National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hadron collider lhc

  1. Exergy Analysis of the Cryogenic Helium Distribution System for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudet, S; Tavian, L; Wagner, U; 10.1063/1.3422294

    2010-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN features the world’s largest helium cryogenic system, spreading over the 26.7 km circumference of the superconducting accelerator. With a total equivalent capacity of 145 kW at 4.5 K including 18 kW at 1.8 K, the LHC refrigerators produce an unprecedented exergetic load, which must be distributed efficiently to the magnets in the tunnel over the 3.3 km length of each of the eight independent sectors of the machine. We recall the main features of the LHC cryogenic helium distribution system at different temperature levels and present its exergy analysis, thus enabling to qualify second-principle efficiency and identify main remaining sources of irreversibility..

  2. Large Area Silicon Tracking Detectors with Fast Signal Readout for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köstner, S

    2005-01-01

    The Standard Model of elementary particles, which is summarized briefly in the second chapter, incorporates a number of successful theories to explain the nature and consistency of matter. However not all building blocks of this model could yet be tested by experiment. To confirm existing theories and to improve nowadays understanding of matter a new machine is currently being built at CERN, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), described in the third chapter. LHC is a proton-proton collider which will reach unprecedented luminosities and center of mass energies. Five experiments are attached to it to give answers to questions like the existence of the Higgs meson, which allows to explain the mass content of matter, and the origin of CP-violation, which plays an important role in the baryogenesis of the universe. Supersymmetric theories, proposing a bosonic superpartner for each fermion and vice versa, will be tested. By colliding heavy ions, high energy and particle densities can be achieved and probed. This stat...

  3. Beam collimation at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolai V. Mokhov

    2003-08-12

    Operational and accidental beam losses in hadron colliders can have a serious impact on machine and detector performance, resulting in effects ranging from minor to catastrophic. Principles and realization are described for a reliable beam collimation system required to sustain favorable background conditions in the collider detectors, provide quench stability of superconducting magnets, minimize irradiation of accelerator equipment, maintain operational reliability over the life of the machine, and reduce the impact of radiation on personnel and the environment. Based on detailed Monte-Carlo simulations, such a system has been designed and incorporated in the Tevatron collider. Its performance, comparison to measurements and possible ways to further improve the collimation efficiency are described in detail. Specifics of the collimation systems designed for the SSC, LHC, VLHC, and HERA colliders are discussed.

  4. Jet production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jouttenus, Teppo T. (Teppo Tapani)

    2012-01-01

    Hadronic jets feature in many final states of interest in modern collider experiments. They form a significant Standard Model background for many proposed new physics processes and also probe QCD interactions at several ...

  5. B Physics Theory for Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Buchalla

    2008-09-03

    A short overview of theoretical methods for B physics at hadron colliders is presented. The main emphasis is on the theory of two-body hadronic B decays, which provide a rich field of investigation in particular for the Tevatron and the LHC. The subject holds both interesting theoretical challenges as well as many opportunities for flavor studies and new physics tests. A brief review of the current status and recent developments is given. A few additional topics in B physics are also mentioned.

  6. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  7. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Baryshevsky

    2015-04-25

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  8. BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Ewerz; Lynne H. Orr; W. James Stirling; Bryan R. Webber

    1999-12-22

    Hadron colliders can provide important tests of BFKL `small-x' dynamics. We discuss two examples of such tests, the inclusive dijet jet cross section at large rapidity separation and the number of associated `mini-jets' in Higgs boson production.

  9. LHC - Large Hadon Collider Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will accelerate two proton beams to an energy corresponding to about 7,000 times their mass (7000 GeV). The collision of the two beams reproduces the conditions in the Universe when it was about 10 -1 2 sec old. Many innovative techniques - such as cooling with superfluid helium, the extensive use of high temperature superconducting cables, the two-in-one design for super-conducting dipole magnets, and new ultra-high vacuum technologies - had to be developed to make its construc-tion possible.

  10. 293 K - 1.9 K supporting systems for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryo-magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, M; Renaglia, T; Rohmig, P; Williams, L R

    1998-01-01

    The LHC machine will incorporate some 2000 main ring super-conducting magnets cooled at 1.9 K by super-fluid pressurized helium, mainly 15m-long dipoles with their cryostats and 6m-long quadrupoles housed in the Short Straight Section (SSS) units. This paper presents the design of the support system of the LHC arc cryo-magnets between 1.9 K at the cold mass and 293 K at the cryostat vacuum vessel. The stringent positioning precision for magnet alignment and the high thermal performance for cryogenic efficiency are the main conflicting requirements, which have lead to a trade-off design. The systems retained for LHC are based on column-type supports positioned in the vertical plane of the magnets inside the cryostats. An ad-hoc design has been achieved both for cryo-dipoles and SSS. Each column is composed of a main tubular thin-walled structure in composite material (glass-fibre/epoxy resin, for its low thermal conductivity properties), interfaced to both magnet and cryostat via stainless steel flanges. The t...

  11. ERL-BASED LEPTON-HADRON COLLIDERS: eRHIC AND LHeC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    Two hadron-ERL colliders are being proposed. The Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) plans to collide the high-energy protons and heavy ions in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN with 60-GeV polarized electrons or positrons. The baseline scheme for this facility adds to the LHC a separate recirculating superconducting (SC) lepton linac with energy recovery, delivering a lepton current of 6.4mA. The electron-hadron collider project eRHIC aims to collide polarized (and unpolarized) electrons with a current of 50 (220) mA and energies in the range 5–30 GeV with a variety of hadron beams— heavy ions as well as polarized light ions— stored in the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL. The eRHIC electron beam will be generated in an energy recovery linac (ERL) installed inside the RHIC tunnel.

  12. Neutrino experiments and the Large Hadron Collider: friends across 14 orders of magnitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Janet

    This paper explores some of the questions that connect the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and neutrino experiments. What is the origin of mass? What is the meaning of flavor? Is there direct evidence of new forces or particles? ...

  13. Complementarity of the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the $e^+e^-$ International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. Choi

    2008-09-10

    The next-generation high-energy facilities, the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the prospective $e^+e^-$ International Linear Collider (ILC), are expected to unravel new structures of matter and forces from the electroweak scale to the TeV scale. In this report we review the complementary role of LHC and ILC in drawing a comprehensive and high-precision picture of the mechanism breaking the electroweak symmetries and generating mass, and the unification of forces in the frame of supersymmetry.

  14. A large hadron electron collider at CERN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelleira Fernandez, J. L.

    2015-04-06

    This document provides a brief overview of the recently published report on the design of the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), which comprises its physics programme, accelerator physics, technology and main detector concepts. The LHeC exploits and develops challenging, though principally existing, accelerator and detector technologies. This summary is complemented by brief illustrations of some of the highlights of the physics programme, which relies on a vastly extended kinematic range, luminosity and unprecedented precision in deep inelastic scattering. Illustrations are provided regarding high precision QCD, new physics (Higgs, SUSY) and eletron-ion physics. The LHeC is designed to run synchronously with the LHC in the twenties and to achieve an integrated luminosity of O(100)fb–1. It will become the cleanest high resolution microscope of mankind and will substantially extend as well as complement the investigation of the physics of the TeV energy scale, which has been enabled by the LHC.

  15. Photons and Exclusive Processes at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Nystrand

    2010-01-26

    The theoretical and experimental aspects of particle production from the strong equivalent photon fluxes present at high energy hadron colliders are reviewed. The goal is to show how photons at hadron colliders can improve what we have learnt from experiments with lepton beams. Experiments during the last 5-10 years have shown the feasibility of studying photoproduction in proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions. The experimental and theoretical development has revealed new opportunities as well as challenges.

  16. NLO QCD corrections to ZZ jet production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binoth, T.; Gleisberg, T.; Karg, S.; Kauer, N.; Sanguinetti, G.

    2010-05-26

    A fully differential calculation of the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to the production of Z-boson pairs in association with a hard jet at the Tevatron and LHC is presented. This process is an important background for Higgs particle and new physics searches at hadron colliders. We find sizable corrections for cross sections and differential distributions, particularly at the LHC. Residual scale uncertainties are typically at the 10% level and can be further reduced by applying a veto against the emission of a second hard jet. Our results confirm that NLO corrections do not simply rescale LO predictions.

  17. Universal QGP Hadronization Conditions at RHIC and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johann Rafelski; Michal Petran

    2014-06-07

    We address the principles governing QGP hadronization and particle production in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. We argue that chemical non-equilibrium is required and show that once this condition is assumed a very good description of hadron production in collider RHIC and at LHC heavy ion experiments follows. We present results of our analysis as a function of centrality. Comparing most extreme experimental conditions we show that only the reaction volume and degree of strangeness phase space saturation change. We determine the universal QGP fireball hadronization conditions.

  18. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  19. Higgs Boson Searches at Hadron Colliders (1/4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-21

    In these Academic Training lectures, the phenomenology of Higgs bosons and search strategies at hadron colliders are discussed. After a brief introduction on Higgs bosons in the Standard Model and a discussion of present direct and indirect constraints on its mass the status of the theoretical cross section calculations for Higgs boson production at hadron colliders is reviewed. In the following lectures important experimental issues relevant for Higgs boson searches (trigger, measurements of leptons, jets and missing transverse energy) are presented. This is followed by a detailed discussion of the discovery potential for the Standard Model Higgs boson for both the Tevatron and the LHC experiments. In addition, various scenarios beyond the Standard Model, primarily the MSSM, are considered. Finally, the potential and strategies to measured Higgs boson parameters and the investigation of alternative symmetry breaking scenarios are addressed.

  20. Top quark studies at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinervo, P.K. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-01-01

    The techniques used to study top quarks at hadron colliders are presented. The analyses that discovered the top quark are described, with emphasis on the techniques used to tag b quark jets in candidate events. The most recent measurements of top quark properties by the CDF and DO Collaborations are reviewed, including the top quark cross section, mass, branching fractions, and production properties. Future top quark studies at hadron colliders are discussed, and predictions for event yields and uncertainties in the measurements of top quark properties are presented.

  1. SEARCHING FOR HIGGS BOSONS AND NEW PHYSICS AT HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung Kao

    2007-09-05

    The objectives of research activities in particle theory are predicting the production cross section and decay branching fractions of Higgs bosons and new particles at hadron colliders, developing techniques and computer software to discover these particles and to measure their properties, and searching for new phenomena and new interactions at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The results of our project could lead to the discovery of Higgs bosons, new particles, and signatures for new physics, or we will be able to set meaningful limits on important parameters in particle physics. We investigated the the prospects for the discovery at the CERN Large Hadron Collider of Higgs bosons and supersymmetric particles. Promising results are found for the CP-odd pseudoscalar ($A^0$) and the heavier CP-even scalar ($H^0$) Higgs bosons with masses up to 800 GeV. Furthermore, we study properties of the lightest neutralino ($\\chi^0$) and calculate its cosmological relic density in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model as well as the muon anomalous magnetic moment $a_\\mu = (g_\\mu - 2)/2$ in a supersymmetric $U(1)'$ model. We found that there are regions of the parameter space that can explain the experimental deviation of $a_\\mu$ from the Standard Model calculation and yield an acceptable cold dark matter relic density without conflict with collider experimental constraints. % Recently, we presented a complete next-to-leading order (NLO) calculation for the total cross section of inclusive Higgs pair production via bottom-quark fusion ($b\\bar{b} \\to hh$) at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in the Standard Model and the minimal supersymmetric model. We plan to predict the Higgs pair production rate and to study the trilinear coupling among the Higgs bosons. % In addition, we have made significant contributions in B physics, single top production, charged Higgs search at the Fermilab as well as in grid computing for both D0 and ATLAS.

  2. The Hunt for New Physics at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Nath; B. D. Nelson; H. Davoudiasl; B. Dutta; D. Feldman; Z. Liu; T. Han; P. Langacker; R. Mohapatra; J. Valle; A. Pilaftsis; D. Zerwas; S. AbdusSalam; C. Adam-Bourdarios; J. A. Aguilar-Saavedra; B. Allanach; B. Altunkaynak; L. A. Anchordoqui; H. Baer; B. Bajc; O. Buchmueller; M. Carena; R. Cavanaugh; S. Chang; K. Choi; C. Csaki; S. Dawson; F. de Campos; A. De Roeck; M. Duhrssen; O. J. P. Eboli; J. R. Ellis; H. Flacher; H. Goldberg; W. Grimus; U. Haisch; S. Heinemeyer; M. Hirsch; M. Holmes; T. Ibrahim; G. Isidori; G. Kane; K. Kong; R. Lafaye; G. Landsberg; L. Lavoura; J. S. Lee; S. J. Lee; M. Lisanti; D. Lust; M. B. Magro; R. Mahbubani; M. Malinsky; F. Maltoni; S. Morisi; M. M. Muhlleitner; B. Mukhopadhyaya; M. Neubert; K. A. Olive; G. Perez; P. Fileviez Perez; T. Plehn; E. Ponton; W. Porod; F. Quevedo; M. Rauch; D. Restrepo; T. G. Rizzo; J. C. Romao; F. J. Ronga; J. Santiago; J. Schechter; G. Senjanovic; J. Shao; M. Spira; S. Stieberger; Z. Sullivan; T. M. P. Tait; X. Tata; T. R. Taylor; M. Toharia; J. Wacker; C. E. M. Wagner; L. -T. Wang; G. Weiglein; D. Zeppenfeld; K. Zurek

    2010-01-14

    The Large Hadron Collider presents an unprecedented opportunity to probe the realm of new physics in the TeV region and shed light on some of the core unresolved issues of particle physics. These include the nature of electroweak symmetry breaking, the origin of mass, the possible constituent of cold dark matter, new sources of CP violation needed to explain the baryon excess in the universe, the possible existence of extra gauge groups and extra matter, and importantly the path Nature chooses to resolve the hierarchy problem - is it supersymmetry or extra dimensions. Many models of new physics beyond the standard model contain a hidden sector which can be probed at the LHC. Additionally, the LHC will be a top factory and accurate measurements of the properties of the top and its rare decays will provide a window to new physics. Further, the LHC could shed light on the origin of neutralino masses if the new physics associated with their generation lies in the TeV region. Finally, the LHC is also a laboratory to test the hypothesis of TeV scale strings and D-brane models. An overview of these possibilities is presented in the spirit that it will serve as a companion to the Technical Design Reports (TDRs) by the particle detector groups ATLAS and CMS to facilitate the test of the new theoretical ideas at the LHC. Which of these ideas stands the test of the LHC data will govern the course of particle physics in the subsequent decades.

  3. Beam Optics Studies in the Large Hadron Collider Observations on an Anomalous Octupolar Resonance Line in the LHC -- and -- Accuracy & Feasibility of the $\\beta^*$ Measurement for LHC and HL-LHC Using K-Modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlier, F S

    While linear LHC dynamics are mostly understood and under control, non-linear beam dynamics will play an increasingly important role in the challenging regimes of future LHC operation. In 2012, turn-by-turn measurements of large betatron excitations of LHC Beam 2 at injection energy were carried out. These measurements revealed an unexpectedly large spectral line in the horizontal motion with frequency $-Q_x-2Q_y$. Detailed analyses and simulations are presented to understand the nature of this spectral line. -- ABSTRACT II -- The future regimes of operation of the LHC will require improved control of $\\beta^*$ measurements to succesfully level the luminosities in the interaction points. The method of K-modulation has been widely used in other machines such as, LEP, HERA, Tevatron and ALBA to measure lattice beta functions. In the LHC, K-modulation of the last quadrupoles of the IP is the method to measure $\\beta^*$ in the IP. This paper highlights the challenge of high precision tune measurements (up to $10...

  4. Triphoton production at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Williams, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    We present next-to-leading order predictions for the production of triphoton final states at the LHC and the Tevatron. Our results include the effect of photon fragmentation for the first time and we are able to quantify the impact of different isolation prescriptions. We find that calculations accounting for fragmentation effects at leading order, and those employing a smooth cone isolation where no fragmentation contribution is required, are in reasonable agreement with one another. However, larger differences in the predicted rates arise when higher order corrections to the fragmentation functions are included. In addition we present full analytic results for the $\\gamma\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\gamma\\gamma+$jet one-loop amplitudes. These amplitudes, which are particularly compact, may be useful to future higher-order calculations. Our results are available in the Monte Carlo code MCFM.

  5. Heavy-ion performance of the LHC and future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)696614; Jowett, John M.

    2015-10-09

    In 2008 the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments started operation at the European Centre of Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva with the main aim of finding or excluding the Higgs boson. Only four years later, on the 4th of July 2012, the discovery of a Higgs-like particle was proven and first published by the two main experiments ATLAS and CMS. Even though proton–proton collisions are the main operation mode of the LHC, it also acts as an heavy-ion collider. Here, the term “heavy-ion collisions” refers to the collision between fully stripped nuclei. While the major hardware system of the LHC is compatible with heavy-ion operation, the beam dynamics and performance limits of ion beams are quite different from those of protons. Because of the higher mass and charge of the ions, beam dynamic effects like intra-beam scattering and radiation damping are stronger. Also the electromagnetic cross-sections in the collisions are larger, leading to significantly faster intensity decay and thus shorter l...

  6. Department of Energy assessment of the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This report summarizes the conclusions of the committee that assessed the cost estimate for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This proton-proton collider will be built at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics near Geneva, Switzerland. The committee found the accelerator-project cost estimate of 2.3 billion in 1995 Swiss francs, or about $2 billion US, to be adequate and reasonable. The planned project completion date of 2005 also appears achievable, assuming the resources are available when needed. The cost estimate was made using established European accounting procedures. In particular, the cost estimate does not include R and D, prototyping and testing, spare parts, and most of the engineering labor. Also excluded are costs for decommissioning the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP) that now occupies the tunnel, modifications to the injector system, the experimental areas, preoperations costs, and CERN manpower. All these items are assumed by CERN to be included in the normal annual operations budget rather than the construction budget. Finally, contingency is built into the base estimate, in contrast to Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that explicitly identify contingency. The committee`s charge, given by Dr. James F. Decker, Deputy Directory of the DOE Office of Energy Research, was to understand the basis for the LHC cost estimate, identify uncertainties, and judge the overall validity of the estimate, proposed schedule, and related issues. The committee met at CERN April 22--26, 1996. The assessment was based on the October 1995 LHC Conceptual Design Report or ``Yellow Book,`` cost estimates and formal presentations made by the CERN staff, site inspection, detailed discussions with LHC technical experts, and the committee members` considerable experience.

  7. Rare b hadron decays at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blake, T; Hiller, G

    2015-01-01

    With the completion of Run~I of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, particle physics has entered a new era. The production of unprecedented numbers of heavy-flavoured hadrons in high energy proton-proton collisions allows detailed studies of flavour-changing processes. The increasingly precise measurements allow to probe the Standard Model with a new level of accuracy. Rare $b$ hadron decays provide some of the most promising approaches for such tests, since there are several observables which can be cleanly interpreted from a theoretical viewpoint. In this article, the status and prospects in this field are reviewed, with a focus on precision measurements and null tests.

  8. Resummation of transverse energy in vector boson and Higgs boson production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Papaefstathiou; Jennifer M. Smillie; Bryan R. Webber

    2010-02-23

    We compute the resummed hadronic transverse energy (E_T) distribution due to initial-state QCD radiation in vector boson and Higgs boson production at hadron colliders. The resummed exponent, parton distributions and coefficient functions are treated consistently to next-to-leading order. The results are matched to fixed-order calculations at large E_T and compared with parton-shower Monte Carlo predictions at Tevatron and LHC energies.

  9. Heavy Majorana Neutrinos from $W?$ Fusion at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Alva; Tao Han; Richard Ruiz

    2015-02-25

    Vector boson fusion processes become increasingly more important at higher collider energies and for probing larger mass scales due to collinear logarithmic enhancements of the cross section. In this context, we revisit the production of a hypothetic heavy Majorana neutrino $(N)$ at hadron colliders. Particular attention is paid to the fusion process $W\\gamma \\rightarrow N\\ell^{\\pm}$. We systematically categorize the contributions from an initial state photon in the elastic, inelastic, and deeply inelastic channels. Comparing with the leading channel via the Drell-Yan production $q \\bar{q}'\\rightarrow W^{*}\\rightarrow N\\ell^{\\pm}$ at NNLO in QCD, we find that the $W\\gamma$ fusion process becomes relatively more important at higher scales, surpassing the DY mechanism at $m_{N} \\sim 1 \\text{TeV} \\ (770 \\text{GeV})$ at the 14 TeV LHC (100 TeV VLHC). We investigate the inclusive heavy Majorana neutrino signal, including QCD corrections, and quantify the Standard Model backgrounds at future hadron colliders. We conclude that, with the currently allowed mixing $| V_{\\mu N}| ^2discovery can be made via the same-sign dimuon channel for $m_N = 530 (1070)$ GeV at the 14 TeV LHC (100 TeV VLHC) after 1 ab$^{-1}$. Reversely, for $m_N = 500$ GeV and the same integrated luminosity, a mixing $| V_{\\mu N}|^2$ of the order $1.1\\times10^{-3} (2.5\\times10^{-4})$ may be probed.

  10. News from CERN, LHC Status and Strategy for Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolf-Dieter Heuer

    2012-02-27

    This paper presents the latest development at CERN, concentrating on the status of the LHC and the strategy for future linear colliders. The immediate plans include the exploitation of the LHC at its design luminosity and energy as well as upgrades to the LHC (luminosity and energy) and to its injectors. This may be complemented by a linear electron-positron collider, based on the technology being developed by the Compact Linear Collider and by the International Linear Collider and/or by a high-energy electron-proton collider. This contribution describes the various future directions, all of which have a unique value to add to experimental particle physics, and concludes by outlining key messages for the way forward.

  11. CLIC Drive Beam and LHC Based Fel-Nucleus Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Braun; R. Corsini; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas

    2005-08-09

    The feasibility of a CLIC-LHC based FEL-nucleus collider is investigated. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all requirements of an ideal photon source for the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method. The physics potential of the proposed collider is illustrated for a beam of Pb nuclei.

  12. The Large Hadron Collider of CERN and the roadmap toward higher performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, L

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider is exploring the new frontier of particle physics. It is the largest and most ambitious scientific instrument ever built and 100 years after the Rutherford experiment it continues that tradition of “smashing atoms” to unveil the secret of the infinitely small. LHC makes use of all what we learnt in 40 years of hadron colliders, in particular of ISR and Sp-pbarS at CERN and Tevatron at Fermilab, and it is based on Superconductivity, discovered also 100 years ago. Designing, developing the technology, building and finally commissioning the LHC took more than twenty years. While LHC is now successfully running, we are already preparing the future for the next step. First, by increasing of a factor five the LHC luminosity in ten years from now, and then by increasing its energy by a factor two or more, on the horizon of the next twenty years. These LHC upgrades, in luminosity and energy, will be the super-exploitation of the CERN infrastructure and is the best investment that the HEP...

  13. Proceedings of the Sixth International Workshop on Multiple Partonic Interactions at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Astalos; S. Baranov; P. Bartalini; I. Belyaev; Ch. Bierlich; B. Blok; A. Buckley; F. A. Ceccopieri; I. Cherednikov; J. R. Christiansen; D. Ciangottini; M. Deak; B. Ducloue; R. Field; J. R. Gaunt; K. Golec-Biernat; L. Goerlich; A. Grebenyuk; O. Gueta; P. Gunnellini; I. Helenius; H. Jung; D. Kar; O. Kepka; M. Klusek-Gawenda; A. Knutsson; P. Kotko; M. W. Krasny; K. Kutak; E. Lewandowska; G. Lykasov; R. Maciula; A. M. Moraes; T. Martin; G. Mitsuka; L. Motyka; M. Myska; J. Otwinowski; T. Pierog; V. Pleskot; M. Rinaldi; W. Schafer; A. Siodmok; T. Sjostrand; A. Snigirev; A. Stasto; R. Staszewski; T. Stebel; M. Strikman; A. Szczurek; D. Treleani; M. Trzebinski; H. van Haevermaet; A. van Hameren; P. van Mechelen; W. Waalewijn; W. Y. Wang

    2015-06-18

    Multiple Partonic Interactions are often crucial for interpreting results obtained at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The quest for a sound understanding of the dynamics behind MPI - particularly at this time when the LHC is due to start its "Run II" operations - has focused the aim of this workshop. MPI@LHC2014 concentrated mainly on the phenomenology of LHC measurements whilst keeping in perspective those results obtained at previous hadron colliders. The workshop has also debated some of the state-of-the-art theoretical considerations and the modeling of MPI in Monte Carlo event generators. The topics debated in the workshop included: Phenomenology of MPI processes and multiparton distributions; Considerations for the description of MPI in Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD); Measuring multiple partonic interactions; Experimental results on inelastic hadronic collisions: underlying event, minimum bias, forward energy flow; Monte Carlo generator development and tuning; Connections with low-x phenomena, diffraction, heavy-ion physics and cosmic rays. In a total of 57 plenary talks the workshop covered a wide range of experimental results, Monte Carlo development and tuning, phenomenology and dedicated measurements of MPI which were produced with data from the LHC's Run I. Recent progress of theoretical understanding of MPI in pp, pA and AA collisions as well as the role of MPI in diffraction and small-x physics were also covered. The workshop forstered close contact between the experimental and theoretical communities. It provided a setting to discuss many of the different aspects of MPI, eventually identifying them as a unifying concept between apparently different lines of research and evaluating their impact on the LHC physics programme.

  14. Future Possibilities for Lepton-Hadron Collider Physics and Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleming, G; Lammers, S; Magill, S

    2001-01-01

    We have considered the physics opportunities of future lepton-hadron colliders and how these opportunities might be realized in a possible polarized eRHIC facility and an e-p collider as part of a staged or final version VLHC. We evaluated the physics priorities based on experience at HERA and, using simulated data for e-p collisions with sqrt(s) > 1 TeV, showed how detector designs would be impacted by the physics.

  15. Future Possibilities for Lepton-Hadron Collider Physics and Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fleming; E. Kinney; S. Lammers; S. Magill

    2002-01-29

    We have considered the physics opportunities of future lepton-hadron colliders and how these opportunities might be realized in a possible polarized eRHIC facility and an e-p collider as part of a staged or final version VLHC. We evaluated the physics priorities based on experience at HERA and, using simulated data for e-p collisions with sqrt(s) > 1 TeV, showed how detector designs would be impacted by the physics.

  16. TOP AND HIGGS PHYSICS AT THE HADRON COLLIDERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jabeen, Shabnam

    2013-10-20

    This review summarizes the recent results for top quark and Higgs boson measurements from experiments at Tevatron, a proton–antiproton collider at a center-of-mass energy of ? s =1 . 96 TeV, and the Large Hadron Collider, a proton–proton collider at a center- of-mass energy of ? s = 7 TeV. These results include the discovery of a Higgs-like boson and measurement of its various properties, and measurements in the top quark sector, e.g. top quark mass, spin, charge asymmetry and production of single top quark.

  17. Large Hadron Collider probe of supersymmetric neutrinoless double beta decay mechanism.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Pas, H.

    Fe b 2 00 9 CAVENDISH-HEP-2009-03, DAMTP-2009-15, DO-TH-09/01 Large Hadron Collider probe of supersymmetric neutrinoless double beta decay mechanism B. C. Allanach? DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA, United Kingdom C... to the Standard Model, a non-zero lepton number violating coupling ??111 predicts both neutrinoless double beta decay and resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We show that, in this case, if neutrinoless double beta decay is discovered in the next...

  18. Design Study of a Superconducting Insertion Quadrupole Magnet for the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, G A; Taylor, T M; Yamamoto, A; Tsuchiya, K; Higashi, N; Nakamoto, T; Ogitsu, T; Ohuchi, N; Shintomi, T; Terashima, A

    1997-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a high gradient super conducting insertion quadrupole magnet has been carried out in collaboration between KEK and CERN for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to be built at CERN. A model magnet design has been optimized to provide a nominal design field gradient of 240 T/m with a bore aperture of 70 mm and an operational field gradient of 225 T/m at 1.9 K under radiation environment with a beam energy deposit of several watts per meter in the superconducting coils. The design and its optimization process are discussed.

  19. Mirror World at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Barbieri; Thomas Gregoire; Lawrence J. Hall

    2005-09-22

    A mirror world can modify in a striking way the LHC signals of the Higgs sector. An exact or approximate Z_2 symmetry between the mirror world and our world allows large mixing between the Higgs bosons of these worlds, leading to production rates and branching ratios for these states that are markedly different from the standard model and are characteristic of a mirror world. The constraints on these Higgs boson masses from precision electroweak data differ from the standard model bound, so that the new physics that cancels the quadratic divergence induced by the top quark may appear at a larger scale, possibly beyond the reach of the LHC. However, the scale of new physics needed to cancel the quadratic divergence induced by the Higgs boson is not significantly changed. With small breakings of the Z_2 parity, the lightest mirror quarks (and possibly charged mirror leptons) could be the dark matter in the universe, forming galactic halos that are stable to cooling. A possible signal from the relic radiation density of the mirror world is also discussed.

