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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "half-sample stratum pair402" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File02: File02: (file02_cb83.csv) BLDGID2 Building ID STR402 Half-sample stratum PAIR402 Half-sample pair number SQFTC2 Square footage $SQFTC17. BCWM2C Principal activity $BCWOM25. YRCONC2C Year constructed $YRCONC15 REGION2 Census region $REGION13 XSECWT2 Cross-sectional weight ELSUPL2N Supplier reported electricity use $YESNO15. NGSUPL2N Supplier reported natural gas use $YESNO15. FKSUPL2N Supplier reported fuel oil use $YESNO15.

2

Water permeation through stratum corneum lipid bilayers from atomistic simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stratum corneum, the outermost layer of skin, consists of keratin filled rigid non-viable corneocyte cells surrounded by multilayers of lipids. The lipid layer is responsible for the barrier properties of the skin. We calculate the excess chemical potential and diffusivity of water as a function of depth in lipid bilayers with compositions representative of the stratum corneum using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. The maximum in the excess free energy of water inside the lipid bilayers is found to be twice that of water in phospholipid bilayers at the same temperature. Permeability, which decreases exponentially with the free energy barrier, is reduced by several orders of magnitude as compared to with phospholipid bilayers. The average time it takes for a water molecule to cross the bilayer is calculated by solving the Smoluchowski equation in presence of the free energy barrier. For a bilayer composed of a 2:2:1 molar ratio of ceramide NS 24:0, cholesterol and free fatty acid 24:0 at 300K, we estimate the permeability P=3.7e-9 cm/s and the average crossing time \\tau_{av}=0.69 ms. The permeability is about 30 times smaller than existing experimental results on mammalian skin sections.

Chinmay Das; Peter D. Olmsted; Massimo G. Noro

2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

Bilayer Structure and Lipid Dynamics in a Model Stratum Corneum with Oleic Acid  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The stratum corneum is the uppermost layer of the skin and acts as a barrier to keep out contaminants and retain moisture. Understanding the molecular structure and behavior of this layer will provide guidance for optimizing its biological function. In this study we use a model mixture comprised of equimolar portions of ceramide NS (24:0), lignoceric acid, and cholesterol to model the effect of the addition of small amounts of oleic acid to the bilayer at 300 and 340 K. Five systems at each temperature have been simulated with concentrations between 0 and 0.1 mol % oleic acid. Our major finding is that subdiffusive behavior over the 200 ns time scale is evident in systems at 340 K, with cholesterol diffusion being enhanced with increased oleic acid. Importantly, cholesterol and other species diffuse faster when radial densities indicate nearest neighbors include more cholesterol. We also find that, with the addition of oleic acid, the bilayer midplane and interfacial densities are reduced and there is a 3% decrease in total thickness occurring mostly near the hydrophilic interface at 300 K with reduced overall density at 340 K. Increased interdigitation occurs independent of oleic acid with a temperature increase. Slight ordering of the long non-hydroxy fatty acid of the ceramide occurs near the hydrophilic interface as a function of the oleic acid concentration, but no significant impact on hydrogen bonding is seen in the chosen oleic acid concentrations.

Hoopes, Matthew I.; Noro, Massimo G.; Longo, Marjorie L.; Faller, Roland

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

4

Gaguk Zakaria received his Stratum One (Bachelor of Science) degree in Electrical Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering in 1985 from Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia, and his Master of Science degree

Beex, A. A. "Louis"

5

Soil Formation and Transport Processes on Hillslopes along a Precipitation Gradient in the Atacama Desert, Chile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008). Some cosmogenic radionuclide work has been done inhalf) and cosmogenic radionuclide data (second half). sampleFinkel for cosmogenic radionuclide analyses. This work was

Owen, Justine J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Kansas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas) Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or...

7

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

establishments within a stratum would also be homogeneous with respect to the quantities, types, and shares of energy consumed as fuels and for nonfuel purposes. Also, the weight...

