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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "half-sample stratum pair402" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File02: File02: (file02_cb83.csv) BLDGID2 Building ID STR402 Half-sample stratum PAIR402 Half-sample pair number SQFTC2 Square footage $SQFTC17. BCWM2C Principal activity $BCWOM25. YRCONC2C Year constructed $YRCONC15 REGION2 Census region $REGION13 XSECWT2 Cross-sectional weight ELSUPL2N Supplier reported electricity use $YESNO15. NGSUPL2N Supplier reported natural gas use $YESNO15. FKSUPL2N Supplier reported fuel oil use $YESNO15.

2

The effect of stratum thickness ratio on crossflow in a stratified petroleum reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF STRATUM THICKNESS RATIO ON CROSSFLOW IN A STRATIFIED PETROLEUM RESERVOIR A Thesis By Michael J. Kereluk Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 4966 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECT OF STRATUM THICKNESS RATIO ON CROSSFLOW IN A STRATIFIED PETROLEUM RESERVOIR A Thesis By Michael I. Kereluk Approved as to style and content by: Chazrma of Com 'ttee...

Kereluk, Michael Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

3

Effect of the drilling mud filtrate temperature on the resistivity of the stratum saturated by oil and gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model of the axisymmetric distribution of the phases in the zone of invasion of the water-based drilling mud into the productive stratum whose porous space can simultaneously contain three immiscib...

V. I. Pen’kovskii; N. K. Korsakova…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Apoptotic Susceptibility of Cancer Cells Selected for Camptothecin Resistance: Gene Expression Profiling, Functional Analysis, and Molecular Interaction Mapping  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...basis of a stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis test, after taking into account...applied the stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis (extended Mantel-Haenszel...basis of a stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis test, after taking into account...

William C. Reinhold; Hosein Kouros-Mehr; Kurt W. Kohn; Alika K. Maunakea; Samir Lababidi; Anna Roschke; Kristen Stover; Jes Alexander; Panayotis Pantazis; Lance Miller; Edison Liu; Ilan R. Kirsch; Yoshimasa Urasaki; Yves Pommier; John N. Weinstein

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Reduced levels of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II in human prostate cancer: an immunohistochemical study.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...basis of a stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis test, after taking into account...applied the stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis (extended Mantel-Haenszel...basis of a stratum-adjusted Kruskal-Wallis test, after taking into account...

R H Williams; A M Stapleton; G Yang; L D Truong; E Rogers; T L Timme; T M Wheeler; P T Scardino; T C Thompson

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Accretion, Sediment Deposition and Suspended Sediment Dynamics in Mugu Lagoon, a Southern California Coastal Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

creek and marsh stratum on sediment deposition. Error barsBorgnis. 2009. Dynamics of sediment accumulation in Pond A21Vegetation on Suspended Sediment, Yangtze Delta. Journal of

Rosencranz, Jordan Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

High Fertility in the Central American Isthmus: A Risk in Transition (Translation of Spanish Version)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Costa Rica, Honduras, and Panama, and for the five stateschanges over time; only in Panama has there been a certaineconomic stratum are low (Panama, 1990) and the proportion

Rodríguez Vignoli, Jorge

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

E-Print Network 3.0 - apocrine protein signature Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

higher up... granules: (converts protein to keratin) Lamellar granules: release lipids that repels water 5-10 Stratum... (milk) glands 5-24Histology of skin glands...

9

Distribution and Synaptic Connectivity of Neuropeptide YImmunoreactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the inner nuclear layer (INL) and 90 cells/mm2 in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). In the INL, most primarily in stratum 1 of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). A few cells in the INL also ramified in stratum 3 of the IPL. A few immunoreactive processes, originating from somata in the INL and processes in the IPL

Grzywacz, Norberto

10

Underground Storage of Natural Gas (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any natural gas public utility may appropriate for its use for the underground storage of natural gas any subsurface stratum or formation in any land which the commission shall have found to be...

11

Miltefosine Increases Lipid and Protein Dynamics in Leishmania amazonensis Membranes at Concentrations Similar to Those Needed for Cytotoxicity Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CAPES, FUNAPE, and FAPEG. Rodrigo Alves Moreira, Sebastiao Antonio...0113 . 14. Alonso, A , WP dos Santos, SJ Leonor, JG dos Santos, and M Tabak. 2001. Stratum...CM d'Avila-Levy, ALS dos Santos, and MH Branquinha. 2011...