  20. Detecting Fourth Generation Quarks at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Atwood; Sudhir Kumar Gupta; Amarjit Soni

    2011-07-13

    We consider the phenomenology of the fourth generation heavy quarks which would be pair produced at the LHC. We show that if such a quark with a mass in the phenomenologically interesting range of 400 GeV--600 GeV decays to a light quark and a W-boson, it will produce a signal in a number of channels which can be seen above the background from the three generation Standard Model processes. In particular, such quarks could be seen in channels where multiple jets are present with large missing momentum and either a single hard lepton, an opposite sign hard lepton pair or a same sign lepton pair. In the same sign dilepton channel there is little background and so an excess of such pairs at large invariant mass will indicate the presence of heavy down type quarks. More generally, in our study, the main tool we use to determine the mass of the heavy quark in each of the channels we consider is to use the kinematics of the decay of such quarks to resolve the momenta of the unobserved neutrinos. We show how this can be carried out, even in cases where the kinematics is under-determined by use of the approximation, which holds quite well, that the two heavy quarks are nearly at rest in the center of mass frame. Since it is very likely that at least the lightest heavy quark decays in the mode we consider, this means that it should be observed at the LHC. Indeed, it is expected that the mass splitting between the quarks is less than $m_W$ so that if the Cabbibo-Kobayshi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix element between the fourth and lower generations are not too small, both members of the fourth generation quark doublet will decay in this way. If this is so, the combined signal of these two quarks will make the signal for the fourth generation somewhat more prominent.

  1. Single and multiple intrabeam scattering in hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    Single and multiple intra-beam scattering are usually considered separately. Such separation works well for electron-positron colliders but usually yields only coarse description in the case of hadron colliders. Boltzmann type integro-differential equation is used to describe evolution of longitudinal distribution due to IBS. The finite size of the longitudinal potential well, its non-linearity and x-y coupling are taken into account. The model predictions for longitudinal and transverse distributions are compared to the experimental measurements.

  2. Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from B Hadrons Research

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Bottom group studies the production and decay of B hadrons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

  3. Beam physics in future electron hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valloni, A; Klein, M; Schulte, D; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    High-energy electron-hadron collisions could support a rich research programme in particle and nuclear physics. Several future projects are being proposed around the world, in particular eRHIC at BNL, MEIC at TJNAF in the US, and LHeC at CERN in Europe. This paper will highlight some of the accelerator physics issues, and describe related technical developments and challenges for these machines. In particular, optics design and beam dynamics studies are discussed, including longitudinal phase space manipulation, coherent synchrotron radiation, beam-beam kink instability, ion effects, as well as mitigation measures for beam break up and for space-charge induced emittance growth, all of which could limit the machine performance. Finally, first steps are presented towards an LHeC R&D facility, which should investigate relevant beam-physics processes.

  4. Radio Frequency Noise Effects on the CERN Large Hadron Collider Beam Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastoridis, T.; Baudrenghien, P.; Butterworth, A.; Molendijk, J.; Rivetta, C.; Fox, J.D.; /SLAC

    2012-04-30

    Radio frequency (rf) accelerating system noise can have a detrimental impact on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) performance through longitudinal motion and longitudinal emittance growth. A theoretical formalism has been developed to relate the beam and rf station dynamics with the bunch length growth. Measurements were conducted at LHC to determine the performance limiting rf components and validate the formalism through studies of the beam diffusion dependence on rf noise. As a result, a noise threshold was established for acceptable performance which provides the foundation for beam diffusion estimates for higher energies and intensities. Measurements were also conducted to determine the low level rf noise spectrum and its major contributions, as well as to validate models and simulations of this system.

  5. Chiral electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang Zhong; Chun-Bin Yang; Xu Cai; Sheng-Qin Feng

    2015-10-03

    It was proposed that the electric fields may lead to chiral separation in QGP, which is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. We used the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to calculate the electric field distributions of the off-central collisions. The chiral electro field spatial distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. Compared with magnetic field spatial distribution, electric field shows some different features in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The dependence of the electric field produced by the thermal quark in the central position with different impact parameters on the proper time with different collision energies in the RHIC and LHC energy region are studied in this paper.

  6. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - An Introduction (1/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    This is the first lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This first lecture provides a brief introduction to hadron collider physics and collider detector experiments as well as offers some analysis guidelines. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  7. A 233 km tunnel for lepton and hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, D. J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Datta, A.; Duraisamy, M.; Luo, T.; Lyons, G. T. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Mississippi-Oxford, University, MS 38677 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    A decade ago, a cost analysis was conducted to bore a 233 km circumference Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) tunnel passing through Fermilab. Here we outline implementations of e{sup +}e{sup -}, pp-bar , and {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} collider rings in this tunnel using recent technological innovations. The 240 and 500 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders employ Crab Waist Crossings, ultra low emittance damped bunches, short vertical IP focal lengths, superconducting RF, and low coercivity, grain oriented silicon steel/concrete dipoles. Some details are also provided for a high luminosity 240 GeV e{sup +}e{sup -} collider and 1.75 TeV muon accelerator in a Fermilab site filler tunnel. The 40 TeV pp-bar collider uses the high intensity Fermilab p-bar source, exploits high cross sections for pp-bar production of high mass states, and uses 2 Tesla ultra low carbon steel/YBCO superconducting magnets run with liquid neon. The 35 TeV muon ring ramps the 2 Tesla superconducting magnets at 9 Hz every 0.4 seconds, uses 250 GV of superconducting RF to accelerate muons from 1.75 to 17.5 TeV in 63 orbits with 71% survival, and mitigates neutrino radiation with phase shifting, roller coaster motion in a FODO lattice.

  8. A High Field Magnet Design for A Future Hadron Collider==== R. Gupta, K. Chow, D. Dietderich, S. Gourlay, G. Millos, A. McInturff, R. Scanlan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ramesh

    A High Field Magnet Design for A Future Hadron Collider==== R. Gupta, K. Chow, D. Dietderich, S the completion of LHC. This paper presents a high field magnet design option based on Nb3Sn technology. A preliminary magnetic and mechanical design of a 14-16 T, 2-in-1 dipole based on the "common coil design

  9. NNLO Benchmarks for Gauge and Higgs Boson Production at TeV Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Alekhin; J. Blümlein; P. Jimenez-Delgado; S. Moch; E. Reya

    2010-11-29

    The inclusive production cross sections for $W^+, W^-$ and $Z^0$-bosons form important benchmarks for the physics at hadron colliders. We perform a detailed comparison of the predictions for these standard candles based on recent next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) parton parameterizations and new analyses including the combined HERA data, compare to all available experimental results, and discuss the predictions for present and upcoming RHIC, SPS, Tevatron and LHC energies. The rates for gauge boson production at the LHC can be rather confidently predicted with an accuracy of better than about 10% at NNLO. We also present detailed NNLO predictions for the Higgs boson production cross sections for Tevatron and LHC energies (1.96, 7, 8, 14 TeV), and propose a possible method to monitor the gluon distribution experimentally in the kinematic region close to the mass range expected for the Higgs boson. The production cross sections of the Higgs boson at the LHC are presently predicted with an accuracy of about 10--17%. The inclusion of the NNLO contributions is mandatory for achieving such accuracies since the total uncertainties are substantially larger at NLO.

  10. Lifetime Analysis at High Intensity Colliders Applied to the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvachua, B; Bruce, R; Burkart, F; Redaelli, S; Valentino, G; Wollmann, D

    2013-01-01

    The beam lifetime is one of the main parameters to define the performance of a collider. In a super-conducting machine like the LHC, the lifetime determines the intensity reach for a given collimation cleaning. The beam lifetime can be calculated from the direct measurement of beam current. However, due to the noise in the beam current signal only an average lifetime over several seconds can be calculated. We propose here an alternative method, which uses the signal of the beam loss monitors in the vicinity of the primary collimators to get the instantaneous beam lifetime at the collimators. In this paper we compare the lifetime from the two methods and investigate the minimum lifetime over the LHC cycle for all the physics fills in 2011 and 2012. These data provide a reference for estimates of performance reach from collimator cleaning.

  11. Hadron Collider Tests of Neutrino Mass-Generating Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz, Richard E

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics (SM) is presently the best description of nature at small distances and high energies. However, with tiny but nonzero neutrino masses, a Higgs boson mass unstable under radiative corrections, and little guidance on understanding the hierarchy of fermion masses, the SM remains an unsatisfactory description of nature. Well-motivated scenarios that resolve these issues exist but also predict extended gauge (e.g., Left-Right Symmetric Models), scalar (e.g., Supersymmetry), and/or fermion sectors (e.g., Seesaw Models). Hence, discovering such new states would have far-reaching implications. After reviewing basic tenets of the SM and collider physics, several beyond the SM (BSM) scenarios that alleviate these shortcomings are investigated. Emphasis is placed on the production of a heavy Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders in the context of low-energy, effective theories that simultaneously explain the origin of neutrino masses and their smallness compared to other elementar...

  12. Compressed supersymmetry after 1 fb?¹ at the Large Hadron Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LeCompte, Thomas J.; Martin, Stephen P.

    2012-02-01

    We study the reach of the Large Hadron Collider with 1 fb?¹ of data at ?s=7 TeV for several classes of supersymmetric models with compressed mass spectra, using jets and missing transverse energy cuts like those employed by ATLAS for summer 2011 data. In the limit of extreme compression, the best limits come from signal regions that do not require more than 2 or 3 jets and that remove backgrounds by requiring more missing energy rather than a higher effective mass.

  13. Exploring higher dimensional black holes at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Chris M.; Palmer, M. J.; Parker, Michael A.; Richardson, P.

    Preprint typeset in JHEP style - HYPER VERSION Cavendish-HEP-04/29 ATL-COM-PHYS-2004-067 Exploring Higher Dimensional Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider C.M. Harris†, M.J. Palmer†, M.A. Parker†, P. Richardson‡, A. Sabetfakhri† and B.R. Webber... the Standard Model matter and gauge fields are confined to the physical three-branes in a higher dimensional space, it has been shown that most of the black hole decay products are Standard Model quanta emitted on the brane [7] and are therefore visible...

  14. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics...

  15. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN: Report on the Physics and Design Concepts for Machine and Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Abelleira Fernandez; C. Adolphsen; A. N. Akay; H. Aksakal; J. L. Albacete; S. Alekhin; P. Allport; V. Andreev; R. B. Appleby; E. Arikan; N. Armesto; G. Azuelos; M. Bai; D. Barber; J. Bartels; O. Behnke; J. Behr; A. S. Belyaev; I. Ben-Zvi; N. Bernard; S. Bertolucci; S. Bettoni; S. Biswal; J. Blümlein; H. Böttcher; A. Bogacz; C. Bracco; G. Brandt; H. Braun; S. Brodsky; O. Brüning; E. Bulyak; A. Buniatyan; H. Burkhardt; I. T. Cakir; O. Cakir; R. Calaga; V. Cetinkaya; E. Ciapala; R. Ciftci; A. K. Ciftci; B. A. Cole; J. C. Collins; O. Dadoun; J. Dainton; A. De. Roeck; D. d'Enterria; A. Dudarev; A. Eide; R. Enberg; E. Eroglu; K. J. Eskola; L. Favart; M. Fitterer; S. Forte; A. Gaddi; P. Gambino; H. García Morales; T. Gehrmann; P. Gladkikh; C. Glasman; R. Godbole; B. Goddard; T. Greenshaw; A. Guffanti; V. Guzey; C. Gwenlan; T. Han; Y. Hao; F. Haug; W. Herr; A. Hervé; B. J. Holzer; M. Ishitsuka; M. Jacquet; B. Jeanneret; J. M. Jimenez; J. M. Jowett; H. Jung; H. Karadeniz; D. Kayran; A. Kilic; K. Kimura; M. Klein; U. Klein; T. Kluge; F. Kocak; M. Korostelev; A. Kosmicki; P. Kostka; H. Kowalski; G. Kramer; D. Kuchler; M. Kuze; T. Lappi; P. Laycock; E. Levichev; S. Levonian; V. N. Litvinenko; A. Lombardi; J. Maeda; C. Marquet; S. J. Maxfield; B. Mellado; K. H. Mess; A. Milanese; S. Moch; I. I. Morozov; Y. Muttoni; S. Myers; S. Nandi; Z. Nergiz; P. R. Newman; T. Omori; J. Osborne; E. Paoloni; Y. Papaphilippou; C. Pascaud; H. Paukkunen; E. Perez; T. Pieloni; E. Pilicer; B. Pire; R. Placakyte; A. Polini; V. Ptitsyn; Y. Pupkov; V. Radescu; S. Raychaudhuri; L. Rinolfi; R. Rohini; J. Rojo; S. Russenschuck; M. Sahin; C. A. Salgado; K. Sampei; R. Sassot; E. Sauvan; U. Schneekloth; T. Schörner-Sadenius; D. Schulte; A. Senol; A. Seryi; P. Sievers; A. N. Skrinsky; W. Smith; H. Spiesberger; A. M. Stasto; M. Strikman; M. Sullivan; S. Sultansoy; Y. P. Sun; B. Surrow; L. Szymanowski; P. Taels; I. Tapan; A. T. Tasci; E. Tassi; H. Ten. Kate; J. Terron; H. Thiesen; L. Thompson; K. Tokushuku; R. Tomás García; D. Tommasini; D. Trbojevic; N. Tsoupas; J. Tuckmantel; S. Turkoz; T. N. Trinh; K. Tywoniuk; G. Unel; J. Urakawa; P. VanMechelen; A. Variola; R. Veness; A. Vivoli; P. Vobly; J. Wagner; R. Wallny; S. Wallon; G. Watt; C. Weiss; U. A. Wiedemann; U. Wienands; F. Willeke; B. -W. Xiao; V. Yakimenko; A. F. Zarnecki; Z. Zhang; F. Zimmermann; R. Zlebcik; F. Zomer

    2012-09-07

    The physics programme and the design are described of a new collider for particle and nuclear physics, the Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), in which a newly built electron beam of 60 GeV, up to possibly 140 GeV, energy collides with the intense hadron beams of the LHC. Compared to HERA, the kinematic range covered is extended by a factor of twenty in the negative four-momentum squared, $Q^2$, and in the inverse Bjorken $x$, while with the design luminosity of $10^{33}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ the LHeC is projected to exceed the integrated HERA luminosity by two orders of magnitude. The physics programme is devoted to an exploration of the energy frontier, complementing the LHC and its discovery potential for physics beyond the Standard Model with high precision deep inelastic scattering measurements. These are designed to investigate a variety of fundamental questions in strong and electroweak interactions. The physics programme also includes electron-deuteron and electron-ion scattering in a $(Q^2, 1/x)$ range extended by four orders of magnitude as compared to previous lepton-nucleus DIS experiments for novel investigations of neutron's and nuclear structure, the initial conditions of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation and further quantum chromodynamic phenomena. The LHeC may be realised either as a ring-ring or as a linac-ring collider. Optics and beam dynamics studies are presented for both versions, along with technical design considerations on the interaction region, magnets and further components, together with a design study for a high acceptance detector. Civil engineering and installation studies are presented for the accelerator and the detector. The LHeC can be built within a decade and thus be operated while the LHC runs in its high-luminosity phase. It thus represents a major opportunity for progress in particle physics exploiting the investment made in the LHC.

  16. Diffractive W production at hadron colliders as a test of colour singlet exchange mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gunnar Ingelman; Roman Pasechnik; Johan Rathsman; Dominik Werder

    2012-10-22

    We revisit diffractive and exclusive W production at hadron colliders in different models for soft colour exchanges. The process pp to p[WX]p, and in particular a W charge asymmetry, has been suggested as a way to discriminate diffractive processes as being due to pomeron exchange in Regge phenomenology or QCD-based colour reconnection models. Our detailed analysis of the latter models at LHC energies shows, however, that they give similar results as pomeron models for very leading protons and central W production, including a vanishing W charge asymmetry. We demonstrate that soft colour exchange models provide a continuous transition from diffractive to inelastic processes and thereby include the intrinsic asymmetry of inelastic interactions while being at the same time sensitive to the underlying hadronisation models. Such sensitivity also concerns the differential distributions in proton momentum and W transverse momentum which opens possibilities to discriminate between different colour reconnection models.

  17. Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Large Hadron Collider to 2025 and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florio, Massimo; Sirtori, Emanuela

    2015-01-01

    Social cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of projects has been successfully applied in different fields such as transport, energy, health, education, and environment, including climate change. It is often argued that it is impossible to extend the CBA approach to the evaluation of the social impact of research infrastructures, because the final benefit to society of scientific discovery is generally unpredictable. Here, we propose a quantitative approach to this problem, we use it to design an empirically testable CBA model, and we apply it to the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the highest-energy accelerator in the world, currently operating at CERN. We show that the evaluation of benefits can be made quantitative by determining their value to users (scientists, early-stage researchers, firms, visitors) and non-users (the general public). Four classes of contributions to users are identified: knowledge output, human capital development, technological spillovers, and cultural effects. Benefits for non-users can be ...

  18. Simulation study of electron cloud induced instabilities and emittance growth for the CERN Large Hadron Collider proton beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benedetto, Elena; Schulte, Daniel; Rumolo, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    The electron cloud may cause transverse single-bunch instabilities of proton beams such as those in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). We simulate these instabilities and the consequent emittance growth with the code HEADTAIL, which models the turn-by-turn interaction between the cloud and the beam. Recently some new features were added to the code, in particular, electric conducting boundary conditions at the chamber wall, transverse feedback, and variable beta functions. The sensitivity to several numerical parameters has been studied by varying the number of interaction points between the bunch and the cloud, the phase advance between them, and the number of macroparticles used to represent the protons and the electrons. We present simulation results for both LHC at injection and SPS with LHC-type beam, for different electron-cloud density levels, chromaticities, and bunch intensities. Two regimes with qualitatively different emittance growth are observed: above th...

  19. Detecting Exotic Heavy Leptons at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; C. M. Harris; M. A. Parker; P. Richardson; B. R. Webber

    2001-08-10

    New almost-degenerate charged and neutral heavy leptons are a feature of a number of theories of physics beyond the Standard Model. The prospects for detecting these at the Large Hadron Collider using a time-of-flight technique are considered, along with any cosmological or experimental constraints on their masses. Based on a discovery criterion of 10 detected exotic leptons we conclude that, with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb-1, it should be possible to detect such leptons provided their masses are less than 950 GeV. It should also be possible to use the angular distribution of the produced particles to distinguish these exotic leptons from supersymmetric scalar leptons, at a better than 90% confidence level, for masses up to 580 GeV.

  20. Precise Predictions for Z + 4 Jets at Hadron Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ita, H.; Bern, Z.; Dixon, L.J.; Cordero, F.Febres; Kosower, D.A.; Maitre, D.

    2011-12-09

    We present the cross section for production of a Z boson in association with four jets at the Large Hadron Collider, at next-to-leading order in the QCD coupling. When the Z decays to neutrinos, this process is a key irreducible background to many searches for new physics. Its computation has been made feasible through the development of the on-shell approach to perturbative quantum field theory. We present the total cross section for pp collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV, after folding in the decay of the Z boson, or virtual photon, to a charged-lepton pair. We also provide distributions of the transverse momenta of the four jets, and we compare cross sections and distributions to the corresponding ones for the production of a W boson with accompanying jets.

  1. Exploring Small Extra Dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; K. Odagiri; M. J. Palmer; M. A. Parker; A. Sabetfakhri; B. R. Webber

    2002-11-13

    Many models that include small extra space dimensions predict graviton states which are well separated in mass, and which can be detected as resonances in collider experiments. It has been shown that the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider can identify such narrow states up to a mass of 2080 GeV in the decay mode G->ee, using a conservative model. This work extends the study of the ee channel over the full accessible parameter space, and shows that the reach could extend as high as 3.5 TeV. It then discusses ways in which the expected universal coupling of the resonance can be confirmed using other decay modes. In particular, the mode G-> di-photons is shown to be measurable with good precision, which would provide powerful confirmation of the graviton hypothesis. The decays G-> mu mu, WW, ZZ and jet--jet are measurable over a more limited range of couplings and masses. Using information from mass and cross-section measurements, the underlying parameters can be extracted. In one test model, the size of the extra dimension can be determined to a precision in length of 7x10^-33 m.

  2. Exploring Small Extra Dimensions at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, Benjamin C; Palmer, M J; Parker, M A; Sabetfakhri, A; Webber, Bryan R

    2002-01-01

    Many models that include small extra space dimensions predict graviton states which are well separated in mass, and which can be detected as resonances in collider experiments. It has been shown that the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider can identify such narrow states up to a mass of 2080 GeV in the decay mode $Gightarrow e^+e^-$, using a conservative model. This work extends the study of the $e^+e^-$ channel over the full accessible parameter space, and shows that the reach could extend as high as 3.5 TeV. It then discusses ways in which the expected universal coupling of the resonance can be confirmed using other decay modes. In particular, the mode $Gightarrow gammagamma$ is shown to be measurable with good precision, which would provide powerful confirmation of the graviton hypothesis. The decays $Gightarrow mu^+mu^-, W^+W^-, Z^0Z^0$ and jet--jet are measurable over a more limited range of couplings and masses. Using information from mass and cross-section measurements, the underlying parameter...

  3. Effects of invisible particle emission on global inclusive variables at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Papaefstathiou; Bryan Webber

    2010-07-23

    We examine the effects of invisible particle emission in conjunction with QCD initial state radiation (ISR) on quantities designed to probe the mass scale of new physics at hadron colliders, which involve longitudinal as well as transverse final-state momenta. This is an extension of our previous treatment, arXiv:0903.2013, of the effects of ISR on global inclusive variables. We present resummed results on the visible invariant mass distribution and compare them to parton-level Monte Carlo results for top quark and gluino pair-production at the LHC. There is good agreement as long as the visible pseudorapidity interval is large enough (eta ~ 3). The effect of invisible particle emission is small in the case of top pair production but substantial for gluino pair production. This is due mainly to the larger mass of the intermediate particles in gluino decay (squarks rather than W-bosons). We also show Monte Carlo modelling of the effects of hadronization and the underlying event. The effect of the underlying event is large but may be approximately universal.

  4. A Novel method for modeling the recoil in W boson events at hadron collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Ahsan, Mahsana; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls /Northeastern U.

    2009-07-01

    We present a new method for modeling the hadronic recoil in W {yields} {ell}{nu} events produced at hadron colliders. The recoil is chosen from a library of recoils in Z {yields} {ell}{ell} data events and overlaid on a simulated W {yields} {ell}{nu} event. Implementation of this method requires that the data recoil library describe the properties of the measured recoil as a function of the true, rather than the measured, transverse momentum of the boson. We address this issue using a multidimensional Bayesian unfolding technique. We estimate the statistical and systematic uncertainties from this method for the W boson mass and width measurements assuming 1 fb{sup -1} of data from the Fermilab Tevatron. The uncertainties are found to be small and comparable to those of a more traditional parameterized recoil model. For the high precision measurements that will be possible with data from Run II of the Fermilab Tevatron and from the CERN LHC, the method presented in this paper may be advantageous, since it does not require an understanding of the measured recoil from first principles.

  5. QCD corrections to associated t anti-t h production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; L. Orr; L. Reina; D. Wackeroth

    2002-10-07

    We briefly present the status of QCD corrections to the inclusive total cross section for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a top-quark pair within the Standard Model at hadron colliders.

  6. On CP violation and the measurement of the dimuon charge asymmetry at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hoeneisen

    2006-07-26

    B factories measure the CP violation parameter of B^0 Bbar^0 mixing and decay. Hadron colliders measure the dimuon charge asymmetry of an admixture of B hadrons. In this note we discuss a subtle point on how the CP violation parameter of B^0_s Bbar^0_s mixing and decay can be extracted from these measurements.

  7. Resummation of the transverse-energy distribution in Higgs boson production at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimiliano Grazzini; Andreas Papaefstathiou; Jennifer M. Smillie; Bryan R. Webber

    2014-08-25

    We compute the resummed hadronic transverse-energy ($E_T$) distribution due to initial-state QCD radiation in the production of a Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 126 GeV by gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider, with matching to next-to-leading order calculations at large $E_T$. Effects of hadronization, underlying event and limited detector acceptance are estimated using aMC@NLO with the Herwig++ and Pythia 8 event generators.

  8. Sources of machine-induced background in the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, R.; et al.,

    2013-11-21

    One source of experimental background in the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is particles entering the detectors from the machine. These particles are created in cascades, caused by upstream interactions of beam protons with residual gas molecules or collimators. We estimate the losses on the collimators with SixTrack and simulate the showers with FLUKA and MARS to obtain the flux and distribution of particles entering the ATLAS and CMS detectors. We consider some machine configurations used in the first LHC run, with focus on 3.5 TeV operation as in 2011. Results from FLUKA and MARS are compared and a very good agreement is found. An analysis of logged LHC data provides, for different processes, absolute beam loss rates, which are used together with further simulations of vacuum conditions to normalize the results to rates of particles entering the detectors. We assess the relative importance of background from elastic and inelastic beam-gas interactions, and the leakage out of the LHC collimation system, and show that beam-gas interactions are the dominating source of machine-induced background for the studied machine scenarios. Our results serve as a starting point for the experiments to perform further simulations in order to estimate the resulting signals in the detectors.

  9. Cost-Benefit Analysis of the Large Hadron Collider to 2025 and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Florio; Stefano Forte; Emanuela Sirtori

    2015-07-20

    Social cost-benefit analysis (CBA) of projects has been successfully applied in different fields such as transport, energy, health, education, and environment, including climate change. It is often argued that it is impossible to extend the CBA approach to the evaluation of the social impact of research infrastructures, because the final benefit to society of scientific discovery is generally unpredictable. Here, we propose a quantitative approach to this problem, we use it to design an empirically testable CBA model, and we apply it to the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the highest-energy accelerator in the world, currently operating at CERN. We show that the evaluation of benefits can be made quantitative by determining their value to users (scientists, early-stage researchers, firms, visitors) and non-users (the general public). Four classes of contributions to users are identified: knowledge output, human capital development, technological spillovers, and cultural effects. Benefits for non-users can be estimated, in analogy to public goods with no practical use (such as environment preservation), using willingness to pay. We determine the probability distribution of cost and benefits for the LHC since 1993 until planned decommissioning in 2025, and we find there is a 92% probability that benefits exceed its costs, with an expected net present value of about 3 billion euro, not including the unpredictable economic value of discovery of any new physics. We argue that the evaluation approach proposed here can be replicated for any large-scale research infrastructure, thus helping the decision-making on competing projects, with a socio-economic appraisal complementary to other evaluation criteria.

  10. CLIC-LHC Based FEL-Nucleus Collider: Feasibility and Physics Search Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Braun; R. Corsini; J. P. Delahaye; E. Guliyev; A. Ozcan; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas; S. Yigit

    2005-03-25

    The feasibility of a CLIC-LHC based FEL-nucleus collider is investigated. It is shown that the proposed scheme satisfies all requirements of an ideal photon source for the Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence method. The tunability, monochromaticity and high polarization of the FEL beam together with high statistics and huge energy of LHC nucleus beams will give an unique opportunity to determine different characteristics of excited nuclear levels. The physics potential of the proposed collider is illustrated for a beam of Pb nuclei.

  11. QCD Corrections to Scalar Diquark Production at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao Han; Ian Lewis; Thomas McElmurry

    2010-02-15

    We calculate the next-to-leading order QCD corrections to quark-quark annihilation to a scalar resonant state ("diquark") in a color representation of antitriplet or sextet at the Tevatron and LHC energies. At the LHC, we find the enhancement (K-factor) for the antitriplet diquark is typically about 1.31--1.35, and for the sextet diquark is about 1.22--1.32 for initial-state valence quarks. The full transverse-momentum spectrum for the diquarks is also calculated at the LHC by performing the soft gluon resummation to the leading logarithm and all orders in the strong coupling.

  12. Probing triple-Higgs productions via $4b2\\gamma$ at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Yi; Zhao, Xiaoran; Zhong, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Zhijie

    2015-01-01

    The quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or ILC at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed MC simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel $HHH\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}\\gamma\\gamma$, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than $1.8\\times 10^4$ ab$^{-1}$. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear ($\\lambda_3$) and quartic ($\\lambda_4$) self-couplings of the Higgs. We find that, through a search in the triple Higgs production, the...

  13. Probing triple-Higgs productions via $4b2?$ at a 100 TeV hadron collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chien-Yi Chen; Qi-Shu Yan; Xiaoran Zhao; Zhijie Zhao; Yi-Ming Zhong

    2015-10-23

    The quartic self-coupling of the Standard Model Higgs boson can only be measured by observing the triple-Higgs production process, but it is challenging for the LHC Run 2 or ILC at a few TeV because of its extremely small production rate. In this paper, we present a detailed MC simulation study of the triple-Higgs production through gluon fusion at a 100 TeV hadron collider and explore the feasibility of observing this production mode. We focus on the decay channel $HHH\\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}\\gamma\\gamma$, investigating detector effects and optimizing the kinematic cuts to discriminate the signal from the backgrounds. Our study shows that in order to observe the Standard Model triple-Higgs signal, the integrated luminosity of a 100 TeV hadron collider should be greater than $1.8\\times 10^4$ ab$^{-1}$. We also explore the dependence of the cross section upon the trilinear ($\\lambda_3$) and quartic ($\\lambda_4$) self-couplings of the Higgs. We find that, through a search in the triple Higgs production, the parameters $\\lambda_3$ and $\\lambda_4$ can be restricted to the ranges $[-1, 5]$ and $[-20, 30]$, respectively. We also examine how new physics can change the production rate of triple-Higgs events. For example, in the singlet extension of the Standard Model, we find that the triple-Higgs production rate can be increased by a factor of $\\mathcal{O}(10)$.