8

Assessing understorey structural characteristics in eucalypt forests: an investigation of LiDAR techniques.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The potential of airborne LiDAR technology to quantify forest structure within eucalypt forests has been evaluated with a focus on the understorey stratum. To achieve… (more)

Goodwin, Nicholas R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Method for in situ heating of hydrocarbonaceous formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for extracting valuable constituents from underground hydrocarbonaceous deposits such as heavy crude tar sands and oil shale is disclosed. Initially, a stratum containing a rich deposit is hydraulically fractured to form a horizontally extending fracture plane. A conducting liquid and proppant is then injected into the fracture plane to form a conducting plane. Electrical excitations are then introduced into the stratum adjacent the conducting plate to retort the rich stratum along the conducting plane. The valuable constituents from the stratum adjacent the conducting plate are then recovered. Subsequently, the remainder of the deposit is also combustion retorted to further recover valuable constituents from the deposit. Various R.F. heating systems are also disclosed for use in the present invention.

Little, William E. (Morgantown, WV); McLendon, Thomas R. (Laramie, WY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by building type and climate zone with the intent ofWe roughly describe the climate zones as Coast, Foothills,group A. Stratum B. SPP climate zone - description 1- Coast

Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

13

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 2: Building Activity File 2: Building Activity (cb86f02.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. B-3 Any residential use RESUSE3 28- 28 $YESNO.

14

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 7: HVAC, Lighting, and Building Shell Conservation Features File 7: HVAC, Lighting, and Building Shell Conservation Features (cb86f07.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

15

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4: Imputation Flags for HVAC, Lighting 4: Imputation Flags for HVAC, Lighting and Shell Conservation Features (cb86f14.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

16

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 4: Building Shell, Equipment, Energy Audits, File 4: Building Shell, Equipment, Energy Audits, and "Ohter" Conservation Features (cb86f04.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

17

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 8: Electricity File 8: Electricity (cb86f08.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

18

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 3: Operating Hours File 3: Operating Hours (cb86f03.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

19

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3: Imputation Flags for Energy Audits, 3: Imputation Flags for Energy Audits, "Other" Conservation Features, and End Uses (cb86f13.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

20

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Propane and District Chilled Water 1: Propane and District Chilled Water (cb86f11.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "half-sample stratum pair402" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File10: District Steam and Hot Water File10: District Steam and Hot Water (cb86f10.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

22

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources 5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources (cb86f05.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

23

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File12: Imputation Flags for Summary Data, Building Activity, File12: Imputation Flags for Summary Data, Building Activity, Operating Hours, Shell and Equipment (cb86f12.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

24

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 11: District Steam and Hot Water File 11: District Steam and Hot Water (CBECS89.A11) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30

25

EVENT TREE ANALYSIS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: A CASE HISTORY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Savannah River Site (SRS), a Department of Energy (DOE) installation in west-central South Carolina there is a unique geologic stratum that exists at depth that has the potential to cause surface settlement resulting from a seismic event. In the past the particular stratum in question has been remediated via pressure grouting, however the benefits of remediation have always been debatable. Recently the SRS has attempted to frame the issue in terms of risk via an event tree or logic tree analysis. This paper describes that analysis, including the input data required.

Williams, R

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

26

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 12: District Chilled Water File 12: District Chilled Water (CBECS89.A12) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30

27

A system for ubiquitous fall monitoring at home via a wireless sensor network and a wearable mote  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accidental falls of our elderly, and physical injuries resulting, represent a major health and economic problem. Falls are the most common cause of serious injuries and are a major health threat in the stratum of older population. Early detection of ... Keywords: Accelerometer, Activities of daily living, Fall detection, Falls in the elderly, Wireless sensor network

Roberto Paoli; Francisco J. Fernández-Luque; Ginés Doménech; Félix Martínez; Juan Zapata; Ramón Ruiz

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Society of Petroleum Engineers Oil Deposits in Diatomites: A New Challenge for Subterranean Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

primary in a Lost Hills well dramatically increases after several months. There was no water injection at the injection wells after the hydrofracture, so that at the well, condition = 1 should be satisfied. The most. Each injection well occupies a certain vol- ume (area in 2D) of the stratum. Due to water injection

Patzek, Tadeusz W.