Rodrigo Alves Moreira; Sebastião Antonio Mendanha; Kelly Souza Fernandes; Grazzielle Guimaraes Matos; Lais Alonso; Miriam Leandro Dorta; Antonio Alonso

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

Method for in situ heating of hydrocarbonaceous formations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for extracting valuable constituents from underground hydrocarbonaceous deposits such as heavy crude tar sands and oil shale is disclosed. Initially, a stratum containing a rich deposit is hydraulically fractured to form a horizontally extending fracture plane. A conducting liquid and proppant is then injected into the fracture plane to form a conducting plane. Electrical excitations are then introduced into the stratum adjacent the conducting plate to retort the rich stratum along the conducting plane. The valuable constituents from the stratum adjacent the conducting plate are then recovered. Subsequently, the remainder of the deposit is also combustion retorted to further recover valuable constituents from the deposit. Various R.F. heating systems are also disclosed for use in the present invention.

Little, William E. (Morgantown, WV); McLendon, Thomas R. (Laramie, WY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mechanistic investigation of skin barrier perturbation induced by surfactants in the presence of humectants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The stratum corneum (SC) of the skin functions as a barrier between the body and the environment. Surfactants such as Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) are used in skin cleansers and in skin-care formulations because of their ...

Ghosh, Saswata

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fungal Skin Infections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dermatophyte or ringworm infections are confined to stratum corneum or keratinised structures derived from epidermis, such as nail or hair, and these superficial infections are considered in this chapter. ...

R. J. Hay

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 2: Building Activity File 2: Building Activity (cb86f02.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. B-3 Any residential use RESUSE3 28- 28 $YESNO.

16

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 7: HVAC, Lighting, and Building Shell Conservation Features File 7: HVAC, Lighting, and Building Shell Conservation Features (cb86f07.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

17

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4: Imputation Flags for HVAC, Lighting 4: Imputation Flags for HVAC, Lighting and Shell Conservation Features (cb86f14.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

18

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3: Imputation Flags for Energy Audits, 3: Imputation Flags for Energy Audits, "Other" Conservation Features, and End Uses (cb86f13.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

19

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 4: Building Shell, Equipment, Energy Audits, File 4: Building Shell, Equipment, Energy Audits, and "Ohter" Conservation Features (cb86f04.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

20

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 8: Electricity File 8: Electricity (cb86f08.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "half-sample stratum pair402" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Neonatal ovine uterine morphogenesis: mechanisms regulating the development of endometrial glands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the inner layer of the myometrium; 3) stromal cells [stratum compactum (SC) and stratum This thesis follows the style and format of Molecular Reproduction and Development. spongiosum (SS)] that aids in differentiation of the epithelia via epithelial... in the stromal cells (Yamashita et al. , 1989). In ER-tr knock-out (ERKO) mice, uterine gland development is retarded (Cooke et al. , 1998; Buchanan et al. , 1999). In neonatal pigs, administration of the ER-tr antagonist, ICI 182, 780, inhibits formation...

Taylor, Kristin Marie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 3: Operating Hours File 3: Operating Hours (cb86f03.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

23

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Propane and District Chilled Water 1: Propane and District Chilled Water (cb86f11.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

24

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File10: District Steam and Hot Water File10: District Steam and Hot Water (cb86f10.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

25

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 12: District Chilled Water File 12: District Chilled Water (CBECS89.A12) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30

26

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources 5: End Uses of Major Energy Sources (cb86f05.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA3 28- 29 $ACTIVTY.

27

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File12: Imputation Flags for Summary Data, Building Activity, File12: Imputation Flags for Summary Data, Building Activity, Operating Hours, Shell and Equipment (cb86f12.csv) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format Building identifier BLDGID3 1- 5 Adjusted weight ADJWT3 7- 14 Variance stratum STRATUM3 16- 17 Pair member PAIR3 19- 19 Census region REGION3 21- 21 $REGION. Census division CENDIV3 23- 23 $CENDIV. B-2 Square footage SQFTC3 25- 26 $SQFTC.

