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Sample records for half-sample pair number

  1. Heavy pair production currents with general quantum numbers in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dimensionally regularized nonrelativistic QCD (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Heavy pair production currents with general quantum numbers in dimensionally regularized nonrelativistic QCD Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Heavy pair production currents with general quantum numbers in dimensionally regularized nonrelativistic QCD We discuss the form and construction of general color singlet heavy particle-antiparticle pair production currents for arbitrary quantum numbers, and

  2. Heavy pair production currents with general quantum numbers in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    currents for heavy quark and colored scalar pairs in arbitrary sup 2S+1Lsub J angular-spin states are determined at next-to-leading order in the nonrelativistic power...

  3. Particle-number fluctuations and neutron-proton pairing effects on proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douici, M.; Allal, N. H.; Fellah, M.; Benhamouda, N.; Oudih, M. R.

    2012-10-20

    The particle-number fluctuation effect on the root-mean-square (rms) proton and neutron radii of even-even N Almost-Equal-To Z nuclei is studied in the isovector neutron-proton (np) pairing case using an exact particle-number projection method and the Woods-Saxon model.

  4. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the

  5. Extracting the mass dependence and quantum numbers of short-range correlated pairs from A(e,e'p) and A(e,e'pp) scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Colle, C.; Hen, O.; Cosyn, W.; Korover, I.; Piasetzky, E.; Ryckebusch, J.; Weinstein, L. B.

    2015-08-06

    We present an analysis of electroinduced single-proton and two-proton knockout measurements off 12C, 27Al, 56Fe, and 208Pb in kinematics dominated by scattering off SRC pairs.

  6. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File02: (file02cb83.csv) BLDGID2 Building ID STR402 Half-sample stratum PAIR402 Half-sample pair number SQFTC2 Square footage SQFTC17. BCWM2C Principal activity BCWOM25. ...

  7. Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solution of the pairing Hamiltonian in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and discuss several aspects of the theory, including the unitarity of the ... of pairing fields, and treatment of pairing in systems with odd particle numbers. ...

  8. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Valles

    2010-01-08

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  9. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goals are to design, develop, and evaluate the scalability and commercial feasibility of the PSH Paired Straight Hearth Furnace alternative ironmaking process.

  10. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paired Straight Hearth Furnace A Coal Based DRI and Molten Metal Process for Long Range Replacement of Blast Furnaces and Coke Ovens The U. S. steel industry has reduced its energy intensity per ton of steel shipped by 33% since 1990. However, further signifcant gains in energy effciency will require the development of new, transformational iron and steelmaking processes. The Paired Straight Hearth Furnace (PSH) process is an emerging alterna- tive high productivity, direct reduced iron (DRI)

  11. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scattering creates artificial Fermi arcs for Tc ? T ? Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.

  12. Nuclear Pairs | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Pairs High-Resolution Spectrometers The two High-Resolution Spectrometers in Hall A Opposites attract and likes repel, or so the saying goes. That is the case in magnetism, where two bar magnets will only link up with the north end of one facing the south of the other. But where the nucleus of the atom is concerned, the quirky laws of physics are a little different. There, an attraction between the positively charged proton and the neutral neutron holds the nucleus together. Sometimes, a

  13. Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation Authors: Hupin, G ; Lacroix, D Publication Date: 2012-04-26 OSTI Identifier: 1089536 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-552951 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical review C, vol. 86, na, August 17, 2012, pp. 024309 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore

  14. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-03-11

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus

  15. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3023307 Name: Madeleine Brown Organization: nJa Address: --- -------- -------- -- Country: Phone Number: United States Fax Number: n/a E-mail: --- -------- --------_._------ --- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Please send me a copy of the emails and records relating to the decision to allow the underage son of Bill Gates to tour Hanford in June 2010. Please also send the emails and records that justify the Department of Energy to prevent other minors from visiting B Reactor. Optional

  16. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1074438 Name: Gayle Cooper Organization: nla Address: _ Country: United States Phone Number: Fax Number: nla E-mail: . ~===--------- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Information pertaining to the Department of Energy's cost estimate for reinstating pension benefit service years to the Enterprise Company (ENCO) employees who are active plan participants in the Hanford Site Pension Plan. This cost estimate was an outcome of the DOE's Worker Town Hall Meetings held on September 17-18, 2009.

  17. Pairing, pseudogap and Fermi arcs in cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaminski, Adam; Kondo, Takeshi; Takeuchi, Tsunehiro; Gu, Genda

    2014-04-29

    We use Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the relationship between the pseudogap, pairing and Fermi arcs in cuprates. High quality data measured over a wide range of dopings reveals a consistent picture of Fermiology and pairing in these materials. The pseudogap is due to an ordered state that competes with superconductivity rather than preformed pairs. Pairing does occur below Tpair ~ 150K and significantly above Tc, but well below T* and the doping dependence of this temperature scale is distinct from that of the pseudogap. The d-wave gap is present below Tpair, and its interplay with strong scatteringmore » creates “artificial” Fermi arcs for Tc ≤ T ≤ Tpair. However, above Tpair, the pseudogap exists only at the antipodal region. This leads to presence of real, gapless Fermi arcs close to the node. The length of these arcs remains constant up to T*, where the full Fermi surface is recovered. As a result, we demonstrate that these findings resolve a number of seemingly contradictory scenarios.« less

  18. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Paired Straight Hearth Furnace Paired Straight Hearth Furnace PDF icon paired_straight_hearth_furnace.pdf More Documents & Publications Nitrogen Control in Electric Arc Furnace Steelmaking by Direct Reduced Iron Fines Injection Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Furnace Steelmaking

  19. Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with heavy bosons (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association with heavy bosons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak and QCD corrections to top-pair hadroproduction in association with heavy bosons Authors: Frixione, S. ; /CERN ; Hirschi, V. ; /SLAC ; Pagani, D. ; /Louvain U., CP3 ; Shao, H.-S. ; /CERN ; Zaro, M. ; /Paris U., IV Publication Date: 2015-05-20 OSTI Identifier: 1182439 Report Number(s):

  20. Calculations of pair production by Monte Carlo methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bottcher, C.; Strayer, M.R.

    1991-01-01

    We describe some of the technical design issues associated with the production of particle-antiparticle pairs in very large accelerators. To answer these questions requires extensive calculation of Feynman diagrams, in effect multi-dimensional integrals, which we evaluate by Monte Carlo methods on a variety of supercomputers. We present some portable algorithms for generating random numbers on vector and parallel architecture machines. 12 refs., 14 figs.

  1. Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property:NumOfPlants Property:NumProdWells Property:NumRepWells Property:Number of Color Cameras Property:Number of Devices Deployed Property:Number of Plants included in...

  2. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSR Key Number Retrieval Pease enter key in the box Submit

  3. Pair Creation at Large Inherent Angles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, P.; Tauchi, T.; Schroeder, D.V.; /SLAC

    2007-04-25

    In the next-generation linear colliders, the low-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} pairs created during the collision of high-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} beams would cause potential deleterious background problems to the detectors. At low collider energies, the pairs are made essentially by the incoherent process, where the pair is created by the interaction of beamstrahlung photons on the individual particles in the oncoming beam. This problem was first identified by Zolotarev, et al[1]. At energies where the beamstrahlung parameter {Upsilon} lies approximately in the range 0.6 {approx}< {Upsilon} {approx}< 100, pair creation from the beamstrahlung photons is dominated by a coherent process, first noted by Chen[2]. The seriousness of this pair creation problem lies in the transverse momenta that the pair particles carry when leaving the interaction point (IP) with large angles. One source of transverse momentum is from the kick by the field of the oncoming beam which results in an outcoming angle {theta} {proportional_to} 1/{radical}x, where x is the fractional energy of the particle relative to the initial beam particle energy[2,3]. As was shown in Ref. 131, there in fact exists an energy threshold for the coherent pairs, where x{sub th} {approx}> 1/2{Upsilon}. Thus within a tolerable exiting angle, there exists an upper limit for {Upsilon} where all coherent pairs would leave the detector through the exhaust port[4]. A somewhat different analysis has been done by Schroeder[5]. In the next generation of linear colliders, as it occurs, the coherent pairs can be exponentially suppressed[2] by properly choosing the {Upsilon}({approx}< 0.6). When this is achieved, the incoherent pairs becomes dominant. Since the central issue is the transverse momentum for particles with large angles, we notice that there is another source for it. Namely, when the pair particles are created at low energies, the intrinsic angles of these pairs when produced may already be large. This issue was first studied in Ref. [1]. In this paper we reinvestigate the problem, following essentially the same equivalent photon approach, but with changes in specific details including the virtual photon spectrum. In addition, various assumptions are made more explicit. The formulas derived are then applied to the collider parameters designed by Palmer[6].

  4. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-02-14

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  5. 90 Seconds of Discovery: Frustrated Lewis Pairs

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kathmann, Shawn; Schenter, Greg; Autrey, Tom

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen activating catalysts play an important role in producing valuable chemicals, such as biofuels and ammonia. As a part of efforts to develop the next generation of these catalysts, PNNL researchers have found potential in Frustrated Lewis Pairs.

  6. Optical flashes from internal pairs formed in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panaitescu, A.

    2015-06-09

    We develop a numerical formalism for calculating the distribution with energy of the (internal) pairs formed in a relativistic source from unscattered MeVTeV photons. For gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, this formalism is more suitable if the relativistic reverse shock that energizes the ejecta is the source of the GeV photons. The number of pairs formed is set by the source GeV output (calculated from the Fermi-LAT fluence), the unknown source Lorentz factor, and the unmeasured peak energy of the LAT spectral component. We show synchrotron and inverse-Compton light curves expected from pairs formed in the shocked medium and identify some criteria for testing a pair origin of GRB optical counterparts. Pairs formed in bright LAT afterglows with a Lorentz factor in the few hundreds may produce bright optical counterparts ($R\\lt 10$) lasting for up to one hundred seconds. As a result, the number of internal pairs formed from unscattered seed photons decreases very strongly with the source Lorentz factor, thus bright GRB optical counterparts cannot arise from internal pairs if the afterglow Lorentz factor is above several hundreds.

  7. Optical flashes from internal pairs formed in gamma-ray burst afterglows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Panaitescu, A.

    2015-06-09

    We develop a numerical formalism for calculating the distribution with energy of the (internal) pairs formed in a relativistic source from unscattered MeV–TeV photons. For gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows, this formalism is more suitable if the relativistic reverse shock that energizes the ejecta is the source of the GeV photons. The number of pairs formed is set by the source GeV output (calculated from the Fermi-LAT fluence), the unknown source Lorentz factor, and the unmeasured peak energy of the LAT spectral component. We show synchrotron and inverse-Compton light curves expected from pairs formed in the shocked medium and identify some criteria for testing a pair origin of GRB optical counterparts. Pairs formed in bright LAT afterglows with a Lorentz factor in the few hundreds may produce bright optical counterparts (more » $$R\\lt 10$$) lasting for up to one hundred seconds. As a result, the number of internal pairs formed from unscattered seed photons decreases very strongly with the source Lorentz factor, thus bright GRB optical counterparts cannot arise from internal pairs if the afterglow Lorentz factor is above several hundreds.« less

  8. Big Numbers | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Big Numbers May 16, 2011 This article has some numbers in it. In principle, numbers are just language, like English or Japanese. Nevertheless, it is true that not everyone is comfortable or facile with numbers and may be turned off by too many of them. To those people, I apologize that this article pays less attention to maximizing the readership than some I do. But sometimes it's just appropriate to indulge one's self, so here goes. When we discuss the performance of some piece of equipment, we

  9. Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiprocessor switch with selective pairing System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or

  10. Automated DNA Base Pair Calling Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-07-07

    The procedure solves the problem of calling the DNA base pair sequence from two channel electropherogram separations in an automated fashion. The core of the program involves a peak picking algorithm based upon first, second, and third derivative spectra for each electropherogram channel, signal levels as a function of time, peak spacing, base pair signal to noise sequence patterns, frequency vs ratio of the two channel histograms, and confidence levels generated during the run. Themore »ratios of the two channels at peak centers can be used to accurately and reproducibly determine the base pair sequence. A further enhancement is a novel Gaussian deconvolution used to determine the peak heights used in generating the ratio.« less

  11. Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold ...

  12. Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking: Origin of the Raman modes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking: Origin of the Raman modes in superconducting cuprates Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pair breaking versus symmetry breaking:...

  13. The spontaneous synchronized dance of pairs of water molecules...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The spontaneous synchronized dance of pairs of water molecules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The spontaneous synchronized dance of pairs of water molecules Molecular ...

  14. Protons Pair Up With Neutrons | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Embargoed: Not for Release Until 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time Thursday, 29 May Contact: Kandice Carter 757-269-7263 Protons Pair Up With Neutrons NEWPORT NEWS, VA - Research performed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has found that protons are about 20 times more likely to pair up with neutrons than with other protons in the nucleus. The result will be published online by the journal Science, at the Science Express website. BigBite Correlated protons

  15. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  16. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool formore » direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.« less

  17. Resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galda, Alexey; Mel'nikov, A. S.; Vinokur, V. M.

    2015-02-09

    Superconducting fluctuations have proved to be an irreplaceable source of information about microscopic and macroscopic material parameters that could be inferred from the experiment. According to common wisdom, the effect of thermodynamic fluctuations in the vicinity of the superconducting transition temperature, Tc, is to round off all of the sharp corners and discontinuities, which otherwise would have been expected to occur at Tc. Here we report the current spikes due to radiation-induced resonant tunneling of fluctuation Cooper pairs between two superconductors which grow even sharper and more pronounced upon approach to Tc. This striking effect offers an unprecedented tool for direct measurements of fluctuation Cooper pair lifetime, which is key to our understanding of the fluctuation regime, most notably to nature of the pseudogap state in high-temperature superconductors. Our finding marks a radical departure from the conventional view of superconducting fluctuations as a blurring and rounding phenomenon.

  18. Document Details Document Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Document Details Document Number Date of Document Document Title/Description [Links below to each document] D195066340 Not listed. N/A REVISIONS IN STRATIGRAPHIC NOMENCLATURE OF COLUMBIA RIVER BASALT GROUP D196000240 Not listed. N/A EPA DENIAL OF LINER LEACHATE COLLECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS D196005916 Not listed. N/A LATE CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION WITHIN SUBSIDING BASIN SOUTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON D196025993 RHO-BWI-ST-14 N/A SUPRABASALT SEDIMENTS OF COLD CREEK SYNCLINE AREA

  19. Pair creation in an electric flux tube and chiral anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwazaki, Aiichi [International Economics and Politics, Nishogakusha University, Ohi Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8585 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    Using the chiral anomaly, we discuss the pair creation of massless fermions under the effect of a magnetic field B-vector when an electric flux tube E-vector parallel to B-vector is switched on. The tube is axially symmetric and infinitely long. For the constraint B>>E, we can analytically obtain the spatial and temporal behaviors of the number density of the fermions, the azimuthal magnetic field generated by the fermions, and so on. We find that the lifetime t{sub c} of the electric field becomes shorter as the width of the tube becomes narrower. Applying it to the plasma in high-energy heavy-ion collisions, we find that the color electric field decays quickly such that t{sub c}{approx_equal}Q{sub s}{sup -1}, in which Q{sub s} is the saturation momentum.

  20. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M. (Oakland, CA); Dawson, John (Pacific Palisades, CA)

    1993-01-01

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source.

  1. Synergy between pair coupled cluster doubles and pair density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garza, Alejandro J.; Bulik, Ireneusz W.; Henderson, Thomas M.; Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    2015-01-28

    Pair coupled cluster doubles (pCCD) has been recently studied as a method capable of accounting for static correlation with low polynomial cost. We present three combinations of pCCD with KohnSham functionals of the density and on-top pair density (the probability of finding two electrons on top of each other) to add dynamic correlation to pCCD without double counting. With a negligible increase in computational cost, these pCCD+DFT blends greatly improve upon pCCD in the description of typical problems where static and dynamic correlations are both important. We argue thatas a black-box method with low scaling, size-extensivity, size-consistency, and a simple quasidiagonal two-particle density matrixpCCD is an excellent match for pair density functionals in this type of fusion of multireference wavefunctions with DFT.

  2. Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair production at LHC14 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair ...

  3. Search for pair production of first and second generation leptoquarks...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pair production of first and second generation leptoquarks in proton-proton collisions at sqrts 8 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for pair production...

  4. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. II. Recoupled pair bond dyads in carbon and sulfur difluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunning, Thom H. Takeshita, Tyler Y.; Xu, Lu T.

    2015-01-21

    Formation of a bond between a second ligand and a molecule with a recoupled pair bond results in a recoupled pair bond dyad. We examine the recoupled pair bond dyads in the a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2}, which are formed by the addition of a fluorine atom to the a{sup 4}?{sup ?} states of CF and SF, both of which possess recoupled pair bonds. The two dyads are very different. In SF{sub 2}, the second FSF bond is very strong (D{sub e} = 106.3 kcal/mol), the bond length is much shorter than that in the SF(a{sup 4}?{sup ?}) state (1.666 versus 1.882 ), and the three atoms are nearly collinear (?{sub e} = 162.7) with only a small barrier to linearity (0.4 kcal/mol). In CF{sub 2}, the second FCF bond is also very strong (D{sub e} = 149.5 kcal/mol), but the bond is only slightly shorter than that in the CF(a{sup 4}?{sup ?}) state (1.314 versus 1.327 ), and the molecule is strongly bent (?{sub e} = 119.0) with an 80.5 kcal/mol barrier to linearity. The a{sup 3}B{sub 1} states of CF{sub 2} and SF{sub 2} illustrate the fundamental differences between recoupled pair bond dyads formed from 2s and 3p lone pairs.

  5. Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e + e - annihilation at NNLO

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in QCD: The vector current contributions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e + e - annihilation at NNLO in QCD: The vector current contributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e + e - annihilation at NNLO in QCD: The vector current contributions Authors: Gao, Jun ; Zhu, Hua Xing Publication Date: 2014-12-17 OSTI Identifier: 1180238 Grant/Contract Number: SC0003870; DEAC0276SF00515 Type:

  6. Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  7. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  9. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  10. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  11. New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  12. New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  13. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  14. Method for sequencing DNA base pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sessler, A.M.; Dawson, J.

    1993-12-14

    The base pairs of a DNA structure are sequenced with the use of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The DNA structure is scanned by the STM probe tip, and, as it is being scanned, the DNA structure is separately subjected to a sequence of infrared radiation from four different sources, each source being selected to preferentially excite one of the four different bases in the DNA structure. Each particular base being scanned is subjected to such sequence of infrared radiation from the four different sources as that particular base is being scanned. The DNA structure as a whole is separately imaged for each subjection thereof to radiation from one only of each source. 6 figures.

  15. Scheduler for multiprocessor system switch with selective pairing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael Karl; Salapura, Valentina

    2015-01-06

    System, method and computer program product for scheduling threads in a multiprocessing system with selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). The method configures the selective pairing facility to use checking provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating need for hardware checking. The method configures the selective pairing facility to provide multiple independent cores and allocate threads to corresponding processor cores indicating inherent resilience.

  16. Pairing in bulk nuclear matter beyond BCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, D.; Dickhoff, W. H.; Dussan, H.; Witte, S. J.; Rios, A.; Polls, A.

    2014-10-15

    The influence of short-range correlations on the spectral distribution of neutrons is incorporated in the solution of the gap equation for the {sup 3}P{sub 2}?{sup 3}F{sub 2} coupled channel in pure neutron matter. This effect is studied for different realistic interactions including one based on chiral perturbation theory. The gap in this channel vanishes at all relevant densities due to the treatment of these correlations. We also consider the effect of long-range correlations by including polarization terms in addition to the bare interaction which allow the neutrons to exchange density and spin fluctuations governed by the strength of Landau parameters allowed to have reasonable values consistent with the available literature. Preliminary results indicate that reasonable values of these parameters do not generate a gap in the {sup 3}P{sub 2}?{sup 3}F{sub 2} coupled channel either for all three realistic interactions although the pairing interaction becomes slightly more attractive.

  17. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ☉} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new

  18. Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak matching conditions for top pair production at threshold We determine the real parts of electroweak matching conditions relevant for top quark pair production close to threshold in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic (NNLL) order. Numerically the corrections are comparable to the NNLL QCD corrections.

  19. Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated ...

  20. Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We argue that the distribution at large transverse momentum, Qsub T>>Q, with the pair's ... the transverse momentum distributions in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and ...

  1. Synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in GRB afterglows (analytical treatment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panaitescu, A.; Vestrand, W. T. [Space and Remote Sensing, MS B244, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    We calculate the synchrotron and inverse-Compton emissions from pairs formed in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows from high-energy photons (above 100 MeV), assuming a power-law photon spectrum C {sub ?}??{sup 2} and considering only the pairs generated from primary high-energy photons. The essential properties of these pairs (number, minimal energy, cooling energy, distribution with energy) and of their emission (peak flux, spectral breaks, spectral slope) are set by the observables GeV fluence ?(t) = Ft and spectrum, and by the Lorentz factor, ?, and magnetic field, B, of the source of high-energy photons, at observer time, t. Optical and X-ray pseudo light curves, F {sub ?}(?), are calculated for the given B; proper synchrotron self-Compton light curves are calculated by setting the dynamics ?(t) of the high-energy photon source to be that of a decelerating, relativistic shock. It is found that the emission from pairs can accommodate the flux and decays of the optical flashes measured during the prompt (GRB) phase, but it decays faster than the X-ray plateaus observed during the delayed (afterglow) phase. The brightest pair optical emission is obtained for 100 < ? < 500, and depends mostly on the GeV fluence, being independent of the source redshift. Emission from pairs formed during the GRB phase offers an alternate explanation to reverse-shock optical flashes. These two models may be distinguished based on their corresponding flux decay index-spectral slope relations, different correlations with the Large Area Telescope fluence, or through modeling of the afterglow multiwavelength data.

  2. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependentmore » pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.« less

  3. Pairing-induced speedup of nuclear spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadhukhan, Jhilam; Dobaczewski, J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Sheikh, J. A.; Baran, A.

    2014-12-22

    Collective inertia is strongly influenced at the level crossing at which the quantum system changes its microscopic configuration diabatically. Pairing correlations tend to make the large-amplitude nuclear collective motion more adiabatic by reducing the effect of these configuration changes. Competition between pairing and level crossing is thus expected to have a profound impact on spontaneous fission lifetimes. To elucidate the role of nucleonic pairing on spontaneous fission, we study the dynamic fission trajectories of 264Fm and 240Pu using the state-of-the-art self-consistent framework. We employ the superfluid nuclear density functional theory with the Skyrme energy density functional SkM* and a density-dependent pairing interaction. Along with shape variables, proton and neutron pairing correlations are taken as collective coordinates. The collective inertia tensor is calculated within the nonperturbative cranking approximation. The fission paths are obtained by using the least action principle in a four-dimensional collective space of shape and pairing coordinates. Pairing correlations are enhanced along the minimum-action fission path. For the symmetric fission of 264Fm, where the effect of triaxiality on the fission barrier is large, the geometry of the fission pathway in the space of the shape degrees of freedom is weakly impacted by pairing. This is not the case for 240Pu, where pairing fluctuations restore the axial symmetry of the dynamic fission trajectory. The minimum-action fission path is strongly impacted by nucleonic pairing. In some cases, the dynamical coupling between shape and pairing degrees of freedom can lead to a dramatic departure from the static picture. As a result, in the dynamical description of nuclear fission, particle-particle correlations should be considered on the same footing as those associated with shape degrees of freedom.

  4. PULSAR PAIR CASCADES IN A DISTORTED MAGNETIC DIPOLE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, Alice K.; Muslimov, Alex G.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the effect of a distorted neutron star dipole magnetic field on pulsar pair cascade multiplicity and pair death lines. Using a simple model for a distorted dipole field that produces an offset polar cap (PC), we derive the accelerating electric field above the PC in space-charge-limited flow. We find that even a modest azimuthally asymmetric distortion can significantly increase the accelerating electric field on one side of the PC and, combined with a smaller field line radius of curvature, leads to larger pair multiplicity. The death line for producing pairs by curvature radiation moves downward in the P- P-dot diagram, allowing high pair multiplicities in a larger percentage of the radio pulsar population. These results could have important implications for the radio pulsar population, high energy pulsed emission, and the pulsar contribution to cosmic ray positrons.