29

Mining subsidence prediction based on 3D stratigraphic model and visualization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

3D phenomenon involved in mining subsidence was Classified, summarized and aggregated, established the hierarchical structure that describing the geologic phenomena and engineering phenomena of stratum structure. Proposed a 3D stratigraphic model that ... Keywords: 3D stratigraphic model, 3D visualization, DEMs-TEN model, mining subsidence prediction

Ruisheng Jia; Yanjun Peng; Hongmei Sun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

third series volume xv part 2 2002 Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following death.2 Stratum B com- The author is indebted to Donald Harper, John Lagerwey, and Michael J and Immortality in the Mind of Han China," H JAS 25 (1965), pp. 80­122; and idem, "`O Soul, Come Back!' A Study jing chao jiabu zhi wei" , Li- shi yuyan yanjiusuo jikan 18 (1948), pp. 375­84; and Li Gang , "Ye lun

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

31

Linkage of anthropogenic aerosol to clouds and climate. Progress report No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the first year of this project equipment was built to obtain direct droplet measurement data from a mobile platform in fog (or mountain impacted stratum) and to characterize CCN according to particle volatility (thermal processing). Since the start date, July 15, 1990, was during the California stratus season and it was necessary to complete the construction of equipment and allow time before a field project it was not possible to begin field work until the summer of 1991. This report discusses surface measurements made in 1991 and 1992 as well as the SEAHUNT (Shiptrail Evolution Above High Updraft Naval Targets) Project and the ASTEX (Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment) Project.

Hudson, J.G.

1992-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Posters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters The Effects of Arctic Stratus Clouds on the Solar Energy Budget in the Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Ocean System Z. Jin and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Radiative Transfer Model We have developed a comprehensive radiative transfer model pertinent to the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system (Jin and Stamnes 1994; Jin et al., in press). The main features of the newly-developed radiative transfer model include: * The atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean each represented by a sufficient number of layers to resolve the change in the optical properties of each stratum. * An appropriate quadrature structure to take into account the refraction and the total reflection at the air-ice or air-

33

Fuel injector system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

Hsu, Bertrand D. (Erie, PA); Leonard, Gary L. (Schenctady, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Interpretation of Geoelectric Structure at Hululais Prospect Area, South Sumatra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Schlumberger resistivity surveys were conducted in 1993 as part of a combined geological, geophysical and geological program to investigate a geothermal prospect in the Hululais area, Southern Sumatra. These resistivity data resolved the upper conductive layer and were interpreted to define the shallow extent of a possible geothermal system. A follow-up magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out to probe deeper than the dc resistivity survey results achieved. However, the resistive sub-stratum below the conductive layer was still poorly resolved. Possible reasons for this include a preferential channeling of the telluric current within the thick shallow very conductive layer, thus limiting the penetration depth of the magnetotelluric signals and poor resolution due to high noise levels caused by significant rain and sferics.

Mulyadi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte’s measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, G.

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F?Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume?proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non?overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte’s measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

38

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Expression of proliferative and inflammatory markers in a full-thickness human skin equivalent following exposure to the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur mustard is a potent vesicant that induces inflammation, edema and blistering following dermal exposure. To assess molecular mechanisms mediating these responses, we analyzed the effects of the model sulfur mustard vesicant, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, on EpiDerm-FT{sup TM}, a commercially available full-thickness human skin equivalent. CEES (100-1000 {mu}M) caused a concentration-dependent increase in pyknotic nuclei and vacuolization in basal keratinocytes; at high concentrations (300-1000 {mu}M), CEES also disrupted keratin filament architecture in the stratum corneum. This was associated with time-dependent increases in expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a marker of cell proliferation, and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and phosphorylated histone H2AX, markers of DNA damage. Concentration- and time-dependent increases in mRNA and protein expression of eicosanoid biosynthetic enzymes including COX-2, 5-lipoxygenase, microsomal PGE{sub 2} synthases, leukotriene (LT) A{sub 4} hydrolase and LTC{sub 4} synthase were observed in CEES-treated skin equivalents, as well as in antioxidant enzymes, glutathione S-transferases A1-2 (GSTA1-2), GSTA3 and GSTA4. These data demonstrate that CEES induces rapid cellular damage, cytotoxicity and inflammation in full-thickness skin equivalents. These effects are similar to human responses to vesicants in vivo and suggest that the full thickness skin equivalent is a useful in vitro model to characterize the biological effects of mustards and to develop potential therapeutics.