28

 

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

File 11: District Steam and Hot Water File 11: District Steam and Hot Water (CBECS89.A11) Ques- tion- naire Variable Variable Variable Variable item Description Name Position Format CASEID Building identifier BLDGID4 1- 5 Census region REGION4 7- 7 $REGION. Census division CENDIV4 9- 9 $CENDIV. B2 Square footage SQFTC4 11- 12 $SQFTC. Principal building activity PBA4 14- 15 $ACTIVTY. F3 Year construction was completed YRCONC4 17- 18 $YRCONC. Adjusted weight ADJWT4 20- 27 Variance stratum STRATUM4 29- 30

29

Impact of federal regulations on the small coal mine in Appalachia. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of a study of the total costs of compliance with federal regulations of coal mines in Eastern Kentucky. The mines were stratified by tonnage per year and employment. Mail and personal interview surveys were conducted for each stratum. Survey results attempt to suggest the competitive position of small concerns and to form a basis for necessary modifications in regulations.

Davis, B.; Ferrell, R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

file:///S|/ASBESTOS/NISTIRs/FRJan1994ClarificationMultilayers.txt[1/20/2011 11:19:53 AM] [Federal Register: January 5, 1994  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the results reported by layer (discrete stratum). Specific examples are given below. Plaster/Stucco Systems If plaster and stucco wall or ceiling systems are layered, and the layers can be distinguished, then the layers must be analyzed separately. Where a plaster or stucco wall system is constructed in layers

31

Toward Optimal Stratification for Stratified Monte-Carlo Integration Alexandra Carpentier a.carpentier@statslab.cam.ac.uk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R´emi Munos remi.munos@inria.fr INRIA Lille - Nord Europe, Parc Scientifique de la Haute-Borne, 40 proportional to the measure of the stratum times a quantity depending of the variations of F in the stra- tum

Boyer, Edmond

32

Obsidian Dating and East African Archeology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which contain few diagnostic tools (12). Stratum 2 con-sists...commonly to manufacture stone tools from Acheulean times (19...can pro-vide an independent assessment of bone apatite chronologies...the flaking and use of stone tools. As a result, numerous ter-restrial...

Joseph W. Michels; Ignatius S. T. Tsong; Charles M. Nelson

1983-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Situational Effects in Ability Testing 1 Running head: SITUATIONAL EFFECTS IN ABILITY TESTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for entry into the French Aircraft Pilot Training, gathered on a set of three tests (visual perception stability of broad cognitive abilities within a short time interval like one year. Broad cognitive abilities Testing 4 2. broad abilities (also named "stratum II"), defined as very general abilities like fluid

Boyer, Edmond

34

Fogs and Horticulture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to fog, two factors-the presence of poisons in the atmosphere and the reduction of light-have to be considered. To counteract these the urban cultivator is asked to construct ... openings where the admitted air can be filtered; whilst to compensate for the loss of light due to the absorption which the rays undergo in traversing a stratum of dense fog ...

1893-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

35

Vegetation survey of Four Mile Creek wetlands. [Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of forested wetlands along upper Four Mile Creek was conducted. The region from Road 3 to the creek headwaters was sampled to evaluate the composition of woody and herbaceons plant communities. All sites were found to fall into either the Nyssa sylvatica (Black Gum) -- Persea borbonia (Red Bay) or Nyssa sylvatica -- Acer rubrum (Red Maple) types. These community types are generally species-rich and diverse. Previous studies (Greenwood et al., 1990; Mackey, 1988) demonstrated contaminant stress in areas downslope from the F- and H-Area seepage basins. In the present study there were some indications of contaminant stress. In the wetland near H-Area, shrub basal area, ground cover stratum species richness, and diversity were low. In the area surrounding the F-Area tree kill zone, ground cover stratum cover and shrub basal area were low and ground cover stratum species richness was low. The moderately stressed site at F-Area also showed reduced overstory richness and diversity and reduced ground cover stratum richness. These results could, however, be due to the very high basal area of overstory trees in both stressed F-Area sites that would reduce light availability to understory plants. No threatened or endangered plant species were found in the areas sampled. 40 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Loehle, C.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Lasers in Surgery and Medicine 32:137142 (2003) Cooling Efficiency of Cryogen Spray During Laser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and other vascular skin lesions. The efficacy of CSC depends critically on the heat transfer coefficient (H layer, detach- ed from in vivo human skin. The heat transfer coefficient of the stratum corneum to be dependent on the specific design of the cryogen valve and nozzle. With nozzles used in typical clinical