  14. QCD effects in Higgs boson production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Grazzini

    2010-01-21

    We present updated predictions for Higgs boson production at the Tevatron and the LHC and we review their corresponding uncertainties. We report on a study of the impact of QCD radiative corrections on the Higgs boson search at the Tevatron.

  15. SUSY Signatures at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Paige

    2002-11-01

    The ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have devoted considerable effort to the study of SUSY signatures and measurements. This talk provides an overview of what can be learned at the LHC if TeV-scale SUSY exists.

  16. TESLA*HERA as Lepton (Photon)-Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Yavas; A. K. Ciftci; S. Sultansoy

    2000-04-11

    New facilities for particle and nuclear physics research, which will be available due to constructing the TESLA linear electron-positron collider tangentially to the HERA proton ring, are discussed.

  17. Physics studies at a future linear collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabassam, Hajrah

    2012-06-22

    With the start of the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN, we will obtain a new understanding of the physics beyond our current limits. New discoveries will be made; but we will require a deeper understanding, which the ...

  18. Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W-boson decays at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Alan; Gripaios, Ben; Lester, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    Ju l 2 00 9 Cavendish-HEP-09/04 Measuring the Higgs boson mass in dileptonic W -boson decays at hadron colliders Alan J. Barr,1, ? Ben Gripaios,2, † and Christopher G. Lester3, ‡ 1Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH, United Kingdom 2... CERN PH-TH, Geneva 23, 1211 Switzerland 3Cavendish Laboratory, Dept of Physics, JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge, CB3 0HE, United Kingdom (Dated: July 22, 2009) It is expected that hadron collider measurements of the Higgs boson mass using the decay h ? W...

  19. Hadron multiplicity in pp and AA collisions at LHC from the Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene Levin; Amir H. Rezaeian

    2010-08-10

    We provide quantitative predictions for the rapidity, centrality and energy dependencies of inclusive charged-hadron productions for the forthcoming LHC measurements in nucleus-nucleus collisions based on the idea of gluon saturation in the color-glass condensate framework. Our formulation gives very good descriptions of the first data from the LHC for the inclusive charged-hadron production in proton-proton collisions, the deep inelastic scattering at HERA at small Bjorken-x, and the hadron multiplicities in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC.

  20. Physics Reach at Future Colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krawczyk, Maria [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Warsaw, ul. Hoz-dota 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2007-11-27

    The physics reach at future colliders is discussed, with focus on the Higgs sector. First we present the Standard Model and some results obtained at the existing high-energy hadron collider, Tevatron, together with the corresponding expectations for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which starts operating in 2008. Then we discuss important low energy measurements: the anomalous magnetic moment for muon and the leptonic B-decay together with b{yields}s{gamma}. Finally the potential of the planned e{sup +}e{sup -} International Linear Collider (ILC) and its possible option Photon Linear Collider (PLC), e{gamma} and {gamma}{gamma}, is shortly presented.

  1. The fate of long-lived superparticles with hadronic decays after LHC Run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zhen; Tweedie, Brock

    2015-06-08

    Supersymmetry searches at the LHC are both highly varied and highly constraining, but the vast majority are focused on cases where the final-stage visible decays are prompt. Scenarios featuring superparticles with detector-scale lifetimes have therefore remained a tantalizing possibility for sub-TeV SUSY, since explicit limits are relatively sparse. Nonetheless, the extremely low backgrounds of the few existing searches for collider-stable and displaced new particles facilitates recastings into powerful long-lived superparticle searches, even for models for which those searches are highly non-optimized. In this paper, we assess the status of such models in the context of baryonic R-parity violation, gauge mediation,more »and mini-split SUSY. We explore a number of common simplified spectra where hadronic decays can be important, employing recasts of LHC searches that utilize different detector systems and final-state objects. The LSP/NLSP possibilities considered here include generic colored superparticles such as the gluino and light-flavor squarks, as well as the lighter stop and the quasi-degenerate Higgsino multiplet motivated by naturalness. We find that complementary coverage over large swaths of mass and lifetime is achievable by superimposing limits, particularly from CMS’s tracker-based displaced dijet search and heavy stable charged particle searches. Adding in prompt searches, we find many cases where a range of sparticle masses is now excluded from zero lifetime to infinite lifetime with no gaps. In other cases, the displaced searches furnish the only extant limits at any lifetime.« less

  2. Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes and Jet Substructure in Proton-Proton Collisions at 7.0 TeV Center-of-Mass Energy with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, David Wilkins

    2012-03-20

    This thesis presents the first measurement of 6 hadronic event shapes in proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 7 TeV using the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Results are presented at the particle-level, permitting comparisons to multiple Monte Carlo event generator tools. Numerous tools and techniques that enable detailed analysis of the hadronic final state at high luminosity are described. The approaches presented utilize the dual strengths of the ATLAS calorimeter and tracking systems to provide high resolution and robust measurements of the hadronic jets that constitute both a background and a signal throughout ATLAS physics analyses. The study of the hadronic final state is then extended to jet substructure, where the energy flow and topology within individual jets is studied at the detector level and techniques for estimating systematic uncertainties for such measurements are commissioned in the first data. These first substructure measurements in ATLAS include the jet mass and sub-jet multiplicity as well as those concerned with multi-body hadronic decays and color flow within jets. Finally, the first boosted hadronic object observed at the LHC - the decay of the top quark to a single jet - is presented.

  3. QCD Corrections to Pair Production of Type III Seesaw Leptons at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Ruiz

    2015-09-17

    If kinematically accessible, hadron collider experiments provide an ideal laboratory for the direct production of heavy lepton partners in Seesaw models. In the context of the Type III Seesaw Mechanism, the $\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s)$ rate and shape corrections are presented for the pair production of hypothetical, heavy $SU(2)_L$ triplet leptons in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=13,$ 14, and 100 TeV. The next-to-leading order (NLO) $K$-factors span, approximately, $K^{NLO}=1.1 - 1.4$ for both charged current and neutral current processes over a triplet mass range $m_T = 100~\\text{GeV}-2\\text{TeV}$. Total production cross sections exhibit a $^{+5\\%}_{-6\\%}$ scale dependence at 14 TeV and $\\pm1\\%$ at 100 TeV. The NLO differential $K$-factors for heavy lepton kinematics are largely flat, suggesting that na\\"ive scaling by the total $K^{NLO}$ is reasonably justified. The resummed transverse momentum distribution of the dilepton system is presented at leading logarithmic (LL) accuracy. The effects of resummation are large in TeV-scale dilepton systems. Discovery potential to heavy lepton pairs at 14 and 100 TeV is briefly explored: At the High-Luminosity LHC, we estimate a $4.8-6.3\\sigma$ discovery potential maximally for $m_T = 1.5-1.6~\\text{TeV}$ after 3000 fb$^{-1}$. With 300 (3000) fb$^{-1}$, there is $2\\sigma$ sensitivity up to $m_T = 1.3-1.4~\\text{TeV}~(1.7-1.8~\\text{TeV})$ in the individual channels. At 100 TeV and with 10 fb$^{-1}$, a $5\\sigma$ discovery can be achieved for $m_T=1.4-1.6~\\text{TeV}$.

  4. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Searching for New Physics (2/3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-20

    This is the second lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This second lecture discusses techniques important for analyses searching for new physics using the CDF B_s --> mu+ mu- search as a specific example. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  5. Top Physics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Vander Donckt; for the CMS; ATLAS Collaborations

    2008-05-21

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide a huge amount of top-antitop events, making the LHC a top quark factory, producing 1 tt pair per second at a luminosity of 10^33cm-2s-1. A large top quark sample will be available from the start of LHC and will play an important role in commissioning the CMS and ATLAS detectors. An overview of the top quark measurements during the first data-taking period is given.

  6. Top quark physics at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Bernreuther

    2008-05-09

    The physics perspectives of the production and decay of single top quarks and top quark pairs at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) are reviewed from a phenomenological point of view.

  7. Top Quark Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Spanò; for the ATLAS; CMS collaborations

    2011-12-16

    Top quark production in proton proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is reviewed using data collected by the ATLAS and CMS detectors. Most recent results on searches for new physics related to top quark production mechanism are included.

  8. Non-extensivity Parameter of Thermodynamical Model of Hadronic Interactions at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tadeusz Wibig

    2010-05-31

    The LHC measurements above SPS and Tevatron energies give the opportunity to test predictions of non-extensive thermodynamical picture of hadronic interaction to examine measured transverse momenta distributions for new interaction energy range. We determined Tsallis model non-extensivity parameter for the hadronization process before short-lived particles decayed and distort the initial p_t distribution. We have shown that it follows exactly smooth rise determined at lower energies below present LHC record. The shape of the q parameter energy dependence is consistent with expectations and the evidence of the asymptotic limit may be seen.

  9. Ground Vibration Measurements at LHC Point 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsche, Kirk; /SLAC; Gaddi, Andrea; /CERN

    2012-09-17

    Ground vibration was measured at Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Point 4 during the winter shutdown in February 2012. This report contains the results, including power and coherence spectra. We plan to collect and analyze vibration data from representative collider halls to inform specifications for future linear colliders, such as ILC and CLIC. We are especially interested in vibration correlations between final focus lens locations.

  10. Distinguishing Spins in Decay Chains at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christiana Athanasiou; Christopher G. Lester; Jennifer M. Smillie; Bryan R. Webber

    2008-08-29

    If new particles are discovered at the LHC, it will be important to determine their spins in as model-independent a way as possible. We consider the case, commonly encountered in models of physics beyond the Standard Model, of a new scalar or fermion $D$ decaying sequentially into other new particles $C,B,A$ via the decay chain $D\\to C q$, $C\\to B l^{near}$, $B\\to A l^{far}$, $l^{near}$ and $l^{far}$ being opposite-sign same-flavour charged leptons and $A$ being invisible. We compute the observable 2- and 3-particle invariant mass distributions for all possible spin assignments of the new particles, and discuss their distinguishability using a quantitative measure known as the Kullback-Leibler distance.

  11. Nuclear shadowing and prompt photons at relativistic hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Brenner Mariotto; V. P. Goncalves

    2008-08-26

    The production of prompt photons at high energies provides a direct probe of the dynamics of the strong interactions. In particular, one expect that it could be used to constrain the behavior of the nuclear gluon distribution in $pA$ and $AA$ collisions. In this letter we investigate the influence of nuclear effects in the production of prompt photons and estimate the transverse momentum dependence of the nuclear ratios $R_{pA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (pA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ and $R_{AA} = {\\frac{d\\sigma (AA)}{dy d^2 p_T}} / A^2 {\\frac{d\\sigma (pp)}{dy d^2 p_T}}$ at RHIC and LHC energies. We demonstrate that the study of these observables can be useful to determine the magnitude of the shadowing and antishadowing effects in the nuclear gluon distribution.

  12. Particle Physics after the Higgs-Boson Discovery: Opportunities for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris

    2015-08-24

    The first run of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN brought the discovery of the Higgs boson, an apparently elementary scalar particle with a mass of 125 GeV, the avatar of the mechanism that hides the electroweak symmetry. Then, a new round of experimentation is beginning, with the energy of the proton–proton colliding beams raised to 6.5 TeV per beam, from 4 TeV at the end of the first run. I summarize what we have learned about the Higgs boson, and calls attention to some issues that will be among our central concerns in the near future.

  13. Exploring Higher Dimensional Black Holes at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. M. Harris; M. J. Palmer; M. A. Parker; P. Richardson; A. Sabetfakhri; B. R. Webber

    2004-11-01

    In some extra dimension theories with a TeV fundamental Planck scale, black holes could be produced in future collider experiments. Although cross sections can be large, measuring the model parameters is difficult due to the many theoretical uncertainties. Here we discuss those uncertainties and then we study the experimental characteristics of black hole production and decay at a typical detector using the ATLAS detector as a guide. We present a new technique for measuring the temperature of black holes that applies to many models. We apply this technique to a test case with four extra dimensions and, using an estimate of the parton-level production cross section error of 20%, determine the Planck mass to 15% and the number of extra dimensions to +-0.75.

  14. Physics and Analysis at a Hadron Collider - Making Measurements (3/3)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    This is the third lecture of three which together discuss the physics of hadron colliders with an emphasis on experimental techniques used for data analysis. This third lecture discusses techniques important for analyses making a measurement (e.g. determining a cross section or a particle property such as its mass or lifetime) using some CDF top-quark analyses as specific examples. The lectures are aimed at graduate students.

  15. Nucleon Decay and Neutrino Experiments, Experiments at High Energy Hadron Colliders, and String Theor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Chang Kee; Douglas, Michaek; Hobbs, John; McGrew, Clark; Rijssenbeek, Michael

    2013-07-29

    This is the final report of the DOE grant DEFG0292ER40697 that supported the research activities of the Stony Brook High Energy Physics Group from November 15, 1991 to April 30, 2013. During the grant period, the grant supported the research of three Stony Brook particle physics research groups: The Nucleon Decay and Neutrino group, the Hadron Collider Group, and the Theory Group.

  16. Complementarity in direct searches for additional Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Kanemura; Hiroshi Yokoya; Ya-Juan Zheng

    2014-07-28

    We discuss complementarity of discovery reaches of heavier neutral Higgs bosons and charged Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs). We perform a comprehensive analysis on their production and decay processes for all types of Yukawa interaction under the softly-broken discrete symmetry which is introduced to avoid flavour changing neutral currents, and we investigate parameter spaces of discovering additional Higgs bosons at the ILC beyond the LHC reach. We find that the 500 GeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 500 fb^{-1} shows an advantage for discovering the additional Higgs bosons in the region where the LHC cannot discover them with the integrated luminosity of 300 fb^{-1}. For the 1 TeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 1 ab^{-1}, production processes of an additional Higgs boson associated with the top quark can be useful as discovery channels in some parameter spaces where the LHC with the integrated luminosity of 3000 fb^{-1} cannot reach. It is emphasized that the complementary study at the LHC and the ILC is useful not only to survey additional Higgs bosons at the TeV scale, but also to discriminate types of Yukawa interaction in the 2HDM.

  17. Complementarity in direct searches for additional Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanemura, Shinya; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2014-01-01

    We discuss complementarity of discovery reaches of heavier neutral Higgs bosons and charged Higgs bosons at the LHC and the International Linear Collider (ILC) in two Higgs doublet models (2HDMs). We perform a comprehensive analysis on their production and decay processes for all types of Yukawa interaction under the softly-broken discrete symmetry which is introduced to avoid flavour changing neutral currents, and we investigate parameter spaces of discovering additional Higgs bosons at the ILC beyond the LHC reach. We find that the 500 GeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 500 fb^{-1} shows an advantage for discovering the additional Higgs bosons in the region where the LHC cannot discover them with the integrated luminosity of 300 fb^{-1}. For the 1 TeV run of the ILC with the integrated luminosity of 1 ab^{-1}, production processes of an additional Higgs boson associated with the top quark can be useful as discovery channels in some parameter spaces where the LHC with the integrated luminos...

  18. Jet Physics with A Large Ion Collider Experiment at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Jochen

    In the presence of the strongly-interacting medium created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, highly energetic partons from hard interactions lose energy through scattering and radiating. This effect, referred to as jet quenching, is observed as a suppression of particles with large momenta transverse to the beam axis (high-$p_\\perp$). To study the impact of the medium evolution on the energy loss modelling in the Monte Carlo event generator JEWEL, we compare results obtained for different scenarios of Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_\\mathrm{NN}} = 200~\\mathrm{GeV}$. For this purpose, JEWEL was extended to use the output of relativistic hydrodynamic calculations in the OSCAR2008H format. We find the modelling of common observables, e.g. the nuclear modification factor, to be rather insensitive to the details of the medium evolution, for which the analytically accessible Bjorken expansion can thus be considered adequate. The OSCAR interface now allows further studies also at LHC energies. Jets of large transve...

  19. Prospects for Colliders and Collider Physics to the 1 PeV Energy Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. King

    2000-05-04

    A review is given of the prospects for future colliders and collider physics at the energy frontier. A proof-of-plausibility scenario is presented for maximizing our progress in elementary particle physics by extending the energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders as quickly and economically as might be technically and financially feasible. The scenario comprises 5 colliders beyond the LHC -- one each of e+e- and hadron colliders and three muon colliders -- and is able to hold to the historical rate of progress in the log-energy reach of hadron and lepton colliders, reaching the 1 PeV constituent mass scale by the early 2040's. The technical and fiscal requirements for the feasibility of the scenario are assessed and relevant long-term R&D projects are identified. Considerations of both cost and logistics seem to strongly favor housing most or all of the colliders in the scenario in a new world high energy physics laboratory

  20. Searching for Narrow Graviton Resonances with the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, Benjamin C; Parker, M A; Webber, Bryan R

    2000-01-01

    A spectrum of massive graviton states is present in several recent theoretical models that include extra space dimensions. In some such models the graviton states are well separated in mass, and can be detected as resonances in collider experiments. The ability of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider to identify such states and measure their properties is considered, in the case that the resonances are narrow compared to the experimental resolution. The discovery limits for the detection of the decay mode G->e+e- are derived. The angular distribution of the lepton pair is used to determine the spin of the intermediate state. In one specific model, the resonance can be detected up to a graviton resonance mass of 2080 GeV, while the angular distribution favours a spin-2 hypothesis over a spin-1 hypothesis at 90% confidence for resonance masses up to 1720 GeV.

  1. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment: Measuring Matter Antimatter Asymmetries at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkes, Chris; Gutierrez, J

    2015-01-01

    This document is the student manual for a third year undergraduate laboratory experiment at the University of Manchester. This project aims to measure a fundamental difference between the behaviour of matter and antimatter through the analysis of data collected by the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. The three-body dmecays $B^\\pm \\rightarrow h^\\pm h^+ h^-$, where $h^\\pm$ is a $\\pi^\\pm$ or $K^\\pm$ are studied. The inclusive matter antimatter asymmetry is calculated, and larger asymmetries are searched for in localized regions of the phase-space.

  2. Addendum to Distinguishing Spins in Decay Chains at the Large Hadron Collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Athanasiou, Christiana; Lester, Christopher G; Smillie, Jennifer M; Webber, Bryan R

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 06 06 21 2v 1 2 0 Ju n 20 06 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION Cavendish–HEP–06/15 Addendum to “Distinguishing Spins in Decay Chains at the Large Hadron Collider”? Christiana Athanasiou1, Christopher G. Lester2... such points, we have as M ?? M logR? i KLi(T, S) ? N , (2.6) which is the Monte Carlo equivalent of eq. (1.2). Results for R = 1000 and M = 5 × 107 are shown in table 4. By comparing with tables 1-3, we see that, as might be expected, – 2 – the three...

  3. Distinguishing spins in supersymmetric and universal extra dimension models at the large hadron collider.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smillie, Jennifer M; Webber, Bryan R

    ar X iv :h ep -p h/ 05 07 17 0v 3 2 1 Fe b 20 07 Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION Cavendish–HEP–05/11 Distinguishing Spins in Supersymmetric and Universal Extra Dimension Models at the Large Hadron Collider? Jennifer M. Smillie1... lepton mass distribution 8 4.6 Observable quark-lepton correlations 9 5. Production cross sections 11 6. Experimental observables 13 7. Conclusions 15 A. Quark + far lepton correlation 16 B. UED production cross sections 17 1. Introduction The search...

  4. Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTech Connect Nanomechanical switch for|Connect Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics

  5. 62-TeV center of mass hadron collider with superbunch beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryuji Yamada et al.

    2001-11-05

    The scheme of a 62-TeV center of mass p-p collider with superbunch beams at Fermilab is proposed as a practical and realistically achievable future project. It will be built in two stages, using the same tunnel, first with a 2 Tesla low field magnet collider ring and later with a 10 Tesla high field magnet collider ring. Both low and high field magnets have twin bore aperture and will be installed in the tunnel with the circumference of 87.25 km. In each bore a proton beam is accelerated, using induction cavities to increase luminosity. In the first stage they install a 7 TeV accelerator ring with operating field of 2 Tesla, based on the superferric transmission-line design. This ring will be operated at a 14-TeV center of mass collider. This will have the same energy as the LHC, but it will have 15 times higher luminosity, namely 1.5 x 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. The estimated synchrotron radiation is negligible with this machine. The existing Fermilab accelerator system, including the 150 GeV main injector, will be used as the injector system. Its rough cost estimation and schedule for this first stage are presented. In the second stage proton beams are accelerated, also using induction cavities up to 31 TeV with the 10 Tesla dipole magnets. The counter circulating beams will collide with the 62-TeV center of mass energy. With the superbunch beams they can expect the luminosity can be increased about 15 times more than the conventional method with RF cavities. It will be 10{sup 35}/cm{sup 2}/sec. In the second stage, the synchrotron radiation power will be about 12 W/m, and they need an elaborated beam screen.

  6. Hadron production in pA collisions at the LHC from the Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamal Jalilian-Marian; Amir H. Rezaeian

    2011-12-22

    We investigate the contribution of inelastic and elastic processes to single inclusive hadron production in proton-proton and proton (deuteron)-nucleus collisions at RHIC and the LHC. Using the hybrid formulation which includes both elastic and inelastic contributions, supplemented with the running-coupling Balitsky-Kovchegov equation, we get a good description of RHIC data. It is shown that inclusion of the inelastic terms makes the transverse momentum dependence of the production cross section steeper in the mid-rapidity region but does not affect the cross section in the very forward region. The inelastic processes also lead to a sharper increase of the nuclear modification factor R_{pA} with increasing p_T. We also make predictions for the nuclear modification factor in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC (\\sqrt{s}=4.4 and 8.8 TeV) at various rapidities using the Color Glass Condensate framework.

  7. Beam Physics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2003-01-01

    The design of the Large Hadron Collider incorporates the accumulated knowledge obtained from previous generations of hadron colliders. Among the well known effects limiting machine performance are intrabeam scattering, the beam-beam interaction and stability against collective motion. Simulations and recent experiments in the SPS have shown that the electron cloud effect observed in the B-factories will be present both in the LHC and in its injector. All of these phenomena are discussed together with the measure taken in the machine design to overcome them.

  8. Search for a light fermiophobic Higgs boson produced via gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Benbrik, Rachid; Guedes, R. B.; Santos, R.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, we propose new Higgs production mechanisms with multiphoton final states in the fermiophobic limit of the two Higgs doublet model. The processes are: gg{yields}hh, gg{yields}Hh followed by H{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah followed by A{yields}hZ. In the fermiophobic limit, gg{yields}hh and gg{yields}Ah{yields}hhZ would give rise to 4{gamma} signature while gg{yields}Hh{yields}hhh can give a 6{gamma} final state. We show that both the Fermilab Tevatron and CERN's Large Hadron Collider can probe a substantial slice of the parameter space in this fermiophobic scenario of the two Higgs doublet model. If observed the above processes can give some information on the triple Higgs couplings involved.

  9. Phenomenology of Production and Decay of Spinning Extra-Dimensional Black Holes at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James A. Frost; Jonathan R. Gaunt; Marco O. P. Sampaio; Marc Casals; Sam R. Dolan; M. Andrew Parker; Bryan R. Webber

    2009-10-16

    We present results of CHARYBDIS2, a new Monte Carlo simulation of black hole production and decay at hadron colliders in theories with large extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity. The main new feature of CHARYBDIS2 is a full treatment of the spin-down phase of the decay process using the angular and energy distributions of the associated Hawking radiation. Also included are improved modelling of the loss of angular momentum and energy in the production process as well as a wider range of options for the Planck-scale termination of the decay. The new features allow us to study the effects of black hole spin and the feasibility of its observation in such theories.

  10. The Higgs Physics Programme at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Sefkow

    2014-10-13

    The talk summarises the case for Higgs physics in $e^+e^-$ collisions and explains how Higgs parameters can be extracted in a model-independent way at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The expected precision will be discussed in the context of projections for the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  11. The Higgs Physics Programme at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefkow, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The talk summarises the case for Higgs physics in $e^+e^-$ collisions and explains how Higgs parameters can be extracted in a model-independent way at the International Linear Collider (ILC). The expected precision will be discussed in the context of projections for the experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  12. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  13. On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Shiltsev

    2015-09-28

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of the next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium and far-future of accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance potential and cost range.

  14. Model-Independent Measurement of the e+e– --> HZ Cross Section at a Future e+e– Linear Collider using Hadronic Z Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AUTHOR|(SzGeCERN)435733

    2015-01-01

    A future e+e collider, such as the ILC or CLIC, would allow the Higgs sector to be probed with a precision significantly beyond that achievable at the High-Luminosity LHC. A central part of the Higgs programme at an e+e collider is the model-independent determination of the absolute Higgs couplings to fermions and to gauge bosons. Here the measurement of the e+e --> HZ Higgsstrahlung cross sec- tion, using the recoil mass technique, sets the absolute scale for all Higgs coupling measurements. Previous studies have considered s (e+e --> HZ) with Z --> l+l-, where l = e, ?. In this paper it is shown for the first time that a near model- independent recoil mass technique can be extended to the hadronic decays of the Z boson. Because the branching ratio for Z --> qq is approximately ten times greater than for Z --> l+l-, this method is statistically more powerful than using the leptonic decays. For an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of ps = 350 GeV at CLIC, s (e+e --> HZ) can be meas...

  15. Model-Independent Measurement of the e+e- -> HZ Cross Section at a Future e+e- Linear Collider using Hadronic Z Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    A future e+e- collider, such as the ILC or CLIC, would allow the Higgs sector to be probed with a precision significantly beyond that achievable at the High-Luminosity LHC. A central part of the Higgs programme at an e+e- collider is the model-independent determination of the absolute Higgs couplings to fermions and to gauge bosons. Here the measurement of the e+e-->HZ Higgsstrahlung cross section, using the recoil mass technique, sets the absolute scale for all Higgs coupling measurements. Previous studies have considered e+e- ->ZH with Z->l+l-, where l = electron or muon. In this paper it is shown for the first time that a near model-independent recoil mass technique can be extended to the hadronic decays of the Z boson. Because the branching ratio for Z->qq is approximately ten times greater than for Z->l+l-, this method is statistically more powerful than using the leptonic decays. For an integrated luminosity of 500 fb-1 at a centre-of-mass energy of 350 GeV at CLIC, the e+e-->HZ cross section can be mea...

  16. Top Quark Pair Production in Association with a Jet with NLO QCD Off-Shell Effects at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevilacqua, G; Kraus, M; Worek, M

    2015-01-01

    We present a complete description of top quark pair production in association with a jet in the dilepton channel. Our calculation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD (NLO) and includes all non-resonant diagrams, interferences and off-shell effects of the top quark. Moreover, non-resonant and off-shell effects due to the finite W gauge boson width are taken into account. This calculation constitutes the first fully realistic NLO computation for top quark pair production with a final state jet in hadronic collisions. Numerical results for differential distributions as well as total cross sections are presented for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at 8 TeV. With our inclusive cuts, NLO predictions reduce the unphysical scale dependence by more than a factor of 3 and lower the total rate by about 13% compared to leading order QCD (LO) predictions. In addition, the size of the top quark off-shell effects is estimated to be below 2%.

  17. Detection of D^0 mesons via hadronic decays in Pb-Pb collisions at LHC with ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Dainese

    2004-01-29

    The ALICE experiment is devoted to the study of heavy-ion collisions at the CERN LHC collider. We present the results of a feasibility study for the detection of D^0 \\to K^-\\pi^+ decays in Pb-Pb collisions with ALICE.

  18. Re-Engineering Control Systems using Automatic Generation Tools and Process Simulation: the LHC Water Cooling Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booth, W; Bradu, B; Gomez Palacin, L; Quilichini, M; Willeman, D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the approach used at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) to perform the re-engineering of the control systems dedicated to the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) water cooling systems.

  19. Production of b-quark jets at the large Hadron Collider in the parton-reggeization approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleev, V. A. Shipilova, A. V.

    2013-11-15

    The inclusive hadroproduction of b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets at the Large Hadron Collider is considered by using the hypothesis of gluon Reggeization in t-channel exchanges at high energies. Experimental data obtained by the ATLAS Collaboration are described well within all of the presented kinematical regions for single b-quark jets and bb-bar-quark dijets without resort to any free parameters.

  20. Superconducting Magnet with the Reduced Barrel Yoke for the Hadron Future Circular Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klyukhin, V I; Berriaud, C; Curé, B; Dudarev, A; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mentink, M; Rolando, G; Da Silva, H F Pais; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2015-01-01

    The conceptual design study of a hadron Future Circular Collider (FCC-hh) with a center-of-mass energy of the order of 100 TeV in a new tunnel of 80-100 km circumference assumes the determination of the basic requirements for its detectors. A superconducting solenoid magnet of 12 m diameter inner bore with the central magnetic flux density of 6 T is proposed for a FCC-hh experimental setup. The coil of 24.518 m long has seven 3.5 m long modules included into one cryostat. The steel yoke with a mass of 21 kt consists of two barrel layers of 0.5 m radial thickness, and 0.7 m thick nose disk, four 0.6 m thick end-cap disks, and three 0.8 m thick muon toroid disks each side. The outer diameter of the yoke is 17.7 m; the length without the forward muon toroids is 33 m. The air gaps between the end-cap disks provide the installation of the muon chambers up to the pseudorapidity of \\pm 3.5. The conventional forward muon spectrometer provides the measuring of the muon momenta in the pseudorapidity region from \\pm 2.7...