  5. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10 11 8 1990's 8 8 10 11 11 9 202 7 7 9 2000's 9 8 9 9 10 12 11 11 6 3 2010's 3 5 3 3 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas

  6. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27 26 29 2000's 28 28 29 29 29 28 26 27 27 25 2010's 24 24 22 22 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Industrial

  7. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge

  8. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  9. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 358 344 354 1990's 526 532 532 526 519 530 534 480 514 555 2000's 526 504 488 450 414 425 439 395 383 390 2010's 368 371 379 383 386 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  10. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 435 435 428 1990's 457 452 459 462 453 463 466 462 454 397 2000's 71 73 439 412 593 716 711 693 693 396 2010's 384 381 372 372 369 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  11. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 93 98 100 1990's 100 113 114 117 119 120 121 93 93 109 2000's 90 90 96 97 179 192 207 220 189 192 2010's 184 177 177 195 218 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  12. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 153 295 376 1990's 364 361 344 334 324 332 367 385 389 417 2000's 432 331 437 550 305 397 421 578 5,298 155 2010's 306 362 466 403 326 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  13. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 138 148 151 1990's 165 170 171 174 186 189 206 216 404 226 2000's 192 203 223 234 241 239 241 253 271 279 2010's 307 259 260 266 269 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  14. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,158 1,152 1,122 1990's 1,135 1,107 1,096 1,066 1,064 359 363 336 325 302 2000's 317 283 54 236 223 223 245 256 243 260 2010's 249 245 248 271 266 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  15. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 261 267 270 1990's 275 283 319 355 381 396 444 481 464 445 2000's 416 402 533 526 475 542 528 548 598 598 2010's 580 556 574 566 575 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  16. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 551 627 550 1990's 1,508 631 783 345 252 713 923 3,379 3,597 3,625 2000's 3,576 3,535 949 924 312 191 274 278 313 293 2010's 293 286 302 323 328 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release

  17. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 22 21 14 1990's 15 13 18 20 24 23 27 30 36 37 2000's 38 36 38 41 43 41 35 37 35 36 2010's 38 36 38 13 13 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  18. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 233 235 1990's 240 243 248 249 252 253 250 265 257 264 2000's 297 316 182 184 186 179 170 185 165 112 2010's 114 129 134 138 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  19. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 575 552 460 1990's 452 377 388 433 481 515 517 561 574 573 2000's 520 518 451 421 398 432 475 467 449 607 2010's 581 630 507 528 520 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  20. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 219 132 64 1990's 62 65 66 75 144 167 183 189 203 200 2000's 217 198 194 191 196 195 192 188 199 187 2010's 184 178 179 183 189 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016

  1. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 73 73 74 1990's 80 81 80 66 89 74 87 81 110 108 2000's 178 233 66 65 69 69 73 76 82 85 2010's 94 102 108 120 126 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  2. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 463 208 211 1990's 182 198 159 197 191 192 182 173 217 147 2000's 207 213 184 142 137 145 155 114 109 101 2010's 102 94 97 95 92 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 190 200 230 1990's 284 228 244 194 135 126 170 194 317 314 2000's 308 295 877 179 121 127 133 133 155 130 2010's 120 123 127 132 131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  4. Neutron-proton pairing correlations in odd mass systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellah, M. Allal, N. H.; Oudih, M. R.

    2015-03-30

    An expression of the ground-state which describes odd mass systems within the BCS approach in the isovector neutron-proton pairing case is proposed using the blocked level technique. The gap equations as well as the energy expression are then derived. It is shown that they exactly generalize the expressions obtained in the pairing between like-particles case. The various gap parameters and the energy are then numerically studied as a function of the pairing-strength within the schematic one-level model.

  5. Chiral three-nucleon forces and pairing in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesinski, Thomas; Hebeler, K.; Duguet, Thomas C; Schwenk, Achim

    2012-01-01

    We present the first study of pairing in nuclei including three-nucleon forces. We perform systematic calculations of the odd-even mass staggering generated using a microscopic pairing interaction at first order in chiral low-momentum interactions. Significant repulsive contributions from the leading chiral three-nucleon forces are found. Two- and three-nucleon interactions combined account for approximately 70% of the experimental pairing gaps, which leaves room for self-energy and induced interaction effects that are expected to be overall attractive in nuclei.

  6. Two-dimensional simulations of pulsational pair-instability supernovae

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Two-dimensional simulations of pulsational pair-instability supernovae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-dimensional simulations of pulsational pair-instability supernovae Massive stars that end their lives with helium cores in the range of 35-65 M {sub ☉} are known to produce repeated thermonuclear outbursts due to a recurring pair-instability. In some of these events, solar masses of material are ejected in repeated outbursts of several ×

  7. Projection techniques as methods of particle-number symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oudih, M. R.; Fellah, M.; Allal, N. H.; Benhamouda, N. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32, El Alia, 16111 Bab Ezzouar, Algiers, Algeria, and Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d'Alger - COMENA, BP 399, Alger-Gare, Algiers (Algeria)

    2007-10-15

    The accuracy of the variation before (VBP) and after (VAP) particle-number projection methods, the Lipkin-Nogami (LN) prescription, and the projected Lipkin-Nogami (PLN) method have been studied using two exactly solvable models. It is shown that the VBP and the LN methods are rather dubious not only in a weak pairing regime, but also in strong pairing for the evaluation of quantities other than the ground state energy. The PLN method provides good results for the ground and the excited state energies, but it must be used with caution for the occupation probabilities and the observables that strongly depend on it. It seems that the VAP is the only suitable method for a global description of the nuclear properties.

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    File02: (file02_cb83.csv) BLDGID2 Building ID STR402 Half-sample stratum PAIR402 Half-sample pair number SQFTC2 Square footage $SQFTC17. BCWM2C Principal activity $BCWOM25. YRCONC2C Year constructed $YRCONC15 REGION2 Census region $REGION13 XSECWT2 Cross-sectional weight ELSUPL2N Supplier reported electricity use $YESNO15. NGSUPL2N Supplier reported natural gas use $YESNO15. FKSUPL2N Supplier reported fuel oil use $YESNO15. STSUPL2N Supplier reported steam use $YESNO15. PRSUPL2N Supplier

  9. Leon Cooper, Cooper Pairs, and the BCS Theory

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    completed while still in his 20s. His concept of Cooper pairs forms the basis of the BCS theory. ... Professor Cooper is cofounder ... of Nestor, Inc., an industry leader in...

  10. Unified description of superconducting pairing symmetry in electron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pairing symmetry in electron-doped Fe-based-122 compounds Authors: Li, Bo ; Pan, Lihua ; Tai, Yuan-Yen ; Graf, Matthias J. ; Zhu, Jian-Xin ; Bassler, Kevin E. ; Ting,...

  11. Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Measurement of the top quark pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at sqrts13 TeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the top quark...

  12. Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production at a linear collider (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Exploring new physics through contact interactions in lepton pair production at a linear collider If a contact interaction type correction to a Standard Model process is observed, studying its detailed properties can provide information on the fundamental physics responsible for

  13. Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Journal Article: Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Beyond Mean-Field Calculation For Pairing Correlation × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy

  14. Leon Cooper, Cooper Pairs, and the BCS Theory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leon Cooper, Cooper Pairs, and the BCS Theory Resources with Additional Information Leon Cooper Courtesy of Brown University "In 1972 [Leon Cooper] received the Nobel Prize in Physics with J. Bardeen and J. R. Schrieffer, for his studies on the theory of superconductivity which was completed while still in his 20s. His concept of Cooper pairs forms the basis of the BCS theory. ... Professor Cooper is cofounder ... of Nestor, Inc., an industry leader in applying neural-network systems to

  15. Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair Energy Efficiency and Fitness - A Complementary Pair June 23, 2011 - 4:15pm Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Former Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs I recently read about a study on fidgeting or as researchers refer to it-incidental physical activity. The study shows that the small collection of movements we often find inconsequential-like drumming your fingers, tapping your foot, or running after the

  16. Pair-instability supernovae in the local universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whalen, Daniel J. [Zentrum fr Astronomie, Institut fr Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitt Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Smidt, Joseph [CCS-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Hirschi, Raphael [Astrophysics Group, EPSAM, University of Keele, Lennard-Jones Labs, Keele ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Yusof, Norhasliza [Department of Physics, University of Malaysia, 50603 Kuala Lampur (Malaysia); Even, Wesley; Fryer, Chris L. [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Stiavelli, Massimo [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Chen, Ke-Jung [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCSC, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Joggerst, Candace C. [XTD-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    The discovery of 150-300 M {sub ?} stars in the Local Group and pair-instability supernova candidates at low redshifts has excited interest in this exotic explosion mechanism. Realistic light curves for pair-instability supernovae at near-solar metallicities are key to identifying and properly interpreting these events as more are found. We have modeled pair-instability supernovae of 150-500 M {sub ?} Z ? 0.1-0.4 Z {sub ?} stars. These stars lose up to 80% of their mass to strong line-driven winds and explode as bare He cores. We find that their light curves and spectra are quite different from those of Population III pair-instability explosions, which therefore cannot be used as templates for low-redshift events. Although non-zero metallicity pair-instability supernovae are generally dimmer than their Population III counterparts, in some cases they will be bright enough to be detected at the earliest epochs at which they can occur, the formation of the first galaxies at z ? 10-15. Others can masquerade as dim, short duration supernovae that are only visible in the local universe and that under the right conditions could be hidden in a wide variety of supernova classes. We also report for the first time that some pair-instability explosions can create black holes with masses of ?100 M {sub ?}.

  17. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  18. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  19. Document ID Number: RL-721

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ---------------------------------------------------------- Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings,

  20. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 54,306 55,400 56,822 1990's 56,903 57,265 58,068 57,827 60,320 60,902 62,064 65,919 76,467 64,185 2000's 66,193 65,794 65,788 65,297 65,223 65,294 66,337 65,879 65,313 67,674 2010's 68,163 67,696 67,252 67,136 67,806 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  1. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,313 2,293 2,380 1990's 2,431 2,523 2,509 2,458 2,477 2,491 2,512 2,496 2,464 2,620 2000's 2,792 2,781 2,730 2,743 2,799 2,787 2,735 2,704 2,757 3,057 2010's 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  2. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 656 662,217 668,432 683,528 1990's 686,149 700,195 711,043 730,114 744,394 751,890 766,322 781,711 788,464 775,311 2000's 805,689 807,770 806,389 809,754 806,660 809,454 808,801 796,476 792,236 785,005 2010's 778,985 772,892 767,396 765,957 769,418 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 11,484 11,649 11,806 1990's 11,921 12,071 12,204 12,359 12,475 12,584 12,732 12,945 13,176 13,409 2000's 13,711 14,002 14,342 14,502 13,999 14,120 14,384 13,408 12,764 13,215 2010's 12,998 13,027 13,133 13,246 13,399 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  4. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 66 67,648 68,612 69,540 1990's 70,808 72,565 74,268 75,842 77,670 79,474 81,348 83,596 86,243 88,924 2000's 91,297 93,896 97,077 100,404 104,360 108,401 112,269 115,500 119,039 120,124 2010's 121,166 121,736 122,983 124,411 126,416 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  5. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46 46,702 46,636 46,776 1990's 47,292 53,982 47,781 47,678 48,568 49,145 49,693 50,115 51,712 53,022 2000's 54,056 54,724 56,260 56,082 56,186 56,572 57,091 57,169 57,586 57,191 2010's 56,676 56,547 56,532 56,585 56,649 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  6. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 545 567,962 564,195 572,461 1990's 586,866 642,659 604,899 610,337 635,335 661,192 689,597 724,911 764,167 802,469 2000's 846,016 884,789 925,927 957,442 993,885 1,042,662 1,088,574 1,119,266 1,128,264 1,130,047 2010's 1,138,448 1,146,286 1,157,688 1,172,003 1,186,794 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  7. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60 60,355 61,630 61,848 1990's 61,530 61,731 62,221 62,952 63,821 65,490 67,293 68,413 69,974 71,389 2000's 72,933 71,875 71,530 71,016 70,655 69,990 69,475 69,495 69,144 69,043 2010's 67,987 67,815 68,765 68,791 69,011 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  8. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 1,410 1,151 1,412 1990's 1,396 1,367 1,319 1,364 1,417 1,366 1,488 1,336 1,300 1,393 2000's 1,414 1,122 1,407 1,269 1,223 1,120 1,120 1,055 1,104 1,025 2010's 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 475 480,839 485,112 491,110 1990's 488,850 495,148 504,722 513,466 521,176 531,182 539,952 544,460 550,017 554,121 2000's 560,055 552,716 553,192 553,211 554,844 555,861 555,905 557,966 556,746 557,355 2010's 549,970 551,795 549,959 549,764 549,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  10. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 84,636 93,005 92,252 1990's 85,775 88,746 85,873 102,187 92,744 104,453 105,889 107,926 108,832 113,177 2000's 117,993 120,984 122,447 123,006 125,107 120,167 126,713 128,965 242,693 153,826 2010's 144,487 138,225 142,825 144,246 139,556 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  11. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,626 7,199 13,057 1990's 6,539 5,006 8,723 7,283 8,019 10,447 10,952 11,058 11,245 8,027 2000's 8,794 9,750 9,090 11,272 10,949 12,019 12,456 12,678 36,928 19,208 2010's 12,751 10,721 10,840 11,063 10,946 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  12. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,082,777 1,100,635 1,114,920 1990's 1,118,429 1,127,536 1,137,911 1,155,443 1,179,869 1,180,860 1,188,317 1,204,494 1,212,486 1,232,887 2000's 1,278,781 1,283,008 1,295,952 1,324,715 1,306,142 1,297,508 1,348,848 1,361,470 1,236,480 1,370,353 2010's 1,389,592 1,408,314 1,447,947

  13. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 178,469 185,961 191,474 1990's 195,766 198,890 201,561 204,453 207,629 211,817 214,843 222,726 224,506 227,159 2000's 230,558 225,109 247,818 246,123 246,991 253,415 254,923 253,139 252,382 252,017 2010's 249,309 249,456 249,994 250,994 253,127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,885 11,117 11,452 1990's 11,500 11,446 11,460 11,425 11,308 11,454 11,848 12,233 11,888 14,527 2000's 11,384 11,210 10,468 10,378 10,088 10,049 9,885 9,728 10,563 18,186 2010's 9,332 9,088 8,833 8,497 8,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,452,554 2,491,149 2,531,304 1990's 2,573,570 2,609,561 2,640,579 2,677,085 2,717,683 2,767,190 2,812,876 2,859,483 2,903,698 2,949,628 2000's 2,999,737 3,011,205 3,110,743 3,140,021 3,161,370 3,187,583 3,193,920 3,188,152 3,172,623 3,169,026 2010's 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349

  16. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 88,789 90,256 92,916 1990's 95,474 97,388 99,707 93,062 102,857 103,874 105,531 108,686 110,986 114,127 2000's 116,529 119,007 121,751 123,123 125,133 126,310 129,149 128,367 130,847 131,801 2010's 132,163 132,938 134,394 135,557 136,382 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  17. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,585 2,670 2,638 1990's 2,574 2,486 2,515 2,477 2,592 2,531 2,564 2,233 2,188 2,267 2000's 2,025 1,996 2,029 2,074 2,040 1,432 1,257 1,146 1,131 2,039 2010's 2,106 1,770 1,793 1,870 1,878 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 872,148 894,380 911,001 1990's 946,107 970,941 998,201 1,074,631 1,049,263 1,080,009 1,103,709 1,134,019 1,161,423 1,190,190 2000's 1,222,397 1,249,748 1,282,751 1,308,143 1,338,061 1,364,237 1,401,362 1,401,623 1,413,162 1,423,703 2010's 1,429,681 1,436,063 1,445,824 1,459,134 1,472,663 - = No

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 43,362 44,170 44,253 1990's 43,184 43,693 44,313 45,310 43,803 45,444 46,029 47,311 45,345 47,620 2000's 50,913 51,109 50,468 50,928 54,027 54,936 55,741 56,155 55,291 50,713 2010's 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,312 1,263 1,282 1990's 1,317 1,314 1,327 1,324 1,313 1,298 1,241 1,199 1,165 1,246 2000's 1,199 1,214 1,083 1,161 996 1,205 1,181 1,346 1,132 1,141 2010's 980 982 936 933 943 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  1. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 370,094 372,238 376,353 1990's 382,251 386,264 392,155 398,472 405,312 415,123 418,442 423,397 415,673 426,352 2000's 434,501 438,069 435,146 438,861 445,212 445,856 437,669 445,043 443,025 437,715 2010's 436,840 442,479 442,840 445,589 444,423 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  2. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,711 97,939 99,721 1990's 105,164 117,675 125,174 125,571 132,378 130,318 133,445 135,553 135,417 133,464 2000's 133,969 135,968 137,924 140,057 141,258 142,148 143,632 142,965 141,529 140,633 2010's 138,670 138,214 144,906 142,495 143,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,832 2,880 3,063 1990's 3,140 3,096 2,989 3,040 3,115 3,033 3,408 3,097 3,151 3,152 2000's 3,094 3,085 2,935 3,115 3,600 3,545 3,548 3,511 3,514 3,573 2010's 3,541 3,307 3,692 3,538 3,497 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  4. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,180,546 1,194,985 1,208,523 1990's 1,213,305 1,211,342 1,220,203 1,225,921 1,281,007 1,259,102 1,275,465 1,293,032 1,307,563 1,311,865 2000's 1,324,282 1,326,160 1,340,726 1,343,614 1,346,773 1,348,743 1,353,892 1,354,173 1,352,015 1,348,781 2010's 1,348,549 1,342,920 1,389,910 1,357,740

  5. Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 21,382 22,246 22,219 1990's 23,331 23,185 23,610 24,373 25,349 26,329 26,374 27,457 28,065 28,424 2000's 29,215 29,429 30,250 30,814 31,357 31,304 31,817 32,472 33,008 33,731 2010's 34,002 34,305 34,504 34,909 35,205 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 167,883 171,785 171,156 1990's 174,384 177,726 182,641 188,879 194,357 203,435 205,199 209,806 218,851 222,114 2000's 224,784 226,171 229,015 232,839 236,511 240,554 245,883 247,035 253,122 255,472 2010's 257,322 259,046 259,957 262,122 265,849 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60,707 61,365 60,377 1990's 60,405 60,947 61,319 60,599 62,045 61,275 61,117 51,661 63,819 53,943 2000's 55,194 55,692 56,560 55,999 57,087 57,389 56,548 55,761 58,160 56,454 2010's 56,246 56,553 56,608 58,005 57,191 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  8. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 675 684 702 1990's 712 718 696 718 766 2,432 2,234 11,553 10,673 10,342 2000's 10,161 10,504 9,156 9,022 8,463 7,973 7,697 7,668 11,627 7,863 2010's 7,912 7,955 8,160 8,495 8,791 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  9. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18,294 18,921 19,924 1990's 20,694 22,124 22,799 23,207 24,521 25,593 26,613 27,629 29,030 30,521 2000's 31,789 32,782 33,877 34,590 35,792 37,093 38,546 40,128 41,098 41,303 2010's 40,801 40,944 41,192 41,710 42,338 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,422 219,981 236,237 1990's 256,119 283,307 295,714 305,099 336,353 364,112 393,783 426,221 458,737 490,029 2000's 520,233 550,850 580,319 610,756 648,551 688,058 726,772 750,570 758,315 760,391 2010's 764,435 772,880 782,759 794,150 808,970 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 8,831 9,159 10,237 1990's 10,521 11,088 11,383 11,726 12,240 12,450 12,755 13,225 13,512 13,932 2000's 14,219 15,068 15,130 15,047 15,429 16,266 16,139 16,150 41,332 16,937 2010's 16,645 17,186 17,758 17,298 17,421 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60,078 61,969 64,059 1990's 65,310 67,991 69,356 70,938 72,656 74,232 75,175 77,092 78,786 80,958 2000's 82,813 84,760 87,147 88,170 88,600 94,473 94,600 94,963 67,945 96,924 2010's 95,361 97,400 99,738 98,715 99,146 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  13. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,236 3,196 3,381 1990's 2,802 3,506 3,119 2,664 3,401 3,652 3,973 5,375 6,228 5,672 2000's 5,288 2,962 3,200 3,101 3,021 2,891 2,701 2,991 2,984 2,384 2010's 2,457 2,468 2,525 2,567 2,596 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  14. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 435,826 472,928 492,821 1990's 520,140 539,321 575,096 607,388 652,307 678,147 699,159 740,013 777,805 815,908 2000's 858,004 891,227 905,816 953,732 948,283 992,906 1,022,430 1,063,871 1,095,362 1,102,001 2010's 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 - = No Data

  15. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11,905 12,104 12,454 1990's 12,742 12,082 12,353 12,650 12,944 13,399 13,789 14,099 14,422 15,050 2000's 15,531 15,740 16,093 16,202 16,443 16,518 16,848 17,013 17,284 17,632 2010's 17,823 18,421 19,089 19,855 20,687 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  16. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 83,517 84,059 84,643 1990's 85,646 87,880 89,522 91,237 93,398 95,818 97,761 98,326 101,930 104,051 2000's 105,660 106,758 108,716 110,048 112,206 114,152 116,615 118,100 120,056 122,065 2010's 123,585 125,392 130,044 133,975 137,972 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  17. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,601 219,257 225,347 1990's 233,075 236,519 237,861 240,684 245,190 250,223 259,663 254,991 258,076 266,102 2000's 269,561 269,327 271,160 271,203 272,445 277,767 270,552 272,555 272,899 270,596 2010's 268,346 268,647 267,793 269,081 269,758 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,929 8,163 8,356 1990's 8,301 8,479 8,573 8,678 8,655 8,650 8,672 7,779 8,112 8,136 2000's 8,267 8,515 8,111 8,098 7,899 8,328 6,929 6,858 6,806 6,712 2010's 6,571 6,482 6,381 6,554 6,526 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,648,972 2,678,838 2,714,839 1990's 2,766,912 2,801,716 2,826,713 2,867,959 2,921,536 2,967,375 2,994,891 3,041,948 3,050,960 3,111,108 2000's 3,178,840 3,195,584 3,208,466 3,225,908 3,250,068 3,272,307 3,263,062 3,273,791 3,262,716 3,253,184 2010's 3,240,619 3,236,160 3,244,274 3,271,074 3,283,869 -

  20. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 87,824 86,666 86,172 1990's 85,790 86,744 87,120 88,181 87,494 88,358 89,852 90,284 89,711 80,986 2000's 80,558 79,045 80,029 79,733 79,512 78,726 78,745 93,991 94,247 94,314 2010's 92,430 93,903 94,537 95,385 96,004 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 809,171 805,107 806,875 1990's 814,296 824,172 832,677 842,130 845,448 856,604 866,531 872,454 877,236 867,922 2000's 859,951 868,314 875,338 876,420 875,271 880,403 879,589 920,616 923,650 924,745 2010's 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 40,967 41,998 43,997 1990's 47,175 55,374 50,251 51,910 53,700 55,409 57,613 60,419 63,085 65,034 2000's 66,893 68,098 69,150 74,515 71,762 73,520 74,683 80,998 76,868 76,893 2010's 77,370 77,822 78,237 79,276 80,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 676 1,034 738 1990's 699 787 740 696 765 791 799 704 695 718 2000's 717 821 842 926 907 1,118 1,060 1,136 1,075 1,051 2010's 1,053 1,066 1,076 1,085 1,099 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016

  5. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 280,670 288,066 302,156 1990's 326,177 376,166 354,256 371,151 391,845 411,465 433,638 456,960 477,796 502,000 2000's 523,952 542,799 563,744 625,398 595,495 626,685 647,635 664,455 674,421 675,582 2010's 682,737 688,681 693,507 700,211 707,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 166,901 172,615 178,545 1990's 186,772 191,103 193,863 198,299 206,812 209,245 214,340 215,057 216,519 223,732 2000's 228,037 225,911 226,957 227,708 231,051 233,132 231,540 234,597 233,462 233,334 2010's 233,751 233,588 235,049 237,922 239,681 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  7. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,089 6,070 6,023 1990's 6,238 6,344 6,496 6,407 6,388 6,328 6,441 6,492 6,736 7,080 2000's 6,330 6,159 5,880 5,577 5,726 5,577 5,241 4,868 4,772 4,745 2010's 4,624 5,007 5,066 5,024 5,084 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  8. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,237,877 2,271,801 2,291,242 1990's 2,311,795 2,333,377 2,363,575 2,386,249 2,393,053 2,413,715 2,431,909 2,452,524 2,493,639 2,486,704 2000's 2,519,794 2,542,724 2,559,024 2,572,584 2,591,458 2,600,574 2,605,782 2,620,755 2,631,340 2,635,886 2010's 2,646,211 2,667,392 2,678,547