Aguilar, Guillermo

37

A BASIS FOR MODIFYING THE TANK 12 COMPOSITE SAMPLING DESIGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SRR sampling campaign to obtain residual solids material from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm Tank 12 primary vessel resulted in obtaining appreciable material in all 6 planned source samples from the mound strata but only in 5 of the 6 planned source samples from the floor stratum. Consequently, the design of the compositing scheme presented in the Tank 12 Sampling and Analysis Plan, Pavletich (2014a), must be revised. Analytical Development of SRNL statistically evaluated the sampling uncertainty associated with using various compositing arrays and splitting one or more samples for compositing. The variance of the simple mean of composite sample concentrations is a reasonable standard to investigate the impact of the following sampling options. Composite Sample Design Option (a). Assign only 1 source sample from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each of the composite samples. Each source sample contributes material to only 1 composite sample. Two source samples from the floor stratum would not be used. Composite Sample Design Option (b). Assign 2 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that one source sample from the floor must be used twice, with 2 composite samples sharing material from this particular source sample. All five source samples from the floor would be used. Composite Sample Design Option (c). Assign 3 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that several of the source samples from the floor stratum must be assigned to more than one composite sample. All 5 source samples from the floor would be used. Using fewer than 12 source samples will increase the sampling variability over that of the Basic Composite Sample Design, Pavletich (2013). Considering the impact to the variance of the simple mean of the composite sample concentrations, the recommendation is to construct each sample composite using four or five source samples. Although the variance using 5 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (c)) was slightly less than the variance using 4 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (b)), there is no practical difference between those variances. This does not consider that the measurement error variance, which is the same for all composite sample design options considered in this report, will further dilute any differences. Composite Sample Design Option (a) had the largest variance for the mean concentration in the three composite samples and should be avoided. These results are consistent with Pavletich (2014b) which utilizes a low elevation and a high elevation mound source sample and two floor source samples for each composite sample. Utilizing the four source samples per composite design, Pavletich (2014b) utilizes aliquots of Floor Sample 4 for two composite samples.

Shine, G.

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

38

The impact of cooperative, group, and individual ranching systems on resource productivity in South-Central Kenya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, The issue of land subdivision of the group and cooperative ranching systems was also investigated. This was done by dividing the individual ranches into 4 strata (land area groups). The average land areas were 110, Z40, 500, and 800 ha for Strata 1-4.... To address the cooperative and group ranch land subdivision issue, similar budget analyses were performed for the four individ- ual ranch strata. Results revealed that stratum 4 had all positive net returns while the other three strata had negative net...

Onchoke, Sospeter Nyamwaro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Posters  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Posters The Effects of Arctic Stratus Clouds on the Solar Energy Budget in the Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Ocean System Z. Jin and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska B. D. Zak Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico Radiative Transfer Model We have developed a comprehensive radiative transfer model pertinent to the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system (Jin and Stamnes 1994; Jin et al., in press). The main features of the newly-developed radiative transfer model include: * The atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean each represented by a sufficient number of layers to resolve the change in the optical properties of each stratum. * An appropriate quadrature structure to take into account the refraction and the total reflection at the air-ice or air-

40

Instabilities of uniform filtration flows with phase transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New mechanisms of instability are described for vertical flows with phase transition through horizontally extended two-dimensional regions of a porous medium. A plane surface of phase transition becomes unstable at an infinitely large wavenumber and at zero wavenumber. In the latter case, the unstable flow undergoes reversible subcritical bifurcations leading to the development of secondary flows (which may not be horizontally uniform). The evolution of subcritical modes near the instability threshold is governed by the Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskunov equation. Two examples of flow through a porous medium are considered. One is the unstable flow across a water-bearing layer above a layer that carries a vapor-air mixture under isothermal conditions in the presence of capillary forces at the phase transition interface. The other is the vertical flow with phase transition in a high-temperature geothermal reservoir consisting of two high-permeability regions separated by a low-permeability stratum.