  1. Single and double photonuclear excitations in Pb+Pb collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djuvsland, Oystein; Nystrand, Joakim

    2011-04-15

    Cross sections are calculated for single and double photon exchange in ultraperipheral Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The particle production is simulated with the DPMJET event generator. Large cross sections are found for particle production around midrapidity, making these processes an important background to hadronic nuclear interactions at both the trigger and analysis levels.

  2. Searches for additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinya Kanemura; Hiroshi Yokoya; Ya-Juan Zheng

    2015-05-05

    We study direct searches of additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC Run-II, its luminosity upgraded version with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, and the International Linear Collider (ILC) with the collision energy of 1 TeV. Additional Higgs bosons are predicted in all kinds of extended Higgs sectors, and their detection at collider experiments is a clear signature of the physics beyond the standard model. We consider two Higgs doublet models with the discrete symmetry as benchmark models. If these additional Higgs bosons are heavy enough, the decay modes including top quarks can be dominant, and the searches in multi-top-quarks events become an important probe of the Higgs sector. We evaluate the discovery reach in the parameter space of the model, and find that there are parameter regions where the searches at the LHC with 3000 fb$^{-1}$ cannot survey, but the searches at the ILC 1 TeV run can. The combination of direct searches at the LHC and the ILC is useful to explore extended Higgs sectors.

  3. Searches for additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanemura, Shinya; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2015-01-01

    We study direct searches of additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC Run-II, its luminosity upgraded version with 3000 fb$^{-1}$, and the International Linear Collider (ILC) with the collision energy of 1 TeV. Additional Higgs bosons are predicted in all kinds of extended Higgs sectors, and their detection at collider experiments is a clear signature of the physics beyond the standard model. We consider two Higgs doublet models with the discrete symmetry as benchmark models. If these additional Higgs bosons are heavy enough, the decay modes including top quarks can be dominant, and the searches in multi-top-quarks events become an important probe of the Higgs sector. We evaluate the discovery reach in the parameter space of the model, and find that there are parameter regions where the searches at the LHC with 3000 fb$^{-1}$ cannot survey, but the searches at the ILC 1 TeV run can. The combination of direct searches at the LHC and the ILC is useful to explore extended Higgs sectors.

  4. Effects of QCD radiation on inclusive variables for determining the scale of new physics at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Papaefstathiou; Bryan Webber

    2009-07-10

    We examine the effects of QCD initial-state radiation on a class of quantities, designed to probe the mass scale of new physics at hadron colliders, which involve longitudinal as well as transverse final-state momenta. In particular, we derive universal functions that relate the invariant mass and energy distribution of the visible part of the final state to that of the underlying hard subprocess. Knowledge of this relationship may assist in checking hypotheses about new processes, by providing additional information about their scales. We compare our results with those of Monte Carlo studies and find good general agreement.

  5. Identifying Charged Hadrons on the Relativistic Rise Using the ALICE TPC at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gros, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The chain from hadron collisions to the physics results requires several important links. First the outcome of the collision is measured by the detectors. Then, the signal from the detector is processed and transformed into information relevant for the study of the physics processes. The data is made available to physicists to be analysed and used to improve theories. This thesis presents work done on no most of these steps for the ALICE experiment at LHC. First a study of the main processes in the TPC detector for ALICE was done using simulation and test beam data. The results are shown in paper I. The study was deepened with the analysis of test beam data from a TPC prototype for the ILC, as shown in paper III. Concurrently, a study on the Grid – computing framework for distributed computing and storage resources – was performed. This involved the development of an interface module between the ALICE software AliEn and the ARC software developped in the Nordic countries. This work is presented in paper I...

  6. Large Hadron Collider probe of supersymmetric neutrinoless double beta decay mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; C. H. Kom; H. Päs

    2009-02-26

    In the minimal supersymmetric extension to the Standard Model, a non-zero lepton number violating coupling lambda'_111 predicts both neutrinoless double beta decay and resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We show that, in this case, if neutrinoless double beta decay is discovered in the next generation of experiments, there exist good prospects to observe single slepton production at the LHC. Neutrinoless double beta decay could otherwise result from a different source (such as a non-zero Majorana neutrino mass). Resonant single slepton production at the LHC can therefore discriminate between the lambda'_111 neutrinoless double beta decay mechanism and others.

  7. Large Hadron Collider Probe of Supersymmetric Neutrinoless Double-Beta-Decay Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Paes, H. [DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Cavendish Laboratory, J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Fakultaet fuer Physik, Technische Universitaet Dortmund, D-44221, Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-08-28

    In the minimal supersymmetric extension to the standard model, a nonzero lepton number violating coupling {lambda}{sub 111}{sup '} predicts both neutrinoless double-beta-decay and resonant single slepton production at the LHC. We show that, in this case, if neutrinoless double beta decay is discovered in the next generation of experiments, there exist good prospects to observe single slepton production at the LHC. Neutrinoless double beta decay could otherwise result from a different source (such as a nonzero Majorana neutrino mass). Resonant single slepton production at the LHC can therefore discriminate between the {lambda}{sub 111}{sup '} neutrinoless double-beta-decay mechanism and others.

  8. arXiv:hepph/9905551 Diphoton Background to Higgs Boson Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Carl

    arXiv:hep­ph/9905551 v2 27 Apr 2000 Diphoton Background to Higgs Boson Production at the LHC section of a light Higgs boson at the CERN Large Hadron Collider demand the accurate prediction--90526 I. INTRODUCTION The direct search for the Standard Model (SM) Higgs boson at the CERN LEP collider

  9. Search for Signatures of Extra Dimensions in the Diphoton Mass Spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    A search for signatures of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a ...

  10. Remote Operations for LHC and CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gottschalk, E.E.; /Fermilab

    2007-04-01

    Commissioning the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and its experiments will be a vital part of the worldwide high energy physics program beginning in 2007. A remote operations center has been built at Fermilab to contribute to commissioning and operations of the LHC and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and to develop new capabilities for real-time data analysis and monitoring for LHC, CMS, and grid computing. Remote operations will also be essential to a future International Linear Collider with its multiple, internationally distributed control rooms. In this paper we present an overview of Fermilab's LHC@FNAL remote operations center for LHC and CMS, describe what led up to the development of the center, and describe noteworthy features of the center.

  11. Searches for dark matter signals in simplified models at future hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian-Fei Xiang; Xiao-Jun Bi; Peng-Fei Yin; Zhao-Huan Yu

    2015-03-10

    We study the prospect of dark matter (DM) searches in the monojet channel at future $pp$ colliders with center-of-mass energies of 33, 50, and 100~TeV. We consider a class of simplified models in which a vector boson connecting DM particles to quarks is introduced. Comparing with studies in the effective field theory, the present framework gives more reasonable production rates and kinematics of the DM signatures. We estimate the sensitivities of future colliders with an integrated luminosity of 3 $ab^{-1}$ to the DM-induced monojet signature and show the parameter space that can be explored. The constraints from direct and indirect DM detection experiments are compared with the future collider sensitivities. We find that the future collider detection will be much more sensitive than the indirect detection for the vector interaction, and have better sensitivities than those of the direct detection by several orders of magnitude for the axial vector interaction.

  12. Time Machine at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Ya. Aref'eva; I. V. Volovich

    2007-10-25

    Recently, black hole and brane production at CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has been widely discussed. We suggest that there is a possibility to test causality at the LHC. We argue that if the scale of quantum gravity is of the order of few TeVs, proton-proton collisions at the LHC could lead to the formation of time machines (spacetime regions with closed timelike curves) which violate causality. One model for the time machine is a traversable wormhole. We argue that the traversable wormhole production cross section at the LHC is of the same order as the cross section for the black hole production. Traversable wormholes assume violation of the null energy condition (NEC) and an exotic matter similar to the dark energy is required. Decay of the wormholes/time machines and signatures of time machine events at the LHC are discussed.

  13. Klystron switching power supplies for the Internation Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fraioli, Andrea; /Cassino U. /INFN, Pisa

    2009-12-01

    The International Linear Collider is a majestic High Energy Physics particle accelerator that will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, by producing electron-positron collisions at center of mass energy of about 500 GeV. In particular, the subject of this dissertation is the R&D for a solid state Marx Modulator and relative switching power supply for the International Linear Collider Main LINAC Radio Frequency stations.

  14. Chemical and thermal freeze-out of identified hadrons at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiangrong Zhu; Huichao Song

    2015-09-11

    This proceeding briefly summarizes our recent VISHNU hybrid model investigations on the chemical and thermal freeze-out of various hadrons species in 2.76 A TeV Pb+Pb collisions. Detailed analysis on the evolution of particle yields and the last elastic collisions distributions during the hadronic evolution reveals that the two multi-strange hadrons, $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$, experience early chemical and thermal freeze-out when compared with other hadron species.

  15. Chemical and thermal freeze-out of identified hadrons at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Xiangrong

    2015-01-01

    This proceeding briefly summarizes our recent VISHNU hybrid model investigations on the chemical and thermal freeze-out of various hadrons species in 2.76 A TeV Pb+Pb collisions. Detailed analysis on the evolution of particle yields and the last elastic collisions distributions during the hadronic evolution reveals that the two multi-strange hadrons, $\\Xi$ and $\\Omega$, experience early chemical and thermal freeze-out when compared with other hadron species.

  16. Electroweak symmetry breaking by strong dynamics and the collider phenomenology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy L. Barklow et al.

    2002-12-23

    We discuss the possible signatures in the electroweak symmetry breaking sector by new strong dynamics at future hadron colliders such as the Tevatron upgrade, the LHC and VLHC, and e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders. Examples include a heavy Higgs-like scalar resonance, a heavy Technicolor-like vector resonance and pseudo-Goldstone states, non-resonance signatures via enhanced gauge-boson scattering and fermion compositeness.

  17. Single and Double Photonuclear Excitations in Pb+Pb Collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 2.76 TeV at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oystein Djuvsland; Joakim Nystrand

    2011-04-19

    Cross sections are calculated for single and double photon exchange in ultraperipheral Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC. The particle production is simulated with the DPMJET event generator. Large cross sections are found for particle production around mid-rapidity making these processes an important background to hadronic nuclear interactions at both the trigger and analysis levels.

  18. Charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Taesoo; Cabrera, Daniel; Cassing, Wolfgang; Bratkovskaya, Elena

    2015-01-01

    We study charm production in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=$2.76 TeV in the Parton-Hadron-String-Dynamics transport approach and the charm dynamics in the partonic and hadronic medium. The charm quarks are produced through initial binary nucleon-nucleon collisions by using the PYTHIA event generator taking into account the (anti-)shadowing incorporated in the EPS09 package. The produced charm quarks interact with off-shell massive partons in the quark-gluon plasma and are hadronized into $D$ mesons through coalescence or fragmentation close to the critical energy density, and then interact with hadrons in the final hadronic stage with scattering cross sections calculated in an effective Lagrangian approach with heavy-quark spin symmetry. The PHSD results show a reasonable $R_{\\rm AA}$ and elliptic flow of $D$ mesons in comparison to the experimental data for Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV from the ALICE Collaboration. We also study the effect of temperature-dependent off-shell charm q...

  19. Les Houches Guidebook to Monte Carlo Generators for Hadron Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Dobbs; S. Frixione; E. Laenen; K. Tollefson; H. Baer; E. Boos; B. Cox; R. Engel; W. Giele; J. Huston; S. Ilyin; B. Kersevan; F. Krauss; Y. Kurihara; L. Lonnblad; F. Maltoni; M. Mangano; S. Odaka; P. Richardson; A. Ryd; T. Sjostrand; P. Skands; Z. Was; B. R. Webber; D. Zeppenfeld

    2004-03-05

    Recently the collider physics community has seen significant advances in the formalisms and implementations of event generators. This review is a primer of the methods commonly used for the simulation of high energy physics events at particle colliders. We provide brief descriptions, references, and links to the specific computer codes which implement the methods. The aim is to provide an overview of the available tools, allowing the reader to ascertain which tool is best for a particular application, but also making clear the limitations of each tool.

  20. Prompt photon production and photon-hadron correlations at RHIC and the LHC from the Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamal Jalilian-Marian; Amir H. Rezaeian

    2012-07-16

    We investigate inclusive prompt photon and semi-inclusive prompt photon-hadron production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions using the Color Glass Condensate (CGC) formalism which incorporates non-linear dynamics of gluon saturation at small x via Balitsky-Kovchegov equation with running coupling. For inclusive prompt photon production, we rewrite the cross-section in terms of direct and fragmentation contributions and show that the direct photon (and isolated prompt photon) production is more sensitive to gluon saturation effects. We then analyze azimuthal correlations in photon-hadron production in high energy proton-nucleus collisions and obtain a strong suppression of the away-side peak in photon-hadron correlations at forward rapidities, similar to the observed mono-jet production in deuteron-gold collisions at forward rapidity at RHIC. We make predictions for the nuclear modification factor R_{p(d)A} and photon-hadron azimuthal correlations in proton(deuteron)-nucleus collisions at RHIC and the LHC at various rapidities.

  1. First Observation of Vector Boson Pairs in a Hadronic Final State at the Tevatron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We present the first observation in hadronic collisions of the electroweak production of vector boson pairs (VV, V=W, Z) where one boson decays to a dijet final state. The data correspond to 3.5??fb[superscript -1] of ...

  2. Scaling properties of inclusive W$^\\pm$ production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arleo, François; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    We consider the hadroproduction of W gauge bosons in their leptonic decay mode. Starting from the leading-order expressions, we show that by defining a suitable scaling variable the center-of-mass dependence of the cross sections at the LHC energies can be essentially described by a simple power law. The scaling exponent is directly linked to the small-$x$ behaviour of quark distributions which, at the high virtualities involved in W production, is largely dictated by QCD parton evolution. This entails a particularly simple scaling law for the lepton charge asymmetry and also predicts that measurements in different collision systems (p-p, p-$\\overline{\\rm p}$, p-Pb Pb-Pb) are straightforwardly related. The expectations are compared with the existing data and a very good overall agreement is observed. A precision observable that can be measured at the LHC is proposed.

  3. Scaling properties of inclusive W$^\\pm$ production at hadron colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Arleo; Émilien Chapon; Hannu Paukkunen

    2015-09-14

    We consider the hadroproduction of W gauge bosons in their leptonic decay mode. Starting from the leading-order expressions, we show that by defining a suitable scaling variable the center-of-mass dependence of the cross sections at the LHC energies can be essentially described by a simple power law. The scaling exponent is directly linked to the small-$x$ behaviour of quark distributions which, at the high virtualities involved in W production, is largely dictated by QCD parton evolution. This entails a particularly simple scaling law for the lepton charge asymmetry and also predicts that measurements in different collision systems (p-p, p-$\\overline{\\rm p}$, p-Pb Pb-Pb) are straightforwardly related. The expectations are compared with the existing data and a very good overall agreement is observed. A precision observable that can be measured at the LHC is proposed.

  4. Light vector meson photoproduction in hadron-hadron and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the energies available at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Sampaio dos Santos; M. V. T. Machado

    2015-01-30

    In this work we analyse the theoretical uncertainties on the predictions for the photoproduction of light vector mesons in coherent pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC energies using the color dipole approach. In particular, we present our predictions for the rapidity distribution for rh0 and phi photoproduction and perform an analysis on the uncertainties associated to the choice of vector meson wavefunctionand the phenomenological models for the dipole cross section. Comparison is done with the recent ALICE analysis on coherent production of rho at 2.76 TeV in PbPb collisions.

  5. Selected experimental results from heavy-ion collisions at LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Singh, Ranbir; Kumar, Lokesh; Netrakanti, Pawan Kumar; Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2013-01-01

    We review a subset of experimental results from the heavy-ion collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) facility at CERN. Excellent consistency is observed across all the experiments at the LHC (at center of mass energysNN=2.76 TeV) for the measurements such as charged particle multiplicity density, azimuthal anisotropy coefficients, and nuclear modification factor of charged hadrons. Comparison to similar measurements from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at lower energy (sNN=200 GeV) suggests that the system formed at LHC has a higher energy density and larger system size and lives for a longer time. These measurements aremore »compared to model calculations to obtain physical insights on the properties of matter created at the RHIC and LHC.« less

  6. Strange prospects for LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Hippolyte

    2006-08-31

    Strange quark and hadron production will be studied at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energies in order to explore the properties of both pp and heavy-ion collisions. The ALICE experiment will be specifically efficient in the strange sector with the identification of baryons and mesons over a wide range of transverse momentum. Dedicated measurements are proposed for investigating chemical equilibration and bulk properties. Strange particles can also help to probe kinematical regions where hard processes and pQCD dominate. We try to anticipate here several ALICE analyses to be performed as the first Pb--Pb and pp data will be available.

  7. Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Abreu; S. V. Akkelin; J. Alam; J. L. Albacete; A. Andronic; D. Antonov; F. Arleo; N. Armesto; I. C. Arsene; G. G. Barnafoldi; J. Barrette; B. Bauchle; F. Becattini; B. Betz; M. Bleicher; M. Bluhm; D. Boer; F. W. Bopp; P. Braun-Munzinger; L. Bravina; W. Busza; M. Cacciari; A. Capella; J. Casalderrey-Solana; R. Chatterjee; L. -W. Chen; J. Cleymans; B. A. Cole; Z. Conesa Del Valle; L. P. Csernai; L. Cunqueiro; A. Dainese; J. Dias de Deus H. -T. Ding; M. Djordjevic; H. Drescher; I. M. Dremin A. Dumitru; A. El; R. Engel; D. d'Enterria; K. J. Eskola; G. Fai; E. G. Ferreiro; R. J. Fries; E. Frodermann; H. Fujii; C. Gale; F. Gelis; V. P. Goncalves; V. Greco; C. Greiner; M. Gyulassy; H. van Hees; U. Heinz; H. Honkanen; W. A. Horowitz; E. Iancu; G. Ingelman; J. Jalilian-Marian; S. Jeon; A. B. Kaidalov; B. Kampfer; Z. -B. Kang; Iu. A. Karpenko; G. Kestin; D. Kharzeev; C. M. Ko; B. Koch; B. Kopeliovich; M. Kozlov; I. Kraus; I. Kuznetsova; S. H. Lee; R. Lednicky; J. Letessier; E. Levin; B. -A. Li; Z. -W. Lin; H. Liu; W. Liu; C. Loizides; I. P. Lokhtin; M. V. T. Machado; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Managadze; M. L. Mangano; M. Mannarelli; C. Manuel; G. Martinez; J. G. Milhano; A. Mocsy; D. Molnar; M. Nardi; J. K. Nayak; H. Niemi; H. Oeschler; J. -Y. Ollitrault; G. Paic; C. Pajares; V. S. Pantuev; G. Papp; D. Peressounko; P. Petreczky; S. V. Petrushanko; F. Piccinini; T. Pierog; H. J. Pirner; S. Porteboeuf; I. Potashnikova; G. Y. Qin; J. -W. Qiu; J. Rafelski; K. Rajagopal; J. Ranft; R. Rapp; S. S. Rasanen; J. Rathsman; P. Rau; K. Redlich; T. Renk; A. H. Rezaeian; D. Rischke; S. Roesler; J. Ruppert; P. V. Ruuskanen; C. A. Salgado; S. Sapeta; I. Sarcevic; S. Sarkar; L. I. Sarycheva; I. Schmidt; A. I. Shoshi; B. Sinha; Yu. M. Sinyukov; A. M. Snigirev; D. K. Srivastava; J. Stachel; A. Stasto; H. Stocker; C. Yu. Teplov; R. L. Thews; G. Torrieri; V. Topor Pop; D. N. Triantafyllopoulos; K. L. Tuchin; S. Turbide; K. Tywoniuk; A. Utermann; R. Venugopalan; I. Vitev; R. Vogt; E. Wang; X. N. Wang; K. Werner; E. Wessels; S. Wheaton; S. Wicks; U. A. Wiedemann; G. Wolschin; B. -W. Xiao; Z. Xu; S. Yasui; E. Zabrodin; K. Zapp; B. Zhang; B. -W. Zhang; H. Zhang; D. Zhou

    2007-11-06

    This writeup is a compilation of the predictions for the forthcoming Heavy Ion Program at the Large Hadron Collider, as presented at the CERN Theory Institute 'Heavy Ion Collisions at the LHC - Last Call for Predictions', held from May 14th to June 10th 2007.

  8. CERN and LHC - their place in global science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the largest scientific instrument in the world. It brings into collision intense beams of protons and ions to explore the structure of matter and investigate the forces of nature at an unprecedented energy scale, thus serving a community of some 7,000 particle physicists from all over the world.

  9. Charged Higgs boson in the $W^\\pm$ Higgs channel at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rikard Enberg; William Klemm; Stefano Moretti; Shoaib Munir; Glenn Wouda

    2015-02-14

    In light of the recent discovery of a neutral Higgs boson, $H_{\\rm obs}$, with a mass near 125 GeV, we reassess the LHC discovery potential of a charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, in the $W^\\pm H_{\\rm obs}$ decay channel. This decay channel can be particularly important for a $H^\\pm$ heavier than the top quark, when it is produced through the $pp \\rightarrow tH^\\pm$ process. The knowledge of the mass of $H_{\\rm obs}$ provides an additional handle in the kinematic selection when reconstructing a Breit-Wigner resonance in the $H_{\\rm obs} \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}$ decay channel. We consider some extensions of the Standard Model Higgs sector, with and without supersymmetry, and perform a dedicated signal-to-background analysis to test the scope of this channel for the LHC running at the design energy (14 TeV), for 300/fb (standard) and 3000/fb (high) integrated luminosities. We find that, while this channel does not show much promise for a supersymmetric $H^\\pm$ state, significant portions of the parameter spaces of several two-Higgs doublet models are testable.

  10. Lepton number violating processes mediated by Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Lu Zhun; Schmidt, Ivan [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Tecnica Federico, Santa Maria, Casilla 110-V, Valparaiso (Chile) and Center of Subatomic Physics, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2009-10-01

    We study the lepton number violating like-sign dilepton processes h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}jjX and h{sub 1}h{sub 2}{yields}l{sup {+-}}l{sup '{+-}}W{sup {+-}}X, mediated by heavy GeV scale Majorana neutrinos. We focus on the resonantly enhanced contributions with a nearly on-mass-shell Majorana neutrino in the s channel. We study the constraints on like-sign dilepton production at the Tevatron and the LHC on the basis of the existing experimental limits on the masses of heavy neutrinos and their mixings U{sub {alpha}}{sub N} with {alpha}={nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}}, {nu}{sub {tau}}. Special attention is paid to the constraints from neutrinoless double beta decay. We note that searches for like-sign e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}} events at Tevatron and LHC may provide evidence of CP violation in the neutrino sector. We also discuss the conditions under which it is possible to extract individual constraints on the mixing matrix elements in a model independent way.

  11. Pair Production of Heavy Quarkonium and $B_c(^*)$ Mesons at Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rong Li; Yu-Jie Zhang; Kuang-Ta Chao

    2009-03-12

    We investigate the pair production of S-wave heavy quarkonium at the LHC in the color-singlet mechanism (CSM) and estimate the contribution from the gluon fragmentation process in the color-octet mechanism (COM) for comparison. With the matrix elements extracted previously in the leading order calculations, the numerical results show that the production rates are quite large for the pair production processes at the LHC. The $p_t$ distribution of double $J/\\psi$ production in the CSM is dominant over that in the COM when $p_t$ is smaller than about 8GeV. For the production of double $\\Upsilon$, the contribution of the COM is always larger than that in the CSM. The large differences in the theoretical predictions between the CSM and COM for the $p_t$ distributions in the large $p_t$ region are useful in clarifying the effects of COM on the quarkonium production. We also investigate the pair production of S-wave $B_c$ and $B_c^*$ mesons, and the measurement of these processes is useful to test the CSM and extract the LDMEs for the $B_c$ and $B_c^*$ mesons.

  12. Hadronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Webber

    1994-11-30

    Hadronization corrections to the predictions of perturbative QCD are reviewed. The existing models for the conversion of quarks and gluons into hadrons are summarized. The most successful models give a good description of the data on $e^+e^-$ event shapes and jet fragmentation functions, and suggest that the dominant hadronization effects have a $1/Q$ dependence on the hard process energy scale $Q$. In several cases the $1/Q$ terms can be understood in terms of a simple longitudinal phase-space model. They can also be inferred by relating non-perturbative renormalon effects to the infrared cutoff dependence of perturbative contributions.

  13. The Potential of the Linac-Ring Type Colliders for Particle and Nuclear Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Ciftci; E. Recepoglu; S. Sultansoy; O. Yavas; M. Yilmaz

    2003-10-02

    Linac-ring type colliders will open new windows for both energy frontier and particle factories. Concerning the first direction, these machines seem to be a sole way to TeV scale in lepton-hadron collisison at constituent level. An essential advantage of the linac-ring type lepton-hadron colliders is the possibility of the construction of gamma-p, gamma-A and FELgamma-A colliders based on them. Today, eRHIC, THERA (TESLA on HERA)and Linac*LHC can be considered as realistic candidates for future lepton-hadron and photon hadron colliders. When it comes to factories, one can reach essentially higher luminosities comparing to standard ring-ring type machines. For example, L=10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 can be achieved for phi and charm-tau factories. In this presentation we briefly discuss the parameters and physics search potential of the linac-ring type machines.

  14. Exploring top quark FCNC at hadron colliders in association with flavor physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, C S; Yuan, Xing-Bo

    2015-01-01

    The top quark flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) process is an excellent probe to search for new physics in top sector since the Standard Model expectation is extremely suppressed. We explore Higgs-mediated top quark FCNC, focusing on H-t-c Yukawa coupling \\lambda_{ct} within the general two Higgs doublet model. After electroweak symmetry breaking the top quark FCNC couplings are included in the charged Higgs Yukawa sector so that they contribute to various processes in flavor physics. To probe \\lambda_{ct}, we study anomalous single top production and the same sign top pair production at the LHC in association with flavor physics from the tree-level processes B \\to D^{(*)} \\tau \

  15. Distinguishing Spins in Supersymmetric and Universal Extra Dimension Models at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jennifer M. Smillie; Bryan R. Webber

    2007-02-21

    An interesting alternative to supersymmetry (SUSY) for extending physics beyond the Standard Model is a model with universal extra dimensions (UED), in which the SUSY superpartners are replaced by Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model particles. If new particles are discovered at the LHC, even if their mass spectrum favours SUSY or UED, it will be vital to distinguish between their spin assignments in the two models as far as possible. We extend the method proposed by Barr [hep-ph/0405052] to the UED case and investigate the angular and charge asymmetries of decay distributions for sample mass spectra of both SUSY and UED types. For hierarchical (`SUSY-type') mass spectra there is a good chance of distinguishing the spin structures of the two models. However, a mass spectrum of the quasi-degenerate type expected in UED would make it difficult to observe spin correlations.

  16. Neural Networks Search for Charged Higgs Boson of Two Doublet Higgs Model at the Hadrons Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakhet, Nady; Hussein, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present an analysis of a search for charged Higgs boson in the context of Two Doublet Higgs Model (2HDM) which is an extension of the Standard Model of particles physics. The 2HDM predicts by existence scalar sector with new five Higgs bosons, two of them are electrically charged and the other three Higgs bosons are neutral charged. Our analysis based on the Monte Carlo data produced from the simulation of 2HDM with proton antiproton collisions at the Tevatron $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV (Fermi Lab) and proton proton collisions at the LHC $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV (CERN) with final state includes electron , muon , multiple jets and missing transverse energy via the production and decay of the new Higgs in the hard process $pp(\\bar{p})\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}\\rightarrow H^{+}b H^{-}\\bar{b}$

  17. Neural Networks Search for Charged Higgs Boson of Two Doublet Higgs Model at the Hadrons Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nady Bakhet; Maxim Yu. Khlopov; Tarek Hussein

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we present an analysis of a search for charged Higgs boson in the context of Two Doublet Higgs Model (2HDM) which is an extension of the Standard Model of particles physics. The 2HDM predicts by existence scalar sector with new five Higgs bosons, two of them are electrically charged and the other three Higgs bosons are neutral charged. Our analysis based on the Monte Carlo data produced from the simulation of 2HDM with proton antiproton collisions at the Tevatron $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV (Fermi Lab) and proton proton collisions at the LHC $\\sqrt{s}=14$ TeV (CERN) with final state includes electron , muon , multiple jets and missing transverse energy via the production and decay of the new Higgs in the hard process $pp(\\bar{p})\\rightarrow t\\bar{t}\\rightarrow H^{+}b H^{-}\\bar{b}$

  18. Energy range of hadronic calorimeter towers and cells for high-pT jets at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov; J. Dull

    2015-12-28

    This paper discusses a study of tower and cell energy ranges of a hadronic calorimeter for a 100 TeV pp collider. The dynamic energy ranges were estimated using Standard Model jets with transverse momenta above 20 TeV. The simulations were performed using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo model after a fast detector simulation tuned to the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. We estimate the maximum energy range of towers and cells as a function of lateral cell sizes for several extreme cases of jet transverse energy.