  9. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,128 16,096 16,924 1990's 17,765 18,430 18,607 21,178 21,208 21,472 21,664 21,862 22,136 22,254 2000's 22,592 22,815 23,364 23,270 22,994 23,082 23,150 23,007 23,010 22,988 2010's 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  10. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 180,656 185,861 190,796 1990's 195,100 196,438 197,926 198,563 200,959 202,947 204,259 212,777 208,208 211,097 2000's 214,474 216,781 219,769 221,141 223,669 224,320 225,027 223,589 224,103 224,846 2010's 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  11. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,414 37,075 38,856 1990's 39,904 39,999 40,968 42,191 45,487 47,293 48,650 50,817 52,237 53,436 2000's 54,794 55,257 55,608 55,909 56,049 56,974 57,452 57,544 56,317 55,850 2010's 55,853 55,846 55,908 55,997 56,172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  12. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,256 1,273 1,307 1990's 1,384 1,400 1,568 1,625 1,928 1,802 1,759 1,764 1,728 1,768 2000's 1,715 1,702 1,563 1,574 1,528 1,535 1,528 1,472 1,426 1,358 2010's 1,325 1,329 1,435 1,452 1,426 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  13. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 302,321 313,831 327,527 1990's 339,486 344,763 357,818 370,411 416,773 412,259 426,088 443,093 460,141 473,799 2000's 489,340 501,161 508,686 516,362 527,008 541,523 554,953 570,213 561,196 565,774 2010's 570,797 576,594 583,633 593,286 604,743 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  14. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,480 12,438 12,771 1990's 13,443 13,692 14,133 16,523 15,539 16,285 16,880 17,432 17,972 18,453 2000's 19,100 19,378 19,794 20,070 20,457 20,771 21,149 21,502 21,819 22,071 2010's 22,267 22,570 22,955 23,214 23,591 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  15. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 101,468 102,084 103,538 1990's 105,436 107,846 110,291 128,029 119,544 124,152 127,269 130,307 133,095 136,789 2000's 142,075 144,310 147,356 150,725 148,105 157,457 160,481 163,458 165,694 168,096 2010's 169,838 170,877 173,856 176,204 179,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  16. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 77,104 81,159 84,040 1990's 88,753 89,863 91,999 94,860 97,943 101,561 103,867 105,925 109,772 112,978 2000's 115,691 118,561 120,130 131,916 125,042 124,755 126,970 126,324 128,007 127,704 2010's 127,914 128,969 130,139 131,091 131,001 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  17. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,206 2,151 2,555 1990's 2,361 2,369 2,425 2,512 2,440 2,393 2,306 2,382 5,149 2,159 2000's 2,386 2,704 2,657 2,755 2,738 2,498 2,545 2,656 2,650 2,717 2010's 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 534,882 565,856 599,042 1990's 627,031 661,105 696,140 733,363 768,421 804,724 841,232 867,793 905,757 937,896 2000's 969,537 993,363 1,009,225 1,022,628 1,037,429 1,049,307 1,063,328 1,071,756 1,084,102 1,083,573 2010's 1,085,387 1,089,009 1,084,726 1,094,122 1,106,681 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  19. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,852 4,427 13,383 1990's 13,659 13,770 5,481 5,823 5,222 9,043 8,796 5,339 5,318 5,655 2000's 11,613 10,047 9,143 9,015 9,359 9,136 8,664 11,063 5,568 8,581 2010's 8,779 8,713 8,953 8,525 8,406 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  20. Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31,329 32,637 32,966 1990's 34,697 35,627 36,145 37,816 39,183 40,101 40,107 40,689 42,054 43,861 2000's 47,201 47,477 50,202 51,063 51,503 55,174 55,821 57,741 59,502 60,781 2010's 61,976 62,885 63,383 64,114 65,134 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 414,020 418,569 432,377 1990's 453,023 455,649 467,664 484,438 503,583 523,622 562,343 567,786 588,364 609,603 2000's 641,111 657,728 660,677 678,833 701,255 743,761 754,554 778,644 794,880 810,442 2010's 821,525 830,219 840,687 854,389 869,052 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,447 2,698 2,768 1990's 2,949 3,154 3,198 3,314 3,512 3,649 3,790 3,928 4,034 4,219 2000's 4,316 4,416 4,516 4,602 4,684 4,781 4,861 4,925 4,980 5,085 2010's 5,137 5,256 5,535 5,441 5,589 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  3. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,553 16,616 16,920 1990's 18,300 19,879 20,468 21,553 22,546 23,523 24,383 25,539 26,664 27,931 2000's 28,532 29,463 30,108 30,856 31,971 33,015 34,081 34,937 35,929 37,242 2010's 38,047 38,839 39,917 41,152 42,231 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  4. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 54,071 54,892 61,012 1990's 63,751 67,997 69,629 70,161 72,188 74,690 77,284 78,986 77,220 80,500 2000's 84,646 84,839 86,328 87,202 87,919 90,577 91,481 93,015 94,219 95,704 2010's 95,401 96,086 96,503 97,499 98,741 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  5. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 877 895 895 1990's 929 1,156 1,101 2,706 2,740 2,812 2,822 2,391 2,469 2,984 2000's 1,749 1,261 1,526 1,517 1,217 1,402 1,256 1,271 1,205 1,126 2010's 1,059 1,103 1,132 1,132 1,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  6. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 550,318 573,731 601,906 1990's 622,883 651,203 664,500 690,061 721,495 753,003 789,985 812,866 847,938 893,887 2000's 907,855 941,582 982,521 996,564 1,029,389 1,066,302 1,085,509 1,101,863 1,113,016 1,124,717 2010's 1,133,103 1,145,049 1,155,636 1,170,161 1,183,894 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  7. Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 51,365 56,487 55,231 1990's 58,148 60,887 63,391 65,810 68,118 70,781 73,708 75,550 77,770 80,995 2000's 83,189 84,628 85,286 87,082 93,559 92,417 93,628 95,615 97,799 98,965 2010's 99,231 99,674 100,038 100,939 101,730 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  8. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,355 3,564 3,365 1990's 3,428 3,495 3,490 3,448 3,586 3,544 3,587 3,748 3,848 4,040 2000's 4,007 3,898 3,928 3,775 3,992 3,489 3,428 3,630 3,483 3,428 2010's 3,372 3,353 3,338 3,320 3,355 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  9. Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 392,469 413,008 425,624 1990's 458,013 492,189 528,913 565,475 604,315 638,603 673,357 702,701 737,208 779,104 2000's 813,319 841,617 861,943 895,800 926,510 966,199 997,728 1,025,171 1,047,319 1,059,239 2010's 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  10. California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 413 404,507 407,435 410,231 1990's 415,073 421,278 412,467 411,648 411,140 411,535 408,294 406,803 588,224 416,791 2000's 413,003 416,036 420,690 431,795 432,367 434,899 442,052 446,267 447,160 441,806 2010's 439,572 440,990 442,708 444,342 443,115 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  11. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31 44,764 44,680 46,243 1990's 46,048 44,865 40,528 42,748 38,750 38,457 36,613 35,830 36,235 36,435 2000's 35,391 34,893 33,725 34,617 41,487 40,226 38,637 39,134 39,591 38,746 2010's 38,006 37,575 37,686 37,996 37,548 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  12. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916

  13. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 108 109,770 110,769 112,004 1990's 112,661 113,945 114,898 115,924 115,994 118,502 121,221 123,580 125,178 129,041 2000's 131,613 134,393 136,489 138,621 138,543 137,513 139,746 141,420 144,719 145,624 2010's 145,460 145,837 145,960 150,145 150,235 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 896 923 976 1990's 1,018 1,074 1,108 1,032 1,176 1,528 2,099 2,923 3,349 4,727 2000's 4,994 4,729 4,337 4,054 4,175 4,318 4,472 4,592 4,816 5,084 2010's 6,232 6,529 6,906 7,293 7,823 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 925 942,571 955,810 970,512 1990's 983,592 1,002,154 1,022,542 1,044,699 1,073,308 1,108,899 1,147,743 1,183,978 1,223,433 1,265,032 2000's 1,315,619 1,365,413 1,412,923 1,453,974 1,496,876 1,524,813 1,558,911 1,583,945 1,606,602 1,622,434 2010's 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1,690,581 -

  16. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,709 2,818 2,908 1990's 3,061 2,921 2,923 2,952 3,754 3,705 3,435 3,459 3,441 3,465 2000's 3,683 3,881 3,716 3,625 3,470 3,437 3,393 3,317 3,196 3,138 2010's 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6 6,180 6,566 7,074 1990's 7,485 7,895 8,173 8,409 8,721 9,133 9,518 9,807 10,081 10,441 2000's 9,639 11,075 11,463 11,682 11,921 12,070 12,345 12,576 12,703 12,839 2010's 12,861 12,931 12,997 13,163 13,352 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 81 82,829 84,328 86,428 1990's 88,894 91,467 94,027 96,914 100,431 103,531 106,548 109,400 112,507 115,961 2000's 117,845 122,829 126,418 129,870 133,197 137,115 141,276 145,010 147,541 149,006 2010's 150,458 152,005 153,307 155,627 158,502 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 41 42,376 43,178 43,802 1990's 43,674 45,012 45,123 47,344 47,851 46,459 47,578 48,251 46,778 50,052 2000's 50,888 53,118 53,794 55,121 55,324 55,479 55,259 57,320 58,125 59,549 2010's 60,854 61,582 63,477 64,772 67,460 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  20. Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 442 444,848 446,690 452,544 1990's 457,648 467,221 471,863 484,816 497,777 512,365 521,674 532,790 542,770 556,628 2000's 571,972 590,221 603,690 617,373 639,014 656,069 673,122 682,996 679,265 674,090 2010's 675,551 679,199 686,994 694,210 703,535 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 94 98,809 102,277 106,690 1990's 108,295 109,659 111,423 114,889 117,980 120,122 123,200 123,367 126,050 225,020 2000's 128,275 130,373 128,233 129,867 128,923 128,389 127,843 127,832 126,804 127,347 2010's 124,759 123,454 121,243 126,060 122,573 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 3,034 3,144 3,079 1990's 3,153 3,124 3,186 3,302 3,277 3,261 3,310 3,310 3,262 5,580 2000's 3,294 3,330 3,219 3,326 3,161 3,543 3,053 2,913 2,890 2,254 2010's 2,174 2,184 2,112 2,242 2,481 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  3. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,190 1,237,201 1,275,128 1,308,972 1990's 1,334,935 1,363,723 1,396,860 1,430,626 1,460,141 1,495,992 1,538,458 1,553,948 1,659,730 1,732,865 2000's 1,680,749 1,737,850 1,735,063 1,747,017 1,752,346 1,773,121 1,726,239 1,793,650 1,791,256 1,744,934 2010's 1,740,587 1,740,006 1,739,543 1,805,425

  4. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,896 2,852 2,842 1990's 2,837 2,786 2,793 3,222 2,805 2,825 2,823 2,783 2,761 2,763 2000's 2,768 2,777 2,781 2,804 2,578 2,572 2,548 2,547 2,540 2,535 2010's 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,502 28,761 28,970 1990's 29,137 29,701 29,805 29,984 30,614 30,492 31,017 30,990 30,918 30,708 2000's 30,751 30,794 30,731 30,473 26,255 26,219 25,982 25,899 25,632 25,466 2010's 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,482 18,454 18,813 1990's 19,452 20,328 21,145 21,989 22,999 24,150 25,271 26,436 27,697 28,923 2000's 30,018 30,789 31,547 32,274 33,104 33,362 33,625 33,767 37,320 38,245 2010's 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722 40,229 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 104,824 111,532 113,898 1990's 113,954 126,282 136,121 148,582 162,971 175,320 187,756 200,165 213,786 227,807 2000's 240,399 251,004 261,219 274,481 288,380 301,357 316,915 323,114 336,191 342,277 2010's 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 367,394 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241,367 278,473 252,791 1990's 257,851 261,107 263,988 268,104 262,308 264,756 265,007 268,841 271,585 274,919 2000's 279,179 278,506 279,838 281,877 273,967 276,763 300,606 296,465 298,418 294,226 2010's 291,395 293,213 297,523 282,743 294,391 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,460 20,015 25,161 1990's 25,991 26,489 27,178 27,807 25,788 25,929 29,493 28,472 28,063 27,605 2000's 27,348 27,421 27,477 26,698 29,187 29,887 26,109 24,000 23,737 23,857 2010's 25,043 23,722 23,390 23,804 23,829 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,170,364 3,180,199 3,248,117 1990's 3,287,091 3,320,285 3,354,679 3,388,983 3,418,052 3,452,975 3,494,545 3,521,707 3,556,736 3,594,071 2000's 3,631,762 3,670,693 3,688,281 3,702,308 3,754,132 3,975,961 3,812,121 3,845,441 3,869,308 3,839,438 2010's 3,842,206 3,855,942 3,878,806 3,838,120

  11. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 116,571 119,458 122,803 1990's 124,919 128,223 129,973 131,925 134,336 137,162 139,097 140,515 141,307 145,631 2000's 148,411 148,830 150,092 151,586 151,943 159,649 154,322 155,885 157,223 155,615 2010's 156,557 161,293 158,213 158,965 159,596 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,250,476 1,275,401 1,306,747 1990's 1,327,772 1,358,640 1,377,023 1,402,770 1,438,483 1,463,640 1,489,647 1,509,142 1,531,914 1,570,253 2000's 1,604,456 1,613,373 1,657,640 1,644,715 1,588,738 1,707,195 1,661,186 1,677,857 1,678,158 1,662,663 2010's 1,669,026 1,707,148 1,673,132 1,681,841 1,693,267

  13. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 80,797 81,294 82,549 1990's 83,047 84,387 85,325 86,452 86,918 88,585 89,663 90,643 91,300 92,306 2000's 93,836 95,485 96,496 96,712 97,274 97,767 97,823 97,979 98,144 98,416 2010's 98,396 98,541 99,113 99,017 99,182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  14. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,033 1,937 1,895 1990's 1,883 1,866 1,835 1,903 1,957 1,957 2,066 1,839 1,862 1,797 2000's 1,831 1,830 1,855 1,791 1,746 1,744 1,670 1,651 1,652 1,626 2010's 1,528 1,465 1,469 1,491 1,572 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 690,532 689,655 701,687 1990's 706,842 716,088 729,081 740,722 750,678 760,848 771,109 780,746 790,162 799,015 2000's 812,323 818,313 824,218 832,230 839,415 850,095 858,915 865,553 872,980 875,781 2010's 879,713 883,733 892,123 895,414 900,420 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 82,934 83,810 85,143 1990's 85,539 86,874 86,840 87,735 86,457 88,163 89,168 85,018 89,654 86,003 2000's 87,007 86,592 87,397 88,030 86,640 85,634 85,686 85,376 84,703 84,715 2010's 84,446 84,874 84,673 84,969 85,867 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  17. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,440 4,314 4,366 1990's 4,357 3,445 3,296 4,369 3,560 3,079 2,988 7,014 10,706 5,861 2000's 8,833 9,341 9,891 9,295 8,955 8,300 8,152 8,327 8,098 7,793 2010's 7,664 7,954 7,970 7,877 7,429 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  18. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 725,676 733,101 731,792 1990's 747,081 753,839 762,545 777,658 773,357 797,524 804,213 811,975 841,843 824,803 2000's 833,662 836,486 843,353 850,464 855,272 856,761 862,203 858,304 853,125 855,454 2010's 853,842 854,730 854,800 858,572 861,092 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63,024 63,971 65,041 1990's 67,086 68,461 69,466 71,998 73,562 74,521 76,079 77,693 80,147 80,283 2000's 81,588 81,795 82,757 84,110 84,493 85,243 85,236 85,210 84,985 83,862 2010's 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  20. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,391 1,436 1,443 1990's 1,544 1,587 1,608 1,585 1,621 1,630 1,633 1,698 1,864 1,813 2000's 1,801 1,701 1,785 1,695 1,672 1,698 1,658 1,599 1,585 1,715 2010's 1,742 1,705 1,720 1,767 1,780 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 596,320 606,106 614,058 1990's 624,477 633,942 644,281 654,664 668,774 685,481 696,989 713,509 726,960 735,371 2000's 744,816 749,106 756,234 763,290 767,022 770,080 770,171 771,047 753,531 754,761 2010's 758,129 759,584 757,790 761,575 760,131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  2. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 67,382 66,472 64,114 1990's 62,770 61,574 61,030 62,055 62,184 62,930 62,101 62,270 63,029 62,911 2000's 62,710 62,241 62,247 63,512 60,580 58,409 57,097 57,127 57,066 58,396 2010's 58,562 58,749 63,381 59,147 58,611 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  3. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,617 1,503 1,531 1990's 1,504 1,469 1,452 1,592 1,737 1,383 1,444 1,406 1,380 1,397 2000's 1,318 1,440 1,357 1,291 1,460 1,086 962 945 988 954 2010's 942 920 963 916 883 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  4. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,435 3,731 3,986 1990's 4,250 4,455 4,838 4,979 5,297 5,819 6,414 6,606 6,662 6,582 2000's 6,954 6,936 7,375 7,517 7,687 8,178 8,168 8,334 8,491 8,815 2010's 9,084 9,681 10,179 11,415 11,810 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,134 11,933 11,902 1990's 12,000 12,424 13,766 13,880 14,104 14,917 14,982 15,221 15,646 15,247 2000's 17,111 17,302 17,921 18,385 18,707 18,633 18,824 18,921 19,571 20,806 2010's 21,142 22,461 23,555 24,765 27,047 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 51,252 53,045 54,740 1990's 55,576 61,878 62,858 63,767 64,698 66,094 69,991 69,056 67,850 69,301 2000's 70,671 70,691 71,824 72,076 72,809 73,780 74,584 74,856 75,053 75,771 2010's 75,192 75,788 75,799 77,117 77,846 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,222 5,397 5,570 1990's 5,646 520 514 496 516 481 430 479 1,472 536 2000's 329 795 1,434 1,361 1,354 1,325 1,340 1,333 1,225 1,234 2010's 1,255 1,226 1,163 1,173 1,179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  8. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 755,294 760,754 767,219 1990's 774,707 782,373 894,677 807,204 824,137 841,772 871,012 890,195 901,455 939,029 2000's 941,384 959,772 978,319 987,863 1,009,455 1,024,955 1,040,941 1,053,948 1,057,521 1,067,807 2010's 1,071,566 1,077,168 1,078,978 1,099,272 1,101,292 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  9. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31,283 33,192 33,880 1990's 32,785 32,755 33,289 33,611 33,756 36,144 33,837 33,970 35,362 35,483 2000's 41,949 35,607 35,016 35,160 34,932 36,635 34,748 34,161 34,275 34,044 2010's 34,063 34,041 34,078 34,283 34,339 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  10. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 351,024 349,765 349,347 1990's 349,673 350,489 352,463 352,997 352,929 353,629 358,049 362,432 359,783 362,292 2000's 360,471 363,126 361,171 359,919 358,027 374,301 353,292 347,433 347,368 343,837 2010's 344,131 342,069 340,256 340,102 338,652 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  11. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,760 99,157 102,492 1990's 106,043 109,616 112,761 115,961 119,788 125,539 129,146 131,238 134,651 135,829 2000's 140,370 144,050 149,774 150,128 151,907 155,109 159,074 160,614 163,026 163,843 2010's 164,173 165,002 165,657 166,845 167,901 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,411 7,218 7,307 1990's 7,154 7,194 7,396 7,979 7,342 6,454 5,861 8,346 9,158 9,756 2000's 9,630 9,864 9,648 10,138 10,190 8,484 5,707 5,999 5,969 6,396 2010's 6,413 6,376 6,581 6,677 7,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  13. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,054,347 1,072,585 1,097,514 1990's 1,123,557 1,151,939 1,182,834 1,220,500 1,253,333 1,291,424 1,324,570 1,361,348 1,390,068 1,426,909 2000's 1,458,959 1,484,536 1,514,700 1,541,455 1,569,719 1,592,621 1,611,772 1,632,200 1,646,644 1,656,614 2010's 1,663,583 1,671,834 1,681,001 1,692,891

  14. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,342 15,093 14,012 1990's 13,767 14,931 15,064 15,315 15,348 15,580 17,036 15,907 16,171 16,317 2000's 16,366 16,027 16,170 17,164 17,490 17,904 18,016 18,062 19,286 19,843 2010's 19,977 20,146 20,387 20,617 20,894 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 113,175 112,126 113,129 1990's 113,598 113,463 114,793 116,027 117,385 119,544 131,910 125,740 127,324 127,750 2000's 129,274 129,897 133,445 135,441 137,434 140,013 142,385 143,644 152,439 153,062 2010's 153,852 155,181 157,226 158,889 160,896 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  16. Modulated pair condensate of p-orbital ultracold fermions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Zixu; Zhao Erhai; Liu, W. Vincent; Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan; Ho, Chiu Man

    2010-09-15

    We show that an interesting kind of pairing occurs for spin-imbalanced Fermi gases under a specific experimental condition--the spin up and spin down Fermi levels lying within the p{sub x} and s orbital bands of an optical lattice, respectively. The pairs condense at a finite momentum equal to the sum of the two Fermi momenta of spin up and spin down fermions and form a p-orbital pair condensate. This 2k{sub F} momentum dependence has been seen before in spin- and charge-density waves, but it differs from the usual p-wave superfluids such as {sup 3}He, where the orbital symmetry refers to the relative motion within each pair. Our conclusion is based on the density matrix renormalization group analysis for the one-dimensional (1D) system and mean-field theory for the quasi-1D system. The phase diagram of the quasi-1D system is calculated, showing that the p-orbital pair condensate occurs in a wide range of fillings. In the strongly attractive limit, the system realizes an unconventional BEC beyond Feynman's no-node theorem. The possible experimental signatures of this phase in molecule projection experiment are discussed.

  17. Investigation on collisions of filament pairs in dielectric barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Lifang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Ben; Zhang, Xinpu; He, Yafeng; Li, Xuechen; Hebei Key Laboratory of Optic-electronic Information Materials, Baoding 071002

    2013-12-15

    Collisions of filament pairs in a hexagonal superlattice pattern in dielectric barrier discharge are investigated on different timescales. In the evolution of the pattern, the space scale of each hexagon cell decreases with the increasing voltage. The duration of one collision is seven half voltage cycles at least. Two stable orientations of a pair are approximately perpendicular to each other and the orientational changes occurring during the entire colliding process should be a multiple of 30. The time interval between two consecutive collisions decreases with the increasing voltage. The distance between the paired spots decreases nonmonotonically. Based on the discharge order of the pattern, it is inferred that the collision should be the interaction between a discharging filament and the surface charges deposited by another discharged filament, and the nonmonotonic decrease of distance D is explained.

  18. BINARY STAR ORBITS. IV. ORBITS OF 18 SOUTHERN INTERFEROMETRIC PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Tokovinin, Andrei E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mi

    2010-09-15

    First orbits are presented for 3 interferometric pairs and revised solutions for 15 others, based in part on first results from a recently initiated program of speckle interferometric observations of neglected southern binaries. Eight of these systems contain additional components, with multiplicity ranging up to 6.

  19. Pair spectrometer hodoscope for Hall D at Jefferson Lab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barbosa, Fernando J.; Hutton, Charles L.; Sitnikov, Alexandre; Somov, Alexander S.; Somov, S.; Tolstukhin, Ivan

    2015-09-21

    We present the design of the pair spectrometer hodoscope fabricated at Jefferson Lab and installed in the experimental Hall D. The hodoscope consists of thin scintillator tiles; the light from each tile is collected using wave-length shifting fibers and detected using a Hamamatsu silicon photomultiplier. Light collection was measured using relativistic electrons produced in the tagger area of the experimental Hall B.

  20. The multilevel pairing Hamiltonian versus the degenerate case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, M.B. Cenni, R.; Chiacchiera, S.; Molinari, A.; Palumbo, F.

    2007-11-15

    We study the pairing Hamiltonian in a set of non-degenerate levels. First, we review in the path integral framework the spontaneous breaking of the U(1) symmetry occurring in such a system for the degenerate situation. Then the behaviors with the coupling constant of the ground state energy in the multilevel and in the degenerate case are compared. Next we discuss, in the multilevel case, an exact strong coupling expansion for the ground state energy which introduces the moments of the single particle level distribution. The domain of validity of the expansion, which is known in the macroscopic limit, is explored for finite systems and its implications for the energy of the latter is discussed. Finally the seniority and Gaudin excitations of the pairing Hamiltonian are addressed and shown to display the same gap in leading order.

