9. QER- Comment of Jennifer Markens 6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, I am writing in concern about efforts by Kinder Morgan to locate in conservation lands along the Northern area of Massachusetts. These lands are the watershed for our whole state, and this infiltration by two gas investment companies: Northeast Utilities and Kinder Morgan is dangerous to our state's water, and violate the rights of our small state to a clean, safe environment. Further, these lands, and the donations that support them are our state heritage. And there are further concerns. Massachusetts is about to find out what the term "resource curse" means. At the moment, Massachusetts has abundant water. The Marcellus shale is our near neighbor. Our watersheds are now under assault. This is happening right now, in all of Massachusetts' watersheds. Northeast Utilities, now a Connecticut gas investment company, appears to be working aggressively with investment company, Texas –based, Kinder Morgan to gain control of water in Massachusetts. The proposed gas pipeline is using monopoly owned electrical grids to snake through protected aquifers and watersheds, with pipelines known to carry radioactive gas from the Marcellus, along with benzene, neurotoxins, and endocrine disrupting chemicals. Pipelines leak. They also explode. Blast zones created by high pressure, high volume gas pipelines, running adjacent to high voltage, direct current ,electrical cables, are deliberately planned to run right through populated areas. This will gut rural community economies, reducing property values, making sure there is less public oversight of these regions, while placing these areas under the control of privately owned gas investment entities. The gas industry is exempt from clean air, clean water, and clean drinking water legislation. If gas is so clean and safe, why is that necessary? . The idea of "cheap gas" is a falsehood. Gas extraction comes at an exorbitant price: billions of gallons of drinking water, necessary for human life, are destroyed for each well head created. In order to keep up with current demand, thousands of new wells must be drilled each year, as older wells decline in production. And that's for U.S. demand: worldwide demand is immanent. Disposal of ruined drinking water is also a problem, and significant amounts of this chemically poisoned, ruined water are dumped into public waterways, even across state borders, or are pumped and dumped back into the ground. Fifty percent of our nation is currently experiencing severe drought. Gas pipelines proposed for the state are as much a grab for Massachusetts' water and water regions, as it is to set up a shipping route for gas investment interests abroad. Our urban legislators and officials may be vulnerable to gas investment lobbying: hence the limp legislative response on fixing existing gas leaks that have bilked over 1 billion dollars from ratepayers, and flouted DPU authority. Water treatment plants cannot address the toxicity of ruined water, and unless Massachusetts citizens don't want to be used as human filters by gas industry investment greed, this had better be stopped. Please stop this. It makes a mockery of every environmental effort of our state a region, and is completely unnecessary. Sincerely, Jennie Markens Best regards, Jennie Markens

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1983 DPF WORKSHOP ON COLLIDER DETECTORS: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES, FEB. 28 - MARCH 4, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loken Ed, S.C.; Nemethy Ed, P.

    1983-04-01

    It is useful before beginning our work here to restate briefly the purpose of this workshop in the light of the present circumstances of elementary particle physics in the U.S. The goal of our field is easily stated in a general way: it is to reach higher center of mass energies and higher luminosities while employing more sensitive and more versatile event detectors, all in order to probe more deeply into the physics of elementary particles. The obstacles to achieving this goal are equally apparent. Escalating costs of construction and operation of our facilities limit alternatives and force us to make hard choices among those alternatives. The necessity to be highly selective in the choice of facilities, in conjunction with the need for increased manpower concentrations to build accelerators and mount experiments, leads to complex social problems within the science. As the frontier is removed ever further, serious technical difficulties and limitations arise. Finally, competition, much of which is usually healthy, now manifests itself with greater intensity on a regional basis within our country and also on an international scale. In the far ({ge}20 yr) future, collaboration on physics facilities by two or more of the major economic entities of the world will possibly be forthcoming. In the near future, we are left to bypass or overcome these obstacles on a regional scale as best we can. The choices we face are in part indicated in the list of planned and contemplated accelerators shown in Table I. The facilities indicated with an asterisk pose immediate questions: (1) Do we need them all and what should be their precise properties? (2) How are the ones we choose to be realized? (3) What is the nature of the detectors to exploit those facilities? (4) How do we respond to the challenge of higher luminosity as well as higher energy in those colliders? The decision-making process in this country and elsewhere depends on the answers to these technical questions. Those relating to the accelerators have been and continue to be addressed in many workshops and studies. For example, a workshop organized by M. Tigner will begin to study the means of achieving a very high energy (10 TeV x 10 TeV) hadron collider; this is scheduled at the end of March at Cornell University. If it seems desirable, continuity in the form of subsequent workshops on technical questions relating to accelerator facilities might be provided by the Division of Particles and Fields (DPF) of the American Physical Society, as it is doing here for collider detectors. The workshop we are about to begin is intended to address questions (3) and (4) above. It is an attempt to look at those questions from a broad point of view by assembling a wide spectrum of experts from universities and national and international laboratories. It is planned to make the proceedings of the workshop available to the 1983 Woods Hole Sub-Panel of HEPAP which is charged with the responsibility for recommendations concerning the choices that face the U.S. program. This is the main reason that we are meeting at the present time. In this connection, it is worth emphasizing that the DPF is an organization of roughly 3000 physicists from universities and national laboratories. It is an independent organization not affiliated with any laboratory or government agency. Most important, it is not a decision-making body or a lobbying group. Its aim is to provide neutral arenas for scholarly discussion of the salient issues of our area of science, e.g., the DPF Summer Study on Particle Physics and Facilities in Snowmass, Colorado, in the summer of 1982. For this reason it concentrates on technical questions such as those of this Workshop.