  19. Energy range of hadronic calorimeter towers and cells for high-pT jets at a 100 TeV collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Chekanov; J. Dull

    2015-11-04

    This paper discusses a study of tower and cell energy ranges of a hadronic calorimeter for a 100 TeV pp collider. The dynamic energy ranges were estimated using Standard Model jets with transverse momenta above 20 TeV. The simulations were performed using the PYTHIA Monte Carlo model after a fast detector simulation tuned to the ATLAS hadronic calorimeter. We estimate the maximum energy range of towers and cells as a function of lateral cell sizes for several extreme cases of jet transverse energy.

  20. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2015-07-27

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density $\\rho_{\\mu} > 5.9~$m$^{-2}$. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplicities, their simulations failed to describe the frequency of the highest multiplicity events. In this work we show that the high multiplicity events observed in ALICE stem from primary cosmic rays with energies above $10^{16}$ eV and that the frequency of these events can be successfully described by assuming a heavy mass composition of primary cosmic rays in this energy range. The development of the resulting air showers was simulated using the latest version of QGSJET to model hadronic interactions. This observation places significant constraints on alternative, more exotic, production mechanisms for these events.

  1. Tevatron Collider Program - Physics, Results, Future?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzysztof Sliwa

    2012-01-03

    An overview of more than 25 years of the Tevatron Collider program at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, near Chicago, Illinois, USA, is presented. The physics goals of the program itself, the Tevatron accelerator design characteristics and some of its achievements are described. A selected set of the past and ongoing physics analyses and measurements performed by CDF and D0 collaborations are summarized. Also, in view of the modified plans and schedule of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the future of the Tevatron program is discussed.

  2. Crystal Ball: On the Future High Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiltsev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    High energy particle colliders have been in the forefront of particle physics for more than three decades. At present the near term US, European and international strategies of the particle physics community are centered on full exploitation of the physics potential of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) through its high-luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC). A number of next generation collider facilities have been proposed and are currently under consideration for the medium- and far-future of the accelerator-based high energy physics. In this paper we offer a uniform approach to evaluation of various accelerators based on the feasibility of their energy reach, performance reach and cost range. We briefly review such post-LHC options as linear e+e- colliders in Japan (ILC) or at CERN (CLIC), muon collider, and circular lepton or hadron colliders in China (CepC/SppC) and Europe (FCC). We conclude with a look into ultimate energy reach accelerators based on plasmas and crystals, and some perspectives for the far future of ...

  3. Search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton mass spectrum at the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Khachatryan, Vardan; Sirunyan, Albert M.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; /Yerevan Phys. Inst. /Vienna, OAW /Minsk, High Energy Phys. Ctr. /Antwerp U., WISINF /Vrije U., Brussels /Brussels U. /Gent U. /Louvain U. /UMH, Mons /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U.

    2011-12-01

    A search for signatures of extra dimensions in the diphoton invariant-mass spectrum has been performed with the CMS detector at the LHC. No excess of events above the standard model expectation is observed using a data sample collected in proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.2 fb{sup -1}. In the context of the large-extra-dimensions model, lower limits are set on the effective Planck scale in the range of 2.3-3.8 TeV at the 95% confidence level. These limits are the most restrictive bounds on virtual-graviton exchange to date. The most restrictive lower limits to date are also set on the mass of the first graviton excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model in the range of 0.86-1.84 TeV, for values of the associated coupling parameter between 0.01 and 0.10.

  4. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Backhaus, Malte; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Run-2 of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. Therefore the ATLAS experiment has constructed the first 4-layer Pixel detector in HEP, installing a new Pixel layer, also called Insertable B-Layer (IBL). IBL is a fourth layer of pixel detectors, and has been installed in May 2014 at a radius of 3.3 cm between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe. To cope with the high radiation and pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed as well as a new read-out chip within CMOS 130nm technology and with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. The new detector is the first large scale application of of 3D detectors and CMOS 130nm technology. An overview of the lessons learned during the IBL project will be presented, focusing on the challenges and highlighting the issues met during the productio...

  5. The upgraded Pixel Detector of the ATLAS Experiment for Run2 at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mullier, Geoffrey Andre; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Pixel Detector of the ATLAS experiment has shown excellent performance during the whole Run-1 of LHC. Taking advantage of the long showdown, the detector was extracted from the experiment and brought to surface, to equip it with new service quarter panels, to repair modules and to ease installation of the Insertable B-Layer (IBL), a fourth layer of pixel detectors, installed in May 2014 between the existing Pixel Detector and a new smaller radius beam-pipe at a radius of 3.3 cm. To cope with the high radiation and increased pixel occupancy due to the proximity to the interaction point, two different silicon sensor technologies (planar and 3D) have been developed. A new readout chip has been developed within CMOS 130nm technology with larger area, smaller pixel size and faster readout capability. Dedicated design features in combination with a new composite material were considered and used in order to reduce the material budget of the support structure while keeping the optimal thermo-mechanical performan...

  6. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guaglio, Gianluca; Santoni, C

    2005-01-01

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data...

  7. Reliability of Beam Loss Monitor Systems for the Large Hadron Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guaglio, G.; Dehning, B.; Santoni, C.

    2005-06-08

    The increase of beam energy and beam intensity, together with the use of super conducting magnets, opens new failure scenarios and brings new criticalities for the whole accelerator protection system. For the LHC beam loss protection system, the failure rate and the availability requirements have been evaluated using the Safety Integrity Level (SIL) approach. A downtime cost evaluation is used as input for the SIL approach. The most critical systems, which contribute to the final SIL value, are the dump system, the interlock system, the beam loss monitors system, and the energy monitor system. The Beam Loss Monitors System (BLMS) is critical for short and intense particles losses at 7 TeV and assisted by the Fast Beam Current Decay Monitors at 450 GeV. At medium and higher loss time it is assisted by other systems, such as the quench protection system and the cryogenic system. For BLMS, hardware and software have been evaluated in detail. The reliability input figures have been collected using historical data from the SPS, using temperature and radiation damage experimental data as well as using standard databases. All the data has been processed by reliability software (Isograph). The analysis spaces from the components data to the system configuration.

  8. The Working Group M5 on Lepton-Hadron Colliders Conveners: Ilan Ben-Zvi and Georg H. Hoffstaetter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    ........................................................................... 28 3. eRHIC, Electron-Hadron Collisions with RHIC

  9. Irradiation Tests and Expected Performance of Readout Electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter for the HL-LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Nagel

    2013-09-03

    The readout electronics of the ATLAS Hadronic Endcap Calorimeter (HEC) will have to withstand an about 3-5 times larger radiation environment at the future high-luminosity LHC (HLLHC) compared to their design values. The preamplifier and summing boards (PSBs), which are equipped with GaAs ASICs and comprise the heart of the readout electronics, were irradiated with neutrons and protons with fluences surpassing several times ten years of operation of the HL-LHC. Neutron tests were performed at the NPI in Rez, Czech Republic, where a 36 MeV proton beam was directed on a thick heavy water target to produce neutrons. The proton irradiation was done with 200 MeV protons at the PROSCAN area of the Proton Irradiation Facility at the PSI in Villigen, Switzerland. In-situ measurements of S-parameters in both tests allow the evaluation of frequency dependent performance parameters, like gain and input impedance, as a function of fluence. The linearity of the ASIC response was measured directly in the neutron tests with a triangular input pulse of varying amplitude. The results obtained allow an estimation of the expected performance degradation of the HEC. For a possible replacement of the PSB chips, alternative technologies were investigated and exposed to similar neutron radiation levels. In particular, IHP 250 nm Si CMOS technology has turned out to show good performance and match the specifications required. The performance measurements of the current PSB devices, the expected performance degradations under HL-LHC conditions, and results from alternative technologies will be presented.

  10. Radiative return capabilities of a high-energy, high-luminositye+e-collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Karliner, Marek; Low, Matthew; Rosner, Jonathan L.; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-08-14

    An electron-positron collider operating at a center-of-mass energy ECM can collect events at all lower energies through initial-state radiation (ISR or radiative return). We explore the capabilities for radiative return studies by a proposed high-luminosity collider at ECM = 250 or 90 GeV, to fill in gaps left by lower-energy colliders such as PEP, PETRA, TRISTAN, and LEP. These capabilities are compared with those of the lower-energy e+e- colliders as well as hadron colliders such as the Tevatron and the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some examples of accessible questions in dark photon searches and heavy flavor spectroscopy are given.

  11. The ATLAS Experiment: Getting Ready for the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenni, Peter (CERN) [CERN

    2006-05-15

    At CERN the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project is well advanced. First proton-proton collisions at the high-energy frontier are expected for the second half of 2007. In parallel to the collider construction the powerful general-purpose ATLAS detector is being assembled in its underground cavern by a world-wide collaboration. ATLAS will explore new domains of particle physics. After briefly overviewing the LHC construction and installation progress, the status of the ATLAS experiment will be presented, including examples of the exciting prospects for new physics.

  12. Electron lenses for particle collimation in LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, v.; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    Electron Lenses built and installed in Tevatron have proven themselves as safe and very reliable instruments which can be effectively used in hadron collider operation for a number of applications, including compensation of beam-beam effects [1], DC beam removal from abort gaps [2], as a diagnostic tool. In this presentation we - following original proposal [3] - consider in more detail a possibility of using electron lenses with hollow electron beam for ion and proton collimation in LHC.

  13. Present status and future prospects for a Higgs boson discovery at the Tevatron and LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard E. Haber

    2010-11-04

    Discovering the Higgs boson is one of the primary goals of both the Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The present status of the Higgs search is reviewed and future prospects for discovery at the Tevatron and LHC are considered. This talk focuses primarily on the Higgs boson of the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension. Theoretical expectations for the Higgs boson and its phenomenological consequences are reviewed.

  14. Cryogenic Test of Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity for the LHC High Luminosity Upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, B; Belomestnykh, S; Ben-Zvi, I; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, C; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, L; Li, Z; Marques, C; Skaritka, J; Verdú-Andres, S; Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    A Proof-of-Principle (PoP) Double Quarter Wave Crab Cavity (DQWCC) was designed and fabricated for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. A vertical cryogenic test has been done at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL). The cavity achieved 4.5 MV deflecting voltage with a quality factor above 3×109 . We report the test results of this design.

  15. Collider signature of T-quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carena, Marcela; Hubisz, Jay; /Fermilab; Perelstein, Maxim; /Cornell U., LEPP; Verdier, Patrice; /Lyon, IPN

    2006-10-01

    Little Higgs models with T Parity contain new vector-like fermions, the T-odd quarks or ''T-quarks'', which can be produced at hadron colliders with a QCD-strength cross section. Events with two acoplanar jets and large missing transverse energy provide a simple signature of T-quark production. We show that searches for this signature with the Tevatron Run II data can probe a significant part of the Little Higgs model parameter space not accessible to previous experiments, exploring T-quark masses up to about 400 GeV. This reach covers parts of the parameter space where the lightest T-odd particle can account for the observed dark matter relic abundance. We also comment on the prospects for this search at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC).

  16. nature physics | VOL 6 | DECEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 925 CERN's Large Hadron Collider has passed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    winter shut-down, possibly at an increased beam energy of 4 TeV. An extensive period of shut-down by the LHC, but as the LHC will really only hit the heights after its 2012/2013 shut-down period, the planned emerge at once from the meltdown of the two lead ions. The intention is to study the formation of quark

  17. Prospects on the search for invisible Higgs decays in the ZH channel at the LHC and HL-LHC: A Snowmass White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hideki Okawa; Josh Kunkle; Elliot Lipeles

    2014-12-16

    We show prospects on a search for invisible decays of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). This search is performed on a Higgs boson produced in association with a Z boson. We expect that the branching ratio of 17-22% (6-14%) could be excluded at 95% confidence level with 300 fb^{-1} (3000 fb^{-1}) of data at sqrt(s)=14 TeV. The range indicates different assumptions on the control of systematic uncertainties. Interpretations with Higgs-portal dark matter models are also considered.

  18. Heavy quark production at HERA and its relevance for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wing

    2006-06-17

    The import of HERA data on heavy quark production for LHC experiments is discussed. Knowlegde of all aspects of the beauty and charm production process, viz. the parton density functions of colliding hadrons, the hard scatter, and the fragmentation of the quarks into hadrons, can aid LHC experimentation. This short write-up concentrates on possible influences HERA data can have and on the current status (and history) of beauty production from both HERA and Tevatron experiments. In general, next-to-leading order QCD gives a reasonable description of beauty production although some regions of phase space such as low p_T show indications of differences.

  19. Searches for BSM and Higgs boson at LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jinnouchi, O. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science and Engineering (Japan); Collaboration: ATLAS Collaboration; CMS Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    This article reviews the recent results from the two energy frontier experiments, ATLAS and CMS at the large hadron collider (LHC), using the data collected during 2011 corresponding up to 4.9 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity of {radical}(s) = 7TeV proton proton collisions. The recent results of searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson, and searches for beyond Standard Model physics based on supersymmetry and other new exotic models are presented.

  20. nature physics | VOL 3 | DECEMBER 2007 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 823 The Large Hadron Collider is almost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    . And as the year comes full-circle, here's to physics from the LHC in 2008. References 1. House of Commons a steep one at that) has already been defined by the cooling, powering and then warming up of one sector

  1. Adapting the serial Alpgen event generator to simulate LHC collisions on millions of parallel threads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Childers, J T; LeCompte, T J; Papka, M E; Benjamin, D P

    2015-01-01

    As the LHC moves to higher energies and luminosity, the demand for computing resources increases accordingly and will soon outpace the growth of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid. To meet this greater demand, event generation Monte Carlo was targeted for adaptation to run on Mira, the supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Alpgen is a Monte Carlo event generation application that is used by LHC experiments in the simulation of collisions that take place in the Large Hadron Collider. This paper details the process by which Alpgen was adapted from a single-processor serial-application to a large-scale parallel-application and the performance that was achieved.

  2. Impact of parton distribution function and {alpha}{sub s} uncertainties on Higgs boson production in gluon fusion at hadron colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demartin, Federico; Mariani, Elisa [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Forte, Stefano; Vicini, Alessandro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Rojo, Juan [INFN, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2010-07-01

    We present a systematic study of uncertainties due to parton distributions (PDFs) and the strong coupling on the gluon-fusion production cross section of the standard model Higgs at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. We compare procedures and results when three recent sets of PDFs are used, CTEQ6.6, MSTW08, and NNPDF1.2, and we discuss specifically the way PDF and strong coupling uncertainties are combined. We find that results obtained from different PDF sets are in reasonable agreement if a common value of the strong coupling is adopted. We show that the addition in quadrature of PDF and {alpha}{sub s} uncertainties provides an adequate approximation to the full result with exact error propagation. We discuss a simple recipe to determine a conservative PDF+{alpha}{sub s} uncertainty from available global parton sets, and we use it to estimate this uncertainty on the given process to be about 10% at the Tevatron and 5% at the LHC for a light Higgs.

  3. LHC RF System Time-Domain Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mastorides, T.; Rivetta, C.

    2010-09-14

    Non-linear time-domain simulations have been developed for the Positron-Electron Project (PEP-II) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These simulations capture the dynamic behavior of the RF station-beam interaction and are structured to reproduce the technical characteristics of the system (noise contributions, non-linear elements, and more). As such, they provide useful results and insight for the development and design of future LLRF feedback systems. They are also a valuable tool for the study of diverse longitudinal beam dynamics effects such as coupled-bunch impedance driven instabilities and single bunch longitudinal emittance growth. Results from these studies and related measurements from PEP-II and LHC have been presented in multiple places. This report presents an example of the time-domain simulation implementation for the LHC.

  4. Exclusive production of heavy charged Higgs boson pairs in the $p p \\to p p H^+ H^-$ reaction at the LHC and a future circular collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Lebiedowicz; Antoni Szczurek

    2015-04-23

    We calculate differential cross sections for exclusive production of heavy charged scalar, weakly interacting particles (charged Higgs bosons, charged technipions, etc.) via photon-photon exchanges in the $p p \\to p p H^+ H^-$ reaction with exact $2 \\to 4$ kinematics. We present distributions in rapidities, transverse momenta, and correlations in azimuthal angles between the protons and between the charged Higgs bosons. As an example, the integrated cross section for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 14~TeV (LHC) is about 0.1~fb and about 0.9~fb at the Future Circular Collider (FCC) for $\\sqrt{s}$ = 100~TeV when assuming $m_{H^{\\pm}} = 150$~GeV. The results are compared with results obtained within standard equivalent-photon approximation known from the literature. We discuss the role of the Dirac and Pauli electromagnetic form factors of the proton. We have also performed first calculations of cross sections for the exclusive diffractive Khoze-Martin-Ryskin mechanism. We have estimated limits on the $g_{h H^+ H^-}$ coupling constant within two-Higgs dublet model based on recent experimental data from the LHC. The diffractive contribution is, however, much smaller than the $\\gamma \\gamma$ one. The $Z \\gamma$, $\\gamma Z$, and $ZZ$ exchanges give even smaller contributions. Absorption corrections are calculated for the first time differentially for various distributions. In general, they lead to a damping of the cross section. The damping depends on the $M_{H^{+}H^{-}}$ invariant mass and on $t$ four-momentum transfers squared. In contrast to diffractive processes, the larger the collision energy, the smaller the effect of absorption. We discuss a possibility to measure the exclusive production of two charged Higgs bosons with the help of so-called "forward proton detectors" at the LHC experiments.

  5. Linear Collider Physics Resource Book Snowmass 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronan (Editor), M.T.

    2001-06-01

    The American particle physics community can look forward to a well-conceived and vital program of experimentation for the next ten years, using both colliders and fixed target beams to study a wide variety of pressing questions. Beyond 2010, these programs will be reaching the end of their expected lives. The CERN LHC will provide an experimental program of the first importance. But beyond the LHC, the American community needs a coherent plan. The Snowmass 2001 Workshop and the deliberations of the HEPAP subpanel offer a rare opportunity to engage the full community in planning our future for the next decade or more. A major accelerator project requires a decade from the beginning of an engineering design to the receipt of the first data. So it is now time to decide whether to begin a new accelerator project that will operate in the years soon after 2010. We believe that the world high-energy physics community needs such a project. With the great promise of discovery in physics at the next energy scale, and with the opportunity for the uncovering of profound insights, we cannot allow our field to contract to a single experimental program at a single laboratory in the world. We believe that an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider is an excellent choice for the next major project in high-energy physics. Applying experimental techniques very different from those used at hadron colliders, an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider will allow us to build on the discoveries made at the Tevatron and the LHC, and to add a level of precision and clarity that will be necessary to understand the physics of the next energy scale. It is not necessary to anticipate specific results from the hadron collider programs to argue for constructing an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider; in any scenario that is now discussed, physics will benefit from the new information that e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments can provide. This last point merits further emphasis. If a new accelerator could be designed and built in a few years, it would make sense to wait for the results of each accelerator before planning the next one. Thus, we would wait for the results from the Tevatron before planning the LHC experiments, and wait for the LHC before planning any later stage. In reality accelerators require a long time to construct, and they require such specialized resources and human talent that delay can cripple what would be promising opportunities. In any event, we believe that the case for the linear collider is so compelling and robust that we can justify this facility on the basis of our current knowledge, even before the Tevatron and LHC experiments are done. The physics prospects for the linear collider have been studied intensively for more than a decade, and arguments for the importance of its experimental program have been developed from many different points of view. This book provides an introduction and a guide to this literature. We hope that it will allow physicists new to the consideration of linear collider physics to start from their own personal perspectives and develop their own assessments of the opportunities afforded by a linear collider.

  6. Crystal collimation for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirarchi, Daniele; Scandale, Walter; Hall, Geoffrey

    Future upgrades of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may demand improved cleaning performance of its collimation system. Very efficient collimation is required during regular operations at high intensities, because even a small amount of energy deposited on superconducting magnets can cause an abrupt loss of superconducting conditions (quench). The present collimation system has accomplished its tasks during the LHC Run I very well, where no quench with circulating beam took place with up to 150 MJ of stored energy at 4 TeV. On the other hand, uncertainty remains on the performance at the design energy of 7 TeV and with 360 MJ of stored energy. In particular, a further increase up to about 700 MJ is expected for the high luminosity upgrade (HL-LHC), where improved cleaning performance may be needed together with a reduction of collimator impedance. The possibility to use a crystal-based collimation system represents an option for improving both cleaning performance and impedance compared to the present s...

  7. First Experiences with LHC Grid Computing and Distributed Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, Ian

    2010-12-01

    In this presentation the experiences of the LHC experiments using grid computing were presented with a focus on experience with distributed analysis. After many years of development, preparation, exercises, and validation the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments are in operations. The computing infrastructure has been heavily utilized in the first 6 months of data collection. The general experience of exploiting the grid infrastructure for organized processing and preparation is described, as well as the successes employing the infrastructure for distributed analysis. At the end the expected evolution and future plans are outlined.

  8. LHC Beam Loss Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E

    2001-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. Detailed simulations have shown that a set of six detectors outside the cryostats of the quadrupole magnets in the regular arc cells are needed to completely diagnose the expected beam losses and hence protect the magnets. To characterize the quench levels different loss rates are identified. In order to cover all possible quench scenarios the dynamic range of the beam loss monitors has to be matched to the simulated loss rates. For that purpose different detector systems (PIN-diodes and ionization chambers) are compared.

  9. Performance of the ATLAS Calorimeters and Commissioning for LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossetti, Valerio; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS general-purpose experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is equipped with electromagnetic and hadronic liquid-argon (LAr) calorimeters and a hadronic scintillator-steel sampling calorimeter (TileCal) for measuring energy and direction of final state particles in the pseudorapidity range $|\\eta| energies of 7 and 8~TeV. Results on the calorimeter operation, monitoring and data quality, as well as their performance will be presented, including the calibration and stability of the electromagnetic scale, response uniformity and time resolution. These results demonstrate that the LAr and Tile calorimeters perform excellently within their design requirements. The calorimetry system thu...

  10. Tile Calorimeter Upgrade Program for the Luminosity Increasing at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Tile Calorimeter (TileCal) is the central hadronic calorimeter of the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The LHC is scheduled to undergo a major upgrade, in 2022, for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). The ATLAS upgrade program for high luminosity is split into three phases: Phase-0 occurred during $2013-2014$ and prepared the LHC for Run 2; Phase-I, foreseen for 2019, will prepare the LHC for Run 3, whereafter the peak luminosity reaches $2-3 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{2}s^{-1}$; finally, Phase-II, which is foreseen for 2024, will prepare the collider for the HL-LHC operation ($5-7 \\times 10^{34}$ cm$^{2}s^{-1}$). The TileCal main activities for Phase-0 were the installation of the new low voltage power supplies and the activation of the TileCal third layer signal for assisting the muon trigger at $1.01.3$ (TileMuon Project). In Phase-II, a major upgrade in the TileCal readout electronics is planned. Except for the photomultipliers tubes (PMTs), most of the on- and off-detector e...

  11. Search for SUSY at LHC: Precision Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank E. Paige

    1997-12-16

    Methods to make precision measurements of SUSY masses and parameters at the CERN Large Hadron Collider are described.

  12. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojo, Juan; Accardi, Alberto; Ball, Richard D.; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; de Roeck, Albert; Farry, Stephen; Ferrando, James; Forte, Stefano; Gao, Jun; Harland-Lang, Lucian; et al

    2015-09-15

    The accurate determination of Parton Distribution Functions (PDFs) of the proton is an essential ingredient of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) program. PDF uncertainties impact a wide range of processes, from Higgs boson characterization and precision Standard Model measurements to New Physics searches. A major recent development in modern PDF analyses has been to exploit the wealth of new information contained in precision measurements from the LHC Run I, as well as progress in tools and methods to include these data in PDF fits. In this report we summarize the information that PDF-sensitive measurements at the LHC have provided somore »far, and review the prospects for further constraining PDFs with data from the recently started Run II. This document aims to provide useful input to the LHC collaborations to prioritize their PDF-sensitive measurements at Run II, as well as a comprehensive reference for the PDF-fitting collaborations.« less

  13. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlos García-Argos

    2015-01-13

    This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker after 2023, to be installed for operations in the HL-LHC period. The high luminosity and number of interactions per crossing that will happen after the HL-LHC starts require a complete replacement of the ATLAS tracker. The systems that have been defined for the Phase-II Upgrade will be designed to cope with that increased radiation and have the right granularity to maintain the performance with higher pile-up. In this thesis I present results on single modules and larger structures comprising multiple modules. In the context of the current ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker studies, I present an analysis of the data taken by the detector from the beginning of operation in 2010 until the first Long Shut-down in 2013. The analysis consists of an energy loss study in the Semiconductor Tracker, a task the detector was not designed to perform. However, the availability of the Time-over-Threshold of the signals generated by particles traversing the detector elements allows an estimation of the charge deposited by the particles. This calculation of the energy loss is typically used to perform particle identification, a feature that is usually not required from the tracker. In addition, I present a study that proposes the use of this energy loss calculation as a means of tracking radiation damage in the silicon.

  14. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  15. Top-Quark Physics Results From LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Fiorini

    2012-01-30

    The top-quark is a fundamental element of the physics program at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We review the current status of the top-quark measurements performed by ATLAS and CMS experiments in pp collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV by presenting the recent results of the top-quark production rates, top mass measurements and additional top quark properties. We will also describe the recent searches for physics beyond the Standard Model in the top-quark sector.

  16. Top Quark Physics at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorgen D'hondt

    2007-07-10

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is expected to provide proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV, yielding millions of of top quark events. The top-physics potential of the two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, is discussed according to state-of-the-art simulation of both physics and detectors. An overview is given of the most important results with emphasis on the expected improvements in our understanding of physics connected to the top quark.

  17. Dark matter and Higgs boson collider implications of fermions in an abelian-gauged hidden sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrihari Gopalakrishna; Seung J. Lee; James D. Wells

    2009-04-13

    We add fermions to an abelian-gauged hidden sector. We show that the lightest can be the dark matter with the right thermal relic abundance, and discovery is within reach of upcoming dark matter detectors. We also show that these fermions change Higgs boson phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), and in particular could induce a large invisible width to the lightest Higgs boson state. Such an invisibly decaying Higgs boson can be discovered with good significance in the vector boson fusion channel at the LHC.

  18. Soft-collinear effective theory for hadronic and nuclear collisions: The evolution of jet quenching from RHIC to the highest LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitev, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of soft-collinear effective theory with Glauber gluons, results and predictions for inclusive hadron suppression, based upon in-medium parton shower evolution, are presented for Au+Au and Pb+Pb collisions at RHIC and LHC energies $\\sqrt{s}=200$ AGeV and $\\sqrt{s}=2.76, \\, 5.1$ ATeV, respectively. The $\\rm SCET_G$ medium-induced splitting kernels are further implemented to evaluate the attenuation of reconstructed jet cross in such reactions and to examine their centrality and radius $R$ dependence. Building upon a previously developed method to systematically resum the jet shape at next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, a quantitative understanding of the jet shape modification measurement in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=2.76$ ATeV at the LHC can be achieved. Predictions for photon-tagged jet cross sections and shapes, that can shed light on the parton flavor dependence of in-medium parton shower modification, are also given.

  19. Development of Large Area Gas Electron Multiplier Detector and Its Application to a Digital Hadron Calorimeter for Future Collider Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andrew

    2014-09-25

    The UTA High Energy Physics Group conducted generic detector development based on large area, very thin and high sensitivity gas detector using gas electron multiplier (GEM) technology. This is in preparation for a use as a sensitive medium for sampling calorimeters in future collider experiments at the Energy Frontier as well as part of the tracking detector in Intensity Frontier experiments. We also have been monitoring the long term behavior of one of the prototype detectors (30cmx30cm) read out by the SLAC-developed 13-bit KPiX analog chip over three years and have made presentations of results at various APS meetings. While the important next step was the development of large area (1m x 1m) GEM planes, we also have looked into opportunities of applying this technology to precision tracking detectors to significantly improve the performance of the Range Stack detector for CP violation experiments and to provide an amplification layer for the liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber in the LBNE experiment. We have jointly developed 33cmx100cm large GEM foils with the CERN gas detector development group to construct 33cm x100cm unit chambers. Three of these unit chambers will be put together to form a 1m x 1m detector plane. Following characterization of one 33cmx100cm unit chamber prototype, a total of five 1m x 1m planes will be constructed and inserted into an existing 1m3 RPC DHCAL stack to test the performance of the new GEM DHCAL in particle beams. The large area GEM detector we planned to develop in this proposal not only gives an important option to DHCAL for future collider experiments but also the potential to expand its use to Intensity Frontier and Cosmic Frontier experiments as high efficiency, high amplification anode planes for liquid Argon time projection chambers. Finally, thanks to its sensitivity to X-rays and other neutral radiations and its light-weight characteristics, the large area GEM has a great potential for the use in medical imaging and homeland security, as well as satellite based astronomy experiments.

  20. Measurement of the charged-hadron multiplicity in proton-proton collisions at LHC with the CMS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yen-Jie

    2011-01-01

    Charged-hadron pseudorapidity densities and multiplicity distributions in protonproton collisions at [the square root of sigma] = 0.9, 2.36, 7.0 TeV were measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the ...