  1. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  2. Technologist in Residence pilot program pairs companies with national labs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to advance clean energy | Argonne National Laboratory Technologist in Residence pilot program pairs companies with national labs to advance clean energy By Jo Napolitano * December 1, 2015 Tweet EmailPrint The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently selected representatives from Argonne National Laboratory for three of seven spots in its new Technologist in Residence pilot program, created to increase collaboration between the national laboratories and private-sector companies. The pilot -

  3. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graph of up quark/down quark contributions Researchers have published intriguing new observations for how the different kinds of quarks behave inside protons and neutrons. In the proton, the down quark contributes surprisingly little to electron-proton interaction. Also, the up quark contributes much less to electron-neutron interaction than one would expect if all three quarks behaved in similar ways. Quarks Pair Up in Protons (and Neutrons) Ordinarily, physicists generally think of protons and

  4. Nudged Elastic Band Simulations of Kink Pairs in Tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cereceda, D.; Marian, J.

    2015-01-16

    Atomistic techniques have been used to calculate energy barriers for dislocation motion that control the strength (yield stress and flow stress) of the material. In particular, the calculations focus on the change in enthalpy as a straight dislocation moves through the crystal lattice (the Peierls barrier) and kink pair formation enthalpy that controls the thermally activated double-kink mechanism important at low to moderate stresses. A novel means of assessing kink widths within atomistic simulations is introduced.

  5. Paired Straight Hearth Furnace-Transformational Ironmaking Process

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Objective y To develop the next generation of ironmaking process for sustainable steel industry, based on the Paired Straight Hearth Furnace (PSH) for iron ore reduction y PSH is a coal and natural gas coke-free process most suitable for American fine concentrates y PSH is a fundamentally innovative approach - the concerned thermal-chemical phenomena have been confirmed on campus and in industrial scale labs y Objectives of current phase y Define the best approach for discharging the

  6. California's Efforts for Advancing Ultrafine Particle Number...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efforts for Advancing Ultrafine Particle Number Measurements for Clean Diesel Exhaust California's Efforts for Advancing Ultrafine Particle Number Measurements for Clean Diesel...

  7. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for...

  8. Molecular Hydrogen Formation from Proximal Glycol Pairs on TiO2(110)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Long; Li, Zhenjun; Smith, R. Scott; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek

    2014-04-16

    Understanding hydrogen formation on TiO2 surfaces is of great importance as it could provide fundamental insight into water splitting for hydrogen production using solar energy. In this work, hydrogen formation from glycols having different numbers of methyl end-groups have been studied using temperature pro-grammed desorption on reduced, hydroxylated, and oxidized TiO2(110) surfaces. The results from OD-labeled glycols demon-strate that gas-phase molecular hydrogen originates exclusively from glycol hydroxyl groups. The yield is controlled by a combi-nation of glycol coverage, steric hindrance, TiO2(110) order and the amount of subsurface charge. Combined, these results show that proximal pairs of hydroxyl aligned glycol molecules and subsurface charge are required to maximize the yield of this redox reaction. These findings highlight the importance of geometric and electronic effects in hydrogen formation from adsorbates on TiO2(110).

  9. Hydrologic calibration of paired watersheds using a MOSUM approach

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ssegane, H.; Amatya, D. M.; Muwamba, A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Appelboom, T.; Tollner, E. W.; Nettles, J. E.; Youssef, M. A.; Birgand, F.; Skaggs, R. W.

    2015-01-09

    Paired watershed studies have historically been used to quantify hydrologic effects of land use and management practices by concurrently monitoring two neighboring watersheds (a control and a treatment) during the calibration (pre-treatment) and post-treatment periods. This study characterizes seasonal water table and flow response to rainfall during the calibration period and tests a change detection technique of moving sums of recursive residuals (MOSUM) to select calibration periods for each control-treatment watershed pair when the regression coefficients for daily water table elevation (WTE) were most stable to reduce regression model uncertainty. The control and treatment watersheds included 1–3 year intensively managedmore » loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with natural understory, same age loblolly pine intercropped with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), 14–15 year thinned loblolly pine with natural understory (control), and switchgrass only. Although monitoring during the calibration period spanned 2009 to 2012, silvicultural operational practices that occurred during this period such as harvesting of existing stand and site preparation for pine and switchgrass establishment may have acted as external factors, potentially shifting hydrologic calibration relationships between control and treatment watersheds. Results indicated that MOSUM was able to detect significant changes in regression parameters for WTE due to silvicultural operations. This approach also minimized uncertainty of calibration relationships which could otherwise mask marginal treatment effects. All calibration relationships developed using this MOSUM method were quantifiable, strong, and consistent with Nash–Sutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) greater than 0.97 for WTE and NSE greater than 0.92 for daily flow, indicating its applicability for choosing calibration periods of paired watershed studies.« less

  10. Hydrologic calibration of paired watersheds using a MOSUM approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ssegane, H.; Amatya, D. M.; Muwamba, A.; Chescheir, G. M.; Appelboom, T.; Tollner, E. W.; Nettles, J. E.; Youssef, M. A.; Birgand, F.; Skaggs, R. W.

    2015-01-09

    Paired watershed studies have historically been used to quantify hydrologic effects of land use and management practices by concurrently monitoring two neighboring watersheds (a control and a treatment) during the calibration (pre-treatment) and post-treatment periods. This study characterizes seasonal water table and flow response to rainfall during the calibration period and tests a change detection technique of moving sums of recursive residuals (MOSUM) to select calibration periods for each control-treatment watershed pair when the regression coefficients for daily water table elevation (WTE) were most stable to reduce regression model uncertainty. The control and treatment watersheds included 13 year intensively managed loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) with natural understory, same age loblolly pine intercropped with switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), 1415 year thinned loblolly pine with natural understory (control), and switchgrass only. Although monitoring during the calibration period spanned 2009 to 2012, silvicultural operational practices that occurred during this period such as harvesting of existing stand and site preparation for pine and switchgrass establishment may have acted as external factors, potentially shifting hydrologic calibration relationships between control and treatment watersheds. Results indicated that MOSUM was able to detect significant changes in regression parameters for WTE due to silvicultural operations. This approach also minimized uncertainty of calibration relationships which could otherwise mask marginal treatment effects. All calibration relationships developed using this MOSUM method were quantifiable, strong, and consistent with NashSutcliffe Efficiency (NSE) greater than 0.97 for WTE and NSE greater than 0.92 for daily flow, indicating its applicability for choosing calibration periods of paired watershed studies.

  11. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung from nucleon-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.; Gibson, B. F.

    2015-07-22

    Background: Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering ???? (nnvv, ppvv, and npvv) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars, because of the implications for the neutron star cooling. The calculated ???? emissivities within the neutron star environment are relatively insensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations, but differ significantly from those obtained using an OPE model. Purpose: To investigate the free ???? cross sections using a realistic nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, comparing the relative sizes of the cross sections for the three processes nnvv, ppvv, and npvv.

  12. Patent: Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    reflectors | DOEpatents Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors Citation Details Title: Non-astigmatic imaging with matched pairs of spherically bent reflectors

  13. A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into muons Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into muons...

  14. Pair production of color-octet scalars at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idilbi, Ahmad [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Departamento de Fisica Teorica II, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kim, Chul [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mehen, Thomas [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Heavy colored scalar particles, which exist in many models of new physics, can be pair produced at the LHC via gluon-gluon fusion and possibly form quarkoniumlike bound states. If the scalars are also charged under the electroweak gauge group, these bound states can then decay into electroweak bosons. This yields a resonant cross section for final states such as {gamma}{gamma} that can exceed standard model backgrounds. This paper studies this process in the Manohar-Wise model of color-octet scalars (COS). Important threshold logarithms and final state Coulomb-like QCD interactions are resummed using effective field theory. We compute the resummed cross section for gluon-gluon fusion to COS pairs at the LHC as well as the resonant cross section for octetonium decaying to {gamma}{gamma}. The latter cross section exceeds the standard model diphoton cross section when the COS mass is less than 500 (350) GeV for {radical}(s)=14(7) TeV. Nonobservation of resonances below these energies can significantly improve existing bounds on COS masses.

  15. Search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2008-08-01

    We report on a search for the pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in p{bar p} collisions at the center of mass energy {radical}s = 1.96TeV using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. Topologies arising from the LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{nu}q and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{mu}q decay modes are investigated. No excess of data over the standard model prediction is observed and upper limits on the leptoquark pair production cross section are derived at the 95% C.L. as a function of the leptoquark mass and the branching fraction {beta} for the decay LQ {yields} {mu}q. These are interpreted as lower limits on the leptoquark mass as a function of {beta}. For {beta} = 1 (0.5), scalar second generation leptoquarks with masses up to 316GeV (270GeV) are excluded.

  16. Pair instability supernovae of very massive population III stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan; Heger, Alexander; Almgren, Ann; Whalen, Daniel J.

    2014-09-01

    Numerical studies of primordial star formation suggest that the first stars in the universe may have been very massive. Stellar models indicate that non-rotating Population III stars with initial masses of 140-260 M {sub ?} die as highly energetic pair-instability supernovae. We present new two-dimensional simulations of primordial pair-instability supernovae done with the CASTRO code. Our simulations begin at earlier times than previous multidimensional models, at the onset of core contraction, to capture any dynamical instabilities that may be seeded by core contraction and explosive burning. Such instabilities could enhance explosive yields by mixing hot ash with fuel, thereby accelerating nuclear burning, and affect the spectra of the supernova by dredging up heavy elements from greater depths in the star at early times. Our grid of models includes both blue supergiants and red supergiants over the range in progenitor mass expected for these events. We find that fluid instabilities driven by oxygen and helium burning arise at the upper and lower boundaries of the oxygen shell ?20-100 s after core bounce. Instabilities driven by burning freeze out after the SN shock exits the helium core. As the shock later propagates through the hydrogen envelope, a strong reverse shock forms that drives the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. In red supergiant progenitors, the amplitudes of these instabilities are sufficient to mix the supernova ejecta.

  17. Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    superconductors (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based superconductors We investigate the competition between the extended s{+-} wave and dx2-y2 -wave pairing order parameters in the iron-based superconductors. Because of the frustrating pairing interactions among the electron and the

  18. Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solution of the pairing Hamiltonian in finite

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nuclei (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solution of the pairing Hamiltonian in finite nuclei Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov solution of the pairing Hamiltonian in finite nuclei We present an overview of the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) theory of nucleonic superfluidity for finite nuclei. After introducing basic concepts related to pairing correlations, we show how the correlated pairs are incorporated into the HFB wave function.

  19. Photon-number statistics of twin beams: Self-consistent measurement, reconstruction, and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pe?ina, Jan Jr.; Haderka, Ond?ej; Michlek, Vclav

    2014-12-04

    A method for the determination of photon-number statistics of twin beams using the joint signal-idler photocount statistics obtained by an iCCD camera is described. It also provides absolute quantum detection efficiency of the camera. Using the measured photocount statistics, quasi-distributions of integrated intensities are obtained. They attain negative values occurring in characteristic strips an a consequence of pairing of photons in twin beams.

  20. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1981-02-11

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

  1. Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung from nucleon-nucleon scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yi; Liou, M. K.; Schreiber, W. M.; Gibson, B. F.

    2015-07-22

    Background: Neutrino-pair bremsstrahlung processes from nucleon-nucleon scattering ΝΝνν¯ (nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯) have recently attracted attention in studies of neutrino emission in neutron stars, because of the implications for the neutron star cooling. The calculated ΝΝνν¯ emissivities within the neutron star environment are relatively insensitive to the two-nucleon dynamical model used in the calculations, but differ significantly from those obtained using an OPE model. Purpose: To investigate the free ΝΝνν¯ cross sections using a realistic nucleon-nucleon scattering amplitude, comparing the relative sizes of the cross sections for the three processes nnvv¯, ppvv¯, and npvv¯.

  2. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

    1983-10-04

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t[sub max]--t[sub min]) of a series of paired time signals t[sub 1] and t[sub 2] varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t[sub 1][<=]t[sub 2] and t[sub 1]+t[sub 2] equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t[sub min]) of the first signal t[sub 1] closer to t[sub max] and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20--800. 6 figs.

  3. Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theodosiou, George E. (West Chicago, IL); Dawson, John W. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

    1983-01-01

    Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t.sub.max -t.sub.min) of a series of paired time signals t.sub.1 and t.sub.2 varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t.sub.1 .ltoreq.t.sub.2 and t.sub.1 +t.sub.2 equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t.sub.min) of the first signal t.sub.1 closer to t.sub.max and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20-800.

  4. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400...

  5. State recovery and lockstep execution restart in a system with multiprocessor pairing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gara, Alan; Gschwind, Michael K; Salapura, Valentina

    2014-01-21

    System, method and computer program product for a multiprocessing system to offer selective pairing of processor cores for increased processing reliability. A selective pairing facility is provided that selectively connects, i.e., pairs, multiple microprocessor or processor cores to provide one highly reliable thread (or thread group). Each paired microprocessor or processor cores that provide one highly reliable thread for high-reliability connect with a system components such as a memory "nest" (or memory hierarchy), an optional system controller, and optional interrupt controller, optional I/O or peripheral devices, etc. The memory nest is attached to a selective pairing facility via a switch or a bus. Each selectively paired processor core is includes a transactional execution facility, whereing the system is configured to enable processor rollback to a previous state and reinitialize lockstep execution in order to recover from an incorrect execution when an incorrect execution has been detected by the selective pairing facility.

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  7. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  8. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  9. Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  10. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  11. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  12. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  15. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  16. Two-dimensional simulations of pulsational pair-instability supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Ke-Jung; Woosley, Stan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Heger, Alexander [Monash Centre for Astrophysics, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Almgren, Ann [Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Whalen, Daniel J., E-mail: kchen@ucolick.org [T-2, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Massive stars that end their lives with helium cores in the range of 35-65 M {sub ?} are known to produce repeated thermonuclear outbursts due to a recurring pair-instability. In some of these events, solar masses of material are ejected in repeated outbursts of several 10{sup 50} erg each. Collisions between these shells can sometimes produce very luminous transients that are visible from the edge of the observable universe. Previous one-dimensional (1D) studies of these events produce thin, high-density shells as one ejection plows into another. Here, in the first multi-dimensional simulations of these collisions, we show that the development of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability truncates the growth of the high-density spike and drives mixing between the shells. The progenitor is a 110 M {sub ?} solar-metallicity star that was shown in earlier work to produce a superluminous supernova. The light curve of this more realistic model has a peak luminosity and duration that are similar to those of 1D models but a structure that is smoother.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    number concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle number concentration The total number of cloud particles present in any given volume of air. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available

  18. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  19. OMB Control Number: 1910-5165

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    damages assessed under Contract Work Hours and Safety Standards Act: Page 1 OMB Control Number: 1910-5165 Expires: 04302015 SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT...

  20. Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals

  1. Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals

  2. Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of "lone pair" electrons: pairs of chemically inert, nonbonding valence electrons in hybrid orbitals

  3. Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ann Almgren Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics February 4, 2014 Ann Almgren. Berkeley Lab Downloads Almgren-nug2014.pdf | Adobe Acrobat PDF file Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics - Ann Almgren, Berkeley Lab Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:52

  4. Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low-mass lepton pair production at large transverse momentum We study the transverse momentum distribution of low-mass lepton pairs produced in hadronic scattering, using the perturbative QCD factorization approach. We argue that the distribution at large transverse momentum, Q{sub T}>>Q, with the pair's invariant mass Q as low as Q{approx}{lambda}{sub

  5. Microbes paired for biological gas-to-liquids (Bio-GTL) process...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on September 16, 2016 Title: Microbes paired ... Publication Date: 2016-03-16 OSTI Identifier: 1242308 Type: Published Article Journal ...

  6. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  7. Search for baryon number violation in top-quark decays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-02-20

    A search for baryon number violation (BNV) in top-quark decays is performed using pp collisions produced by the LHC at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV. The top-quark decay considered in this search results in one light lepton (muon or electron), two jets, but no neutrino in the final state. Data used for the analysis were collected by the CMS detector and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns. The event selection is optimized for top quarks produced in pairs, with one undergoing the BNV decay and the other the standard model hadronic decay to three jets. No significant excessmore » of events over the expected yield from standard model processes is observed. The upper limits at 95% confidence level on the branching fraction of the BNV top-quark decay are calculated to be 0.0016 and 0.0017 for the muon and the electron channels, respectively. Assuming lepton universality, an upper limit of 0.0015 results from the combination of the two channels. These limits are the first that have been obtained on a BNV process involving the top quark.« less

  8. Charge density stabilised local electron spin pair states in insulating polymers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serra, S.; Dissado, L. A.

    2014-12-14

    A model is presented that addresses the energy stability of localized electron states in insulating polymers with respect to delocalized free electron-like states at variable charge densities. The model was derived using an effective Hamiltonian for the total energy of electrons trapped in large polarons and spin-paired bipolarons, which includes the electrostatic interaction between charges that occurs when the charge density exceeds the infinite dilution limit. The phase diagram of the various electronic states with respect to the charge density is derived using parameters determined from experimental data for polyethylene, and it is found that a phase transition from excess charge in the form of stable polarons to a stable state of bipolarons with charge?=?2 and spin number S?=?0 is predicted for a charge density between 0.2?C/m{sup 3} and ?2?C/m{sup 3}. This transition is consistent with a change from low mobility charge transport to charge transport in the form of pulses with a mobility orders of magnitude higher that has been observed in several insulating polymers.

  9. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP ...

  10. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for the products (equipment, components and/or materials) and if applicable the nonproprietary associated installation/maintenance documentation that will be shipped from the United States to the ITER International Organization in Cadarache, France or to ITER Members worldwide on behalf of the Company. In rare

  11. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication

  12. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Steven William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2012-05-22

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  13. Induction logging device with a pair of mutually perpendicular bucking coils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koelle, Alfred R. (Los Alamos, NM); Landt, Jeremy A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    An instrument is disclosed for mapping vertical conductive fractures in a resistive bedrock, magnetically inducing eddy currents by a pair of vertically oriented, mutually perpendicular, coplanar coils. The eddy currents drive magnetic fields which are picked up by a second, similar pair of coils.

  14. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason (Cambridge, GB); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (Lancaster, PA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Steven William (Cambridge, MA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2008-04-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  15. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (San Diego, CA); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (San Diego, CA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (San Diego, CA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2011-09-06

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  16. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyltRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2010-05-11

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  17. Competition between magnetic and superconducting pairing exchange interactions in confined systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying Zujian; Cuoco, Mario; Noce, Canio; Zhou Huanqiang

    2007-10-01

    We analyze the competition between magnetic and pairing interactions in confined systems relevant to either small superconducting grains or trapped ultracold atomic gases. The response to the imbalance of the chemical potential for the two spin states leads to various inhomogeneous profiles of the pair energy distribution. We show that the position in the energy spectrum for the unpaired particles can be tuned by varying the filling or the pairing strength. When small grains are considered, the antiferromagnetic exchange stabilizes the pair correlations, whereas for Fermi gases, a transition from a mixed configuration to a phase-separated one beyond a critical polarization threshold appears, as does an unconventional phase with a paired shell around a normal core.

  18. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  19. Battling bird flu by the numbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  20. WIPP Documents - All documents by number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: Documents that do not have document numbers are not included in this listing. Large file size alert This symbol means the document may be a large file size. All documents by number Common document prefixes DOE/CAO DOE/TRU DOE/CBFO DOE/WIPP DOE/EA NM DOE/EIS Other DOE/CAO Back to top DOE/CAO 95-1095, Oct. 1995 Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Study This study was conducted to satisfy the requirements defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act and considered by DOE to be a prudent exercise in

  1. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Gimnez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  2. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 618 606 604 540 627 666 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 4,745 4,624 5,007 5,066 5,024 5,084 1987-2014...

  3. The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

    1948-00-00

    Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

  4. Washington Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    059,239 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1987-2014 Sales 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 98,965 99,231...

  5. Minnesota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,436,063 1,445,824 1,459,134 1,472,663 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 131,801 132,163 132,938 134,394 135,557 136,382 1987-2014 Sales 131,986 132,697 134,165 135,235...

  6. West Virginia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    343,837 344,131 342,069 340,256 340,102 338,652 1987-2014 Sales 344,125 342,063 340,251 340,098 338,649 1997-2014 Transported 6 6 5 4 3 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers...

  7. Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 522,658 1986-2014 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 521,460 1997-2014 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1,198 1997-2014 Commercial Number of...

  8. North Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,102,001 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 1987-2014 Sales 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 1,183,152 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 113,630...

  9. Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C...

  10. Maine Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20,806 21,142 22,461 23,555 24,765 27,047 1987-2014 Sales 21,141 22,461 23,555 24,765 27,047 1997-2014 Transported 1 0 0 0 0 2010-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 8,815 9,084...

  11. South Dakota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    173,856 176,204 179,042 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 22,071 22,267 22,570 22,955 23,214 23,591 1987-2014 Sales 22,028 22,332 22,716 22,947 23,330 1998-2014...

  12. The influence of pairing correlations on the isospin symmetry breaking corrections of superallowed Fermi beta decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I k, A. E.; Gerceklioglu, M.; Selam, C.

    2013-05-15

    Within the framework of quasi-particle random phase approximation, the isospin breaking correction of superallowed 0{sup +} {yields} 0{sup +} beta decay and unitarity of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix have been investigated. The broken isotopic symmetry of nuclear part of Hamiltonian has been restored by Pyatov's method. The isospin symmetry breaking correction with pairing correlations has been compared with the previous results without pairing. The effect of pairing interactions has been examined for nine superallowed Fermi beta decays; their parent nuclei are {sup 26}Al, {sup 34}Cl, {sup 38}K, {sup 42}Sc, {sup 46}V, {sup 50}Mn, {sup 54}Co, {sup 62}Ga, {sup 74}Rb.

  13. Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at NNLO in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    QCD: The vector current contributions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at NNLO in QCD: The vector current contributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at NNLO in QCD: The vector current contributions We report on a calculation of the vector current contributions to the electroweak production of top quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at

  14. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scalemore » with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of σtt¯ = 7.64 ± 0.57 (stat + syst) ± 0.45 (luminosity) pb.« less

  15. Measurement of the Top Pair Production Cross Section in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Jet Flavor Discriminant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T; Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A

    2011-08-01

    We present a new method to measure the top quark pair production cross section and the background rates with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb-1 from p p? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II Detector. We select events with a single electron or muon candidate, missing transverse energy, and at least one b-tagged jet. We perform a simultaneous fit to a jet flavor discriminant across nine samples defined by the number of jets and b-tags. An advantage of this approach is that many systematic uncertainties are measured in situ and inversely scale with integrated luminosity. We measure a top cross section of ?tt? = 7.64 0.57 (stat + syst) 0.45 (luminosity) pb.