Black, Adrienne T. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Hayden, Patrick J. [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Casillas, Robert P. [Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, OH (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Environmental Health Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY (United States); Gerecke, Donald R. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Pharmaceutics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D., E-mail: jlaskin@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

dg-ga/9411007 Math. Z., to appear. THE SINGULARITIES OF YANG-MILLS CONNECTIONS FOR BUNDLES ON A SURFACE. II. THE STRATIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Let ? be a closed surface, G a compact Lie group, not necessarily connected, with Lie algebra g, endowed with an adjoint action invariant scalar product, let ?: P ? ? be a principal G-bundle, and pick a Riemannian metric and orientation on ? so that the corresponding Yang-Mills equations are defined. In an earlier paper we determined the local structure of the moduli space N(?) of central Yang-Mills connections on ? near an arbitrary point. Here we show that the decomposition of N(?) into connected components of orbit types of central Yang-Mills connections is a stratification in the strong (i. e. Whitney) sense; furthermore each stratum, being a smooth manifold, inherits a finite volume symplectic structure from the given data. This complements, in a way, results of Atiyah-Bott in that it will in general decompose further the critical sets of the corresponding Yang-Mills functional into smooth pieces. 1991 Mathematics Subject Classification. 14D20, 32G13, 32S60, 58C27, 58D27, 58E15, 81T13. Key words and phrases. Geometry of principal bundles, singularities of smooth mappings, symplectic reduction with singularities, Yang-Mills connections, stratified symplectic space, Poisson structure, geometry of moduli spaces, representation spaces, moduli of vector bundles. † The author carried out this work in the framework of the VBAC research group of Europroj. 2 JOHANNES HUEBSCHMANN

Johannes Huebschmann

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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41

Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)], E-mail: otonielb@zeus.umich.mx; Liliana, Marquez-Benavides; Gaona Francelia, Pinette [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

DOI: 10.1007/s10439-010-0190-4 Effect of Surfactant Mixtures on Skin Structure and Barrier Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associate Editor Daniel Takashi Kamei oversaw the review of this article. Abstract—We investigated the effect of two commonly studied surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C 12TAB), on skin barrier properties. Using skin conductivity, FT-IR of stratum corneum samples, and penetration of radiolabelled SDS, we determined that addition of C12TAB lowers the ability of SDS to perturb skin’s barrier properties. Ultrafiltration experiments revealed that addition of C12TAB serves to decrease the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. None of the measured skin properties including enhancement of skin conductivity, perturbation of lipid structure and skin concentration of SDS correlated with the total SDS concentration in the donor compartment (i.e., the total SDS concentration). However, all these parameters correlated well against the concentration of monomers and sub-micellar aggregates. These findings provide the evidence of the importance of monomer and sub-micellar components in altering skin barrier properties.

Monica A. James-smith; Brittney Hellner; Nancy Annunziato; Samir Mitragotri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Foreign Influences and Consequences on the Nuragic Culture of Sardinia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although it is accepted that Phoenician colonization occurred on Sardinia by the 9th century B.C., it is possible that contact between Sardinia?s indigenous population and the Levantine region occurred in the Late Bronze Age (LBA). Eastern LBA goods found on the island are copper oxhide ingots and Aegean pottery. Previously, it has been suggested that Mycenaeans were responsible for bringing the eastern goods to Sardinia, but the presence of Aegean pottery shards does not confirm the presence of Mycenaean tradesmen. Also, scholars of LBA trade have explained the paucity of evidence for a Mycenaean merchant fleet. Interpretations of two LBA shipwrecks, Cape Gelidonya and Uluburun, indicate that eastern Mediterranean merchants of Cypriot or Syro-Canaanite origin, transported large quantities of oxhide ingots from the Levant towards the west. It remains possible that similar itinerant merchants conducted ventures bringing eastern goods to Sardinia while exploring the western Mediterranean. Trade in eastern goods may have stimulated the advancement that occurred in Nuragic culture in the LBA, resulting in the emergence of an elite social stratum in the Nuragic society. Archaeological evidence, such as elitist burials and increasingly complex architecture, supports the idea of cultural change due to internal competition. This „peer-polity? effect may have been incited because of limited accessibility to the exotic eastern goods and the „ownership? to the rights of this exchange.