  1. Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Röntsch, Raoul

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirect constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. We find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.

  2. Electron Beam for LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mieczyslaw Witold Krasny

    2004-05-13

    A method of delivering a monochromatic electron beam to the LHC interaction points is proposed. In this method, heavy ions are used as carriers of the projectile electrons. Acceleration, storage and collision-stability aspects of such a hybrid beam is discussed and a new beam-cooling method is presented. This discussion is followed by a proposal of the Parasitic Ion-Electron collider at LHC (PIE@LHC). The PIE@LHC provides an opportunity, for the present LHC detectors, to enlarge the scope of their research program by including the program of electron-proton and electron-nucleuscollisions with minor machine and detector investments.

  3. Top Jets at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeida, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Top Jets at the LHC Leandro G. Almeida, Seung J. Lee, GiladSB-08-37; WIS/17/08-SEPT-DPP Top Jets at the LHC Leandro G.p T hadronically-decaying top quarks at the Large Hadron

  4. Model Discrimination at the LHC: a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory Hallenbeck; Maxim Perelstein; Christian Spethmann; Julia Thom; Jennifer Vaughan

    2009-03-11

    We investigate the potential of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to discriminate between two theoretical models predicting anomalous events with jets and large missing transverse energy, minimal supersymmetry and Little Higgs with T Parity. We focus on a simple test case scenario, in which the only exotic particles produced at the LHC are heavy color-triplet states (squarks or T-quarks), and the only open decay channel for these particles is into the stable missing-energy particle (neutralino or heavy photon) plus a quark. We find that in this scenario, the angular and momentum distributions of the observed jets are sufficient to discriminate between the two models with a few inverse fb of the LHC data, provided that these distributions for both models and the dominant Standard Model backgrounds can be reliably predicted by Monte Carlo simulations.

  5. Detector and System Developments for LHC Detector Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelli, Beatrice; Guida, Roberto; Rohne, Ole; Stapnes, Steinar

    2015-05-12

    The future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Physics program and the consequent improvement of the LHC accelerator performance set important challenges to all detector systems. This PhD thesis delineates the studies and strategies adopted to improve two different types of detectors: the replacement of precision trackers with ever increasingly performing silicon detectors, and the improvement of large gaseous detector systems by optimizing their gas mixtures and operation modes. Within the LHC tracker upgrade programs, the ATLAS Insertable B-layer (IBL) is the first major upgrade of a silicon-pixel detector. Indeed the overall ATLAS Pixel Detector performance is expected to degrade with the increase of luminosity and the IBL will recover the performance by adding a fourth innermost layer. The IBL Detector makes use of new pixel and front-end electronics technologies as well as a novel thermal management approach and light support and service structures. These innovations required complex developments and Quality Ass...

  6. Summary of the Mini BNL/LARP/CARE-HHH Workshop on Crab Cavities for the LHC (LHC-CC08)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi,I.; Calaga, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2008-05-01

    The first mini-workshop on crab compensation for the LHC luminosity upgrade (LHC-CC08) was held February 24-25, 2008 at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. A total of 35 participants from 3 continents and 15 institutions from around the world participated to discuss the exciting prospect of a crab scheme for the LHC. If realized it will be the first demonstration in hadron colliders. The workshop is organized by joint collaboration of BNL, US-LARP and CARE-HHH. The enormous interest in the subject of crab cavities for the international linear collider and future light sources has resulted in a large international collaboration to exchange aspects of synergy and expertise. A central repository for this exchange of information documenting the latest design effort for LHC crab cavities is consolidated in a wiki page: https://twiki.cern.ch/twiki/bin/view/Main/LHCCrabCavities. The main goal of this workshop was to define a road-map for a prototype crab cavity to be installed in the LHC and to discuss the associated R&D and beam dynamics challenges. The diverse subject of implementing the crab scheme resulted in a scientific program with a wide range of subtopics which were divided into 8 sessions. Each session was given a list of fundamental questions to be addressed and used as a guideline to steer the discussions.

  7. Updated Risk Analysis of the LHC Cryogenic and Helium Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Tavian, L

    2013-01-01

    The Preliminary Risk Analysis (PRA) of the Large Hadron Collider cryogenic system, performed in 1998, was aimed at the identification of all the risks for personnel, equipment or environment caused by the failures that might accidentally occur in any phase of the machine operation, and that could not be eliminated by design. The risk analysis was performed during a design and an early construction phase of the machine, so after the collider commissioning and consolidation experience, especially due to the 080919 incident in the LHC sector 3-4, PRA had to be revised and updated. The paper discusses the criterions of cryogenic failures categorization taking into account their occurrence and severity.

  8. International linear collider reference design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aarons, G.

    2007-06-22

    The International Linear Collider will give physicists a new cosmic doorway to explore energy regimes beyond the reach of today's accelerators. A proposed electron-positron collider, the ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton collider at the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, together unlocking some of the deepest mysteries in the universe. With LHC discoveries pointing the way, the ILC -- a true precision machine -- will provide the missing pieces of the puzzle. Consisting of two linear accelerators that face each other, the ILC will hurl some 10 billion electrons and their anti-particles, positrons, toward each other at nearly the speed of light. Superconducting accelerator cavities operating at temperatures near absolute zero give the particles more and more energy until they smash in a blazing crossfire at the centre of the machine. Stretching approximately 35 kilometres in length, the beams collide 14,000 times every second at extremely high energies -- 500 billion-electron-volts (GeV). Each spectacular collision creates an array of new particles that could answer some of the most fundamental questions of all time. The current baseline design allows for an upgrade to a 50-kilometre, 1 trillion-electron-volt (TeV) machine during the second stage of the project. This reference design provides the first detailed technical snapshot of the proposed future electron-positron collider, defining in detail the technical parameters and components that make up each section of the 31-kilometer long accelerator. The report will guide the development of the worldwide R&D program, motivate international industrial studies and serve as the basis for the final engineering design needed to make an official project proposal later this decade.

  9. Preliminary Risk Analysis of the LHC Cryogenic System (CERN-LHC-Project-Report-324)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Riddone, G

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), presently under construction at CERN, will require a helium cryogenic system unprecedented in size and capacity, with more than 1600 superconducting magnets operating in superfluid helium and a total inventory of almost 100 tonnes of helium. The objective of the Preliminary Risk Analysis (PRA) is to identify all risks to personnel, equipment or environment resulting from failures that may accidentally occur within the cryogenic system of LHC in any phase of the machine operation, and that could not be eliminated by design. Assigning a gravity coefficient and one analyzing physical processes that will follow any of the recognised failure modes allows to single out worst case scenarios. Recommendations concerning lines of preventive and corrective defence, as well as for further detailed studies, are formulated.

  10. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; et al.,

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-ordermore »(v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt « less

  11. The versatile link, a common project for super-LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amaral, Luis; Dris, Stefanos; Gerardin, Alexandre; Huffman, Todd; Issever, Cigdem; Pacheco, Alberto Jimenez; Jones, Mark; Kwan, Simon; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lian, Zhijun; Liu, Tiankuan; /CERN /Oxford U. /Fermilab /Taipei, Computing Ctr. /Southern Methodist U.

    2009-07-01

    Radiation tolerant, high speed optoelectronic data transmission links are fundamental building blocks in today's large scale High Energy Physics (HEP) detectors, as exemplified by the four experiments currently under commissioning at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), see for example. New experiments or upgrades will impose even more stringent demands on these systems from the point of view of performance and radiation tolerance. This can already be seen from the developments underway for the Super Large Hadron Collider (SLHC) project, a proposed upgrade to the LHC aiming at increasing the luminosity of the machine by factor of 10 to 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, and thus providing a better chance to see rare processes and improving statistically marginal measurements. In the past, specific data transmission links have been independently developed by each LHC experiment for data acquisition (DAQ), detector control as well as trigger and timing distribution (TTC). This was justified by the different types of applications being targeted as well as by technological limitations preventing one single solution from fitting all requirements. However with today's maturity of optoelectronic and CMOS technologies it is possible to envisage the development of a general purpose optical link which can cover most transmission applications: a Versatile Link. Such an approach has the clear advantage of concentrating the development effort on one single project targeting an optical link whose final functionality will only result from the topology and configuration settings adopted.

  12. Zentrale Dienste Zentrale Dienste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨ontgenlaserprojekt European XFEL, den Large Hadron Collider (LHC) bei Genf sowie den geplanten International Linear Collider

  13. Higgs Boson Properties and BSM Higgs Boson Searches at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang F. Mader

    2008-09-24

    At the end of 2008, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will come into operation and the two experiments ATLAS and CMS will start taking data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of \\sqrt{s}=14 TeV. In preparation for the data taking period, the discovery potential for Higgs bosons beyond the Standard Model has been updated by both experiments and is reviewed here. In addition, the prospects for measuring the properties of a Higgs boson like its mass and width, its CP eigenvalues and its couplings to fermions and gauge bosons are discussed.

  14. The Transition Radiation Detector for ALICE at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Kweon; for the ALICE TRD Collaboration

    2009-09-25

    The Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) for the ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) identifies electrons in p+p and in the challenging high multiplicity environment of heavy-ion collisions and provides fast online tracking for the ALICE Level1 trigger. The TRD is designed to have excellent position resolution and pion rejection capability. Presently, six of the 18 TRD supermodules are installed in the ALICE central barrel. In 2008, four supermodules were installed and commissioning of the detector using cosmic ray tracks was successfully performed. We briefly describe the design of the detector and report on the performance and current understanding of the detector based on these data.

  15. Probing New Physics with Jets at the LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Harris, Robert

    2009-09-01

    The Large Hadron Collider at CERN has the potential to make a major discovery as early as 2008 from simple measurements of events with two high energy jets. This talk will present the jet trigger and analysis plans of the CMS collaboration, which were produced at the LHC Physics Center at Fermilab. Plans to search the two jet channel for generic signals of new particles and forces will be discussed. I will present the anticipated sensitivity of the CMS experiment to a variety of models of new physics, including quark compositeness, technicolor, superstrings, extra dimensions and grand unification.

  16. Hadron Colliders Working Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Peggs and M.J. Syphers

    2001-11-08

    The ''point design'' studied this year shows that a staged VLHC (40, {approx} 200 TeV) is feasible, with no insurmountable challenges. Further work can provide a more optimized design, by studying various alternative field strengths (e.g., superferric magnets for Stage 1) for improvements to vacuum, wall impedance, and other major performance parameters. It may be that a ''single-stage'' scenario for accessing higher energies sooner is the correct approach. A next-step design study should be considered to look at the two cases near to and complementary to the 2001 VLHC Design Study. The effectiveness of photon stops and their engineering design need to be addressed in the near future to truly determine if these devices can lead this effort to even higher luminosities and energies. The superbunch approach should continue to be studied, as well as IR designs, new instrumentation and diagnostics, and beam dynamics issues. Finally, a well organized VLHC-motivated beam studies effort should become part of the national program.

  17. The Dark Penguin Shines Light at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Primulando, Reinard; Tsai, Yuhsin

    2015-01-01

    Collider experiments are one of the most promising ways to constrain Dark Matter (DM) interactions. For several types of DM-Standard Model couplings, a meaningful interpretation of the results requires to go beyond effective field theory, considering simplified models with light mediators. This is especially important in the case of loop-mediated interactions. In this paper we perform the first simplified model study of the magnetic dipole interacting DM, by including the one-loop momentum-dependent form factors that mediate the coupling -- given by the Dark Penguin -- in collider processes. We compute bounds from the monojet, monophoton, and diphoton searches at the $8$ and $14$ TeV LHC, and compare the results to those of direct and indirect detection experiments. Future searches at the $100$ TeV hadron collider and at the ILC are also addressed. We find that the optimal search strategy requires loose cuts on the missing transverse energy, to capture the enhancement of the form factors near the threshold fo...

  18. Theoretical Modeling and Experimental Investigation of the Thermal Performance of the LHC Prototype Lattice Cryostats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddone, G

    1997-01-01

    This thesis presents the thermal performance of the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) prototype cryostats both in steady-state and in transient conditions. LHC will be built in the 27 km LEP tunnel and will provide proton-proton collisions. It will make use of superconducting magnets operating in static bath of superfluid helium at 1.9 K. The thesis is mainly divided in three parts. The first part cont ains three chapters which present a brief overview of the LHC project. Part 1-Chapter 1 gives a short introduction to the LHC design layout and performance. Part 1-Chapter 2 refers to LHC cryogenic s ystem and describes the general architecture of the cryogenic plants, the temperature levels and the heat loads. The 50 m long LHC prototype half-cell contains one twin-bore quadrupole and four twin-a perture dipoles. In Part 1-Chapter 3 the design and construction of the prototype dipole and quadrupole cryostats are presented. The LHC prototype cryostats have integrated cryogenic lines, while the final LHC cryostats hav...

  19. ATLAS Jet Trigger Performance in LHC Run I and Initial Run II Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shimizu, Shima; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The immense rate of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be reduced from the nominal bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz to approximately 1 kHz before the data can be written on disk offline. The ATLAS Trigger System performs real-time selection of these events in order to achieve this reduction. Dedicated selection of events containing jets is uniquely challenging at a hadron collider where nearly every event contains significant hadronic energy. Following the very successful first LHC run from 2010 to 2012, the ATLAS Trigger was much improved, including a new hardware topological module and a restructured High Level Trigger system, merging two previous software-based processing levels. This allowed the optimization of resources and a much greater re-use of the precise but costly offline software base. After summarising the overall performance of the jet trigger during the first LHC run, the software design choices and use of the topological module will be reviewed. The expected perform...

  20. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2015-03-01

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K0S or Lambda/anti-Lambda) and a charged particle, emitted in pPb collisions, are presented over a wide range in pseudorapidity and full azimuth. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 35 inverse nanobarns, were collected at a nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy (sqrt(s[NN])) of 5.02 TeV with the CMS detector at the LHC. The results are compared to semi-peripheral PbPb collision data at sqrt(s[NN]) = 2.76 TeV, covering similar charged-particle multiplicities in the events. The observed azimuthal correlations at large relative pseudorapidity are used to extract the second-order (v[2]) and third-order (v[3]) anisotropy harmonics of K0S and Lambda/anti-Lambda particles. These quantities are studied as a function of the charged-particle multiplicity in the event and the transverse momentum of the particles. For high-multiplicity pPb events, a clear particle species dependence of v[2] and v[3] is observed. For pt < 2 GeV, the v[2] and v[3] values of K0S particles are larger than those of Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the same pt. This splitting effect between two particle species is found to be stronger in pPb than in PbPb collisions in the same multiplicity range. When divided by the number of constituent quarks and compared at the same transverse kinetic energy per quark, both v[2] and v[3] for K0S particles are observed to be consistent with those for Lambda/anti-Lambda particles at the 10% level in pPb collisions. This consistency extends over a wide range of particle transverse kinetic energy and event multiplicities.

  1. Long-range two-particle correlations of strange hadrons with charged particles in pPb and PbPb collisions at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    Measurements of two-particle angular correlations between an identified strange hadron (K[0 over S] or [? over [bar over ?

  2. Steady State Heat Deposits Modeling in the Nb3Sn Quadrupole Magnets for the Upgrade of the LHC Inner Triplet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocian, D.; Ambrosio, G.; Felice, H.; Barzi, E.; Bossert, R.; Caspi, S.; Chlachidze, G.; Dietderich, D.; Feher, S.; Ferracin, P.; Hafalia, R.; /Fermilab /Lawrence Berkeley Lab /Brookhaven

    2011-09-01

    In hadron colliders such as the LHC, the energy deposited in the superconductors by the particles lost from the beams or coming from the collision debris may provoke quenches detrimental to the accelerator operation. In previous papers, a Network Model has been used to study the thermodynamic behavior of magnet coils and to calculate the quench levels in the LHC magnets for expected beam loss profiles. This model was subsequently used for thermal analysis and design optimization of Nb{sub 3}Sn quadrupole magnets, which LARP (US LHC Accelerator Research Program) is developing for possible use in the LHC luminosity upgrade. For these new magnets, the heat transport efficiency from the coil to the helium bath needs to be determined and optimized. In this paper the study of helium cooling channels and the heat evacuation scheme are presented and discussed.

  3. Real-time data analysis at the LHC: present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir V. Gligorov

    2015-09-21

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which collides protons at an energy of 14 TeV, produces hundreds of exabytes of data per year, making it one of the largest sources of data in the world today. At present it is not possible to even transfer most of this data from the four main particle detectors at the LHC to "offline" data facilities, much less to permanently store it for future processing. For this reason the LHC detectors are equipped with real-time analysis systems, called triggers, which process this volume of data and select the most interesting proton-proton collisions. The LHC experiment triggers reduce the data produced by the LHC by between 1/1000 and 1/100000, to tens of petabytes per year, allowing its economical storage and further analysis. The bulk of the data-reduction is performed by custom electronics which ignores most of the data in its decision making, and is therefore unable to exploit the most powerful known data analysis strategies. I cover the present status of real-time data analysis at the LHC, before explaining why the future upgrades of the LHC experiments will increase the volume of data which can be sent off the detector and into off-the-shelf data processing facilities (such as CPU or GPU farms) to tens of exabytes per year. This development will simultaneously enable a vast expansion of the physics programme of the LHC's detectors, and make it mandatory to develop and implement a new generation of real-time multivariate analysis tools in order to fully exploit this new potential of the LHC. I explain what work is ongoing in this direction and motivate why more effort is needed in the coming years.

  4. Lepton-flavor-violating decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu} at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffels, M.; Stahl, A. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Kallarackal, J. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kraemer, M.; O'Leary, B. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, RWTH Aachen, 52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-04-01

    Lepton-flavor-violating {tau} decays are predicted in many extensions of the standard model at a rate observable at future collider experiments. In this article we focus on the decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu}, which is a promising channel to observe lepton-flavor violation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We present analytic expressions for the differential decay width derived from a model-independent effective Lagrangian with general four-fermion operators, and estimate the experimental acceptance for detecting the decay {tau}{yields}{mu}{mu}{mu} at the LHC. Specific emphasis is given to decay angular distributions and how they can be used to discriminate new physics models. We provide specific predictions for various extensions of the standard model, including supersymmetric, little Higgs, and technicolor models.

  5. $WWZ/?$ production in large extra dimensions model at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Xiao-Zhou; Duan Peng-Fei; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

    2012-11-06

    We investigate the effect induced by the Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton in the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production in the framework of the large extra dimensions (LED) model at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). The integrated cross sections and various kinematic distributions in the LED model are presented and compared with those in the standard model. The results show that the contributions from KK-graviton exchange remarkably affect the observables of the triple gauge boson ($W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$) production processes at both the ILC and the LHC, particularly either in the high transverse momentum region or in the central rapidity region. We also find that the relative LED discrepancy for the $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production at the LHC is generally larger than that at the ILC due to the additional LED contribution via $gg$ fusion subprocess and the KK-graviton exchanging resonant effect induced by the continuous large colliding energy in $pp$ collision. We conclude that the $W^{+}W^{-}\\gamma$ and $W^{+}W^{-}Z$ productions at the LHC could have the distinct advantage over at the ILC from the aspect of effectively exploring the LED signal in measuring $W^+W^-\\gamma/Z$ production.

  6. Digital measurement system for the LHC klystron high voltage modulator.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkelsen, Anders

    Accelerating voltage in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is created by a means of 16 superconducting standing wave RF cavities, each fed by a 400MHz/300kW continuous wave klystron amplifier. Part of the upgrade program for the LHC long shutdown one is to replace the obsolete analogue current and voltage measurement circuitry located in the high voltage bunkers by a new, digital system, using ADCs and optical fibres. A digital measurement card is implemented and integrated into the current HV modulator oil tank (floating at -58kV) and interfaced to the existing digital VME boards collecting the data for several klystrons at the ground potential. Measured signals are stored for the logging, diagnostics and post-mortem analysis purposes.

  7. Real-time data analysis at the LHC: present and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gligorov, Vladimir V

    2015-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which collides protons at an energy of 14 TeV, produces hundreds of exabytes of data per year, making it one of the largest sources of data in the world today. At present it is not possible to even transfer most of this data from the four main particle detectors at the LHC to "offline" data facilities, much less to permanently store it for future processing. For this reason the LHC detectors are equipped with real-time analysis systems, called triggers, which process this volume of data and select the most interesting proton-proton collisions. The LHC experiment triggers reduce the data produced by the LHC by between 1/1000 and 1/100000, to tens of petabytes per year, allowing its economical storage and further analysis. The bulk of the data-reduction is performed by custom electronics which ignores most of the data in its decision making, and is therefore unable to exploit the most powerful known data analysis strategies. I cover the present status of real-time data analysis ...

  8. A Longitudinal Density Monitor for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff, Adam; Boccardi, Andrea

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest and highest energy particle accelerator, ion bunches circulate in two counter-rotating beams and are brought into collision. Each bunch is confined within a bucket by the longitudinal focusing effect of the radio frequency (RF) cavities. The RF period is 2.5 ns, while the minimum bunch spacing is 25 ns. Thus, 9 out of every 10 buckets should be empty, as well as additional gaps to allow for the rise-time of injection and dump kickers. In practice, however, small numbers of particles can occupy these supposedly empty buckets, causing problems for machine protection and for the absolute calibration of the LHC’s luminosity. The Longitudinal Density Monitor (LDM) is a new monitor, designed to measure the longitudinal distribution of particles in the LHC with a sufficiently high dynamic range to quantify the relative particle population in the supposedly empty buckets. A non-interceptive measurement is made possible by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR...

  9. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariel Schwartzman

    2015-09-17

    Jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton proton (p-p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p-p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo. Large samples of dijet, Z+jets, and photon+jet events at the LHC allowed the calibration of jets with high precision, leading to very small systematic uncertainties. Both ATLAS and CMS achieved a jet energy calibration uncertainty of about 1% in the central detector region and for jets with transverse momentum pT>100 GeV. At low jet pT, the jet energy calibration uncertainty is less than 4%, with dominant contributions from pileup, differences in energy scale between quark and gluon jets, and jet flavor composition.

  10. Search for Heavy Resonances Decaying to Taus in 7 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions at the Large Hadron Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurrola, Alfredo

    2011-10-21

    pb^-1 of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected with the CMS detector at the CERN LHC. The number of observed events in the data is in good agreement with the predictions for SM background processes. In the context of the Sequential SM...

  11. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Battaglia

    2007-05-28

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is the next large scale project in accelerator particle physics. Colliding electrons with positrons at energies from 0.3 TeV up to about 1 TeV, the ILC is expected to provide the accuracy needed to complement the LHC data and extend the sensitivity to new phenomena at the high energy frontier and answer some of the fundamental questions in particle physics and in its relation to Cosmology. This paper reviews some highlights of the ILC physics program and some of the major challenges for the accelerator and detector design.

  12. Effects of Shower Partons on Soft and Semihard hadrons Produced in Pb-Pb Collisions at 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilin Zhu; Rudolph C. Hwa

    2014-11-05

    The production of all identified hadrons at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is studied with emphasis on the $p_T$ distributions up to 20 GeV/c in central collisions. In the framework of the recombination model we find that the shower partons (due to the fragmentation of semihard partons) play an important role in the formation of hadrons in the low- and intermediate-$p_T$ regions. Parameters that control the energy loss of minijets are determined by fitting the upper half of the $p_T$ range of the pion distribution. The resultant soft shower partons are then found to dominate over the thermal partons in the non-strange sector, but not in the strange sector. Since the data on the $p_T$ spectra of all observed hadrons are well reproduced, there is no way out of the implication that any alternative dynamical model on particle production would be incomplete if it does not consider the effects of minijets even at very low $p_T$. Hydrodynamics that relies on rapid equilibration without accounting for the delayed thermalization effects of the hard and semihard partons copiously produced at LHC is an example of such models. The difference between the densities of shower partons produced at LHC and at BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) is quantified and discussed.

  13. Physics validation studies for muon collider detector background simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, Aaron Owen; /Northern Illinois U.

    2011-07-01

    Within the broad discipline of physics, the study of the fundamental forces of nature and the most basic constituents of the universe belongs to the field of particle physics. While frequently referred to as 'high-energy physics,' or by the acronym 'HEP,' particle physics is not driven just by the quest for ever-greater energies in particle accelerators. Rather, particle physics is seen as having three distinct areas of focus: the cosmic, intensity, and energy frontiers. These three frontiers all provide different, but complementary, views of the basic building blocks of the universe. Currently, the energy frontier is the realm of hadron colliders like the Tevatron at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) or the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. While the LHC is expected to be adequate for explorations up to 14 TeV for the next decade, the long development lead time for modern colliders necessitates research and development efforts in the present for the next generation of colliders. This paper focuses on one such next-generation machine: a muon collider. Specifically, this paper focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of beam-induced backgrounds vis-a-vis detector region contamination. Initial validation studies of a few muon collider physics background processes using G4beamline have been undertaken and results presented. While these investigations have revealed a number of hurdles to getting G4beamline up to the level of more established simulation suites, such as MARS, the close communication between us, as users, and the G4beamline developer, Tom Roberts, has allowed for rapid implementation of user-desired features. The main example of user-desired feature implementation, as it applies to this project, is Bethe-Heitler muon production. Regarding the neutron interaction issues, we continue to study the specifics of how GEANT4 implements nuclear interactions. The GEANT4 collaboration has been contacted regarding the minor discrepancies in the neutron interaction cross sections for boron. While corrections to the data files themselves are simple to implement and distribute, it is quite possible, however, that coding changes may be required in G4beamline or even in GEANT4 to fully correct nuclear interactions. Regardless, these studies are ongoing and future results will be reflected in updated releases of G4beamline.

  14. Hadronic resonance production in d+Au collisions at root S(NN) = 200 GeV measured at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M. Calderon de la Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; De Silva, C.; Dedovich, T. G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangaharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; LaPointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C. -H; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, M. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mischke, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; deToledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, Robert E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.

    2008-01-01

    tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider). The masses and widths of these resonances are studied as a function of transverse momentum p(T). We observe that the resonance spectra follow a generalized scaling law with the transverse mass m...

  15. Design and Performance Optimization of the LHC Collimation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert-Démolaize, G

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently under construction at CERN. The LHC is a circular accelerator that stores proton beams and accelerates them to a 7 TeV beam energy. The required bending fields are achieved with super-conducting magnets. The stored proton beams are collided in experimental detectors and produce a design luminosity of 1E+34 cm-2.s-1. Every storage ring encounters unavoidable proton losses. The protons that diffuse into the so-called beam halo can touch accelerator components. In order to avoid quenches of the superconducting magnets, the halo protons must be removed before reaching the magnets. This is achieved with a multi-stage cleaning system, built out of two-sided collimators that are located at adequate positions in the machine. Due to the high stored beam intensity (required for high luminosity), the efficiency of the LHC beam cleaning must be much better than in any other exisiting machine: not more than 0.00002% of protons hitting the collimators may escape and impact on an...

  16. Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    17 Future Colliders Beyond the Standard Model By the early 1980s there were persuasive arguments the default future of international high energy physics. The LHC project calls for two multipurpose detectors

  17. Photonuclear vector meson production in ultra-peripheral Pb-Pb collisions studied by the ALICE experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Nystrand

    2013-03-08

    The strong electromagnetic fields surrounding the Pb-ions accelerated at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) allow two-photon and photonuclear interactions to be studied in a so far unexplored kinematic regime. Exclusive photoproduction of vector mesons can be studied in ultra-peripheral collisions, where the impact parameters are larger than the sum of the nuclear radii and hadronic interactions are strongly suppressed. During the heavy-ion runs at the LHC in 2010 and 2011, the ALICE collaboration used special triggers to select ultra-peripheral collisions. These triggers were based on the Muon spectrometer, the Time-of-Flight detector, the Silicon Pixel detector, and the VZERO scintillator array. Information from other detectors was also used in the analysis. The cross section for coherent photoproduction of J/Psi mesons at forward rapidities will be presented. The result will be compared to model calculations and its implications for nuclear gluon shadowing will be discussed.

  18. Search for Heavy Right-Handed Neutrinos at the LHC and Beyond in the Same-Sign Leptons Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, John N; Pan, Bob Wei-Ping

    2015-01-01

    In this study we explore the LHC's Run II potential to discover heavy Majorana neutrinos with luminosities between $30$ and $3000$ fb$^{-1}$ in the $l^{\\pm}l^{\\prime\\pm}j~j$ final state. Given that there are many models for neutrino mass generation, even within the Type I seesaw framework, we use a simplified model approach and assume that a heavy single Majorana neutrino extension of the SM and a limiting case of the left-right symmetric model. We then extend the analysis to a future hadron collider running at $100$ TeV center of mass energies. This extrapolation in energy allows us to study the relative importance of the resonant production versus gauge boson fusion processes in the study of Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders. We analyze and propose different search strategies designed to maximize the discovery potential in either the resonant production or the gauge boson fusion modes.