  16. Rhode Island Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    24,846 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 1987-2014 Sales 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 22,988 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 1987-2014 Sales 21,507 21,421 21,442 21,731 21,947 1998-2014 Transported 1,542 1,756 1,917 2,011 1,987 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 467 454 468 432 490 551 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 260 249 245 248 271 266 1987-2014 Sales 57 53 56 62 62 1998-2014 Transported 192

  17. South Carolina Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    565,774 570,797 576,594 583,633 593,286 604,743 1987-2014 Sales 570,797 576,594 583,633 593,286 604,743 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 55,850 55,853 55,846 55,908 55,997 56,172 1987-2014 Sales 55,776 55,760 55,815 55,902 56,074 1998-2014 Transported 77 86 93 95 98 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 393 432 396 383 426 452 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,358 1,325 1,329 1,435 1,452 1,426 1987-2014 Sales 1,139 1,137 1,215 1,223 1,199 1998-2014

  18. Tennessee Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    ,083,573 1,085,387 1,089,009 1,084,726 1,094,122 1,106,681 1987-2014 Sales 1,085,387 1,089,009 1,084,726 1,094,122 1,106,681 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 127,704 127,914 128,969 130,139 131,091 131,001 1987-2014 Sales 127,806 128,866 130,035 130,989 130,905 1998-2014 Transported 108 103 104 102 96 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 406 439 404 345 411 438 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 2,717 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 1987-2014 Sales 2,340

  19. Texas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4,248,613 4,288,495 4,326,156 4,370,057 4,424,103 4,469,282 1987-2014 Sales 4,287,929 4,326,076 4,369,990 4,424,037 4,469,220 1997-2014 Transported 566 80 67 66 62 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 313,384 312,277 314,041 314,811 314,036 317,217 1987-2014 Sales 310,842 312,164 312,574 311,493 313,971 1998-2014 Transported 1,435 1,877 2,237 2,543 3,246 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 534 605 587 512 553 583 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 8,581

  20. Kentucky Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    754,761 758,129 759,584 757,790 761,575 760,131 1987-2014 Sales 728,940 730,602 730,184 736,011 735,486 1997-2014 Transported 29,189 28,982 27,606 25,564 24,645 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 83,862 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 1987-2014 Sales 80,541 80,392 80,644 81,579 81,026 1998-2014 Transported 4,166 4,585 4,485 4,420 4,292 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 423 435 407 361 435 469 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,715 1,742 1,705 1,720

  1. Louisiana Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    889,570 893,400 897,513 963,688 901,635 899,378 1987-2014 Sales 893,400 897,513 963,688 901,635 899,378 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 58,396 58,562 58,749 63,381 59,147 58,611 1987-2014 Sales 58,501 58,685 63,256 58,985 58,438 1998-2014 Transported 61 64 125 162 173 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 405 461 441 415 488 532 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 954 942 920 963 916 883 1987-2014 Sales 586 573 628 570 546

  2. Maryland Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    067,807 1,071,566 1,077,168 1,078,978 1,099,272 1,101,292 1987-2014 Sales 923,870 892,844 867,627 852,555 858,352 1997-2014 Transported 147,696 184,324 211,351 246,717 242,940 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 75,771 75,192 75,788 75,799 77,117 77,846 1987-2014 Sales 54,966 53,778 52,383 52,763 53,961 1998-2014 Transported 20,226 22,010 23,416 24,354 23,885 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 912 898 891 846 923 961 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers

  3. Mississippi Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    437,715 436,840 442,479 442,840 445,589 444,423 1987-2014 Sales 436,840 439,511 440,171 442,974 444,423 1997-2014 Transported 0 2,968 2,669 2,615 0 2010-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 50,713 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 1987-2014 Sales 50,503 50,273 50,360 49,829 50,197 1998-2014 Transported 34 363 329 324 41 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 377 419 400 352 388 442 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,141 980 982 936 933 943 1987-2014 Sales 860 853

  4. Missouri Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    348,781 1,348,549 1,342,920 1,389,910 1,357,740 1,363,286 1987-2014 Sales 1,348,549 1,342,920 1,389,910 1,357,740 1,363,286 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 140,633 138,670 138,214 144,906 142,495 143,024 1987-2014 Sales 137,342 136,843 143,487 141,047 141,477 1998-2014 Transported 1,328 1,371 1,419 1,448 1,547 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 437 441 451 378 453 510 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 3,573 3,541 3,307

  5. Montana Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    255,472 257,322 259,046 259,957 262,122 265,849 1987-2014 Sales 256,841 258,579 259,484 261,637 265,323 1997-2014 Transported 481 467 473 485 526 2005-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 33,731 34,002 34,305 34,504 34,909 35,205 1987-2014 Sales 33,652 33,939 33,967 34,305 34,558 1998-2014 Transported 350 366 537 604 647 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 699 602 651 557 601 612 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 396 384 381 372 372 369 1987-2014 Sales 312 304

  6. Utah Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    810,442 821,525 830,219 840,687 854,389 869,052 1987-2014 Sales 821,525 830,219 840,687 854,389 869,052 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 60,781 61,976 62,885 63,383 64,114 65,134 1987-2014 Sales 61,929 62,831 63,298 63,960 64,931 1998-2014 Transported 47 54 85 154 203 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 609 621 643 558 646 586 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 293 293 286 302 323 328 1987-2014 Sales 205 189 189 187 178 1998-2014 Transported 88 97 113

  7. Vermont Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    37,242 38,047 38,839 39,917 41,152 42,231 1987-2014 Sales 38,047 38,839 39,917 41,152 42,231 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 5,085 5,137 5,256 5,535 5,441 5,589 1987-2014 Sales 5,137 5,256 5,535 5,441 5,589 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 488 464 472 418 873 864 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 36 38 36 38 13 13 1987-2014 Sales 37 35 38 13 13 1998-2014 Transported 1 1 0 0 0 1999-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 80,290

  8. Virginia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,124,717 1,133,103 1,145,049 1,155,636 1,170,161 1,183,894 1987-2014 Sales 1,076,080 1,081,581 1,088,340 1,102,646 1,114,224 1997-2014 Transported 57,023 63,468 67,296 67,515 69,670 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 95,704 95,401 96,086 96,503 97,499 98,741 1987-2014 Sales 85,521 85,522 85,595 86,618 87,470 1998-2014 Transported 9,880 10,564 10,908 10,881 11,271 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 707 722 669 624 699 731 1967-2014 Industrial Number of

  9. Washington Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    059,239 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1987-2014 Sales 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 98,965 99,231 99,674 100,038 100,939 101,730 1987-2014 Sales 99,166 99,584 99,930 100,819 101,606 1998-2014 Transported 65 90 108 120 124 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 563 517 567 534 553 535 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 3,428 3,372 3,353 3,338 3,320 3,355 1987-2014 Sales 3,056 3,031

  10. Wisconsin Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    656,614 1,663,583 1,671,834 1,681,001 1,692,891 1,705,907 1987-2014 Sales 1,663,583 1,671,834 1,681,001 1,692,891 1,705,907 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 163,843 164,173 165,002 165,657 166,845 167,901 1987-2014 Sales 163,060 163,905 164,575 165,718 166,750 1998-2014 Transported 1,113 1,097 1,082 1,127 1,151 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 558 501 528 465 596 637 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 6,396 6,413 6,376

  11. Wyoming Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    153,062 153,852 155,181 157,226 158,889 160,896 1987-2014 Sales 117,735 118,433 118,691 117,948 118,396 1997-2014 Transported 36,117 36,748 38,535 40,941 42,500 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 19,843 19,977 20,146 20,387 20,617 20,894 1987-2014 Sales 14,319 14,292 14,187 14,221 14,452 1998-2014 Transported 5,658 5,854 6,200 6,396 6,442 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 523 558 580 514 583 583 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 130 120 123 127 132 131

  12. Nebraska Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    512,551 510,776 514,481 515,338 527,397 522,408 1987-2014 Sales 442,413 446,652 447,617 459,712 454,725 1997-2014 Transported 68,363 67,829 67,721 67,685 67,683 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 56,454 56,246 56,553 56,608 58,005 57,191 1987-2014 Sales 40,348 40,881 41,074 42,400 41,467 1998-2014 Transported 15,898 15,672 15,534 15,605 15,724 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 563 569 568 468 555 567 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 7,863 7,912 7,955

  13. Nevada Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    760,391 764,435 772,880 782,759 794,150 808,970 1987-2014 Sales 764,435 772,880 782,759 794,150 808,970 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 41,303 40,801 40,944 41,192 41,710 42,338 1987-2014 Sales 40,655 40,786 41,023 41,536 42,163 1998-2014 Transported 146 158 169 174 175 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 715 722 751 704 748 687 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 192 184 177 177 195 218 1987-2014 Sales 152 147 146 162 183 1998-2014 Transported 32 30 31

  14. New Hampshire Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    96,924 95,361 97,400 99,738 98,715 99,146 1987-2014 Sales 95,360 97,400 99,738 98,715 99,146 1997-2014 Transported 1 0 0 0 0 2010-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 16,937 16,645 17,186 17,758 17,298 17,421 1987-2014 Sales 15,004 15,198 15,429 14,685 14,527 1998-2014 Transported 1,641 1,988 2,329 2,613 2,894 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 587 505 517 458 532 540 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 155 306 362 466 403 326 1987-2014 Sales 31 25 30 35 45

  15. New Mexico Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    560,479 559,852 570,637 561,713 572,224 614,313 1987-2014 Sales 559,825 570,592 561,652 572,146 614,231 1997-2014 Transported 27 45 61 78 82 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 48,846 48,757 49,406 48,914 50,163 55,689 1987-2014 Sales 45,679 46,104 45,298 46,348 51,772 1998-2014 Transported 3,078 3,302 3,616 3,815 3,917 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 506 516 507 509 534 461 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 471 438 360 121 123 116 1987-2014 Sales 390

  16. North Dakota Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    22,065 123,585 125,392 130,044 133,975 137,972 1987-2014 Sales 123,585 125,392 130,044 133,975 137,972 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 2004-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 17,632 17,823 18,421 19,089 19,855 20,687 1987-2014 Sales 17,745 18,347 19,021 19,788 20,623 1998-2014 Transported 78 74 68 67 64 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 623 578 596 543 667 677 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 279 307 259 260 266 269 1987-2014 Sales 255 204 206 211 210

  17. Oklahoma Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    924,745 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 1987-2014 Sales 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 94,314 92,430 93,903 94,537 95,385 96,004 1987-2014 Sales 88,217 89,573 90,097 90,861 91,402 1998-2014 Transported 4,213 4,330 4,440 4,524 4,602 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 439 452 430 382 464 489 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 2,618 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 1987-2014

  18. Oregon Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    675,582 682,737 688,681 693,507 700,211 707,010 1987-2014 Sales 682,737 688,681 693,507 700,211 707,010 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 76,893 77,370 77,822 78,237 79,276 80,480 1987-2014 Sales 77,351 77,793 78,197 79,227 80,422 1998-2014 Transported 19 29 40 49 58 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 387 352 390 368 386 353 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,051 1,053 1,066 1,076 1,085 1,099 1987-2014 Sales 821 828 817 821 839 1998-2014 Transported

  19. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  20. Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1,690,581 1986-2014 Sales 1,634,582 1,645,711 1,659,803 1,672,307 1,690,576 1997-2014 Transported 5 5 5 5 5 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 145,624 145,460 145,837 145,960 150,145 150,235 1986-2014 Sales 145,236 145,557 145,563 149,826 149,921 1998-2014 Transported 224 280 397 319 314 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 429 396 383 355 392 386 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 5,084 6,232 6,529 6,906

  1. Delaware Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9,006 150,458 152,005 153,307 155,627 158,502 1986-2014 Sales 150,458 152,005 153,307 155,627 158,502 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 12,839 12,861 12,931 12,997 13,163 13,352 1986-2014 Sales 12,706 12,656 12,644 12,777 12,902 1998-2014 Transported 155 275 353 386 450 1999-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 910 948 810 772 849 890 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 112 114 129 134 138 141 1987-2014 Sales 40 35 29 28 28 1998-2014 Transported 74 94 105 110

  2. Florida Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    674,090 675,551 679,199 686,994 694,210 703,535 1986-2014 Sales 661,768 664,564 672,133 679,191 687,766 1997-2014 Transported 13,783 14,635 14,861 15,019 15,769 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 59,549 60,854 61,582 63,477 64,772 67,460 1986-2014 Sales 41,750 41,068 41,102 40,434 41,303 1998-2014 Transported 19,104 20,514 22,375 24,338 26,157 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 846 888 869 861 926 929 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 607 581 630 507 528

  3. Georgia Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,744,934 1,740,587 1,740,006 1,739,543 1,805,425 1,755,847 1986-2014 Sales 321,290 321,515 319,179 377,652 315,562 1997-2014 Transported 1,419,297 1,418,491 1,420,364 1,427,773 1,440,285 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 127,347 124,759 123,454 121,243 126,060 122,573 1986-2014 Sales 32,318 32,162 31,755 36,556 31,845 1998-2014 Transported 92,441 91,292 89,488 89,504 90,728 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 421 482 458 428 454 482 1967-2014 Industrial Number

  4. Hawaii Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    25,466 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 1987-2014 Sales 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 1998-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 2,535 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 1987-2014 Sales 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 691 697 691 727 713 692 1980-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 25 24 24 22 22 23 1997-2014 Sales 24 24 22 22 23 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 13,753 14,111 15,087 16,126 17,635 17,

  5. Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    42,277 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 367,394 1987-2014 Sales 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 367,394 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 38,245 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722 40,229 1987-2014 Sales 38,468 38,872 39,160 39,681 40,188 1998-2014 Transported 38 40 42 41 41 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 412 390 433 404 465 422 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 187 184 178 179 183 189 1987-2014 Sales 108 103 105 109 115 1998-2014 Transported 76 75 74 74 74

  6. Iowa Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    875,781 879,713 883,733 892,123 895,414 900,420 1987-2014 Sales 879,713 883,733 892,123 895,414 900,420 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 98,416 98,396 98,541 99,113 99,017 99,182 1987-2014 Sales 96,996 97,075 97,580 97,334 97,409 1998-2014 Transported 1,400 1,466 1,533 1,683 1,773 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 576 525 526 442 572 579 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,626 1,528 1,465 1,469 1,491 1,572 1987-2014 Sales 1,161 1,110 1,042 1,074 1,135

  7. Kansas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    855,454 853,842 854,730 854,800 858,572 861,092 1987-2014 Sales 853,842 854,730 854,779 858,546 861,066 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 21 26 26 2004-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 84,715 84,446 84,874 84,673 84,969 85,867 1987-2014 Sales 78,310 78,559 78,230 78,441 79,231 1998-2014 Transported 6,136 6,315 6,443 6,528 6,636 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 384 377 378 301 391 425 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 7,793 7,664 7,954 7,970 7,877 7,429 1987-2014

  8. Alabama Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    785,005 778,985 772,892 767,396 765,957 769,418 1986-2014 Sales 778,985 772,892 767,396 765,957 769,418 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 67,674 68,163 67,696 67,252 67,136 67,806 1986-2014 Sales 68,017 67,561 67,117 67,006 67,677 1998-2014 Transported 146 135 135 130 129 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 359 397 371 320 377 406 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 3,057 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 1986-2014 Sales 2,758

  9. Alaska Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    120,124 121,166 121,736 122,983 124,411 126,416 1986-2014 Sales 121,166 121,736 122,983 124,411 126,416 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 13,215 12,998 13,027 13,133 13,246 13,399 1986-2014 Sales 12,673 12,724 13,072 13,184 13,336 1998-2014 Transported 325 303 61 62 63 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 1,258 1,225 1,489 1,515 1,411 1,338 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 3 3 5 3 3 1 1987-2014 Sales 2 2 3 2 1 1998-2014 Transported 1 3 0 1 0 1998-2014

  10. Arizona Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,130,047 1,138,448 1,146,286 1,157,688 1,172,003 1,186,794 1986-2014 Sales 1,138,448 1,146,280 1,157,682 1,171,997 1,186,788 1997-2014 Transported 0 6 6 6 6 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 57,191 56,676 56,547 56,532 56,585 56,649 1986-2014 Sales 56,510 56,349 56,252 56,270 56,331 1998-2014 Transported 166 198 280 315 318 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 563 564 577 558 581 538 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 390 368 371 379 383 386 1987-2014

  11. Arkansas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    557,355 549,970 551,795 549,959 549,764 549,034 1986-2014 Sales 549,970 551,795 549,959 549,764 549,034 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 69,043 67,987 67,815 68,765 68,791 69,011 1986-2014 Sales 67,676 67,454 68,151 68,127 68,291 1998-2014 Transported 311 361 614 664 720 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 527 592 590 603 692 734 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 1,025 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 1986-2014 Sales 580 554 523 513 531 1998-2014 Transported

  12. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shatters records in first year of accelerated shipping effort October 3, 2012 Los Alamos National Laboratory shatters records in first year of accelerated shipping effort Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, October 3, 2012-In the first year of an effort to accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), Los Alamos National Laboratory shattered its own record with 59 more shipments than planned, and became one of the largest

  13. Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In memoriam: Michael Welcome 1957 - 2014 RIP Almgren CCSE Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics Ann Almgren Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory NUG 2014: NERSC@40 February 4, 2014 Collaborators: John Bell, Chris Malone, Andy Nonaka, Stan Woosley, Michael Zingale Almgren CCSE Introduction We often associate astrophysics with explosive phenomena: novae supernovae gamma-ray bursts X-ray bursts Type Ia Supernovae Largest

  14. Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    372 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update

  15. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in

  16. Search for stop pairs in the emu channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tissandier, Fabrice; /Clermont-Ferrand U.

    2007-10-01

    The Standard Model gives a satisfying description of subatomic processes at low energy (< 1 TeV). Beyond this energy scale, other models must be considered. Supersymmetry is one of them. It gives in an elegant way, solutions to several Standard Model short comings. This document reports the search for a supersymmetric signal characterized by the production of two stops decaying into two b-jets, one electron, one muon and missing energy. This study has been performed at the D0 experiment, located on the ring of Tevatron collider at FermiLab, (Chicago, USA), whose energy in the center of mass reaches {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The data used for this analysis have been collected during Run IIa of D0 detector; from april 2003 to march 2006 ({approx} 1fb{sup -1}). The objects handled for this analysis require a good understanding of both calorimeters, muon detectors and trackers. As Tevatron is an hadronic collider and the number of Standard Model processes with the same signature as the signal is low, the background is thus dominated by QCD processes. After the selection cuts, no excess of data has been observed with respect to the Standard Model expectation. D0 experiment sensibility has been improved and the 95% CL exclusion area in [m{sub {bar {nu}}}, m{sub {bar t}{sub 1}}], extended up to stop masses of 170 GeV/c{sup 2} and sneutrino masses of 105 GeV/c{sup 2}. Besides, a part of my work for the collaboration consisted in elaborating a tool to discriminate calorimetric objects at level 3 trigger system; and also in calibrating the two simulated level 1 readouts.

  17. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Elements) Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49 2000's 49 39 38 43 43 44 44 43 43 43 2010's 43 43 44 47 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Number of

  18. Pairing preferences of the model mono-valence mono-atomic ions investigated by molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Qiang [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhang, Ruiting; Zhao, Ying; Li, HuanHuan; Zhuang, Wei, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023, Liaoning (China); Gao, Yi Qin, E-mail: wzhuang@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: gaoyq@pku.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-05-14

    We carried out a series of potential of mean force calculations to study the pairing preferences of a series of model mono-atomic 1:1 ions with evenly varied sizes. The probabilities of forming the contact ion pair (CIP) and the single water separate ion pair (SIP) were presented in the two-dimensional plots with respect to the ion sizes. The pairing preferences reflected in these plots largely agree with the empirical rule of matching ion sizes in the small and big size regions. In the region that the ion sizes are close to the size of the water molecule; however, a significant deviation from this conventional rule is observed. Our further analysis indicated that this deviation originates from the competition between CIP and the water bridging SIP state. The competition is mainly an enthalpy modulated phenomenon in which the existing of the water bridging plays a significant role.

  19. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  20. Nucleon and nucleon-pair momentum distributions in A?12 nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wiringa, Robert B.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Pieper, Steven C.; Carlson, Joseph A.

    2014-02-10

    We report variational Monte Carlo calculations of single-nucleon momentum distributions for A?12 nuclei and nucleon-pair and nucleon-cluster momentum distributions for A?8. The wave functions have been generated for a Hamiltonian containing the Argonne ?18 two-nucleon and Urbana X three-nucleon potentials. The single-nucleon and nucleon-pair momentum distributions exhibit universal features attributable to the one-pion-exchange tensor interaction The single-nucleon distributions are broken down into proton and neutron components and spin-up and spin-down components where appropriate. The nucleon-pair momentum distributions are given separately for pp and pn pairs. The nucleon-cluster momentum distributions include dp in 3He, tp and dd in S4He, ?d inmore6Li,?t in 7Li, and ?? in 8Be. Detailed tables are provided on-line for download.less

  1. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ν(C≡N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore » to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  2. Pair correlations in neutrinoless double {beta} decay candidate {sup 130}Te.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloxham, T.; Kay, B. P.; Schiffer, J. P.; Clark, J. A.; Deibel, C. M.; Freeman, S. J.; Freedman, S. J.; Howard, A. M.; McAllister, S. A.; Parker, P. D.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S. (Physics); ( PSC-USR); (LBNL); (Michigan State Univ.); (Univ. of Manchester); (Yale Univ.)

    2010-08-16

    Pair correlations in the ground state of {sup 130}Te have been investigated using pair-transfer experiments to explore the validity of approximations in calculating the matrix element for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay. This nucleus is a candidate for the observation of such decay, and a good understanding of its structure is crucial for eventual calculations of the neutrino mass, should such a decay indeed be observed. For proton-pair adding, strong transitions to excited 0{sup +} states had been observed in the Te isotopes by Alford et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 323, 339 (1979)], indicating a breaking of the BCS approximation for protons in the ground state. We measured the neutron-pair removing (p,t) reaction on {sup 130}Te and found no indication of a corresponding splitting of the BCS nature of the ground state for neutrons.

  3. Pair correlations in the neutrinoless double-{beta} decay candidate {sup 130}Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloxham, T.; Freedman, S. J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kay, B. P.; Schiffer, J. P.; Clark, J. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Deibel, C. M. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48825 (United States); Freeman, S. J.; Howard, A. M.; McAllister, S. A.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S. [Schuster Laboratory, University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Parker, P. D. [A. W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Pair correlations in the ground state of {sup 130}Te have been investigated using pair-transfer experiments to explore the validity of approximations in calculating the matrix element for neutrinoless double-{beta} decay. This nucleus is a candidate for the observation of such decay, and a good understanding of its structure is crucial for eventual calculations of the neutrino mass, should such a decay indeed be observed. For proton-pair adding, strong transitions to excited 0{sup +} states had been observed in the Te isotopes by Alford et al. [Nucl. Phys. A 323, 339 (1979)], indicating a breaking of the BCS approximation for protons in the ground state. We measured the neutron-pair removing (p,t) reaction on {sup 130}Te and found no indication of a corresponding splitting of the BCS nature of the ground state for neutrons.

  4. Bound free electron-positron pair production accompanied by giant dipole resonances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senguel, M. Y.; Gueclue, M. C.

    2011-01-15

    At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), for example, virtual photons produce many particles. At small impact parameters where the colliding nuclei make peripheral collisions, photon fluxes are very large and these are responsible for the multiple photonuclear interactions. Free pair productions, bound free pair productions, and nuclear Coulomb excitations are important examples of such interactions, and these processes play important roles in the beam luminosity at RHIC and LHC. Here we obtained the impact parameter dependence of bound free pair production cross sections and by using this probability we obtained bound free electron-positron pair production with nuclear breakup for heavy ion collisions at RHIC and LHC. We also compared our results to the other calculations.

  5. Parallel Assembly of Large Genomes from Paired Short Reads (2010 JGI/ANL HPC Workshop)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Aluru, Srinivas [Iowa State University

    2011-06-08

    Srinivas Aluru from Iowa State University gives a presentation on "Parallel Assembly of Large Genomes from Paired Short Reads" at the JGI/Argonne HPC Workshop on January 25, 2010.

  6. Enhanced pairing of quantum critical metals near d = 3 + 1 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This content will become publicly available on July 19, 2016 Title: Enhanced pairing of ... will become publicly available on July 19, 2016 Publisher's Version of Record 10.1103...

  7. Interactions in 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetracyanoborate ion pair: Spectroscopic and density functional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, James X.; Lee, Anita S.; Kitchin, John R.; Nulwala, Hunaid B; Luebke, David R.; Damodaran, Krishnan

    2013-04-24

    Density Functional Theory is used to investigate a weakly coordinating room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methyl imidazolium tetracyanoborate ([Emim]{sup +}[TCB]{sup -}). Four locally stable conformers of the ion pair were located. Atoms-in-molecules (AIM) and electron density analysis indicated the existence of several hydrogen bonds. Further investigation through the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) and Natural Energy Decomposition Analysis (NEDA) calculations provided insight into the origin of interactions in the [Emim]{sup +}[TCB]{sup -} ion pair. Strength of molecular interactions in the ionic liquid was correlated with frequency shifts of the characteristic vibrations of the ion pair. Harmonic vibrations of the ion pair were also compared with the experimental Raman and Infrared spectra. Vibrational frequencies were assigned by visualizing displacements of atoms around their equilibrium positions and through Potential Energy Distribution (PED) analysis.

  8. Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Electroweak production of top-quark pairs in e+e- annihilation at NNLO in QCD: the vector contributions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electroweak production of...

  9. Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in FeAs-based superconductors Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Pairing state with a time-reversal symmetry breaking in FeAs-based superconductors You are ...