Choltco, Margaret E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development of analytical and numerical models for the assessment and interpretation of hydrogeological field tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical models of the flow and tracer tests in fractured aquifers are being developed for the further study of radioactive wastes migration in round water at the Lake Area, which is associated with one of the waste disposal site in Russia. The choice of testing methods, tracer types (chemical or thermal) and the appropriate models are determined by the nature of the ongoing ground-water pollution processes and the hydrogeological features of the site under consideration. Special importance is attached to the increased density of wastes as well as to the possible redistribution of solutes both in the liquid phase and in the absorbed state (largely, on fracture surfaces). This allows for studying physical-and-chemical (hydrogeochemical) interaction parameters which are hard to obtain (considering a fractured structure of the rock mass) in laboratory. Moreover, a theoretical substantiation is being given to the field methods of studying the properties of a fractured stratum aimed at the further construction of the drainage system or the subsurface flow barrier (cutoff wall), as well as the monitoring system that will evaluate the reliability of these ground-water protection measures. The proposed mathematical models are based on a tight combination of analytical and numerical methods, the former being preferred in solving the principal (2D axisymmetrical) class of the problems. The choice of appropriate problems is based on the close feedback with subsequent field tests in the Lake Area. 63 refs.

Mironenko, V.A.; Rumynin, V.G.; Konosavsky, P.K. [St. Petersburg Mining Inst. (Russian Federation); Pozdniakov, S.P.; Shestakov, V.M. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Roshal, A.A. [Geosoft-Eastlink, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Grand Cane, De Soto Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--July 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipeline on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 12-13, 1991, at the Bayou Grand Cane crossing in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, where a pipeline constructed three years prior to the survey crosses the bayou through mature bottomland hardwoods. The sit was not seeded or fertilized after construction activities. At the time of sampling, a dense herb stratum (composed of mostly native species) covered the 20-m-wide ROW, except within drainage channels. As a result of the creation of the ROW, new habitat was created, plant diversity increased, and forest habitat became fragmented. The ROW must be maintained at an early stage of succession to allow access to the pipeline however, impacts to the wetland were minimized by decreasing the width of the ROW to 20 m and recreating the drainage channels across the ROW. The canopy trees on the ROW`s edge shaded part of the ROW, which helped to minimize the effects of the ROW.

Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Hayes, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Percutaneous characterization of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from topical skin application  

SciTech Connect

The synergistic percutaneous enhancement between insect repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone has been proven in our laboratory using a series of in vitro diffusion studies. In this study, we carried out an in vivo study to characterize skin permeation profiles from topical skin application of three commercially available repellent and sunscreen preparations. The correlation between skin disposition and drug metabolism was attempted by using data collected. Both DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin after the application and achieved substantial systemic absorption. Combined use of DEET and oxybenzone significantly enhanced the percutaneous penetration percentages (ranging 36-108%) due to mutual enhancement effects. Skin disposition indicated that DEET produced a faster transdermal permeation rate and higher systemic absorption extent, but oxybenzone formed a concentrated depot within the skin and delivered the content slowly over the time. In vivo AUC{sub P}/MRT of DEET and oxybenzone was increased by 37%/17% and 63%/10% when the two compounds were used together. No DEET was detected from the urine samples 48 h after the application. Tape stripping seemed to be a satisfactory approach for quantitative assessment of DEET and oxybenzone penetration into the stratum corneum. It was also concluded that pharmacological and toxicological perspectives from concurrent application of insect repellent and sunscreen products require further evaluation to ensure use efficacy and safety of these common consumer healthcare products.

Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); House, James D. [Department of Animal Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wang Tao [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gu Xiaochen [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: xgu@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessment of the Geothermal Development of Mexico  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mexico, with a 60 million population has an extension of almost 2 million square kilometers. A large number of volcanoes and hydrothermal manifestations are found in the area, particularly along the Pacific Coast. The electricity needs of this country require its installed capacity to be doubled every eight-and-a-half years. Although its main energy source is the hydrocarbons, new sources of energy are being investigated and developed. In 1973, at Cerro Prieto, a 75 MW plant was inaugurated utilizing geothermal steam, initiating in this way commercial exploitation of this energy. From there on an uninterrupted program of exploration and development has been followed, along and across the country. Probably the region with the highest potential of geothermal energy is the New-volcanic Belt, a zone 300 kilometers wide which crosses the country from the Pacific Coast to the Gulf of Mexico Coast. In this zone, the geothermal fields of Los Azufres, Los Negritos, Ixtlan de los Hervores, La Primavera and San Marcos are located. Sixteen wells have been drilled at Los Azufres, 14 good producers with an average temperature of 275 C. An area of 385 square kilometers is estimated can be exploited for steam production. By 1981, it is expected to have four wellhead turbogenerators rated 6 MW each. Two geothermal wells are now being drilled at La Primavera, with very good results. Temperatures of 275 C have been found at a depth of 800 m in the first well of the Rio Caliente module. The first two wells are now being drilled at Los Humeros geothermal zone. To date, 80 wells have been drilled at Cerro Prieto. In the last group of wells the producing stratum was found at a depth between 2000 and 3000 m. The temperature of this stratum is about 340 C, and each well has an average output of 200 tons per hour. Research is now being conducted to solve the problems encountered of casing corrosion, and for the development of better cementing materials and improved cementing techniques, since the results obtained have not been entirely satisfactory, being the life of the geothermal wells shortened, increasing the cost of power generation. Since its inauguration in 1973, Cerro Prieto has been generating electricity continuously, with increasing annual plant factors, better than 90 percent in the last three years. As of this date, the installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 150 MW. The installation of a fifth unit of 30 MW is now underway. This unit will utilize low pressure steam flashed from the separated water, now being discarded from units 1 to 4. A flashing plant is currently being installed for this purpose. This means a 20 percent increase without drilling more wells. Future plans are the construction of two more plants of 200 MW each, for a total of 620 MW for May 1983. These units will be operating at slightly higher pressures than the existing ones. It is estimated that a total capacity of 40,000 MW could be installed by the year 2000, using steam obtained from the known geothermal areas of Mexico.

Dominguez, B.; Bermejo, F.; Guiza, J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Information bias and lifetime mortality risks of radiation-induced cancer: Low LET radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additive and multiplicative models of relative risk were used to measure the effect of cancer misclassification and DS86 random errors on lifetime risk projections in the Life Span Study (LSS) of Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The true number of cancer deaths in each stratum of the cancer mortality cross-classification was estimated using sufficient statistics from the EM algorithm. Average survivor doses in the strata were corrected for DS86 random error ({sigma}=0.45) by use of reduction factors. Poisson regression was used to model the corrected and uncorrected mortality rates with risks in RERF Report 11 (Part 2) and the BEIR-V Report. Bias due to DS86 random error typically ranged from {minus}15% to {minus}30% for both sexes, and all sites and models. The total bias, including diagnostic misclassification, of excess risk of nonleukemia for exposure to 1 Sv from age 18 to 65 under the non-constant relative project model was {minus}37.1% for males and {minus}23.3% for females. Total excess risks of leukemia under the relative projection model were biased {minus}27.1% for males and {minus}43.4% for females. Thus, nonleukemia risks for 1 Sv from ages 18 to 65 (DRREF=2) increased from 1.91%/Sv to 2.68%/Sv among males and from 3.23%/Sv to 4.92%/Sv among females. Leukemia excess risk increased from 0.87%/Sv to 1.10/Sv among males and from 0.73%/Sv to 1.04/Sv among females. Bias was dependent on the gender, site, correction method, exposure profile and projection model considered. Future studies that use LSS data for US nuclear workers may be downwardly biased if lifetime risk projections are not adjusted for random and systematic errors.

Peterson, L.E.; Schull, W.J.; Davis, B.R. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Health Science Center; Buffler, P.A. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Acoustic telemetry.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broadcasting messages through the earth is a daunting task. Indeed, broadcasting a normal telephone conversion through the earth by wireless means is impossible with todays technology. Most of us don't care, but some do. Industries that drill into the earth need wireless communication to broadcast navigation parameters. This allows them to steer their drill bits. They also need information about the natural formation that they are drilling. Measurements of parameters such as pressure, temperature, and gamma radiation levels can tell them if they have found a valuable resource such as a geothermal reservoir or a stratum bearing natural gas. Wireless communication methods are available to the drilling industry. Information is broadcast via either pressure waves in the drilling fluid or electromagnetic waves in the earth and well tubing. Data transmission can only travel one way at rates around a few baud. Given that normal Internet telephone modems operate near 20,000 baud, these data rates are truly very slow. Moreover, communication is often interrupted or permanently blocked by drilling conditions or natural formation properties. Here we describe a tool that communicates with stress waves traveling through the steel drill pipe and production tubing in the well. It's based on an old idea called Acoustic Telemetry. But what we present here is more than an idea. This tool exists, it's drilled several wells, and it works. Currently, it's the first and only acoustic telemetry tool that can withstand the drilling environment. It broadcasts one way over a limited range at much faster rates than existing methods, but we also know how build a system that can communicate both up and down wells of indefinite length.