Il'ichev, A. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Steklov Institute of Mathematics (Russian Federation)], E-mail: ilichev@mi.ras.ru; Tsypkin, G. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Problems in Mechanics (Russian Federation)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "half-sample stratum pair402" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [National Institute of Toxicological Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Meyoung-Kon [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Sang Wook, E-mail: skin4u@korea.ac.kr [Laboratory of Cell Signaling and Nanomedicine, Department of Dermatology and Division of Brain Korea 21 Project for Biomedical Science, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

42

Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

45

Determination of characteristic alterations of the mass transfer process of thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of research on hydrocarbon mixture sorption in porous medium showed that adsorbent activity with regard to separate components of a gas mixture changes in partial dependence on pressure. The alteration of vented gas content will take place not only in gas condensate fields, when this effect is conditioned by the losses of condensate in the stratum, but also in gas fields, by methods connected with desorption processes. At the same time, gas composition is the basis for different process calculations, such as separation, gas transport, gas filtration in porous medium, and others. Thus the determination of characteristic alterations of gas mixture composition in thermodynamically nonequilibrium hydrocarbon systems mass transfer process becomes important. The binary (methane + pentane) and tricomponent (methane + butane + pentane) systems composed of individual gases of high purity have been researched. Then with help of mathematical methods of experimental data processing the moment of the more characteristic changes of the mass transfer process was discovered. Processing of experimental data for tricomponent system by statistical differentiation allowed the discovery of a pressure below of which lightening of the vented gas was observed.

Ramazanova, E.E.; Nurmamedova, Z.A. [Azerbaijan State Oil Academy, Baku (Azerbaijan). Geotechnological Research Inst. of Oil, Gas, and Chemistry

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Percutaneous characterization of the insect repellent DEET and the sunscreen oxybenzone from topical skin application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synergistic percutaneous enhancement between insect repellent DEET and sunscreen oxybenzone has been proven in our laboratory using a series of in vitro diffusion studies. In this study, we carried out an in vivo study to characterize skin permeation profiles from topical skin application of three commercially available repellent and sunscreen preparations. The correlation between skin disposition and drug metabolism was attempted by using data collected. Both DEET and oxybenzone permeated across the skin after the application and achieved substantial systemic absorption. Combined use of DEET and oxybenzone significantly enhanced the percutaneous penetration percentages (ranging 36-108%) due to mutual enhancement effects. Skin disposition indicated that DEET produced a faster transdermal permeation rate and higher systemic absorption extent, but oxybenzone formed a concentrated depot within the skin and delivered the content slowly over the time. In vivo AUC{sub P}/MRT of DEET and oxybenzone was increased by 37%/17% and 63%/10% when the two compounds were used together. No DEET was detected from the urine samples 48 h after the application. Tape stripping seemed to be a satisfactory approach for quantitative assessment of DEET and oxybenzone penetration into the stratum corneum. It was also concluded that pharmacological and toxicological perspectives from concurrent application of insect repellent and sunscreen products require further evaluation to ensure use efficacy and safety of these common consumer healthcare products.

Kasichayanula, Sreeneeranj [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); House, James D. [Department of Animal Science, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Wang Tao [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Gu Xiaochen [Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, 50 Sifton Road, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 (Canada)], E-mail: xgu@cc.umanitoba.ca

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Horizontal well will be employed in hydraulic fracturing research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on 10-well research site, planned to enable more controlled experiments for better definition of hydraulic fracturing. One of the 10 wells will be a near-horizontal well that will monitor microseismic events along its length. The Gas Research Institute (GR) has begun evaluating a low-permeability, gas-bearing sandstone as the target stratum for experiments to be conducted at its hydraulic fracture test site (HFTS). During a 4-year period, GRI will use the HFTS as a field laboratory to conduct multi-disciplinary research projects to assess the mechanics of hydraulic fracturing. As a result of a screening process the Davis sandstone in the Ft. Worth basin has emerged as the tight gas sand which best fits the selected criteria established by GRI and its contractors, GRI says. The Ft. Worth basin is located approximately 50 miles northwest of Ft. Worth. GRI is planning a research well to fully characterize the Davis prior to making a final decision on the location of the HFTS. If data from the research well indicate the Davis sand does not adequately meet selection criteria, other candidates identified in the screening process will be investigated.