  10. Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Beyond the Lone-Pair Model for Structurally Distorted Metal Oxides Print Wednesday, 28 February 2007 00:00 "Ferroelectricity," by analogy to ferromagnetism, is defined as the presence of spontaneous electrical polarization in a material, often arising from distortions in the material's crystal structure. In oxides of the metals lead and bismuth, such distortions were for many years attributed to the existence of

  11. Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair production at

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LHC14 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair production at LHC14 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Monojet plus soft dilepton signal from light higgsino pair production at LHC14 Authors: Baer, Howard ; Mustafayev, Azar ; Tata, Xerxes Publication Date: 2014-12-08 OSTI Identifier: 1180859 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 11;

  12. Distinguishing LSP archetypes via gluino pair production at LHC13 (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Distinguishing LSP archetypes via gluino pair production at LHC13 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August 19, 2016 Title: Distinguishing LSP archetypes via gluino pair production at LHC13 Authors: Altunkaynak, Baris ; Baer, Howard ; Barger, Vernon ; Huang, Peisi Publication Date: 2015-08-20 OSTI Identifier: 1212337 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information:

  13. Rail-to-rail differential input amplification stage with main and surrogate differential pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles Lanier; Smith, Stephen Fulton

    2007-03-06

    An operational amplifier input stage provides a symmetrical rail-to-rail input common-mode voltage without turning off either pair of complementary differential input transistors. Secondary, or surrogate, transistor pairs assume the function of the complementary differential transistors. The circuit also maintains essentially constant transconductance, constant slew rate, and constant signal-path supply current as it provides rail-to-rail operation.

  14. Compositions of orthogonal glutamyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J Christopher [San Francisco, CA; Schultz, Peter G [La Jolla, CA; Santoro, Stephen [Cambridge, MA

    2009-05-05

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include glutamyl orthogonal tRNAs, glutamyl orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of glutamyl tRNAs/synthetases are provided. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of...

  16. Property:NumberOfLEDSTools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name NumberOfLEDSTools Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLEDSTools&oldid322418" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  17. Property:Number of Color Cameras | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Color Cameras Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Color Cameras Property Type Number Pages using the property "Number of Color Cameras" Showing 25 pages using this...

  18. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  19. The numbers will follow | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The numbers will follow September 26, 2008 As all of you well know, the safety performance of Jefferson Lab, our laboratory, has been nothing short of stellar over the past couple of years. To cap it all, you were subjected to what is usually rated as the toughest of the sit-down examinations, the HSS audit. Not only did you exceed expectations, but you did so by a large margin. A basis for this great result, as documented by the HSS team, was the engagement and commitment of the workforce, the

  20. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S.

  1. Experimental Stations by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Experimental Stations by Number Beam Line by Techniques Photon Source Parameters Station Type Techniques Energy Range Contact Person Experimental Station 1-5 X-ray Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) focused 4600-16000 eV Christopher J. Tassone Tim J. Dunn Experimental Station 2-1 X-ray Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction Focused 5000 - 14500 eV Apurva Mehta Charles Troxel Jr Experimental Station 2-2 X-ray X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 1000-40000 eV Ryan Davis

  2. OMB Control Number: 1910-5165

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    OMB Control Number: 1910-5165 Expires: xx/xx/201x SEMI-ANNUAL DAVIS-BACON ENFORCEMENT REPORT Please submit this Semi-Annual Davis-Bacon Enforcement Report to your site DOE/NNSA Contractor Human Resource Division (CHRD) Office. If you do not have a DOE/NNSA CHRD Office, please submit the report to: DBAEnforcementReports@hq.doe.gov. The following questions regarding enforcement activity (Davis-Bacon and Related Acts) by this Agency are required by 29 CFR, Part 5.7(b), and Department of Labor, All

  3. What's Behind the Numbers? | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    What's Behind the Numbers? Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell What does this mean for me? New website shows data on the why's, when's and how's of crude oil prices. Among the most visible prices that consumers may see on a daily basis are the ones found on the large signs at the gasoline stations alongside our streets and highways. The biggest single factor affecting gasoline prices is the cost of crude oil, the main raw material for gasoline production, which accounts for well over half the

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 1990's 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 2000's 9 8 7 9 6 6 7 7 6 6 2010's 5 5 5 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  5. Michigan Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,169,026 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349 3,192,807 1987-2014 Sales 2,952,550 2,946,507 2,939,693 2,950,315 2,985,315 1997-2014 Transported 199,918 207,388 221,340 230,034 207,492 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 252,017 249,309 249,456 249,994 250,994 253,127 1987-2014 Sales 217,325 213,995 212,411 213,532 219,240 1998-2014 Transported 31,984 35,461 37,583 37,462 33,887 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 649 611 656 578 683 736 1967-2014 Industrial

  6. New Jersey Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,635,324 2,649,282 2,659,205 2,671,308 2,686,452 2,705,274 1987-2014 Sales 2,556,514 2,514,492 2,467,520 2,428,664 2,482,281 1997-2014 Transported 92,768 144,713 203,788 257,788 222,993 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 234,125 234,158 234,721 237,602 236,746 240,083 1987-2014 Sales 200,680 196,963 192,913 185,030 186,591 1998-2014 Transported 33,478 37,758 44,689 51,716 53,492 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 771 775 817 735 726 842 1967-2014 Industrial

  7. Ohio Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,253,184 3,240,619 3,236,160 3,244,274 3,271,074 3,283,869 1987-2014 Sales 1,418,217 1,352,292 855,055 636,744 664,015 1997-2014 Transported 1,822,402 1,883,868 2,389,219 2,634,330 2,619,854 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 270,596 268,346 268,647 267,793 269,081 269,758 1987-2014 Sales 92,621 85,877 51,308 35,966 37,035 1998-2014 Transported 175,725 182,770 216,485 233,115 232,723 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 594 583 601 543 625 679 1967-2014

  8. California Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0,510,950 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 10,754,908 10,781,720 1986-2014 Sales 10,469,734 10,545,585 10,547,706 10,471,814 10,372,973 1997-2014 Transported 72,850 79,605 134,210 283,094 408,747 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 441,806 439,572 440,990 442,708 444,342 443,115 1986-2014 Sales 399,290 390,547 387,760 387,806 385,878 1998-2014 Transported 40,282 50,443 54,948 56,536 57,237 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 561 564 558 572 574 536 1967-2014

  9. Illinois Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ,839,438 3,842,206 3,855,942 3,878,806 3,838,120 3,868,501 1987-2014 Sales 3,568,120 3,594,047 3,605,796 3,550,217 3,570,339 1997-2014 Transported 274,086 261,895 273,010 287,903 298,162 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 294,226 291,395 293,213 297,523 282,743 294,391 1987-2014 Sales 240,197 241,582 244,480 225,913 235,097 1998-2014 Transported 51,198 51,631 53,043 56,830 59,294 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 757 680 735 632 816 837 1967-2014 Industrial

  10. Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Paid FY2004 $294,316 FY2005 $820,074 FY2006 $799,449 FY2007 $877,898 FY2008 $866,608 FY2009 $886,404 FY2010 $800,314 FY2011 $871,280 FY2012 $824,517 FY2013 Cumulative Fee Paid $7,040,860 $820,074 $799,449 $877,898 $916,130 $886,608 Computer Sciences Corporation DE-AC06-04RL14383 $895,358 $899,230 $907,583 Cost Plus Award Fee $134,100,336 $8,221,404 Fee Available Contract Period: Fee Information Minimum

  11. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Butti, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Cremonesi, M.; Cruz, D.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; dAscenzo, N.; Datta, M.; De Barbaro, P.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; dErrico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; DOnofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dorigo, M.; Driutti, A.; Ebina, K.; Edgar, R.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Esham, B.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Fernndez Ramos, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Frisch, H.; Funakoshi, Y.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzlez Lpez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gramellini, E.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Harrington-Taber, T.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hocker, A.; Hong, Z.; Hopkins, W.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kambeitz, M.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Kruse, M.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lannon, K.; Latino, G.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lipeles, E.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, P.; Martnez, M.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Nigmanov, T.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Palni, P.; Papadimitriou, V.; Parker, W.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo Fernndez, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Rolli, S.; Ronzani, M.; Roser, R.; Rosner, J. L.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Stancari, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thomson, E.; Thukral, V.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.

    2013-07-01

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb?. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on ?(pp??jjjj) as a function of the masses of the hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.

  12. Search for Pair Production of Strongly Interacting Particles Decaying to Pairs of Jets in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T.; Albin, E.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2013-07-18

    We present a search for the pair production of a narrow nonstandard-model strongly interacting particle that decays to a pair of quarks or gluons, leading to a final state with four hadronic jets. We consider both nonresonant production via an intermediate gluon as well as resonant production via a distinct nonstandard-model intermediate strongly interacting particle. We use data collected by the CDF experiment in proton-antiproton collisions at √s=1.96 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.6 fb⁻¹. We find the data to be consistent with nonresonant production. We report limits on σ(pp̄→jjjj) as a function of the masses of themore » hypothetical intermediate particles. Upper limits on the production cross sections for nonstandard-model particles in several resonant and nonresonant processes are also derived.« less

  13. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a? to 3:3a? have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomicmorelevel using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a? by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.less

  14. Recombination radius of a Frenkel pair and capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by vacancy clusters in bcc Fe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakashima, Kenichi; Stoller, Roger E.; Xu, Haixuan

    2015-08-04

    The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is a fundamental parameter for the object kinetic Monte Carlo (OKMC) and mean field rate theory (RT) methods that are used to investigate irradiation damage accumulation in neutron irradiated nuclear materials. The recombination radius in bcc Fe has been studied both experimentally and numerically, however there is no general consensus about its value. The detailed atomistic processes of recombination also remain uncertain. Values from 1:0a? to 3:3a? have been employed as a recombination radius in previous studies using OKMC and RT. The recombination process of a Frenkel pair is investigated at the atomic level using the self-evolved atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC) method in this paper. SEAKMC calculations reveal that a self-interstitial atom recombines with a vacancy in a spontaneous reaction from several nearby sites following characteristic pathways. The recombination radius of a Frenkel pair is estimated to be 2.26a? by taking the average of the recombination distances from 80 simulation cases. This value agrees well with the experimental estimate. In addition, we apply these procedures to the capture radius of a self-interstitial atom by a vacancy cluster. The capture radius is found to gradually increase with the size of the vacancy cluster. The fitting curve for the capture radius is obtained as a function of the number of vacancies in the cluster.

  15. The Radical Pair Mechanism and the Avian Chemical Compass: Quantum Coherence and Entanglement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiteng; Kais, Sabre; Berman, Gennady Petrovich

    2015-02-02

    We review the spin radical pair mechanism which is a promising explanation of avian navigation. This mechanism is based on the dependence of product yields on 1) the hyperfine interaction involving electron spins and neighboring nuclear spins and 2) the intensity and orientation of the geomagnetic field. One surprising result is that even at ambient conditions quantum entanglement of electron spins can play an important role in avian magnetoreception. This review describes the general scheme of chemical reactions involving radical pairs generated from singlet and triplet precursors; the spin dynamics of the radical pairs; and the magnetic field dependence of product yields caused by the radical pair mechanism. The main part of the review includes a description of the chemical compass in birds. We review: the general properties of the avian compass; the basic scheme of the radical pair mechanism; the reaction kinetics in cryptochrome; quantum coherence and entanglement in the avian compass; and the effects of noise. We believe that the quantum avian compass can play an important role in avian navigation and can also provide the foundation for a new generation of sensitive and selective magnetic-sensing nano-devices.

  16. A Pair Production Telescope for Medium-Energy Gamma-Ray Polarimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter , Stanley D.; Bloser, Peter F.; Depaola, Gerardo O.; Dion, Michael P.; DeNolfo, Georgia A.; Hanu, Andrei; Iparraguirre, Marcos; Legere, Jason; Longo, Francesco; McConnell, Mark L.; Nowicki, Suzanne F.; Ryan, James M.; Son, Seunghee; Stecker, Floyd W.

    2014-08-01

    We describe the science motivation and development of a pair production telescope for medium-13 energy gamma-ray polarimetry. Our instrument concept, the Advanced Energetic Pair Telescope 14 (AdEPT), takes advantage of the Three-Dimensional Track Imager, a low-density gaseous time 15 projection chamber, to achieve angular resolution within a factor of two of the pair production 16 kinematics limit (~0.6 at 70 MeV), continuum sensitivity comparable with the Fermi-LAT front 17 detector (<310-6 MeV cm-2 s-1 at 70 MeV), and minimum detectable polarization less than 10% 18 for a 10 millicrab source in 106 seconds.

  17. A CLOSE-PAIR ANALYSIS OF DAMP MERGERS AT INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Richard C. Y.; Abraham, Roberto G.; Bridge, Carrie R. E-mail: abraham@astro.utoronto.ca

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the kinematics of {approx}2800 candidate close-pair galaxies at 0.1 < z < 1.2 identified from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey fields. Spectra of these systems were obtained using spectrometers on the 6.5 m Magellan and 5 m Hale telescopes. These data allow us to constrain the rate of dry mergers at intermediate redshifts and to test the 'hot halo' model for quenching of star formation. Using virial radii estimated from the correlation between dynamical and stellar masses published by Leauthaud et al., we find that around 1/5 of our candidate pairs are likely to share a common dark matter halo (our metric for close physical association). These pairs are divided into red-red, blue-red, and blue-blue systems using the rest-frame colors classification method introduced in Chou et al.. Galaxies classified as red in our sample have very low star formation rates, but they need not be totally quiescent, and hence we refer to them as 'damp', rather than 'dry', systems. After correcting for known selection effects, the fraction of blue-blue pairs is significantly greater than that of red-red and blue-red pairs. Red-red pairs are almost entirely absent from our sample, suggesting that damp mergers are rare at z {approx} 0.5. Our data support models with a short merging timescale (<0.5 Gyr) in which star formation is enhanced in the early phase of mergers, but quenched in the late phase. Hot halo models may explain this behavior, but only if virial shocks that heat gas are inefficient until major mergers are nearly complete.

  18. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) - Sales (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Sales (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,823,842 4,599,494 2000's 4,576,873 4,532,034 4,588,964 4,662,853 4,644,363 4,698,626 4,733,822 2010's 4,584,884 4,556,220 4,518,745 4,491,326 4,533,729 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  19. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 220,655 410,695 2000's 433,944 464,412 475,420 489,324 495,586 499,402 539,557 2010's 716,692 763,597 837,652 881,196 885,257 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release

  20. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Sales (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 182,424 157,050 2000's 157,806 152,974 143,177 142,816 151,386 146,450 135,070 2010's 129,119 124,552 121,821 123,124 122,182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  1. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49,014 71,281 2000's 75,826 64,052 62,738 62,698 57,672 59,773 58,760 2010's 63,611 64,749 67,551 69,164 69,953 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date:

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Sales (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Sales (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 55,934,175 56,520,482 56,023,710 2000's 56,261,031 56,710,548 57,267,445 57,815,669 58,524,797 59,787,524 60,129,047 2010's 60,267,648 60,408,842 60,010,723 59,877,464 60,222,681 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  3. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,783 801,264 2,199,519 2000's 2,978,319 3,576,181 3,839,809 4,055,781 3,971,337 3,829,303 4,037,233 2010's 5,274,697 5,531,680 6,364,411 6,934,929 7,005,081 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  4. Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,700 1990's 2,607 2,802 2,890 3,075 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 3,634 2000's 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 7,031 2010's 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  5. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 200,387 206,261 212,496 1990's 217,548 215,408 212,726 215,948 219,061 222,632 224,749 226,714 234,459 232,831 2000's 243,541 212,726 214,526 223,564 223,595 226,007 227,819 230,855 229,235 234,125 2010's 234,158 234,721 237,602 236,746 240,083 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,265 6,123 6,079 1990's 5,976 8,444 11,474 11,224 10,608 10,362 10,139 17,625 16,282 10,089 2000's 9,686 9,247 8,473 9,027 8,947 8,500 8,245 8,036 7,680 7,871 2010's 7,505 7,391 7,290 7,216 7,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  7. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,869,903 1,918,185 1,950,165 1990's 1,982,136 2,005,020 2,032,115 2,060,511 2,089,911 2,123,323 2,147,622 2,193,629 2,252,248 2,245,904 2000's 2,364,058 2,466,771 2,434,533 2,562,856 2,582,714 2,540,283 2,578,191 2,609,788 2,601,051 2,635,324 2010's 2,649,282 2,659,205 2,671,308 2,686,452

  8. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 36,444 36,940 36,960 1990's 38,026 38,622 40,312 40,166 39,846 38,099 37,796 38,918 42,067 43,834 2000's 44,164 44,306 45,469 45,491 45,961 47,745 47,233 48,047 49,235 48,846 2010's 48,757 49,406 48,914 50,163 55,689 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  9. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,087 1990's 17,124 20,021 18,040 20,846 23,292 23,510 24,134 27,421 28,200 26,007 2000's 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 40,157 41,634 42,644 44,241 44,784 2010's 44,748 32,302 28,206 27,073 27,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  10. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,703 1,668 1,653 1990's 1,407 1,337 141 152 1,097 1,065 1,365 1,366 1,549 1,482 2000's 1,517 1,875 1,356 1,270 1,164 988 1,062 470 383 471 2010's 438 360 121 123 116 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  11. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 348,759 356,192 361,521 1990's 369,451 379,472 389,063 397,681 409,095 421,896 428,621 443,167 454,065 473,375 2000's 479,894 485,969 496,577 498,852 509,119 530,277 533,971 547,512 556,905 560,479 2010's 559,852 570,637 561,713 572,224 614,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  12. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 23,276 24,654 27,426 1990's 25,008 28,837 28,198 23,833 21,833 22,484 15,300 23,099 5,294 6,136 2000's 6,553 6,501 3,068 2,984 2,963 3,752 3,642 7,484 7,080 6,634 2010's 6,236 6,609 5,910 6,311 6,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,013,040 4,124,745 4,168,048 1990's 4,236,280 4,357,252 4,409,699 4,464,906 4,533,905 4,636,500 4,720,227 4,761,409 5,044,497 5,010,189 2000's 5,010,817 4,996,446 5,064,384 5,152,177 5,139,949 5,198,028 5,273,379 5,308,785 5,444,335 5,322,332 2010's 5,301,576 5,319,817 5,356,397 5,372,522 5,418,986 - =

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 195,544 199,041 225,346 1990's 218,341 216,529 209,616 209,666 202,940 209,398 206,049 234,855 226,191 228,331 2000's 220,251 217,026 205,915 205,514 209,058 206,223 193,830 198,289 225,044 207,624 2010's 192,730 189,301 189,372 192,288 192,135 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 47,710,444 48,474,449 49,309,593 1990's 50,187,178 51,593,206 52,331,397 52,535,411 53,392,557 54,322,179 55,263,673 56,186,958 57,321,746 58,223,229 2000's 59,252,728 60,286,364 61,107,254 61,871,450 62,496,134 63,616,827 64,166,280 64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 2010's 65,542,345 65,940,522

  16. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,214 1990's 1,162 1,377 1,126 1,092 1,261 997 978 930 847 1,152 2000's 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 1,540 1,645 1,643 2010's 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  17. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 14,683 11,370 11,354 1990's 11,322 11,318 11,206 11,133 11,132 11,089 10,952 10,874 10,658 12,108 2000's 11,106 10,816 10,870 10,565 10,406 10,381 10,410 9,915 10,024 10,288 2010's 9,879 10,050 9,771 9,963 10,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 134 130,748 134,758 134,837 1990's 136,183 136,629 136,438 135,986 135,119 135,299 135,215 134,807 132,867 137,206 2000's 138,252 138,412 143,874 136,258 138,134 141,012 141,953 142,384 142,819 143,436 2010's 144,151 145,524 145,938 146,712 147,877 - = No Data Reported; --

  19. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,935 1990's 16,980 17,948 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 2000's 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 19,713 17,862 21,243 2010's 22,145 25,758 24,697 23,792 24,354 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  20. Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Collider (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large Higgs energy region in Higgs associated top pair production at the Linear Collider The process e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}ttH is considered in the kinematic end point region where the Higgs energy is close to its maximal energy. In perturbative QCD, using the loop expansion, the amplitudes are plagued by

  1. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measurement of the charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair production in s = 8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment Publication Date: 2016-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1240040 Type: Published

  2. Measurement of the charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment Title: Measurement of the charge asymmetry in highly boosted top-quark pair production in s=8 TeV pp collision data collected by the ATLAS experiment Publication Date: 2016-05-01 OSTI Identifier: 1240040 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Physics Letters. Section B

  3. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-TcSuperconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor We report the discovery of a self-doped multilayer high Tcsuperconductor Ba2Ca3Cu4O8F2 (F0234) which contains distinctly differentsuperconducting gap magnitudes along its two Fermi-surface sheets. Whileformal valence counting would

  4. Nuclear pairing from bare interaction: Two and three-body chiral forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finelli, Paolo

    2012-10-20

    In a recent paper the {sup 1}S{sub 0} pairing gap in isospin-symmetric nuclear matter and finite nuclei has been investigated starting from the chiral nucleon-nucleon potential at the N{sup 3}LO order in the two-body sector and the N{sup 2}LO order in the three-body sector. To include realistic nuclear forces in RHB (Relativistic Hartree Bolgoliubov) calculations we relied on a separable representation of the pairing interaction. In this paper we would like to show recent results concerning isotonic chains with N= 28,50,82.

  5. Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) As of: October 2015 Provides a table of Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) PDF icon Project Registration Number Assignment (Active) More Documents & Publications Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Active Project Justification Statement For Additional Information Contact: Jeffrey Feit phone: 301-903-0471 e-mail:

  6. Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Registration Number Assignments (Completed) Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) As of: March 2016 Provides a table of Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) PDF icon Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) More Documents & Publications All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) The Proposed Reaffirmations and Cancellations For Additional Information Contact: Jeffrey Feit phone: 301-903-0471 e-mail:

  7. Collision-induced infrared spectra of H2-He pairs at temperatures from 18 to 7000 K. II. Overtone and hot bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.; Texas Univ., Austin )

    1989-06-01

    The three lowest spectral moments of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of H2-He pairs have been computed from first principles for temperatures T from 18 to 7000 K for a number of hydrogen overtone and hot bands involving vibrational quantum numbers nu = 0, 1, 2, 3 yields nu-prime = 0, 1, 2, 3. The data are given in a form suitable for the computation of CIA spectra of H2-He as function of frequency and temperature, using simple computer codes and model line shapes. The work is of interest for the spectroscopy of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of stars that contain neutral molecular hydrogen and helium (late stars, white dwarfs, and Population II stars) in the infrared and visible region of the spectrum. 13 refs.

  8. Property:NEPA SerialNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SerialNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA SerialNumber Property Type String This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "NEPA SerialNumber"...

  9. Property:OutagePhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutagePhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OutagePhoneNumber Property Type String Description An outage hotline or 24-hour customer service number Note: uses...

  10. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec...

  11. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  12. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  15. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  17. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  18. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

  20. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  1. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  2. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  3. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  4. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  5. meraculous: de novo genome assembly with short paired-end reads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, Jarrod A.; Ho, Isaac; Sunkara, Sirisha; Luo, Shujun; Schroth, Gary P.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2011-08-01

    We describe a new algorithm, meraculous, for whole genome assembly of deep paired-end short reads, and apply it to the assembly of a dataset of paired 75-bp Illumina reads derived from the 15.4 megabase genome of the haploid yeast Pichia stipitis. More than 95% of the genome is recovered, with no errors; half the assembled sequence is in contigs longer than 101 kilobases and in scaffolds longer than 269 kilobases. Incorporating fosmid ends recovers entire chromosomes. Meraculous relies on an efficient and conservative traversal of the subgraph of the k-mer (deBruijn) graph of oligonucleotides with unique high quality extensions in the dataset, avoiding an explicit error correction step as used in other short-read assemblers. A novel memory-efficient hashing scheme is introduced. The resulting contigs are ordered and oriented using paired reads separated by ~280 bp or ~3.2 kbp, and many gaps between contigs can be closed using paired-end placements. Practical issues with the dataset are described, and prospects for assembling larger genomes are discussed.

  6. Calix[4]pyrrole: A New Ion-Pair Receptor As Demonstrated by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wintergerst, Mr. Matthieu; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Moyer, Bruce A; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2008-01-01

    Solvent extraction studies provide confirming evidence that meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole acts as an ion-pair receptor for cesium chloride and cesium bromide in nitrobenzene solution. The stoichiometry of the interaction under extraction conditions from water to nitrobenzene was determined from plots of the cesium distribution ratios vs. cesium salt and receptor concentration, indicating the formation of an ion-paired 1:1:1 cesium:calix[4]pyrrole:halide complex. The extraction results were modeled to evaluate the equilibria inherent to the solvent extraction system, either with chloride or bromide. The binding energy between the halide anion and the calix[4]pyrrole was found to be about 7 kJ/mol larger for cesium chloride than for the cesium bromide. The ion-pairing free energies between the calix[4]pyrrole-halide complex and the cesium cation are nearly the same within experimental uncertainty for either halide, consistent with a structural model in which the Cs+ cation resides in the calix bowl. These results are unexpected since nitrobenzene is a very polar solvent that generally leads to dissociated complexes in the organic phase when used as a diluent in extraction studies of univalent ions. Control studies involving nitrate revealed no evidence of ion-pairing for CsNO3 under conditions identical to those where it is observed for CsCl and CsBr.