Drumheller, Douglas Schaeffer; Kuszmaul, Scott S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Authors: Rick Colwell, Oregon State University, and Dimitris Ntarlagiannis, Rutgers University. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco Mexico, May 21-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The new subdiscipline of biogeophysics has focused mostly on the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in contaminated subsurface environments usually undergoing remediation. However, the use of biogeophysics to examine the biogeochemistry of marine sediments has not yet been well integrated into conceptual models that describe subseafloor processes. Current examples of geophysical measurements that have been used to detect geomicrobiological processes or infer their location in the seafloor include sound surveillance system (SOSUS)-derived data that detect seafloor eruptive events, deep and shallow cross-sectional seismic surveys that determine the presence of hydraulically conductive zones or gas-bearing sediments (e.g., bottom-simulating reflectors or bubble-rich strata), and thermal profiles. One possible area for innovative biogeophysical characterization of the seafloor involves determining the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) in locations where sulfate diffuses from the seawater and methane emanates from subsurface strata. The SMI demarcates a stratum where microbially driven anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is dependent upon methane as an electron donor and sulfate as an electron acceptor. AMO is carried out by a recently defined, unique consortium of microbes that metabolically temper the flux of methane into the overlying seawater. The depth of the SMI is, respectively, shallow or deep according to whether a high or low rate of methane flux occurs from the deep sediments. Presently, the SMI can only be determined by direct measurements of methane and sulfate concentrations in the interstitial waters or by molecular biological techniques that target the microbes responsible for creating the SMI. Both methods require collection and considerable analysis of sediment samples. Therefore, detection of the SMI by non-destructive methods would be advantageous. As a key biogeochemical threshold in marine sediments, the depth of the SMI defines methane charge in marine sediments, whether it is from dissolved methane or from methane hydrates. As such, a biogeophysical strategy for determining SMI depth would represent an important contribution to assessing methane charge with respect to climate change, sediment stability, or potential energy resources.

52

In vitro and in vivo analysis of differential gene expression between normal norfolk terrier dogs and those with an autosomal recessive mutation in KRT10  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural diseases caused by keratin mutations are rare and have only been reported in humans. We have recently identified a heritable skin disorder in Norfolk terriers caused by a mutation in KRT10. Affected dogs have a tendency to form shallow erosions or blisters following mild trauma, which is first noted after the birthing process. As the dogs age, they display generalized hyperpigmentation and scaling that is most severe in the axillary and inguinal regions. The main histologic and ultrastructural features include: marked hyperkeratosis, epidermal hyperplasia, prominent vacuolation of the upper suprabasal layers, eosinophilic intracytoplasmic aggregates (keratin bundles), numerous and frequently enlarged keratohyaline granules, and epidermal hyperplasia. Analysis of an extended pedigree through seven generations confirmed an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. The keratin 10 mutation was defined as a G-T point mutation in intron 5 that affected splicing at the boundary of exon 4 and intron 5. The primary outcome of the mutation was a 35 bp deletion in exon 4 caused by use of a cryptic splice site. Real-time PCR quantitation of KRT10 confirmed that this mutation led to premature mRNA decay and an average 35-fold decrease in KRT10 message. Organotypic cell culture techniques were used to establish in vitro models for normal and affected Norfolk terriers. After 21 days of culture, normal epidermis was cornified with a compact and multifocally parakeratotic stratum corneum. Affected epidermis largely reproduced the expected morphologic alterations. Immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry for keratin 10 protein and real-time PCR quantitation of KRT10 message showed significantly less keratin expression in vitro than in vivo suggesting that the differentiation program in vitro underwent significant alterations. A diagnostic PCR assay was established for detection of the carrier state. Global analysis of gene expression between normal, carrier and affected dogs was performed with DermArray cDNA microarrays. Affected and carrier dogs showed differential regulation of 320 and 298 genes, respectively, between normal dogs. In affected dogs, 217 were upregulated and 103 were downregulated. In carrier dogs, 222 were upregulated and 76 were downregulated. 72 genes (65 upregulated, 7 downregulated) were altered in both affected and heterozygous dogs.