Not Available

1991-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sampling Plan for Assaying Plates Containing Depleted or Normal Uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the rationale behind the proposed method for selecting a 'representative' sample of uranium metal plates, portions of which will be destructively assayed at the Y-12 Security Complex. The total inventory of plates is segregated into two populations, one for Material Type 10 (depleted uranium (DU)) and one for Material Type 81 (normal [or natural] uranium (NU)). The plates within each population are further stratified by common dimensions. A spreadsheet gives the collective mass of uranium element (and isotope for DU) and the piece count of all plates within each stratum. These data are summarized in Table 1. All plates are 100% uranium metal, and all but approximately 60% of the NU plates have Kel-F{reg_sign} coating. The book inventory gives an overall U-235 isotopic percentage of 0.22% for the DU plates, ranging from 0.19% to 0.22%. The U-235 ratio of the NU plates is assumed to be 0.71%. As shown in Table 1, the vast majority of the plates are comprised of depleted uranium, so most of the plates will be sampled from the DU population.

Ivan R. Thomas

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Air bubble-initiated biofabrication of freestanding, semi-permeable biopolymer membranes in PDMS microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Membrane functionality in microfluidics is critical for sample separation, concentration, compartmentalization, filtration, pumping, gradient generation, gas–liquid exchange, and other processes. Integration of functional membranes in microfluidics, however, is nontrivial. Here, we report a simple approach for biofabricating freestanding, semi-permeable biopolymer membranes in microfluidics, initiated with intentionally trapped air bubbles caught within specifically designed polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) apertures. Pressure-driven dissipation of air bubbles through the gas permeable PDMS facilitates local and quiescent contact of two oppositely charged polyelectrolyte polysaccharides forming a layered or sandwiched membrane. This polyelectrolyte complex membrane (PECM) is permeable to ions including hydroxyl ions, which further facilitates layer-by-layer assembly of membrane stratum. Assembled membranes that bridge the 40-?m apertures are sufficiently strong to withstand >1 atmosphere hydrostatic pressure. Further, the semi-permeable membranes allow for programmed generation of small molecule gradients while preventing protein efflux. We envision the simplicity of fabrication, which requires no reagents or complicated valving, when coupled with the functional properties of the membrane polysaccharides, will find utility in cell and tissue studies including preclinical drug screening and toxicity analyses.

Xiaolong Luo; Hsuan-Chen Wu; Jordan Betz; Gary W. Rubloff; William E. Bentley

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Environmental stratification to model climate change impacts on biodiversity and rubber production in Xishuangbanna, Yunnan, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An analysis and multi-model approach, based on a statistically derived Global Environmental Stratification (GEnS) and using a downscaled ensemble (n = 63) of CIMP5 Earth System Models applied across four representative concentration pathways (RCP), has been used to project the impact of climate change on spatial distribution of bioclimatic zones and ecosystems within the biodiverse rich Xishuangbanna Prefecture, Yunnan Province, by the year 2050. Four bioclimatic zones and 9 strata were identified, overlaid with protected areas, and associated with on-going landuse change, i.e. a rapid increase in rubber plantation from 8% to 22% of total area between 2002 and 2010. Significant changes in the areal extent and distribution of all zones and strata are projected, with an averaged mean annual temperature increase ranging from 1.6 °C to 2.4 °C. By 2050, there are significant geographical shifts in all identified strata, with an average upward shift of 309 m of elevation for all strata. On average, more than 75% of Xishuangbanna is predicted to shift to a different zone, with 96% shifting to a different stratum. The area conducive to rubber plantations, currently limited by climatic conditions, expands to nearly 75% of the total area. Climatic change potentially removes the bioclimatic barriers to further expansion of rubber plantations within the area and increases pressure on remaining biodiversity both within and outside of protected areas. The analysis provides the basis for understanding potential impacts of changing bioclimatic conditions on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and landuse change trends, within the context of ongoing rapid change and agricultural expansion in the area. Current efforts to conserve forests, biodiversity and traditional landuse systems require an improved understanding of both the projected climatic changes and the responses of biodiversity and traditional agricultural systems to changing conditions.