  7. Scaling properties of the pairing problem in the strong coupling limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbaro, M.B.; Cenni, R.; Molinari, A.; Quaglia, M.R.

    2013-10-15

    We study the excited states of the pairing Hamiltonian providing an expansion for their energy in the strong coupling limit. To assess the role of the pairing interaction we apply the formalism to the case of a heavy atomic nucleus. We show that only a few statistical moments of the level distribution are sufficient to yield an accurate estimate of the energy for not too small values of the coupling G and we give the analytic expressions of the first four terms of the series. Further, we discuss the convergence radius G{sub sing} of the expansion showing that it strongly depends upon the details of the level distribution. Furthermore G{sub sing} is not related to the critical values of the coupling G{sub crit}, which characterize the physics of the pairing Hamiltonian, since it can exist even in the absence of these critical points. -- Highlights: •We study the excitation spectrum of the pairing Hamiltonian. •We provide an analytic expansion around the strong coupling limit. •We discuss the convergence radius of the expansion. •We connect the radius with the critical points of H.

  8. Measurement of prompt J/? pair production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 Tev

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    Production of prompt J/? meson pairs in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is measured with the CMS experiment at the LHC in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 4.7 fb?. The two J/? mesons are fully reconstructed via their decays into ?? ?? pairs. This observation provides for the first time access to the high-transverse-momentum region of J/? pair production where model predictions are not yet established. The total and differential cross sections are measured in a phase space defined by the individual J/? transverse momentum (pTJ/?) and rapidity (|yJ/?|): |yJ/?| < 1.2 for pTJ/? > 6.5 GeV/c, 1.2 < |yJ/?| < 1.43 for a pT threshold that scales linearly with |yJ/?| from 6.5 to 4.5 GeV/c, and 1.43 < |yJ/?| < 2.2 for pTJ/? > 4.5 GeV/c. The total cross section, assuming unpolarized prompt J/? pair production is 1.49 0.07 (stat) 0.13 (syst) nb. Different assumptions about the J/? polarization imply modifications to the cross section ranging from -31% to +27%.

  9. Finding the first cosmic explosions. IV. 90–140 $$\\;{{M}_{\\odot }}$$ pair-stability supernovae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smidt, Joseph; Whalen, Daniel J.; Chatzopoulos, E.; Wiggins, Brandon; Chen, Ke-Jung; Kozyreva, Alexandra; Even, Wesley

    2015-05-19

    Population III stars that die as pair-instability supernovae are usually thought to fall in the mass range of 140 - 260 M⊙. However, several lines of work have now shown that rotation can build up the He cores needed to encounter the pair instability at stellar masses as low as 90 M⊙. Depending on the slope of the initial mass function of Population III stars, there could be 4 - 5 times as many stars from 90 - 140 M⊙ in the primordial universe than in the usually accepted range. We present numerical simulations of the pair-instability explosions of suchmore » stars performed with the MESA, FLASH and RAGE codes. We find that they will be visible to supernova factories such as Pan-STARRS and LSST in the optical out to z ~ 1-2 and JWST and the 30 m-class telescopes in the NIR out to z ~ 7-10. Such explosions will thus probe the stellar populations of the first galaxies and cosmic star formation rates in the era of cosmological reionization. These supernovae are also easily distinguished from more massive pair-instability explosions, underscoring the fact that there is far greater variety to the light curves of these events than previously understood.« less

  10. Crossing-over in rearranging chromosomes of Drosophila: The role of delayed pairing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadov, B.F.; Chadova, E.V.; Khotskina, E.A.

    1995-11-01

    A Df(2R)MS2-10 deletion of pericentromeric heterochromatin and an Is(Y;2L)419 insertion of Y material in the region 34A, as well as nondisjunction of chromosomes 2 in 2/F(2L); F(2R) females did not directly prevent chromosome arms in chromosome 2 of Drosophila from pairing. However, these events resulted in (1) two- to four-fold decrease in the rate of crossing-over in chromosome 2; (2) a decreased proportion of exchange tetrads two to three times greater for multiple-exchange tetrads than for single-exchange ones; and (3) a decreased rate of crossing-over throughout the entire chromosome arm enhanced in a proximal direction. An In(1)dl-49+B{sup M1}inversion in the X chromosome cancelled the suppression of crossing-over. Crossing-over increased due to an increasing proportion of single-exchange tretrads. The changes in crossing-over found cannot be explained by asynapsis in the chromosomes with rearrangements. According to the authors, these changes are probably accounted for by a delayed pairing of these chromosomes. The delayed pairing of individual chromosome regions or the whole chromosome is considered the most common type of pairing disturbance. It effects on meiosis are discussed. 39 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Measurement of prompt J/? pair production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 Tev

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-17

    Production of prompt J/? meson pairs in proton-proton collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is measured with the CMS experiment at the LHC in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of about 4.7 fb?. The two J/? mesons are fully reconstructed via their decays into ?? ?? pairs. This observation provides for the first time access to the high-transverse-momentum region of J/? pair production where model predictions are not yet established. The total and differential cross sections are measured in a phase space defined by the individual J/? transverse momentum (pTJ/?) and rapidity (|yJ/?|): |yJ/?| morepTJ/? > 6.5 GeV/c, 1.2 J/?| T threshold that scales linearly with |yJ/?| from 6.5 to 4.5 GeV/c, and 1.43 J/?| TJ/? > 4.5 GeV/c. The total cross section, assuming unpolarized prompt J/? pair production is 1.49 0.07 (stat) 0.13 (syst) nb. Different assumptions about the J/? polarization imply modifications to the cross section ranging from -31% to +27%.less

  12. RELATIVE ORIENTATION OF PAIRS OF SPIRAL GALAXIES IN THE SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buxton, Jesse; Ryden, Barbara S., E-mail: buxton.45@osu.edu, E-mail: ryden@astronomy.ohio-state.edu [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-09-10

    From our study of binary spiral galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6, we find that the relative orientation of disks in binary spiral galaxies is consistent with their being drawn from a random distribution of orientations. For 747 isolated pairs of luminous disk galaxies, the distribution of {phi}, the angle between the major axes of the galaxy images, is consistent with a uniform distribution on the interval [0 Degree-Sign , 90 Degree-Sign ]. With the assumption that the disk galaxies are oblate spheroids, we can compute cos {beta}, where {beta} is the angle between the rotation axes of the disks. In the case that one galaxy in the binary is face-on or edge-on, the tilt ambiguity is resolved, and cos {beta} can be computed unambiguously. For 94 isolated pairs with at least one face-on member, and for 171 isolated pairs with at least one edge-on member, the distribution of cos {beta} is statistically consistent with the distribution of cos i for isolated disk galaxies. This result is consistent with random orientations of the disks within pairs.

  13. Drell-Yan Lepton pair production at NNLO QCD with parton showers

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoeche, Stefan; Li, Ye; Prestel, Stefan

    2015-04-13

    We present a simple approach to combine NNLO QCD calculations and parton showers, based on the UNLOPS technique. We apply the method to the computation of Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Large Hadron Collider. We comment on possible improvements and intrinsic uncertainties.

  14. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J. Christopher; Wu, Ning; Santoro, Stephen; Schultz, Peter G

    2014-03-11

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  15. Fluorescence of excited charge-transfer complexes and absolute dynamics of radical-ion pairs in acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gould, I.R.; Farid, S.

    1992-09-17

    An analysis of the dynamics of the radical-ion pairs of a series of 2,6,9,10-tetracyanoanthracene acceptor/alkylbenzene donor systems in acetonitrile is described in this paper. This analysis is carried out by using a combination of time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopies and measurements of {Phi} {sub ions} from the contact radical-ion pair (CRIP) and the solvent-separated radical-ion pair (SSRIP).

  16. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Wu, Ning (Brookline, MA); Santoro, Stephen (Cambridge, MA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2011-10-04

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  17. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Wu, Ning (Brookline, MA); Santoro, Stephen (Cambridge, MA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2009-08-18

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  18. Compositions of orthogonal lysyl-tRNA and aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase pairs and uses thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, J. Christopher (San Francisco, CA); Wu, Ning (Brookline, MA); Santoro, Stephen (Cambridge, MA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA)

    2009-12-29

    Compositions and methods of producing components of protein biosynthetic machinery that include orthogonal lysyl-tRNAs, orthogonal lysyl-aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of lysyl-tRNAs/synthetases, which incorporate homoglutamines into proteins are provided in response to a four base codon. Methods for identifying these orthogonal pairs are also provided along with methods of producing proteins with homoglutamines using these orthogonal pairs.

  19. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  20. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample | Open...

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    issionDevelopmentStrategiesExample Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample&oldid326472...

  1. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples&oldid323715...

  2. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessments | Open Energy Information

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    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfResourceAssessments&oldid31439...

  3. Continuous-wave quasi-phase-matched waveguide correlated photon pair source on a IIIV chip

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrafi, Peyman Zhu, Eric Y.; Dolgaleva, Ksenia; Aitchison, J. Stewart; Qian, Li; Holmes, Barry M.; Hutchings, David C.

    2013-12-16

    We report on the demonstration of correlated photon pair generation in a quasi-phase-matched superlattice GaAs/AlGaAs waveguide using a continuous-wave pump. Our photon pair source has a low noise level and achieves a high coincidence-to-accidental ratio greater than 100, which is the highest value reported in IIIV chips so far. This correlated photon pair source has the potential to be monolithically integrated with on-chip pump laser sources fabricated on the same superlattice wafer structure, enabling direct correlated/entangled photon pair production from a compact electrically powered chip.

  4. Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library (Seventh Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting 2012)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peng, Ze [DOE JGI

    2013-01-25

    Ze Peng from DOE JGI presents "Fosmid Cre-LoxP Inverse PCR Paired-End (Fosmid CLIP-PE), a Novel Method for Constructing Fosmid Pair-End Library" at the 7th Annual Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future (SFAF) Meeting held in June, 2012 in Santa Fe, NM.

  5. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G.; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason W.; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2015-10-20

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  6. Methods and composition for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Wang, Lei (San Diego, CA); Anderson, John Christopher (San Diego, CA); Chin, Jason W. (San Diego, CA); Liu, David R. (Lexington, MA); Magliery, Thomas J. (North Haven, CT); Meggers, Eric L. (Philadelphia, PA); Mehl, Ryan Aaron (San Diego, CA); Pastrnak, Miro (San Diego, CA); Santoro, Stephen William (San Diego, CA); Zhang, Zhiwen (San Diego, CA)

    2012-05-08

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  7. Methods and compositions for the production of orthogonal tRNA-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase pairs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter; Wang, Lei; Anderson, John Christopher; Chin, Jason; Liu, David R.; Magliery, Thomas J.; Meggers, Eric L.; Mehl, Ryan Aaron; Pastrnak, Miro; Santoro, Stephen William; Zhang, Zhiwen

    2006-08-01

    This invention provides compositions and methods for generating components of protein biosynthetic machinery including orthogonal tRNAs, orthogonal aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, and orthogonal pairs of tRNAs/synthetases. Methods for identifying orthogonal pairs are also provided. These components can be used to incorporate unnatural amino acids into proteins in vivo.

  8. A search for pair production of new light bosons decaying into muons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-03

    In this study, a search for the pair production of new light bosons, each decaying into a pair of muons, is performed with the CMS experiment at the LHC, using a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.7 fb1 collected in protonproton collisions at center-of-mass energy of ?s = 8 TeV. No excess is observed in the data relative to standard model background expectation and a model independent upper limit on the product of the cross section, branching fraction, and acceptance is derived. The results are compared with two benchmark models, the first one in the context of the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model, and the second one in scenarios containing a hidden sector, including those predicting a nonnegligible light boson lifetime.

  9. Spatial correlation of photon pairs produced in spontaneous parametric down-conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Procopio, L. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Rosas-Ortiz, O. [Departamento de Fisica, Cinvestav, A.P. 14-740, Mexico D.F. 07000 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, Mexico D.F. 01000 (Mexico); Velazquez, V. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, Mexico D.F. 04510 (Mexico)

    2010-10-11

    We report the observation of spatial biphoton correlation in spontaneous parametric down conversion. The optical bench includes a type-I BBO crystal of effective length 2 mm, pumped by a 100 mW violet laser diode centered at 405.38 nm. Photon pairs are created with degenerate wavelength {approx_equal}810.76 nm. Once the horizontal counting rates have been measured, a simple geometrical recipe is shown to be useful in calculating bounds for the width of vertical counting rates. The spatial correlation between idler and signal photons is illustrated with a coincidence distribution of the coordinate pair (x{sub s},x{sub i}), with x{sub i,s} the idler (signal) detector position in horizontal scan.

  10. Implosion and explosion of electrostatic cylindrical and spherical shocks in asymmetric pair-ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masood, W.; Rizvi, H.

    2011-04-15

    Nonlinear electrostatic shock waves are studied in unmagnetized, dissipative pair-ion plasmas. The dissipation in the system is taken into account by considering the effect of kinematic viscosity of both positive and negative ions in plasmas. The system of fluid equations for asymmetric pair-ion plasma is reduced to Korteweg-deVries-Burgers equation in the limit of small amplitude perturbation. It is observed that the system under consideration admits rarefactive shocks. Keeping in view the practical applications, the nonlinear propagation of both the exploding and imploding shocks is investigated and the differences are expounded in detail. The present study may have relevance in the study of the formation of electrostatic shocks in laser-induced implosion devices, star formation, supernovae explosion, etc.

  11. Structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, Markus H.

    2005-11-01

    Recent experiments at RHIC and theoretical considerations indicate that the quark-gluon plasma, present in the fireball of relativistic heavy-ion collisions, might be in a liquid phase. The liquid state can be identified by characteristic correlation and structure functions. Here definitions of the structure functions and pair correlations of the quark-gluon plasma are presented as well as perturbative results. These definitions might be useful for verifying the quark-gluon-plasma liquid in QCD lattice calculations.

  12. Evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $$\\tau$$ leptons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-01-20

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson decaying into a pair of tau leptons is performed using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2011 and 2012. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 inverse femtobarns at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 19.7 inverse femtobarns at 8 TeV. Each tau lepton decays hadronically or leptonically to an electron or a muon, leading to six different final states for the tau-lepton pair, all considered in this analysis. An excess of events is observed over the expected background contributions, with a local significance largermore » than 3 standard deviations for m[H] values between 115 and 130 GeV. The best fit of the observed H to tau tau signal cross section for m[H] = 125 GeV is 0.78 +- 0.27 times the standard model expectation. These observations constitute evidence for the 125 GeV Higgs boson decaying to a pair of tau leptons.« less

  13. Calix[4]pyrrole: A New Ion-Pair Receptor As Demonstrated by Liquid-Liquid Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wintergerst, Mr. Matthieu; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Moyer, Bruce A; Sessler, Jonathan L.; Delmau, Laetitia Helene

    2008-01-01

    Solvent-extraction studies provide confirming evidence that meso-octamethylcalix[4]pyrrole acts as an ion-pair receptor for cesium chloride and cesium bromide in nitrobenzene solution. The stoichiometry of the interaction under extraction conditions from water to nitrobenzene was determined from plots of the cesium distribution ratios vs cesium salt and receptor concentration, indicating the formation of an ionpaired 1:1:1 cesium:calix[4]pyrrole:halide complex. The extraction results were modeled to evaluate the equilibria inherent to the solvent-extraction system, with either chloride or bromide. The binding energy between the halide anion and the calix[4]pyrrole was found to be about 7 kJ/mol larger for cesium chloride than for the cesium bromide. The ion-pairing free energies between the calix[4]pyrrole-halide complex and the cesium cation are nearly the same within experimental uncertainty for either halide, consistent with a structural model in which the Cs+ cation resides in the calix bowl. These results are unexpected since nitrobenzene is a polar solvent that generally leads to dissociated complexes in the organic phase when used as a diluent in extraction studies of univalent ions. Control studies involving nitrate revealed no evidence of ion pairing for CsNO3 under conditions identical to those where it is observed for CsCl and CsBr.

  14. STUDYING INTERCLUSTER GALAXY FILAMENTS THROUGH STACKING gmBCG GALAXY CLUSTER PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Yuanyuan; Dietrich, Joerg P.; McKay, Timothy A.; Nguyen, Alex T. Q.; Sheldon, Erin S.

    2013-08-20

    We present a method to study the photometric properties of galaxies in filaments by stacking the galaxy populations between pairs of galaxy clusters. Using Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, this method can detect the intercluster filament galaxy overdensity with a significance of {approx}5{sigma} out to z = 0.40. Using this approach, we study the g - r color and luminosity distribution of filament galaxies as a function of redshift. Consistent with expectation, filament galaxies are bimodal in their color distribution and contain a larger blue galaxy population than clusters. Filament galaxies are also generally fainter than cluster galaxies. More interestingly, the observed filament population seems to show redshift evolution at 0.12 < z < 0.40: the blue galaxy fraction has a trend to increase at higher redshift; such evolution is parallel to the ''Butcher-Oemler effect'' of galaxy clusters. We test the dependence of the observed filament density on the richness of the cluster pair: richer clusters are connected by higher density filaments. We also test the spatial dependence of filament galaxy overdensity: this quantity decreases when moving away from the intercluster axis between a cluster pair. This method provides an economical way to probe the photometric properties of filament galaxies and should prove useful for upcoming projects like the Dark Energy Survey.

  15. B-DNA structure is intrinsically polymorphic: even at the level of base pair positions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maehigashi, Tatsuya; Hsiao, Chiaolong; Woods, Kristen Kruger; Moulaei, Tinoush; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2012-10-23

    Increasingly exact measurement of single crystal X-ray diffraction data offers detailed characterization of DNA conformation, hydration and electrostatics. However, instead of providing a more clear and unambiguous image of DNA, highly accurate diffraction data reveal polymorphism of the DNA atomic positions and conformation and hydration. Here we describe an accurate X-ray structure of B-DNA, painstakingly fit to a multistate model that contains multiple competing positions of most of the backbone and of entire base pairs. Two of ten base-pairs of CCAGGCCTGG are in multiple states distinguished primarily by differences in slide. Similarly, all the surrounding ions are seen to fractionally occupy discrete competing and overlapping sites. And finally, the vast majority of water molecules show strong evidence of multiple competing sites. Conventional resolution appears to give a false sense of homogeneity in conformation and interactions of DNA. In addition, conventional resolution yields an average structure that is not accurate, in that it is different from any of the multiple discrete structures observed at high resolution. Because base pair positional heterogeneity has not always been incorporated into model-building, even some high and ultrahigh-resolution structures of DNA do not indicate the full extent of conformational polymorphism.

  16. Quasichemical analysis of the cluster-pair approximation for the thermodynamics of proton hydration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollard, Travis; Beck, Thomas L.

    2014-06-14

    A theoretical analysis of the cluster-pair approximation (CPA) is presented based on the quasichemical theory of solutions. The sought single-ion hydration free energy of the proton includes an interfacial potential contribution by definition. It is shown, however, that the CPA involves an extra-thermodynamic assumption that does not guarantee uniform convergence to a bulk free energy value with increasing cluster size. A numerical test of the CPA is performed using the classical polarizable AMOEBA force field and supporting quantum chemical calculations. The enthalpy and free energy differences are computed for the kosmotropic Na{sup +}/F{sup −} ion pair in water clusters of size n = 5, 25, 105. Additional calculations are performed for the chaotropic Rb{sup +}/I{sup −} ion pair. A small shift in the proton hydration free energy and a larger shift in the hydration enthalpy, relative to the CPA values, are predicted based on the n = 105 simulations. The shifts arise from a combination of sequential hydration and interfacial potential effects. The AMOEBA and quantum chemical results suggest an electrochemical surface potential of water in the range −0.4 to −0.5 V. The physical content of single-ion free energies and implications for ion-water force field development are also discussed.

  17. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  18. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  19. 0{sup +} states in the large boson number limit of the Interacting Boson Approximation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonatsos, Dennis; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.

    2008-11-11

    Studies of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model for large boson numbers have been triggered by the discovery of shape/phase transitions between different limiting symmetries of the model. These transitions become sharper in the large boson number limit, revealing previously unnoticed regularities, which also survive to a large extent for finite boson numbers, corresponding to valence nucleon pairs in collective nuclei. It is shown that energies of 0{sub n}{sup +} states grow linearly with their ordinal number n in all three limiting symmetries of IBA [U(5), SU(3), and O(6)]. Furthermore, it is proved that the narrow transition region separating the symmetry triangle of the IBA into a spherical and a deformed region is described quite well by the degeneracies E(0{sub 2}{sup +}) = E(6{sub 1}{sup +}, E(0{sub 3}{sup +}) = E(10{sub 1}{sup +}), E(0{sub 4}{sup +}) = E(14{sub 1}{sup +}, while the energy ratio E(6{sub 1}{sup +})/E(0{sub 2}{sup +} turns out to be a simple, empirical, easy-to-measure effective order parameter, distinguishing between first- and second-order transitions. The energies of 0{sub n}{sup +} states near the point of the first order shape/phase transition between U(5) and SU(3) are shown to grow as n(n+3), in agreement with the rule dictated by the relevant critical point symmetries resulting in the framework of special solutions of the Bohr Hamiltonian. The underlying partial dynamical symmetries and quasi-dynamical symmetries are also discussed.

  20. Overstable librations can account for the paucity of mean motion resonances among exoplanet pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldreich, Peter; Schlichting, Hilke E. E-mail: hilke@mit.edu

    2014-02-01

    We assess the multi-planet systems discovered by the Kepler satellite in terms of current ideas about orbital migration and eccentricity damping due to planet-disk interactions. Our primary focus is on first order mean motion resonances, which we investigate analytically to lowest order in eccentricity. Only a few percent of planet pairs are in close proximity to a resonance. However, predicted migration rates (parameterized by ?{sub n}=n/| n-dot |) imply that during convergent migration most planets would have been captured into first order resonances. Eccentricity damping (parameterized by ?{sub e}=e/| e-dot |) offers a plausible resolution. Estimates suggest ? {sub e}/? {sub n} ? (h/a){sup 2} ? 10{sup 2}, where h/a is the ratio of disk thickness to radius. Together, eccentricity damping and orbital migration give rise to an equilibrium eccentricity, e {sub eq} ? (? {sub e}/? {sub n}){sup 1/2}. Capture is permanent provided e {sub eq} ? ?{sup 1/3}, where ? denotes the planet to star mass ratio. But for e {sub eq} ? ?{sup 1/3}, capture is only temporary because librations around equilibrium are overstable and lead to passage through resonance on timescale ? {sub e}. Most Kepler planet pairs have e {sub eq} > ?{sup 1/3}. Since ? {sub n} >> ? {sub e} is the timescale for migration between neighboring resonances, only a modest percentage of pairs end up trapped in resonances after the disk disappears. Thus the paucity of resonances among Kepler pairs should not be taken as evidence for in situ planet formation or the disruptive effects of disk turbulence. Planet pairs close to a mean motion resonance typically exhibit period ratios 1%-2% larger than those for exact resonance. The direction of this shift undoubtedly reflects the same asymmetry that requires convergent migration for resonance capture. Permanent resonance capture at these separations from exact resonance would demand ?(? {sub n}/? {sub e}){sup 1/2} ? 0.01, a value that estimates of ? from transit data and (? {sub e}/? {sub n}){sup 1/2} from theory are insufficient to match. Plausible alternatives involve eccentricity damping during or after disk dispersal. The overstability referred to above has applications beyond those considered in this investigation. It was discovered numerically by Meyer and Wisdom in their study of the tidal evolution of Saturn's satellites.

  1. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adams County,...

  2. Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data | Department of Energy the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell PDF icon Modeling the Number of

  3. Social Security Number Reduction Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Social Security Number Reduction Project Social Security Number Reduction Project The document below provides information regarding acceptable uses of the Social Security Number (SSN). PDF icon Baseline Inventory.pdf More Documents & Publications DOE Guidance on the Use of the SSN Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  4. Theory of nodal s±-wave pairing symmetry in the Pu-based 115 superconductor family

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Tanmoy; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Graf, Matthias J.