Barnhart, Kirstin Faye

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A Geomorphological Assessment of Armored Deposits Along the Southern Flanks of Grand Mesa, CO, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A series of deposits, located along the southern flanks of Grand Mesa, Colorado, and extending to the south, are problematic, and the processes related to emplacement are not understood. The overall area is dominated by two landform systems, Grand Mesa, which supported a Pleistocene ice cap, and the North Fork Gunnison River drainage. Thus, one has to ask: Are these deposits the result of the melting of the ice cap or are they fluvial terraces associated with the evolution of the ancestral Gunnison River? The goal of this research was to map the areal extent of the deposits and to interpret the formation and climatic significance in understanding the evolution of the Pleistocene landscape in the region. An extensive exposure, parallel to State Highway 65 near Cory Grade, was used for detailed description and sampling. Three additional exposures, ~10 to 20 km (~6 to 12 mi) were used to extend the areal extent of sampling. The study area was mapped using aerial photography and traditional field mapping aided by GPS. From the field work, a detailed stratigraphic column, including lithology and erodability, was constructed. Vertical exposures of the deposits were described, mapped, and recorded in the field and using detailed photo mosaics. Samples were collected from each stratum of the deposits for grain-size, shape, and sorting analyses. Five distinct depositional facies were identified. Sieve analysis on collected samples shows that four distinct grain-sizes occur in the outcrops; coarse sand, very-coarse sand, granule, and pebble and boulder. Mean grain-sizes range from 0.0722 to 0.9617, -0.0948 to -0.9456, -1.0566 to -1.9053, and -2.0050 to -3.4643, respectively. Glacio-fluvial depositional environments were identified and supported with observations of sedimentary structures and clast composition. Two major environments of deposition are recorded in the deposits; fluvial deposits from glacial outburst floods, and debris flow deposits. Imbrication of clasts in the strata suggests the flow came from the direction of Grand Mesa to the north. Facies and subsequent sequences were constructed to portray evidence that supports the glacio-fluvial mode of deposition.

Brunk, Timothy J.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Temporary Cementitious Sealers in Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Unlike conventional hydrothennal geothermal technology that utilizes hot water as the energy conversion resources tapped from natural hydrothermal reservoir located at {approx}10 km below the ground surface, Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) must create a hydrothermal reservoir in a hot rock stratum at temperatures {ge}200 C, present in {approx}5 km deep underground by employing hydraulic fracturing. This is the process of initiating and propagating a fracture as well as opening pre-existing fractures in a rock layer. In this operation, a considerable attention is paid to the pre-existing fractures and pressure-generated ones made in the underground foundation during drilling and logging. These fractures in terms of lost circulation zones often cause the wastage of a substantial amount of the circulated water-based drilling fluid or mud. Thus, such lost circulation zones must be plugged by sealing materials, so that the drilling operation can resume and continue. Next, one important consideration is the fact that the sealers must be disintegrated by highly pressured water to reopen the plugged fractures and to promote the propagation of reopened fractures. In response to this need, the objective of this phase I project in FYs 2009-2011 was to develop temporary cementitious fracture sealing materials possessing self-degradable properties generating when {ge} 200 C-heated scalers came in contact with water. At BNL, we formulated two types of non-Portland cementitious systems using inexpensive industrial by-products with pozzolanic properties, such as granulated blast-furnace slag from the steel industries, and fly ashes from coal-combustion power plants. These byproducts were activated by sodium silicate to initiate their pozzolanic reactions, and to create a cemetitious structure. One developed system was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class C fly ash (AASC); the other was sodium silicate alkali-activated slag/Class F fly ash (AASF) as the binder of temper-try sealers. Two specific additives without sodium silicate as alkaline additive were developed in this project: One additive was the sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) as self-degradation promoting additive; the other was the hard-burned magnesium oxide (MgO) made from calcinating at 1,000-1,500 C as an expansive additive. The AASC and AASF cementitious sealers made by incorporating an appropriate amount of these additives met the following six criteria: 1) One dry mix component product; 2) plastic viscosity, 20 to 70 cp at 300 rpm; 3) maintenance of pumpability for at least 1 hour at 85 C; 4) compressive strength >2000 psi; 5) self-degradable by injection with water at a certain pressure; and 6) expandable and swelling properties; {ge}0.5% of total volume of the sealer.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Butcher, T.; Brothers, L.; Bour, D.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z