  19. Search for Heavy Right-Handed Neutrinos at the LHC and Beyond in the Same-Sign Leptons Final State

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John N. Ng; Alejandro de la Puente; Bob Wei-Ping Pan

    2015-05-21

    In this study we explore the LHC's Run II potential to discover heavy Majorana neutrinos with luminosities between $30$ and $3000$ fb$^{-1}$ in the $l^{\\pm}l^{\\prime\\pm}j~j$ final state. Given that there are many models for neutrino mass generation, even within the Type I seesaw framework, we use a simplified model approach and assume that a heavy single Majorana neutrino extension of the SM and a limiting case of the left-right symmetric model. We then extend the analysis to a future hadron collider running at $100$ TeV center of mass energies. This extrapolation in energy allows us to study the relative importance of the resonant production versus gauge boson fusion processes in the study of Majorana neutrinos at hadron colliders. We analyze and propose different search strategies designed to maximize the discovery potential in either the resonant production or the gauge boson fusion modes.

  20. Hadron Correlation in Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudolph C. Hwa

    2007-01-18

    We review some recent experimental and theoretical work on the correlation among hadrons produced at intermediate $p_T$ at RHIC. The topics include: forward and backward asymmetry with and without trigger at mid-rapidity, associated-particle distribution on the near side, the $\\Omega$ puzzle and its solution, associated particles on the away side, and two-jet recombination at LHC.

  1. Numerical Field Calculation in Support of the Hardware Commissioning of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwerg, N; Russenschuck, S; 10.1109/TASC.2011.2157344

    2011-01-01

    The hardware commissioning of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) required the testing and qualification of the cryogenic and vacuum system, as well as the electrical systems for the powering of more than 10000 superconducting magnets. Non-conformities had to be resolved within a tight schedule. In this paper we focus on the role that electromagnetic field computation has played during hardware commissioning in terms of analysis of magnet quench, electromagnetic force calculations in busbars and splices, as well as field-quality prediction for the optimization of powering cycles.

  2. Mueller Navelet jets at LHC: a clean test of QCD resummation effects at high energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ducloué; L. Szymanowski; S. Wallon

    2013-09-10

    Mueller Navelet jets were proposed more than 25 years ago as a decisive test of BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders. We here present a complete next-to-leading BFKL study of the azimuthal decorrelation of these jets. This includes both next-to-leading corrections to the Green's function and next-to-leading corrections to the jet vertices. We compare our results with recent data taken at the LHC and results obtained in a fixed order next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculation.

  3. Production of jets at forward rapidities in hadronic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2009-09-07

    We discuss high-pT production processes at forward rapidities in hadron-hadron collisions, and describe recent results from using QCD high-energy factorization in forward jet production at the LHC.

  4. Discovering Inelastic Thermal-Relic Dark Matter at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Izaguirre, Eder; Shuve, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Dark Matter particles with inelastic interactions are ubiquitous in extensions of the Standard Model, yet remain challenging to fully probe with existing strategies. We propose a series of powerful searches at hadron and lepton colliders that are sensitive to inelastic dark matter dynamics. In representative models, we find that the LHC and BaBar could offer strong sensitivity to the thermal-relic dark matter parameter space for dark matter masses between ~100 MeV-100 GeV and fractional mass-splittings above the percent level; future searches at Belle II with a dedicated monophoton trigger could also offer sensitivity to thermal-relic scenarios with masses below a few GeV. Thermal scenarios with either larger masses or splittings are largely ruled out; lower masses remain viable yet may be accessible with other search strategies.

  5. General-purpose event generators for LHC physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, Andy; Butterworth, Jonathan; Gieseke, Stefan; Grellscheid, David; Hoche, Stefan; Hoeth, Hendrik; Krauss, Frank; Lonnblad, Leif; Nurse, Emily; Richardson, Peter; Schumann, Steffen; Seymour, Michael H.; Sjostrand, Torbjorn; Skands, Peter; Webber, Bryan; /Cambridge U.

    2011-03-03

    We review the physics basis, main features and use of general-purpose Monte Carlo event generators for the simulation of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Topics included are: the generation of hard-scattering matrix elements for processes of interest, at both leading and next-to-leading QCD perturbative order; their matching to approximate treatments of higher orders based on the showering approximation; the parton and dipole shower formulations; parton distribution functions for event generators; non-perturbative aspects such as soft QCD collisions, the underlying event and diffractive processes; the string and cluster models for hadron formation; the treatment of hadron and tau decays; the inclusion of QED radiation and beyond-Standard-Model processes. We describe the principal features of the Ariadne, Herwig++, Pythia 8 and Sherpa generators, together with the Rivet and Professor validation and tuning tools, and discuss the physics philosophy behind the proper use of these generators and tools. This review is aimed at phenomenologists wishing to understand better how parton-level predictions are translated into hadron-level events as well as experimentalists wanting a deeper insight into the tools available for signal and background simulation at the LHC.

  6. The standard model and colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchliffe, I.

    1987-03-01

    Some topics in the standard model of strong and electroweak interactions are discussed, as well as how these topics are relevant for the high energy colliders which will become operational in the next few years. The radiative corrections in the Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model are discussed, stressing how these corrections may be measured at LEP and the SLC. CP violation is discussed briefly, followed by a discussion of the Higgs boson and the searches which are relevant to hadron colliders are then discussed. Some of the problems which the standard model does not solve are discussed, and the energy ranges accessible to the new colliders are indicated. (LEW)

  7. Higgs-boson production at the Photon Collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Niezurawski

    2005-03-31

    In this thesis feasibility of the precise measurement of the Higgs-boson production cross section gamma+gamma->higgs->b+bbar at the Photon Collider at TESLA is studied in detail. The study is based on the realistic luminosity spectra simulation. The heavy quark background is estimated using the dedicated code based on NLO QCD calculations. Other background processes, which were neglected in the earlier analyses, are also studied. Also the contribution from the overlaying events, gamma+gamma->hadrons, is taken into account. The non-zero beam crossing angle and the finite size of colliding bunches are included in the event generation. The analysis is based on the full detector simulation with realistic b-tagging, and the criteria of event selection are optimized separately for each considered Higgs-boson mass. For the Standard-Model Higgs boson with mass of 120 to 160 GeV the partial width \\Gamma(h->gamma+gamma)BR(h->b+bbar) can be measured with a statistical accuracy of 2.1-7.7% after one year of the Photon Collider running. The systematic uncertainties of the measurement are estimated to be of the order of 2%. For MSSM Higgs bosons A and H, for M_A=200-350 GeV and tan(beta)=7, the statistical precision of the cross-section measurement is estimated to be 8--34%, for four considered MSSM parameters sets. As heavy neutral Higgs bosons in this scenario may not be discovered at LHC or at the first stage of the e+e- collider, an opportunity of being a discovery machine is also studied for the Photon Collider.

  8. RF Power Generation in LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunner, O C; Valuch, D

    2003-01-01

    The counter-rotating proton beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be captured and then accelerated to their final energies of 2 x 7 TeV by two identical 400 MHz RF systems. The RF power source required for each beam comprises eight 300 kW klystrons. The output power of each klystron is fed via a circulator and a waveguide line to the input coupler of a single-cell super-conducting (SC) cavity. Four klystrons are powered by a 100 kV, 40A AC/DC power converter, previously used for the operation of the LEP klystrons. A five-gap thyratron crowbar protects the four klystrons in each of these units. The technical specification and measured performance of the various high-power elements are discussed. These include the 400MHz/300kW klystrons with emphasis on their group delay and the three-port circulators, which have to cope with peak reflected power levels up to twice the simultaneously applied incident power of 300 kW. In addition, a novel ferrite loaded waveguide absorber, used as termination for port No...

  9. Event simulation for colliders - A basic overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Reuschle

    2014-11-26

    In this article we will discuss the basic calculational concepts to simulate particle physics events at high energy colliders. We will mainly focus on the physics in hadron colliders and particularly on the simulation of the perturbative parts, where we will in turn focus on the next-to-leading order QCD corrections.

  10. Jet energy calibration at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartzman, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Jets are one of the most prominent physics signatures of high energy proton proton (p-p) collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). They are key physics objects for precision measurements and searches for new phenomena. This review provides an overview of the reconstruction and calibration of jets at the LHC during its first Run. ATLAS and CMS developed different approaches for the reconstruction of jets, but use similar methods for the energy calibration. ATLAS reconstructs jets utilizing input signals from their calorimeters and use charged particle tracks to refine their energy measurement and suppress the effects of multiple p-p interactions (pileup). CMS, instead, combines calorimeter and tracking information to build jets from particle flow objects. Jets are calibrated using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations and a residual in situ calibration derived from collision data is applied to correct for the differences in jet response between data and Monte Carlo. Large samples of dijet, Z+jets, and photon+jet e...

  11. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barish, Barry

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we describe the key features of the recently completed technical design for the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 200-500 GeV linear electron-positron collider (expandable to 1 TeV) that is based on 1.3 GHz superconducting radio-frequency (SCRF) technology. The machine parameters and detector characteristics have been chosen to complement the Large Hadron Collider physics, including the discovery of the Higgs boson, and to further exploit this new particle physics energy frontier with a precision instrument. The linear collider design is the result of nearly twenty years of R&D, resulting in a mature conceptual design for the ILC project that reflects an international consensus. We summarize the physics goals and capability of the ILC, the enabling R&D and resulting accelerator design, as well as the concepts for two complementary detectors. The ILC is technically ready to be proposed and built as a next generation lepton collider, perhaps to be built in stages beginning as a Hig...

  12. Hidden-Sector Higgs Bosons at High-Energy Electron-Positron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack H. Collins; James D. Wells

    2012-09-30

    The possibility of a scalar messenger that can couple the Standard Model (SM) to a hidden sector has been discussed in a variety of contexts in the literature in recent years. We consider the case that a new scalar singlet charged under an exotic spontaneously broken Abelian gauge symmetry mixes weakly with the SM Higgs resulting in two scalar mass states, one of which has heavily suppressed couplings to the SM particles. Previous phenomenological studies have focussed on potential signatures for such a model at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). However, there are interesting regions of the parameter space in which the heavier Higgs state would be out of reach for LHC searches if its mass is greater than 1 TeV. We therefore investigate the discovery potential for such a particle at a 3 TeV electron-positron collider, which is motivated by the recent developments of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). We find that such an experiment could substantially extend our discovery reach for a heavy, weakly coupled Higgs boson, and we discuss three possible search channels.

  13. Near-threshold production of $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ at a fixed-target experiment at the future ultra-high-energy proton colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Lansberg; R. E. Mikkelsen; U. I Uggerhøj

    2015-08-18

    We outline the opportunities to study the production of the Standard Model bosons, $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ at "low" energies at fixed-target experiments based at possible future ultra-high-energy proton colliders, \\ie\\ the High-Energy LHC, the Super proton-proton Collider and the Future Circular Collider -- hadron-hadron. These can be indeed made in conjunction with the proposed future colliders designed to reach up to $\\sqrt{s}=100$ TeV by using bent crystals to extract part of the halo of the beam which would then impinge on a fixed target. Without disturbing the collider operation, this technique allows for the extraction of a substantial amount of particles in addition to serve for a beam-cleaning purpose. With this method, high-luminosity fixed-target studies at centre-of-mass energies above the $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ masses, $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 170-300$ GeV, are possible. We also discuss the possibility offered by an internal gas target, which can also be used as luminosity monitor by studying the beam transverse shape.

  14. Near-threshold production of $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ at a fixed-target experiment at the future ultra-high-energy proton colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansberg, J P; Uggerhøj, U I

    2015-01-01

    We outline the opportunities to study the production of the Standard Model bosons, $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ at "low" energies at fixed-target experiments based at possible future ultra-high-energy proton colliders, \\ie\\ the High-Energy LHC, the Super proton-proton Collider and the Future Circular Collider -- hadron-hadron. These can be indeed made in conjunction with the proposed future colliders designed to reach up to $\\sqrt{s}=100$ TeV by using bent crystals to extract part of the halo of the beam which would then impinge on a fixed target. Without disturbing the collider operation, this technique allows for the extraction of a substantial amount of particles in addition to serve for a beam-cleaning purpose. With this method, high-luminosity fixed-target studies at centre-of-mass energies above the $W^\\pm$, $Z^0$ and $H^0$ masses, $\\sqrt{s} \\simeq 170-300$ GeV, are possible. We also discuss the possibility offered by an internal gas target, which can also be used as luminosity monitor by studying the beam ...

  15. LAr Calorimeter Performance and Commissioning for LHC Run-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spettel, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS detector was built to study proton-proton collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at a center of mass energy of up to 14 TeV. The Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry as well as the hadronic calorimetry in the endcap and forward regions. They have shown excellent performance during the first LHC data taking campaign, from 2010 to 2012, so-called Run 1, at a peak luminosity of $8 \\times 10^{33} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$. During the next run, peak luminosities of $1.5 \\times 10^{34} \\text{cm}^{-2}\\text{s}^{-1}$ and even higher are expected at a 25ns bunch spacing. Such a high collision rate may have an impact on the quality of the energy reconstruction which is attempted to be maintained at a high level using a calibration procedure described in this contribution. It also poses major challenges to the first level of the trigger system which is constrained to a maximal rate of 100 kHz. For Run-3, scheduled to start in 2019, instantaneous luminos...

  16. Risk analysis of the LHC underground area fire risk due to faulty electrical equipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, A

    2007-01-01

    The European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Geneva, Switzerland, is currently building the latest generation of particle accelerators, the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The machine is housed in a circular tunnel of 27 km of circumference and is situated approximately 100 metres beneath the surface astride the Franco-Swiss border. Electrically induced fires in the LHC are a major concern, since an incident could present a threat to CERN personnel as well as the public. Moreover, the loss of equipment would result in significant costs and downtime. However, the amount of electrical equipment in the underground area required for operation, supervision and control of the machine is essential. Thus the present thesis is assessing the risk of fire due to faulty electrical equipment in both a qualitative as well as quantitative way. The recommendations following the qualitative analysis suggest the introduction of fire protection zones for the areas with the highest risk of fire due to a combination of p...

  17. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2015-01-01

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  18. Neutrinos and Collider Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank F. Deppisch; P. S. Bhupal Dev; Apostolos Pilaftsis

    2015-08-04

    We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

  19. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsten Buesser

    2013-06-13

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed electron-positron collider for the centre-of-mass energy range of 200 to 500 GeV and with upgrade options towards 1 TeV. The ILC would be the ideal tool to explore with high precision the properties of the new Higgs-like particle that has recently been discovered at the LHC with a mass of around 125 GeV. The ILC accelerator design is based on the mature superconducting technology that has been developed in the TESLA collaboration and that is currently being used for the European XFEL. The exploitation of the huge physics potential of the ILC is a challenge for the design of the ILC detectors.

  20. Automated next-to-leading order predictions for new physics at the LHC: the case of colored scalar pair production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Céline Degrande; Benjamin Fuks; Valentin Hirschi; Josselin Proudom; Hua-Sheng Shao

    2015-04-17

    We present for the first time the full automation of collider predictions matched with parton showers at the next-to-leading accuracy in QCD within non-trivial extensions of the Standard Model. The sole inputs required from the user are the model Lagrangian and the process of interest. As an application of the above, we explore scenarios beyond the Standard Model where new colored scalar particles can be pair produced in hadron collisions. Using simplified models to describe the new field interactions with the Standard Model, we present precision predictions for the LHC within the MadGraph5 aMC@NLO framework.

  1. Automated next-to-leading order predictions for new physics at the LHC: The case of colored scalar pair production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Degrande, Céline; Fuks, Benjamin; Hirschi, Valentin; Proudom, Josselin; Shao, Hua -Sheng

    2015-05-05

    We present for the first time the full automation of collider predictions matched with parton showers at the next-to-leading accuracy in QCD within nontrivial extensions of the standard model. The sole inputs required from the user are the model Lagrangian and the process of interest. As an application of the above, we explore scenarios beyond the standard model where new colored scalar particles can be pair produced in hadron collisions. Using simplified models to describe the new field interactions with the standard model, we present precision predictions for the LHC within the MadGraph5_aMC@NLO framework.

  2. Can one use Mueller-Navelet jets at LHC as a clean test of QCD resummation effects at high energy?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ducloué; L. Szymanowski; S. Wallon

    2013-12-09

    The measurement of azimuthal correlations of Mueller-Navelet jets is generally considered as a decisive test to reveal the effect of BFKL dynamics at hadron colliders. The first experimental study of these correlations at the LHC has been recently performed by the CMS collaboration. We show that the ratios of cosine moments of the azimuthal distribution are successfully described within our next-to-leading logarithmic BFKL treatment. The whole set of CMS data for the azimuthal correlations can also be consistently described provided that one uses a larger renormalization/factorization scale than its natural value.

  3. First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; Bravin, Enrico; Burtin, Gerard; Guerrero, Ana; Jeff, Adam; Rabiller, Aurelie; Roncarolo, Federico; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-13

    The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

  4. First Operation of the Abort Gap Monitor for LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lefevre, Thibaut; /CERN; Bart Pedersen, Stephane; /CERN; Boccardi, Andrea; /CERN; Bravin, Enrico; /CERN; Goldblatt, A.; /CERN; Jeff, Adam; /CERN; Roncarolo, Federico; /CERN; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

    2012-07-06

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) beam-dump system relies on extraction kickers that need 3 microseconds to rise to their nominal field. Since particles transiting the kickers during the rise will not be dumped properly, the proton population in this interval must always remain below quench and damage limits. A specific monitor to measure the particle population of this gap has been designed based on the detection of synchrotron radiation using a gated photomultiplier. Since the quench and damage limits change with the beam energy, the acceptable population in the abort gap and the settings of the monitor must adapt accordingly. This paper presents the design of the monitor, the calibration procedure and the detector performance with beam.

  5. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Micha? [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  6. Probing top-Z dipole moments at the LHC and ILC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the weak electric and magnetic dipole moments of top quark-Z boson interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Their vanishingly small magnitude in the Standard Model makes these couplings ideal for probing New Physics interactions and for exploring the role of top quarks in electroweak symmetry breaking. In our analysis, we consider the production of two top quarks in association with a Z boson at the LHC, and top quark pairs mediated by neutral gauge bosons at the ILC. These processes yield direct sensitivity to top quark-Z boson interactions and complement indirectmore »constraints from electroweak precision data. Our computation is accurate to next-to-leading order in QCD, we include the full decay chain of top quarks and the Z boson, and account for theoretical uncertainties in our constraints. Furthermore, we find that LHC experiments will soon be able to probe weak dipole moments for the first time.« less

  7. Design and Performance Optimization of the LHC Collimation System (CERN-THESIS-2006-069)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert-Démolaize, G

    2006-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is presently under construction at CERN. The LHC is a circular accelerator that stores proton beams and accelerates them to a 7 TeV beam energy. The required bending fields are achieved with super-conducting magnets. The stored proton beams are collided in experimental detectors and produce a design luminosity of 1034 cmâ??2sâ??1. Every storage ring encounters unavoidable proton losses. The protons that diffuse into the so-called beam halo can touch accelerator components. In order to avoid quenches of the superconducting magnets, the halo protons must be removed before reaching the magnets. This is achieved with a multi-stage cleaning system, built out of two-sided collimators that are located at adequate positions in the machine. Due to the high stored beam intensity (required for high luminosity), the efficiency of the LHC beam cleaning must be much better than in any other exisiting machine: not more than 0.00002 % of protons hitting the collimators may escape and imp...

  8. $WW?/Z$ production in the Randall-Sundrum model at LHC and CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li Xiao-Zhou; Ma Wen-Gan; Zhang Ren-You; Guo Lei

    2013-03-26

    We study the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ productions at both the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) in the framework of the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model. The impacts of the virtual RS Kaluza-Klein (KK) graviton on these processes are studied and compared with the standard model (SM) background. We present the integrated and differential cross sections in both the RS model and the SM. The results show that the relative RS discrepancies at the CLIC differ from those at the LHC, particularly in the transverse momentum and rapidity distributions. We also find that the RS signature performance, as a result of the resonance character of the RS KK-graviton spectrum, is distinctively unlike that in the large extra dimensions model. We conclude that the CLIC with unprecedented precision and high center-of-mass energy has a potential advantage over the LHC in exploring the effects of the RS KK graviton on the $W^+W^-\\gamma(Z)$ production processes.

  9. Search for Top Quark FCNC Couplings in Z' Models at the LHC and CLIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Cakir; I. T. Cakir; A. Senol; A. T. Tasci

    2010-05-28

    The top quark is the heaviest particle to date discovered, with a mass close to the electroweak symmetry breaking scale. It is expected that the top quark would be sensitive to the new physics at the TeV scale. One of the most important aspects of the top quark physics can be the investigation of the possible anomalous couplings. Here, we study the top quark flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings via the extra gauge boson Z' at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) energies. We calculate the total cross sections for the signal and the corresponding Standard Model (SM) background processes. For an FCNC mixing parameter x=0.2 and the sequential Z' mass of 1 TeV, we find the single top quark FCNC production cross sections 0.38(1.76) fb at the LHC with sqrt{s_{pp}}=7(14) TeV, respectively. For the resonance production of sequential Z' boson and decays to single top quark at the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) energies, including the initial state radiation and beamstrahlung effects, we find the cross section 27.96(0.91) fb at sqrt{s_{e^{+}e^{-}}}=1(3) TeV, respectively. We make the analysis to investigate the parameter space (mixing-mass) through various Z' models. It is shown that the results benefit from the flavor tagging.

  10. Baryon Production at LHC and Very High Energy Cosmic Ray Spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olga I. Piskounova

    2015-01-27

    The spectra of baryons at LHC can explain the features of the proton spectra in cosmic rays (CR). It seems important to study all baryon data that are available from collider experiments in wide range of energies. Transverse momentum spectra of baryons from RHIC ($\\sqrt(s)$=62 and 200 GeV) and from LHC ($\\sqrt(s)$=0.9 and 7 TeV) have been considered. It is seen that the slope of distributions at low $p_T$'s is changing with energy. The QGSM fit of these spectra gives the average transverse momenta which behave as $s^{0.06}$ that is similar to the previously observed behavior of $\\Lambda^0$ hyperon spectra. The change in average transverse momenta that are slowly growing in VHE hadron interactions at CR detectors cannot cause the "knee" in measured cosmic ray proton spectra. In addition, the available data on heavy quark hadron production from LHC-b at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV were also studied. The preliminary dependence of hadron average transverse momenta on their masses at LHC energy is presented. The possible source of cosmic ray antiparticle-to-particle ratios that are growing with energy was analyzed in the framework of QGSM, where the growing ratios are the result of local leading asymmetry between the production spectra of baryons and antibaryons in the kinematical region of proton target fragmentation. In the laboratory system of cosmic ray measurements this spectrum asymmetry will be seen as growing ratio of secondary antiparticle-to-particle spectra until the certain energy of secondaries. This conclusion makes the particle production at the sources of very high energy cosmic protons important, if the interactions with positive target matter would have place in proximity of these sources.

  11. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after three years of LHC operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De La Torre, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  12. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after two years of LHC operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AbouZeid, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  13. LHCb : LHCbVELO: Performance and Radiation Damage in LHC Run I and Preparationfor Run II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szumlak, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 um thick half-disc silicon sensors with R-measuring and Phi-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 um is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 x 10...

  14. Measurement of neutron production in the very forward rapidity at LHC $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV p-p collision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawade, Kentaro

    Ultra-high-energy cosmic-rays ``UHECRs'' were observed indirectly, and their primary properties are determined by Monte Carlo simulations with hadronic interaction models. However, uncertainty of the hadronic interaction models due to lack of calibration data at energy near UHECR is associated with the large uncertainty of cosmic-ray observations. Therefore, the hadronic interaction models must be calibrated by using high energy accelerators. The Large Hadron Collider forward (LHCf) experiment was designed to verify the hadron interaction models by using the LHC. Because the LHCf detectors were optimized to measure electro-magnetic showers, the performance of the LHCf detectors for hadron shower measurement has not been studied in detail yet. In order to measure forward neutron spectra, the performance of LHCf detectors for hadron showers was evaluated by using Monte Carlo simulations and 350 GeV test beam protons at CERN-SPS for the first time. The detection efficiency was estimated to be from 70\\% to 80\\% f...

  15. Discrimination of New Physics Models with the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masaki Asano; Tomoyuki Saito; Taikan Suehara; Keisuke Fujii; R. S. Hundi; Hideo Itoh; Shigeki Matsumoto; Nobuchika Okada; Yosuke Takubo; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2011-09-28

    The large hadron collider (LHC) is anticipated to provide signals of new physics at the TeV scale, which are likely to involve production of a WIMP dark matter candidate. The international linear collider (ILC) is to sort out these signals and lead us to some viable model of the new physics at the TeV scale. In this article, we discuss how the ILC can discriminate new physics models, taking the following three examples: the inert Higgs model, the supersymmetric model, and the littlest Higgs model with T-parity. These models predict dark matter particles with different spins, 0, 1/2, and 1, respectively, and hence comprise representative scenarios. Specifically, we focus on the pair production process, e+e- -> chi+chi- -> chi0chi0W+W-, where chi0 and chi+- are the WIMP dark matter and a new charged particle predicted in each of these models. We then evaluate how accurately the properties of these new particles can be determined at the ILC and demonstrate that the ILC is capable of identifying the spin of the new charged particle and discriminating these models.

  16. Steady state heat transfer experimental studies of LHC superconducting cables operating in cryogenic environment of superfluid helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santandrea, Dario; Tuccillo, Raffaele; Granieri, Pier Paolo.

    The heat management is a basic and fundamental aspect of the superconducting magnets used in the CERN Large Hadron Collider. Indeed, the coil temperature must be kept below the critical value, despite the heat which can be generated or deposited in the magnet during the normal operations. Therefore, this thesis work aims at determining the heating power which can be extracted from the superconducting cables of the LHC, specially through their electrical insulation which represents the main thermal barrier. An experimental measurement campaign in superfluid helium bath was performed on several samples reproducting the main LHC magnets. The heating power was generated in the sample by Joule heating and the temperature increase was measured by means of Cernox bare chip and thermocouples. An innovative instrumentation technique which also includes the in-situ calibration of the thermocouples was developed. A thorough uncertainty analysis on the overall measurement chain concluded the experimental setup. The prese...

  17. The Real-Time Data Analysis and Decision System for Particle Flux Detection in the LHC Accelerator at CERN.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is an accelerator unprecedented in terms of beam energy, particle production rate and also in the potential of self-destruction. Its operation requires a large variety of instrumentation, not only for the control of the beams, but also for the protection of the complex hardware systems. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from becoming normal conducting and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. For its operation, the system requires 3600 detectors to be placed at various locations around the 27 km ring. The measurement system is sub-divided to the tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitising and transmitting the data, and the surface electronics, which receive the data via 2 km optical data links, process, analyze, store and issue warning...

  18. Discrimination of low missing energy look-alikes at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirtiman Ghosh; Satyanarayan Mukhopadhyay; Biswarup Mukhopadhyaya

    2010-10-28

    The problem of discriminating possible scenarios of TeV scale new physics with large missing energy signature at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) has received some attention in the recent past. We consider the complementary, and yet unexplored, case of theories predicting much softer missing energy spectra. As there is enough scope for such models to fake each other by having similar final states at the LHC, we have outlined a systematic method based on a combination of different kinematic features which can be used to distinguish among different possibilities. These features often trace back to the underlying mass spectrum and the spins of the new particles present in these models. As examples of "low missing energy look-alikes", we consider Supersymmetry with R-parity violation, Universal Extra Dimensions with both KK-parity conserved and KK-parity violated and the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity violated by the Wess-Zumino-Witten anomaly term. Through detailed Monte Carlo analysis of the four and higher lepton final states predicted by these models, we show that the models in their minimal forms may be distinguished at the LHC, while non-minimal variations can always leave scope for further confusion. We find that, for strongly interacting new particle mass-scale ~600 GeV (1 TeV), the simplest versions of the different theories can be discriminated at the LHC running at sqrt{s}=14 TeV within an integrated luminosity of 5 (30) fb^{-1}.

  19. The study of background electric field in relativistic heavy-ion collisions in the RHIC and LHC energy regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Yang; Cai, Xu; Feng, Sheng-Qin

    2015-01-01

    It was proposed that the electric fields may lead to chiral separation in QGP, which is called the chiral electric separation effect. The strong electromagnetic field and the QCD vacuum can both completely be produced in the off-central nuclear-nuclear collision. Based on the theory of Kharzeev, McLerran, and Warringa, we used the Wood-Saxon nucleon distribution to replace that of the uniform distribution to improve the electric field calculation method of the off-central collision. The chiral electro field distribution at Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) energy regions are systematically studied in this paper. Compared with magnetic field spatial distribution, electric field shows some different features in relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  20. Practical Statistics for the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyle Cranmer

    2015-03-26

    This document is a pedagogical introduction to statistics for particle physics. Emphasis is placed on the terminology, concepts, and methods being used at the Large Hadron Collider. The document addresses both the statistical tests applied to a model of the data and the modeling itself.

  1. Director's colloquium March 18 large hadron collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National Nuclear SecurityDirector's colloquium large

  2. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    version of the project (CBA) based on magnets wound fromand the early phase of the CBA. Constructed in two stages asdipoles and the cold iron CBA geometry. Sadly, the next

  3. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanlan, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Trans. on Applied Superconductivity, 5 (1995), J.R. Millersummer study on superconductingdevices and acceleratorsGeneral. Advanced Superconductors (IGC). Waterbury.