    2015-02-27

    The spin-fluctuation mechanism of superconductivity usually results in the presence of gapless or nodal quasiparticle states in the excitation spectrum. Nodal quasiparticle states are well established in copper-oxide, and heavy-fermion superconductors, but not in iron-based superconductors. Here, we study the pairing symmetry and mechanism of a new class of plutonium-based high-Tc superconductors and predict the presence of a nodal s⁺⁻ wave pairing symmetry in this family. Starting from a density-functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculation we predict several three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surfaces in this 115 superconductor family. We identify the dominant Fermi surface “hot-spots” in the inter-band scattering channel,more » which are aligned along the wavevector Q = (π, π, π), where degeneracy could induce sign-reversal of the pairing symmetry. Our calculation demonstrates that the s⁺⁻ wave pairing strength is stronger than the previously thought d-wave pairing; and more importantly, this pairing state allows for the existence of nodal quasiparticles. Finally, we predict the shape of the momentum- and energy-dependent magnetic resonance spectrum for the identification of this pairing symmetry.« less

  5. Theory of nodal s±-wave pairing symmetry in the Pu-based 115 superconductor family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Tanmoy; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Graf, Matthias J.

    2015-02-27

    The spin-fluctuation mechanism of superconductivity usually results in the presence of gapless or nodal quasiparticle states in the excitation spectrum. Nodal quasiparticle states are well established in copper-oxide, and heavy-fermion superconductors, but not in iron-based superconductors. Here, we study the pairing symmetry and mechanism of a new class of plutonium-based high-Tc superconductors and predict the presence of a nodal s⁺⁻ wave pairing symmetry in this family. Starting from a density-functional theory (DFT) based electronic structure calculation we predict several three-dimensional (3D) Fermi surfaces in this 115 superconductor family. We identify the dominant Fermi surface “hot-spots” in the inter-band scattering channel, which are aligned along the wavevector Q = (π, π, π), where degeneracy could induce sign-reversal of the pairing symmetry. Our calculation demonstrates that the s⁺⁻ wave pairing strength is stronger than the previously thought d-wave pairing; and more importantly, this pairing state allows for the existence of nodal quasiparticles. Finally, we predict the shape of the momentum- and energy-dependent magnetic resonance spectrum for the identification of this pairing symmetry.

  6. Exchange-correlation energy from pairing matrix fluctuation and the particle-particle random phase approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggelen, Helen van; Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 ; Yang, Yang; Yang, Weitao

    2014-05-14

    Despite their unmatched success for many applications, commonly used local, semi-local, and hybrid density functionals still face challenges when it comes to describing long-range interactions, static correlation, and electron delocalization. Density functionals of both the occupied and virtual orbitals are able to address these problems. The particle-hole (ph-) Random Phase Approximation (RPA), a functional of occupied and virtual orbitals, has recently known a revival within the density functional theory community. Following up on an idea introduced in our recent communication [H. van Aggelen, Y. Yang, and W. Yang, Phys. Rev. A 88, 030501 (2013)], we formulate more general adiabatic connections for the correlation energy in terms of pairing matrix fluctuations described by the particle-particle (pp-) propagator. With numerical examples of the pp-RPA, the lowest-order approximation to the pp-propagator, we illustrate the potential of density functional approximations based on pairing matrix fluctuations. The pp-RPA is size-extensive, self-interaction free, fully anti-symmetric, describes the strong static correlation limit in H{sub 2}, and eliminates delocalization errors in H{sub 2}{sup +} and other single-bond systems. It gives surprisingly good non-bonded interaction energies competitive with the ph-RPA with the correct R{sup ?6} asymptotic decay as a function of the separation R, which we argue is mainly attributable to its correct second-order energy term. While the pp-RPA tends to underestimate absolute correlation energies, it gives good relative energies: much better atomization energies than the ph-RPA, as it has no tendency to underbind, and reaction energies of similar quality. The adiabatic connection in terms of pairing matrix fluctuation paves the way for promising new density functional approximations.

  7. Search for first generation leptoquark pair production in the electron + missing energy + jets final state

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich

    2011-10-11

    We present a search for the pair production of first generation scalar leptoquarks (LQ) in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider in pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. In the channel LQLQ → eqνeq′, where q,q′ are u or d quarks, no significant excess of data over background is observed, and we set a 95% C.L. lower limit of 326 GeV on the leptoquark mass, assuming equal probabilities of leptoquark decays to eq and νeq′.

  8. Statistics of resonance fluorescence of a pair of atoms in a feedback loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomilin, V. A. Il'ichev, L. V.

    2013-02-15

    The statistics of photoemission events of a pair of closely spaced two-level atoms is calculated in a classical light field whose phase is changed by {pi} after the detection of each spontaneous photon. This statistics is compared with the statistics in the case when the feedback is missing. In both cases, one can observe noticeable antibunching of photons in the range of parameters where no antibunching is observed in a single-atom system. The feedback substantially increases the antibunching. This effect manifests itself more strongly in relatively weak fields and for considerable frequency detunings.

  9. Search for Resonances in the Photoproduction of Proton-Antiproton Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham Stokes

    2006-06-30

    Results are reported on the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{bar p}p with beam energy in the range 4.8-5.5 GeV. The data were collected at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in CLAS experiment E01-017(G6C). The focus of this study is an understanding of the mechanisms of photoproduction of proton-antiproton pairs, and to search for intermediate resonances, both narrow and broad, which decay to p{bar p}. The total measured cross section in the photon energy range 4.8-5.5 GeV is {sigma} = 33 {+-} 2 nb. Measurement of the cross section as a function of energy is provided. An upper limit on the production of a narrow resonance state previously observed with a mass of 2.02 GeV/c{sup 2} is placed at 0.35 nb. No intermediate resonance states were observed. Meson exchange production appears to dominate the production of the proton-antiproton pairs.

  10. Geometric phase and entanglement of Raman photon pairs in the presence of photonic band gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrada, K.; Ooi, C. H. Raymond; Abdel-Khalek, S.

    2015-03-28

    Robustness of the geometric phase (GP) with respect to different noise effects is a basic condition for an effective quantum computation. Here, we propose a useful quantum system with real physical parameters by studying the GP of a pair of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons, involving Raman emission processes with and without photonic band gap (PBG) effect. We show that the properties of GP are very sensitive to the change of the Rabi frequency and time, exhibiting collapse phenomenon as the time becomes significantly large. The system allows us to obtain a state which remains with zero GP for longer times. This result plays a significant role to enhance the stabilization and control of the system dynamics. Finally, we investigate the nonlocal correlation (entanglement) between the pair photons by taking into account the effect of different parameters. An interesting correlation between the GP and entanglement is observed showing that the PBG stabilizes the fluctuations in the system and makes the entanglement more robust against the change of time and frequency.

  11. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmore » parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.« less

  12. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-10-28

    Our search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb-1, with 4.9 fb-1 at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, m h max , m h mod + , m hmod - , light-stop, light-stau, τ-phobic, and low-m H. Lastly, upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  13. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSMmoreparameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.less

  14. Mesophase stabilization in ionic liquid crystals through pairing equally shaped mesogenic cations and anions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stappert, Kathrin; Lipinski, Gregor; Kopiec, Gabriel; Spielberg, Eike T.; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-07-23

    The synthesis and properties of a set of novel ionic liquid crystals with congruently shaped cations and anions are reported to check whether pairing mesogenic cations with mesogenic anions leads to a stabilization of a liquid crystalline phase. To that avail 1-alkyl-3-methyl-triazolium cations with an alkyl chain length of 10, 12, and 14 carbon atoms have been combined with p-alkyloxy-benzenesulfonate anions with different alkyl chain lengths (n = 10, 12, and 14). The corresponding triazolium iodides have been synthesized as reference compounds where the cation and anion have strong size and shape mismatch. The mesomorphic behavior of all compounds ismore » studied by differential scanning calorimetry and polarizing optical microscopy. All compounds except 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium iodide, which qualifies as an ionic liquid, are thermotropic ionic liquid crystals. All other compounds adopt smectic A phases. As a result, a comparison of the thermal phase behavior of the 1-methyl-3-decyltriazolium bromides to the corresponding p-alkoxy-benzensulfonates reveals that definitely the mesophase is stabilized by pairing the rod-shaped 1-alkyl-3-methyltriazolium cation with a rod-like anion of similar size.« less

  15. Search for neutral MSSM Higgs bosons decaying to a pair of tau leptons in pp collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2014-10-28

    A search for neutral Higgs bosons in the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (MSSM) decaying to tau-lepton pairs in pp collisions is performed, using events recorded by the CMS experiment at the LHC. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 24.6 fb?, with 4.9 fb? at 7 TeV and 19.7 fb? at 8 TeV. To enhance the sensitivity to neutral MSSM Higgs bosons, the search includes the case where the Higgs boson is produced in association with a b-quark jet. No excess is observed in the tau-lepton-pair invariant mass spectrum. Exclusion limits are presented in the MSSM parameter space for different benchmark scenarios, mhmax, mhmod+ , mhmod , light-stop, light-stau, ?-phobic, and low-mH. Upper limits on the cross section times branching fraction for gluon fusion and b-quark associated Higgs boson production are also given.

  16. The curious case of HD 41248. A pair of static signals buried behind red noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Tuomi, M.

    2014-10-20

    Gaining a better understanding of the effects of stellar-induced radial velocity noise is critical for the future of exoplanet studies since the discovery of the lowest-mass planets using this method will require us to go below the intrinsic stellar noise limit. An interesting test case in this respect is that of the southern solar analog HD 41248. The radial velocity time series of this star has been proposed to contain either a pair of signals with periods of around 18 and 25 days, which could be due to a pair of resonant super-Earths, or a single and varying 25 day signal that could arise due to a complex interplay between differential rotation and modulated activity. In this work, we build up more evidence for the former scenario, showing that the signals are still clearly significant, even after more than 10 yr of observations, and they likely do not change in period, amplitude, or phase as a function of time, the hallmarks of static Doppler signals. We show that over the last two observing seasons, this star was more intrinsically active and the noise reddened, highlighting why better noise models are needed to find the lowest amplitude signals, in particular, models that consider noise correlations. This analysis shows that there is still sufficient evidence for the existence of two super-Earths on the edge of, or locked into, a 7:5 mean motion resonance orbiting HD 41248.

  17. Higgs boson pair production in new physics models at hadron, lepton, and photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asakawa, Eri; Harada, Daisuke; Okada, Yasuhiro; Kanemura, Shinya; Tsumura, Koji

    2010-12-01

    We study Higgs boson pair production processes at future hadron and lepton colliders including the photon collision option in several new physics models; i.e., the two-Higgs-doublet model, the scalar leptoquark model, the sequential fourth generation fermion model and the vectorlike quark model. Cross sections for these processes can deviate significantly from the standard model predictions due to the one-loop correction to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. For the one-loop induced processes such as gg{yields}hh and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh, where h is the (lightest) Higgs boson and g and {gamma} respectively represent a gluon and a photon, the cross sections can also be affected by new physics particles via additional one-loop diagrams. In the two-Higgs-doublet model and scalar leptoquark models, cross sections of e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}hhZ and {gamma}{gamma}{yields}hh can be enhanced due to the nondecoupling effect in the one-loop corrections to the triple Higgs boson coupling constant. In the sequential fourth generation fermion model, the cross section for gg{yields}hh becomes very large because of the loop effect of the fermions. In the vectorlike quark model, effects are small because the theory has decoupling property. Measurements of the Higgs boson pair production processes can be useful to explore new physics through the determination of the Higgs potential.

  18. Competing pairing states for ultracold fermions in optical lattices with an artificial staggered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Lih-King; Lazarides, Achilleas; Morais Smith, C.; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2010-07-15

    We study fermionic superfluidity in an ultracold Bose-Fermi mixture loaded into a square optical lattice subjected to a staggered flux. While the bosons form a Bose-Einstein condensate at very low temperature and weak interaction, the interacting fermions experience an additional long-ranged attractive interaction mediated by phonons in the bosonic condensate. This leads us to consider a generalized Hubbard model with on-site and nearest-neighbor attractive interactions, which give rise to two competing pairing channels. We use the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory to determine the regimes where distinct fermionic superfluids are stabilized and find that the nonlocal pairing channel favors a superfluid state which breaks both the gauge and the lattice symmetries, similar to unconventional superconductivity occurring in some strongly correlated systems. Furthermore, the particular structure of the single-particle spectrum leads to unexpected consequences, for example, a dome-shaped superfluid region in the temperature versus filing fraction phase diagram, with a normal phase that contains much richer physics than a Fermi liquid. Notably, the relevant temperature regime and coupling strength are readily accessible in state of the art experiments with ultracold trapped atoms.

  19. Twisted injectivity in projected entangled pair states and the classification of quantum phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buerschaper, Oliver

    2014-12-15

    We introduce a class of projected entangled pair states (PEPS) which is based on a group symmetry twisted by a 3-cocycle of the group. This twisted symmetry is expressed as a matrix product operator (MPO) with bond dimension greater than1 and acts on the virtual boundary of a PEPS tensor. We show that it gives rise to a new standard form for PEPS from which we construct a family of local Hamiltonians which are gapped, frustration-free and include fixed points of the renormalization group flow. Based on this insight, we advance the classification of 2D gapped quantum spin systems by showing how this new standard form for PEPS determines the emergent topological order of these local Hamiltonians. Specifically, we identify their universality class as DIJKGRAAFWITTEN topological quantum field theory (TQFT). - Highlights: We introduce a new standard form for projected entangled pair states via a twisted group symmetry which is given by nontrivial matrix product operators. We construct a large family of gapped, frustration-free Hamiltonians in two dimensions from this new standard form. We rigorously show how this new standard form for low energy states determines the emergent topological order.

  20. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows number of health physics degrees increased for graduates, decreased for undergraduates in 2010 Decreased number of B.S. degrees remains higher than levels in the early 2000 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 20, 2011 FY12-09 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of health physics graduate degrees increased for both master's and doctoral candidates in 2010, but decreased for bachelor's degrees, says a report released this year by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The ORISE report,

  1. Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    State | Department of Energy Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Map of the United States showing the location of Workforce Training Projects, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act PDF icon Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State More Documents & Publications Workforce Development Wind Projects

  2. Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell PDF icon Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake:...

  3. Conducting Your Annual VPP Self-Evaluation by the Numbers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... VPP Annual Self-evaluation: By the Numbers Example pre-meeting training 5. Picking who to interview * Fixed - Pick by positionlocation - Safety Council Chair - Union Steward - ...

  4. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Submitted to Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: 6 ...

  5. Request for Proposals Number RHB-5-52483

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Managed and Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Request for Proposals Number RHB-5-52483 "Subsurface Utility Engineering...

  6. Quark-Gluon Plasma Model and Origin of Magic Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghahramany, N.; Ghanaatian, M.; Hooshmand, M.

    2008-04-21

    Using Boltzman distribution in a quark-gluon plasma sample it is possible to obtain all existing magic numbers and their extensions without applying the spin and spin-orbit couplings. In this model it is assumed that in a quark-gluon thermodynamic plasma, quarks have no interactions and they are trying to form nucleons. Considering a lattice for a central quark and the surrounding quarks, using a statistical approach to find the maximum number of microstates, the origin of magic numbers is explained and a new magic number is obtained.

  7. Number of NERSC Users and Projects Through the Years

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Through the Years Careers Visitor Info Web Policies Home About Usage and User Demographics Users and Projects Through the Years Number of NERSC Users and Projects Through...

  8. Temporary EPA ID Number Request | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporary EPA ID Number RequestLegal Abstract A developer that may "generate hazardous waste only from an episodic event" may instead apply for a temporary hazardous waste...

  9. RETIRED A STARS AND THEIR COMPANIONS. VI. A PAIR OF INTERACTING EXOPLANET PAIRS AROUND THE SUBGIANTS 24 SEXTANIS AND HD 200964

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, John Asher [California Institute of Technology, Department of Astrophysics, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Payne, Matthew; Ford, Eric B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Mail Code 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States); Bowler, Brendan P. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawai'i, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Henry, Gregory W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Fischer, Debra A.; Brewer, John M.; Schwab, Christian [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Reffert, Sabine [ZAH-Landessternwarte, Koenigstuhl 12, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Lowe, Thomas B., E-mail: johnjohn@astro.caltech.edu [UCO/Lick Observatory, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2011-01-15

    We report radial velocity (RV) measurements of the G-type subgiants 24 Sextanis (= HD 90043) and HD 200964. Both are massive, evolved stars that exhibit periodic variations due to the presence of a pair of Jovian planets. Photometric monitoring with the T12 0.80 m APT at Fairborn Observatory demonstrates both stars to be constant in brightness to {<=}0.002 mag, thus strengthening the planetary interpretation of the RV variations. Based on our dynamical analysis of the RV time series, 24 Sex b, c have orbital periods of 452.8 days and 883.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.333 AU and 2.08 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.86 M{sub Jup}, assuming a stellar mass M{sub *}= 1.54 M{sub sun}. HD 200964 b, c have orbital periods of 613.8 days and 825.0 days, corresponding to semimajor axes 1.601 AU and 1.95 AU, and minimum masses 1.99 M{sub Jup} and 0.90 M{sub Jup}, assuming M{sub *}= 1.44 M{sub sun}. We also carry out dynamical simulations to properly account for gravitational interactions between the planets. Most, if not all, of the dynamically stable solutions include crossing orbits, suggesting that each system is locked in a mean-motion resonance that prevents close encounters and provides long-term stability. The planets in the 24 Sex system likely have a period ratio near 2:1, while the HD 200964 system is even more tightly packed with a period ratio close to 4:3. However, we caution that further RV observations and more detailed dynamical modeling will be required to provide definitive and unique orbital solutions for both cases, and to determine whether the two systems are truly resonant.

  10. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-DopedHigh...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 97; Related Information: Journal ...

  11. Characterization of a constrained paired-view technique in iterative reconstruction for breast tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Gang; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The order in which the projection views are employed in the reconstruction of tomosynthesis by iterative algorithms, such as simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique and maximum likelihood, has a strong effect on the rate of convergence, accuracy, and the edge-blurring artifacts in the reconstructed image. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize and evaluate the effects of ordering schemes on image quality for breast tomosynthesis reconstruction and to explore a new constrained paired-view technique that could provide reduction of reconstruction artifacts. In this work, the authors compared several different ordering schemes and characterized the image quality and the formation of out-of-plane artifacts. Furthermore, a new normalization method is presented. It produces more accurate reconstructions with reduced artifacts comparing to the standard method of sequential ordering.Methods: In addition to visual assessment of image quality, several indices such as the signal-difference-to-noise ratio, the artifact-spread function, and the lesion detectability (d{sup ?}) were computed to quantitatively evaluate the effect of ordering scheme. The sets of breast tomosynthesis projection images were simulated for reconstruction; one set had uniform background (white noise only) and the other two contained both anatomic background and quantum noise. Clinical breast images were also studied for comparison.Results: The authors have quantified the image quality in reconstructed slices for a range of tumor sizes. The authors proposed method provides better performance for all of the metrics tested (contrast, d{sup ?}, and the level of artifacts) both for the uniform phantom case and in the presence of anatomical structure.Conclusions: The paired projection normalization provides better performance in the image quality of the reconstructed slices, and results in a lower level of artifacts in the Z direction. This implies that even a relatively simple method like the side-to-side sequence, which pairs two symmetrical projections with equal angular distance from the central projection, would achieve better reconstructed image quality than the conventional step-by-step method, which uses sequential projections one after another.

  12. Search for pair production of the scalar top quark in the electron+muon final state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Altona, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.

    2010-09-01

    We report the result of a search for the pair production of the lightest supersymmetric partner of the top quark ({tilde t}{sub 1}) in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}. The scalar top quarks are assumed to decay into a b quark, a charged lepton, and a scalar neutrino ({tilde {nu}}), and the search is performed in the electron plus muon final state. No significant excess of events above the standard model prediction is detected, and improved exclusion limits at the 95% C.L. are set in the (M{sub {tilde t}{sub 1}}, M{sub {tilde {nu}}}) mass plane.

  13. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (t?tH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? and 19.7 fb? collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H ? hadrons, H ? photons, and H ? leptons. The results are characterized by an observed t?tH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, ?=?/?SM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in the standard model. The best fit value is ? = 2.8 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV.

  14. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering datamore » and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.« less

  15. Total-scattering pair-distribution function of organic material from powder electron diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelik, Tatiana E.; Billinge, Simon J. L.; Schmidt, Martin U.; Kolb, Ute

    2015-04-01

    This paper shows for the first time that pair-distribution function analyses can be carried out on organic and organo-metallic compounds from powder electron diffraction data. Different experimental setups are demonstrated, including selected area electron diffraction (SAED) and nanodiffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or nanodiffraction in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) modes. The methods were demonstrated on organo-metallic complexes (chlorinated and unchlorinated copper-phthalocyanine) and on purely organic compounds (quinacridone). The PDF curves from powder electron diffraction data, called ePDF, are in good agreement with PDF curves determined from X-ray powder data demonstrating that the problems of obtaining kinematical scattering data and avoiding beam-damage of the sample are possible to resolve.

  16. Search for the associated production of the Higgs boson with a top-quark pair

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-09-16

    A search for the standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair (t?tH) is presented, using data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of up to 5.1 fb? and 19.7 fb? collected in pp collisions at center-of-mass energies of 7 TeV and 8 TeV respectively. The search is based on the following signatures of the Higgs boson decay: H ? hadrons, H ? photons, and H ? leptons. The results are characterized by an observed t?tH signal strength relative to the standard model cross section, ?=?/?SM, under the assumption that the Higgs boson decays as expected in themorestandard model. The best fit value is ? = 2.8 1.0 for a Higgs boson mass of 125.6 GeV.less

  17. Search for pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks in ppbar collisions at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calfayan, Philippe; /Munich U.

    2008-05-01

    As predicted by numerous extensions of the Standard Model, leptoquarks (LQ) are hypothetical bosons allowing lepton-quark transitions. Under the assumption that they couple only to quarks and leptons of the same generation, three generations of leptoquarks can be distinguished. The search for the pair production of second generation scalar leptoquarks has been carried out in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96TeV, using an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron collider between August 2002 and February 2006. Topologies arising from the LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{nu}q and LQ{ovr LQ} {yields} {mu}q{mu}q decay modes have been investigated. In order to maximize the available statistics, a method for the combination of various prescaled triggers with an inclusive OR has been developed. Since no excess of data over the Standard Model prediction has been observed, upper limits on the leptoquark pair production cross section have been derived at 95% confidence level as function of the leptoquark mass and the branching fraction {beta} = Br(LQ {yields} {mu}q), and are interpreted as lower limits on the leptoquark mass as function of {beta}. For {beta} = 1, {beta} = 1/2 and {beta} = 0.1, the combination of the two channels excludes scalar second generation leptoquarks with masses up to 309GeV, 262GeV, and 174GeV, respectively. The lower bounds on the scalar second generation leptoquark mass obtained for {beta} {ge} 0.1 are the best exclusion limits to date.

  18. Search for the production of ZW and ZZ boson pairs decaying into charged leptons and jets in proton-antiproton collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, Timo Antero; et al,

    2013-11-01

    We present a measurement of the production cross section for ZW and ZZ boson pairs in final states with a pair of charged leptons, from the decay of a Z boson, and at least two jets, from the decay of a W or Z boson, using the full sample of proton-antiproton collisions recorded with the CDF II detector at the Tevatron, corresponding to 8.9 fb^(-1) of integrated luminosity. We increase the sensitivity to vector boson decays into pairs of quarks using a neural network discriminant that exploits the differences between the spatial spread of energy depositions and charged-particle momenta contained within the jet of particles originating from quarks and gluons. Additionally, we employ new jet energy corrections to Monte Carlo simulations that account for differences in the observed energy scales for quark and gluon jets. The number of signal events is extracted through a simultaneous fit to the dijet mass spectrum in three classes of events: events likely to contain jets with a heavy-quark decay, events likely to contain jets originating from light quarks, and events that fail these identification criteria. We determine the production cross section to be 2.5 +2.0 -1.0 pb (< 6.1 pb at the 95% confidence level), consistent with the standard model prediction of 5.1 pb.

  19. Table B10. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Workers" ,,"Fewer than 5 Workers","5 to 9 Workers","10 to 19 Workers","20 to 49 Workers","50 to 99 Workers","100 to 249 Workers","250 or More Workers" "All Buildings ................",4657,2376,807,683,487,174,90,39 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  20. Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offices | Department of Energy About Energy.gov » Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Mailing Addresses and Information Numbers for Operations, Field, and Site Offices Name Telephone Number U.S. Department of Energy Ames Site Office 111 TASF, Iowa State University Ames, Iowa 50011 515-294-9557 U.S. Department of Energy Argonne Site Office 9800 S. Cass Avenue Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-2000 U.S. Department of Energy Berkeley Site Office Berkeley