Robert J. Zomer; Antonio Trabucco; Mingcheng Wang; Rong Lang; Huafang Chen; Marc J. Metzger; Alex Smajgl; Philip Beckschäfer; Jianchu Xu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Novel Applications for Biogeophysics: Prospects for Detecting Key Subseafloor Geomicrobiological Processes or Habitats Authors: Rick Colwell, Oregon State University, and Dimitris Ntarlagiannis, Rutgers University. Venue: American Geophysical UnionÂ’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco Mexico, May 21-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/ [external site]). Abstract: The new subdiscipline of biogeophysics has focused mostly on the geophysical signatures of microbial processes in contaminated subsurface environments usually undergoing remediation. However, the use of biogeophysics to examine the biogeochemistry of marine sediments has not yet been well integrated into conceptual models that describe subseafloor processes. Current examples of geophysical measurements that have been used to detect geomicrobiological processes or infer their location in the seafloor include sound surveillance system (SOSUS)-derived data that detect seafloor eruptive events, deep and shallow cross-sectional seismic surveys that determine the presence of hydraulically conductive zones or gas-bearing sediments (e.g., bottom-simulating reflectors or bubble-rich strata), and thermal profiles. One possible area for innovative biogeophysical characterization of the seafloor involves determining the depth of the sulfate-methane interface (SMI) in locations where sulfate diffuses from the seawater and methane emanates from subsurface strata. The SMI demarcates a stratum where microbially driven anaerobic methane oxidation (AMO) is dependent upon methane as an electron donor and sulfate as an electron acceptor. AMO is carried out by a recently defined, unique consortium of microbes that metabolically temper the flux of methane into the overlying seawater. The depth of the SMI is, respectively, shallow or deep according to whether a high or low rate of methane flux occurs from the deep sediments. Presently, the SMI can only be determined by direct measurements of methane and sulfate concentrations in the interstitial waters or by molecular biological techniques that target the microbes responsible for creating the SMI. Both methods require collection and considerable analysis of sediment samples. Therefore, detection of the SMI by non-destructive methods would be advantageous. As a key biogeochemical threshold in marine sediments, the depth of the SMI defines methane charge in marine sediments, whether it is from dissolved methane or from methane hydrates. As such, a biogeophysical strategy for determining SMI depth would represent an important contribution to assessing methane charge with respect to climate change, sediment stability, or potential energy resources.

52

Brain microstructural development at near-term age in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants: An atlas-based diffusion imaging study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract At near-term age the brain undergoes rapid growth and development. Abnormalities identified during this period have been recognized as potential predictors of neurodevelopment in children born preterm. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter (WM) microstructure in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants to better understand regional WM developmental trajectories at near-term age. DTI scans were analyzed in a cross-sectional sample of 45 VLBW preterm infants (BW ? 1500 g, GA ? 32 weeks) within a cohort of 102 neonates admitted to the NICU and recruited to participate prior to standard-of-care MRI, from 2010 to 2011, 66/102 also had DTI. For inclusion in this analysis, 45 infants had DTI, no evidence of brain abnormality on MRI, and were scanned at PMA ? 40 weeks (34.7–38.6). White matter microstructure was analyzed in 19 subcortical regions defined by DiffeoMap neonatal brain atlas, using threshold values of trace  0.15. Regional fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were calculated and temporal–spatial trajectories of development were examined in relation to PMA and brain region location. Posterior regions within the corona radiata (CR), corpus callosum (CC), and internal capsule (IC) demonstrated significantly higher mean FA values compared to anterior regions. Posterior regions of the CR and IC demonstrated significantly lower RD values compared to anterior regions. Centrally located projection fibers demonstrated higher mean FA and lower RD values than peripheral regions including the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle, retrolenticular part of the IC, posterior thalamic radiation, and sagittal stratum. Centrally located association fibers of the external capsule had higher FA and lower RD than the more peripherally-located superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). A significant relationship between PMA-at-scan and FA, MD, and RD was demonstrated by a majority of regions, the strongest correlations were observed in the anterior limb of the internal capsule, a region undergoing early stages of myelination at near-term age, in which FA increased (r = .433, p = .003) and MD (r = ? .545, p = .000) and RD (r = ? .540, p = .000) decreased with PMA-at-scan. No correlation with PMA-at-scan was observed in the CC or SLF, regions that myelinate later in infancy. Regional patterns of higher FA and lower RD were observed at this near-term age, suggestive of more advanced microstructural development in posterior compared to anterior regions within the CR, CC, and IC and in central compared to peripheral WM structures. Evidence of region-specific rates of microstructural development was observed. Temporal–spatial patterns of WM microstructure development at near-term age have important implications for interpretation of near-term DTI and for identification of aberrations in typical developmental trajectories that may signal future impairment.

Jessica Rose; Rachel Vassar; Katelyn Cahill-Rowley; Ximena Stecher Guzman; David K. Stevenson; Naama Barnea-Goraly

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z