  4. Higgs Hunting at the Large Hadron Collider

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-DoseOptions forHeavy-DutyHere�sHiddenDevelopmentSinjini

  5. An updated analysis of Inert Higgs Doublet Model in light of the recent results from LUX, PLANCK, AMS-02 and LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arhrib, Abdesslam; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yuan, Tzu-Chiang; Yuan, Qiang E-mail: yue-lin.tsai@ipmu.jp E-mail: tcyuan@phys.sinica.edu.tw

    2014-06-01

    In light of the recent discovery by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of a Higgs-like particle with a narrow mass range of 125–126 GeV, we perform an updated analysis on one of the popular scalar dark matter models, the Inert Higgs Doublet Model (IHDM). We take into account in our likelihood analysis of various experimental constraints, including recent relic density measurement, dark matter direct and indirect detection constraints as well as the latest collider constraints on the invisible decay width of the Higgs boson and monojet search at the LHC. It is shown that if the invisible decay of the standard model Higgs boson is open, LHC as well as direct detection experiments like LUX and XENON100 could put stringent limits on the Higgs boson couplings to dark matter. We find that the most favoured parameter space for IHDM corresponds to dark matter with a mass less than 100 GeV or so. In particular, the best-fit points are at the dark matter mass around 70 GeV where the invisible Higgs decay to dark matter is closed. Scalar dark matter in the higher mass range of 0.5–4 TeV is also explored in our study. Projected sensitivities for the future experiments of monojet at LHC-14, XENON1T and AMS-02 one year antiproton flux are shown to put further constraints on the existing parameter space of IHDM.

  6. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after two years of LHC operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AperioBella, L; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry. The most forward part (pseudo-rapidity region 3.1-4.9) contains a electromagnetic section and two hadronic wheels. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over t...

  7. Mass, Spin, and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, William Lathrop

    2011-01-01

    E. Skillman, “New BBN limits on physics beyond the standardH. Simmons, “Multi - jet physics at hadron colliders,” Nucl.Group], “Review of particle physics,” Phys. Lett. B [108] J.

  8. Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.

    2009-10-19

    Parameters are given of muon colliders with center of mass energies of 1.5 and 3 TeV. Pion production is from protons on a mercury target. Capture, decay, and phase rotation yields bunch trains of both muon signs. Six dimensional cooling reduces the emittances until the trains are merged into single bunches, one of each sign. Further cooling in 6 dimensions is then applied, followed by final transverse cooling in 50 T solenoids. After acceleration the muons enter the collider ring. Ongoing R&D is discussed.

  9. Higgs, supersymmetry and dark matter after Run I of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beranger Dumont

    2014-11-13

    Two major problems call for an extension of the Standard Model (SM): the hierarchy problem in the Higgs sector and the dark matter in the Universe. The discovery of a Higgs boson with mass of about 125 GeV was clearly the most significant piece of news from CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC). In addition to representing the ultimate triumph of the SM, it shed new light on the hierarchy problem and opened up new ways of probing new physics. The various measurements performed at Run I of the LHC constrain the Higgs couplings to SM particles as well as invisible and undetected decays. In this thesis, the impact of the LHC Higgs results on various new physics scenarios is assessed, carefully taking into account uncertainties and correlations between them. Generic modifications of the Higgs coupling strengths, possibly arising from extended Higgs sectors or higher-dimensional operators, are considered. Furthermore, specific new physics models are tested. This includes, in particular, the phenomenological Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model. While a Higgs boson has been found, no sign of beyond the SM physics was observed at Run I of the LHC in spite of the large number of searches performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The implications of the negative results obtained in these searches constitute another important part of this thesis. First, supersymmetric models with a dark matter candidate are investigated in light of the negative searches for supersymmetry at the LHC using a so-called "simplified model" approach. Second, tools using simulated events to constrain any new physics scenario from the LHC results are presented. Moreover, during this thesis the selection criteria of several beyond the SM analyses have been reimplemented in the MadAnalysis 5 framework and made available in a public database.

  10. Top-quark production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d'Enterria, David; Paukkunen, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Single and pair top-quark production in proton-lead (p-Pb) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and future circular collider (FCC) energies, are studied with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations including nuclear parton distribution functions. At the LHC, the pair-production cross sections amount to sigma(t-tbar) = 3.4 mub in Pb-Pb at sqrt(s) = 5.5 TeV, and sigma(t-tbar) = 60 nb in p-Pb at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. At the FCC energies of sqrt(s) = 39 and 63 TeV, the same cross sections are factors of 90 and 55 times larger respectively. In the leptonic final-state t-tbar --> W+b W-bbar --> b bbar l+l- nu+nu-, after typical acceptance and efficiency cuts, one expects about 90 and 300 top-quarks per nominal LHC-year and 4.7 10^4 and 10^5 per FCC-year in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions respectively. The total t-tbar cross sections, dominated by gluon fusion processes, are enhanced by 3--8% in nuclear compared to p-p collisions due to an overall net gluon antishadowing, altho...

  11. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strizenec, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudorapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a parallel plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 88.5 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beams. Since then...

  12. Performance of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter after three years of LHC operation and plans for a future upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikiforou, N; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LHC beam...

  13. Measurement of the charged-hadron spectra and nuclear modification factor in lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balek, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measures charged hadron spectra obtained in 2010 and 2011 lead-lead LHC data taking periods with total integrated statistics of 0.15nb${}^{-1}$. The results are compared to the pp spectra of charged hadrons at the same centre-of-mass energy based on the data sample with integrated luminosity of 4.2pb${}^{-1}$ obtained by the ATLAS experiment in 2011 and 2013. These allows for a detailed comparison of the two collision systems in a wide transverse momentum ($0.5 < p_\\mathrm{T} < 150$GeV) and pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|<2$) ranges in different centrality intervals of Pb+Pb collision. The nuclear modification factor $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ is presented in detail as a function of centrality, $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and $\\eta$. It shows a distinct $p_\\mathrm{T}$-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7GeV. Above 60GeV, it is consistent with a flat, centrality-dependent, value within the uncertainties. The value is $0.55\\pm0.01(stat.)\\pm0.04(syst.)$ in the most cen...

  14. Measurement of the charged hadron spectra and nuclear modification factor in lead-lead collisions with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balek, Petr; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measures charged hadron spectra obtained in 2010-2011 lead-lead LHC data taking periods with total integrated statistics of 0.15 nb${}^{-1}$. The results are compared to the pp spectra of charged hadrons at the same centre-of-mass energy based on the data sample with integrated luminosity of 4 pb${}^{-1}$ obtained by the ATLAS experiment in 2013. These allows for a detailed comparison of the two collision systems in a wide transverse momentum ($0.5< p_\\mathrm{T}<150$ GeV) and pseudorapidity ($|\\eta|<2$) ranges in different centrality intervals of Pb+Pb collision. The nuclear modification factors $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ and $R_\\mathrm{CP}$ are presented in detail as a function of centrality, $p_\\mathrm{T}$ and $\\eta$. They show a distinct $p_\\mathrm{T}$-dependence with a pronounced minimum at about 7GeV. Above 60GeV, $R_\\mathrm{AA}$ is consistent with a flat, centrality-dependent, value within the uncertainties. The value is 0.55±0.01(stat.)±0.04(syst....

  15. PROCEEDINGS OF THE WORKSHOP ON LHC INTERACTION REGION CORRECTION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FISCHER,W.; WEI,J.

    1999-09-02

    The Workshop on LHC Interaction Region Correction Systems was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York, on 6 and 7 May 1999. It was attended by 25 participants from 5 institutions. The performance of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at collision energy is limited by the field quality of the interaction region quadrupoles and dipoles. In three sessions the workshop addressed the field quality of the these magnets, reviewed the principles and efficiency of global and local correction schemes and finalized a corrector layout. The session on Field Quality Issues, chaired by J. Strait (FNAL), discussed the progress made by KEK and FNAL in achieving the best possible field quality in the interaction region quadrupoles. Results of simulation studies were presented that assess the effects of magnetic field errors with simulation studies. Attention was given to the uncertainties in predicting and measuring field errors. The session on Global Correction, chaired by J.-P. Koutchouk (CERN), considered methods of reducing the nonlinear detuning or resonance driving terms in the accelerator one-turn map by either sorting or correcting. The session also discussed the crossing angle dependence of the dynamic aperture and operational experience from LEP. The session on Local Correction, chaired by T. Taylor (CERN), discussed the location, strength and effectiveness of multipole correctors in the interaction regions for both proton and heavy ion operation. Discussions were based on technical feasibility considerations and dynamic aperture requirements. The work on linear corrections in the interaction regions was reviewed.

  16. Natural Priors, CMSSM Fits and LHC Weather Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben C Allanach; Kyle Cranmer; Christopher G Lester; Arne M Weber

    2007-07-05

    Previous LHC forecasts for the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), based on current astrophysical and laboratory measurements, have used priors that are flat in the parameter tan beta, while being constrained to postdict the central experimental value of MZ. We construct a different, new and more natural prior with a measure in mu and B (the more fundamental MSSM parameters from which tan beta and MZ are actually derived). We find that as a consequence this choice leads to a well defined fine-tuning measure in the parameter space. We investigate the effect of such on global CMSSM fits to indirect constraints, providing posterior probability distributions for Large Hadron Collider (LHC) sparticle production cross sections. The change in priors has a significant effect, strongly suppressing the pseudoscalar Higgs boson dark matter annihilation region, and diminishing the probable values of sparticle masses. We also show how to interpret fit information from a Markov Chain Monte Carlo in a frequentist fashion; namely by using the profile likelihood. Bayesian and frequentist interpretations of CMSSM fits are compared and contrasted.

  17. Jets in Particle Colliders Andrew Wong!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Jets in Particle Colliders Andrew Wong! #12;Topics · What are jets? · How are they produced? · What do we use to study jets? #12;What are jets? · Bunch of different jets #12;Pretty picture! #12;What's in a jet? · Hadrons ­ Kaons, Pions, Protons, Neutrons · Leptons ­ Mainly electrons and muons · These have

  18. UFOs in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, T; Goddard, B; Holzer, E B; Jimenez, J M; Lechner, V; Mertens, V; Nebot Del Busto, E; Nordt, A; Uythoven, J; Velghe, B; Wenninger, J; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    One of the major known limitations for the performance of the Large Hadron Collider are so called UFOs (Unidentified Falling Objects). UFOs were first observed in July 2010 and caused numerous protection beam dumps since then. They are presumably micrometer sized dust particles that lead to fast beam losses with a duration of about 10 turns when they interact with the beam. In 2011, the diagnostics for such events are highly increased which allows estimations of the properties, dynamics and production mechanisms of the dust particles. The state of knowledge and mitigation strategies are presented.

  19. Systematics of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum and the nuclear suppression factor in heavy-ion collisions from sqrt{s}=200 GeV to sqrt{s} =2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Renk; Hannu Holopainen; Risto Paatelainen; Kari J. Eskola

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, our goal is to make a simultaneous analysis of the high- and low-P_T parts of the charged-hadron P_T spectrum measured by the ALICE collaboration in central Pb-Pb collisions at sqrt{s}=2.76 TeV at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), based on models which have been successfully applied and constrained in Au-Au collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). For the hydrodynamical modeling with which we obtain the low-P_T spectrum, we have computed the initial conditions based on perturbative QCD (pQCD) minijet production and saturation. The sensitivity of the obtained charged-hadron P_T spectrum on the hydrodynamic model parameters is studied. For the high-P_T part, we apply a number of parton-medium interaction models, which are tuned to describe the nuclear suppression factor R_AA measured at the RHIC in central Au-Au collisions at sqrt{s}=200 GeV. We find that the higher kinematic reach of the LHC, manifest in the hardening of the pQCD parton spectral slope, is in principle very efficient in discriminating the various models. However, due to the uncertainties in the p-p baseline, none of the tested models can be firmly ruled out with the present ALICE data. Comparison with the LHC data in this approach also shows that the matching of the hydrodynamic and pQCD+jet quenching components leaves fairly little room for other hadron production mechanisms in the cross-over region P_T=4-5 GeV.

  20. PanDA: Exascale Federation of Resources for the ATLAS Experiment at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando Harald; The ATLAS collaboration; De, Kaushik; Hover, John; Klimentov, Alexei; Maeno, Tadashi; Nilsson, Paul; Oleynik, Danila; Padolski, Siarhei; Panitkin, Sergey; Petrosyan, Artem; Wenaus, Torre

    2015-01-01

    After a scheduled maintenance and upgrade period, the world’s largest and most powerful machine - the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) - is about to enter its second run at unprecedented energies. In order to exploit the scientific potential of the machine, the experiments at the LHC face computational challenges with enormous data volumes that need to be analysed by thousand of physics users and compared to simulated data. Given diverse funding constraints, the computational resources for the LHC have been deployed in a worldwide mesh of data centres, connected to each other through Grid technologies. The PanDA (Production and Distributed Analysis) system was developed in 2005 for the ATLAS experiment on top of this heterogeneous infrastructure to seamlessly integrate the computational resources and give the users the feeling of a unique system. Since its origins, PanDA has evolved together with upcoming computing paradigms in and outside HEP, such as changes in the networking model, Cloud Computing and HPC. It ...

  1. Tevatron instrumentation: boosting collider performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, Vladimir; Jansson, Andreas; Moore, Ronald; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    The Tevatron in Collider Run II (2001-present) is operating with six times more bunches, many times higher beam intensities and luminosities than in Run I (1992-1995). Beam diagnostics were crucial for the machine start-up and the never-ending luminosity upgrade campaign. We present the overall picture of the Tevatron diagnostics development for Run II, outline machine needs for new instrumentation, present several notable examples that led to Tevatron performance improvements, and discuss the lessons for the next big machines--LHC and ILC.

  2. Twistor Spinoffs for Collider Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Lance

    2005-12-19

    Finding the adding up of Feynman diagrams tedious? Hidden symmetries found in the sums of diagrams suggest there is a better way to predict the results of particle collisions - in the past two years, spin-offs of a new theory, known as the Twistor String Theory, have led to the development of efficient alternatives to Feynman diagrams which can be useful for work at the Tevatron, the LHC and for future research at the International Linear Collider. Come see what this 'twistor' is all about!

  3. The readiness of the ATLAS Trigger-DAQ system for the second LHC run

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rammensee, Michael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After its first shutdown, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will provide proton-proton collisions with increased luminosity and energy. In the ATLAS experiment~\\cite{Atlas}, the Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system has been upgraded to deal with the increased event rates~\\cite{TDAQPhase1}. The updated system is radically different from the previous implementation, both in terms of architecture and expected performance. The main architecture has been reshaped in order to profit from the technological progress and to maximize the flexibility and efficiency of the data selection process. Design choices and the strategies employed to minimize the data-collection and the selection latency will be discussed. First results of tests done during the commissioning phase and the operational performance after the first months of data taking will be presented.

  4. $H^\\pm$ in the $W^\\pm h$ channel at the LHC Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rikard Enberg; William Klemm; Stefano Moretti; Shoaib Munir; Glenn Wouda

    2015-06-14

    We analyse the discovery prospects of the charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, via its decay in the $W^\\pm h$ channel in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as several 2-Higgs Doublet Models (2HDMs). $h$, the lightest scalar Higgs boson in these models, is identified with the recently discovered $\\sim 125$ GeV state, $H_\\text{obs}$, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We find that, while it provides an important input in the kinematic selection of signal events, the measured $H_\\text{obs}$ mass renders this channel inaccessible in the MSSM. In the 2HDMs though, through a dedicated signal-to-background analysis for the $pp\\to t(\\bar{b})H^-\\to \\ell^\\pm\

  5. $H^\\pm$ in the $W^\\pm h$ channel at the LHC Run 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enberg, Rikard; Moretti, Stefano; Munir, Shoaib; Wouda, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    We analyse the discovery prospects of the charged Higgs boson, $H^\\pm$, via its decay in the $W^\\pm h$ channel in the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) as well as several 2-Higgs Doublet Models (2HDMs). $h$, the lightest scalar Higgs boson in these models, is identified with the recently discovered $\\sim 125$ GeV state, $H_\\text{obs}$, at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We find that, while it provides an important input in the kinematic selection of signal events, the measured $H_\\text{obs}$ mass renders this channel inaccessible in the MSSM. In the 2HDMs though, through a dedicated signal-to-background analysis for the $pp\\to t(\\bar{b})H^-\\to \\ell^\\pm\

  6. Commissioning and Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with high energy collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300,000 thin-wall drift-tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points for charged particle tracks. The straws have 0.13 mm resolution and measure tracks with $ ert eta ert 0.5 GeV$. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high Lorenz gamma particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC proton-proton collisions.

  7. Production Rate of Second KK Gauge Bosons in UED Models at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsumoto, Shigeki; Senami, Masato; Yamanaka, Masato

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the production rates of the second Kaluza-Klein (KK) photon $\\gamma^{(2)}$ and Z boson $Z^{(2)}$ at the LHC including all significant processes in the minimal universal extra dimension (MUED) model. For discrimination of the MUED model from other TeV scale models in hadron collider experiments, $\\gamma^{(2)}$ and $Z^{(2)}$ play a crucial role. In order to discuss the discrimination and calculate their production rates, we derive effective Lagrangian containing KK number violating operators. We show that KK number violating processes are extremely important for the compactification scale larger than 800 GeV. We find that, with an integrated luminosity of 100 fb$^{-1}$, $\\gamma^{(2)}$ and $Z^{(2)}$ are produced 10$^6$ - 10$^2$ for the compactification scale between 400 GeV and 2000 GeV.

  8. Ionisation losses and wire scanner heating evaluation, possible solutions, application to the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, C

    2000-01-01

    Harmful heating mechanisms, resulting in wire breakage, limit the utilisation of wire scanner monitors to below a given beam intensity. This threshold depends on the accelerator design parameters. In lepton colliders, the short beam bunches generate strong wake-fields inside the vacuum pipe which are sensed by the wire and are the predominant current limit. These effects can be minimised by a smooth design of the monitor cross section and by choosing a wire made of an insulating material [1]. A second source of energy deposition inside the wire, also present in hadron machines, and even when the wire material is insulating, results from collision and ionisation of the wire material atoms by the incident beam particles. Calculations are presented to evaluate the efficiency of this process and a possible solution is suggested which may reduce this limitation. An example is given for the case of the LHC.

  9. First Assessment of Reliability Data for the LHC Accelerator and Detector Cryogenic System Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perinic, G; Alonso-Canella, I; Balle, C; Barth, K; Bel, J F; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Brodzinski, K; Casas-Cubillos, J; Cuccuru, G; Cugnet, M; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Dufay-Chanat, L; Fabre, C; Ferlin, G; Fluder, C; Gavard, E; Girardot, R; Haug, F; Herblin, L; Junker, S; Klabi , T; Knoops, S; Lamboy, J P; Legrand, D; Metselaar, J; Park, A; Perin, A; Pezzetti, M; Penacoba-Fernandez, G; Pirotte, O; Rogez, E; Suraci, A; Stewart, L; Tavian, L J; Tovar-Gonzalez, A; Van Weelderen, R; Vauthier, N; Vullierme, B; Wagner, U

    2012-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system comprises eight independent refrigeration and distribution systems that supply the eight 3.3 km long accelerator sectors with cryogenic refrigeration power as well as four refrigeration systems for the needs of the detectors ATLAS and CMS. In order to ensure the highest possible reliability of the installations, it is important to apply a reliability centred approach for the maintenance. Even though large scale cryogenic refrigeration exists since the mid 20th century, very little third party reliability data is available today. CERN has started to collect data with its computer aided maintenance management system (CAMMS) in 2009, when the accelerator has gone into normal operation. This paper presents the reliability observations from the operation and the maintenance side, as well as statistical data collected by the means of the CAMMS system.

  10. Energy Efficiency of large Cryogenic Systems: the LHC Case and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudet, S; Ferlin, G; Lebrun, P; Tavian, L; Wagner, U

    2013-01-01

    Research infrastructures for high-energy and nuclear physics, nuclear fusion and production of high magnetic fields are increasingly based on applied superconductivity and associated cryogenics in their quest for scientific breakthroughs at affordable capital and operation costs, a condition for their acceptance and sustained funding by society. The thermodynamic penalty for operating at low temperature makes energy efficiency a key requirement for their large cryogenic systems, from conceptual design to procurement, construction and operation. Meeting this requirement takes a combined approach on several fronts in parallel: management of heat loads and sizing of cooling duties, distribution of cooling power matching the needs of the superconducting devices, efficient production of refrigeration, optimal control resting on precise instrumentation and diagnostics, as well as a targeted industrial procurement policy. The case of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is presented. Potential improvements for fu...

  11. Validation and Performance of the LHC Cryogenic System through Commissioning of the First Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serio, L; Casas-Cubillos, J; Chakravarty, A; Claudet, S; Gicquel, F; Gomes, P; Kumar, M; Kush, PK; Millet, F; Perin, A; Rabehl, R; Singh, MR; Soubiran, M; Tavian, L

    2008-01-01

    The cryogenic system [1] for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of commissioning at nominal operating conditions. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC is produced using eight large cryogenic plants and eight 1.8 K refrigeration units installed on five cryogenic islands. Machine cryogenic equipment is installed in a 26.7-km circumference ring deep underground tunnel and are maintained at their nominal operating conditions via a distribution system consisting of transfer lines, cold interconnection boxes at each cryogenic island and a cryogenic distribution line. The functional analysis of the whole system during all operating conditions was established and validated during the first sector commissioning in order to maximize the system availability. Analysis, operating modes, main failure scenarios, results and performance of the cryogenic system are presented.

  12. Dependence of Magnetic Field Quality on Collar Supplier and Dimensions in the Main LHC Dipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellesia, B; Santoni, C; Todesco, E

    2006-01-01

    In order to keep the electro-magnetic forces and to minimize conductor movements, the superconducting coils of the main Large Hadron Collider dipoles are held in place by means of austenitic steel collars. Two suppliers provide the collars necessary for the whole LHC production, which has now reached more than 800 collared coils. In this paper we first assess if the different collar suppliers origin a noticeable difference in the magnetic field quality measured at room temperature. We then analyze the measurements of the collar dimensions carried out at the manufacturers, comparing them to the geometrical tolerances. Finally we use a magneto-static model to evaluate the expected spread in the field components induced by the actual collar dimensions. These spreads are compared to the magnetic measurements at room temperature over the magnet production in order to identify if the collars, rather than other components or assembly process, can account for the measured magnetic field effects. It has been found tha...

  13. Exotic $\\mu\\tau j j$ events from heavy ISS neutrinos at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arganda, E; Marcano, X; Weiland, C

    2015-01-01

    In this letter we study new relevant phenomenological consequences of the right-handed heavy neutrinos with masses at the ${\\cal O}(1)$ TeV energy scale, working within the context of the Inverse Seesaw Model that includes three pairs of quasi-degenerate pseudo-Dirac heavy neutrinos. We propose a new exotic signal of these heavy neutrinos at the CERN Large Hadron Collider containing a muon, a tau lepton, and two jets in the final state, which is based on the interesting fact that this model can incorporate large Lepton Flavor Violation for specific choices of the relevant parameters, particularly, the neutrino Yukawa couplings. We will show here that an observable number of $\\mu\\tau jj$ exotic events, without missing energy, can be produced at this ongoing run of the LHC.

  14. Muon Colliders: The Next Frontier

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tourun, Yagmur [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois, United States

    2010-01-08

    Muon Colliders provide a path to the energy frontier in particle physics but have been regarded to be "at least 20 years away" for 20 years. I will review recent progress in design studies and hardware R&D and show that a Muon Collider can be established as a real option for the post-LHC era if the current vigorous R&D effort revitalized by the Muon Collider Task Force at Fermilab can be supported to its conclusion. All critical technologies are being addressed and no show-stoppers have emerged. Detector backgrounds have been studied in detail and appear to be manageable and the physics can be done with existing detector technology. A muon facility can be built through a staged scenario starting from a low-energy muon source with unprecedented intensity for exquisite reach for rare processes, followed by a Neutrino Factory with ultrapure neutrino beams with unparalleled sensitivity for disentangling neutrino mixing, leading to an energy frontier Muon Collider with excellent energy resolution.

  15. Status of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeter; Performance after 2 years of LHC operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AbouZeid, H; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo-rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.4-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at about 87 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three years period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and single LH...

  16. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions pro- duced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterised by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform az- imuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as pas- sive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical elec- trodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic ra...

  17. Status of the Atlas Liquid Argon Calorimeter and its Performance after Three Years of LHC Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampl, W; The ATLAS collaboration

    2013-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is designed to study the proton-proton collisions produced at the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN. Liquid argon sampling calorimeters are used for all electromagnetic calorimetry covering the pseudo- rapidity region up to 3.2, as well as for hadronic calorimetry in the range 1.5-4.9. The electromagnetic calorimeters use lead as passive material and are characterized by an accordion geometry that allows a fast and uniform azimuthal response without any gap. Copper and tungsten were chosen as passive material for the hadronic calorimetry; whereas a classic plate geometry was adopted at large polar angles, an innovative one based on cylindrical electrodes with thin argon gaps was designed for the coverage at low angles, where the particles flow is higher. All detectors are housed in three cryostats kept at approximately 89 K. After installation in 2004-2006, the calorimeters were extensively commissioned over the three-year period prior to first collisions in 2009, using cosmic rays and s...

  18. Operational results from the LHC luminosity monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, R.; Ratti, A.; Matis, H.S.; Stezelberger, T.; Turner, W.C.; Yaver, H.; Bravin, E.

    2011-03-28

    The luminosity monitors for the high luminosity regions in the LHC have been operating to monitor and optimize the luminosity since 2009. The device is a gas ionization chamber inside the neutral particle absorber 140 m from the interaction point and monitors showers produced by high energy neutral particles from the collisions. It has the ability to resolve the bunch-by-bunch luminosity as well as to survive the extreme level of radiation in the nominal LHC operation. We present operational results of the device during proton and lead ion operations in 2010 and make comparisons with measurements of experiments. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN can accelerate proton and lead ion beams to 7 TeV and 547 TeV and produce collisions of these particles. Luminosity measures performance of the LHC and is particularly important for experiments in high luminosity interaction points (IPs), ATLAS (IP1) and CMS (IP5). To monitor and optimize the luminosities of these IPs, BRAN (Beam RAte Neutral) detectors [1, 2] have been installed and operating since the beginning of the 2009 operation [3]. A neutral particle absorber (TAN) protects the D2 separation dipole from high energy forward neutral particles produced in the collisions [4]. These neutral particles produce electromagnetic and hadronic showers inside the TAN and their energy flux is proportional to the collision rate and hence to the luminosity. The BRAN detector is an Argon gas ionization chamber installed inside the TANs on both sides of the IP1 and IP5 and monitors the relative changes in the luminosity by detecting the ionization due to these showers. When the number of collisions per bunch crossing (multiplicity) is small, the shower rate inside the TAN is also proportional to the luminosity. Hence, the detector is designed to operate by measuring either the shower rate (counting mode for low and intermediate luminosities) or the average shower flux (pulse height mode for high luminosities). The detector is also designed (1) to survive the extreme level of radiation ({approx}1 GGy in the nominal condition), (2) to resolve the shower from each bunch crossing (40 MHz in the nominal condition) and measure the bunch-by-bunch luminosities, and (3) to have four independent square shaped channels, each occupying a quadrant, making the detector sensitive to the crossing angle [1, 2]. During the proton operation in 2010, the beam energy was 3.5 TeV and the multiplicity did not exceed four. Because the counting mode is still effective in such a condition [5], the BRAN were operated in the counting mode in 2010. This paper presents operational results of the BRANs during the operation in 2010 (mainly the proton operation) and makes comparisons with measurements of the experiments. The luminosity optimization is discussed in detail in [6] and so this paper focuses on measurements during the normal operation.

  19. Top-quark production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at LHC energies and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria; Krisztian Krajczar; Hannu Paukkunen

    2015-04-21

    Single and pair top-quark production in proton-lead (p-Pb) and lead-lead (Pb-Pb) collisions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and future circular collider (FCC) energies, are studied with next-to-leading-order perturbative QCD calculations including nuclear parton distribution functions. At the LHC, the pair-production cross sections amount to sigma(t-tbar) = 3.4 mub in Pb-Pb at sqrt(s) = 5.5 TeV, and sigma(t-tbar) = 60 nb in p-Pb at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. At the FCC energies of sqrt(s) = 39 and 63 TeV, the same cross sections are factors of 90 and 55 times larger respectively. In the leptonic final-state t-tbar --> W+b W-bbar --> b bbar l+l- nu+nu-, after typical acceptance and efficiency cuts, one expects about 90 and 300 top-quarks per nominal LHC-year and 4.7 10^4 and 10^5 per FCC-year in Pb-Pb and p-Pb collisions respectively. The total t-tbar cross sections, dominated by gluon fusion processes, are enhanced by 3--8% in nuclear compared to p-p collisions due to an overall net gluon antishadowing, although different regions of their differential distributions are depleted due to shadowing or EMC-effect corrections. The rapidity distributions of the decay leptons in t-tbar processes can be used to reduce the uncertainty on the Pb gluon density at high virtualities by up to 30% at the LHC (full heavy-ion programme), and by 70% per FCC-year. The cross sections for single-top production in electroweak processes are also computed, yielding about a factor of 30 smaller number of measurable top-quarks after cuts, per system and per year.

  20. Michael Schmitt Physics at a -Collider 20-March-2001 1 Physics at a -Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmitt, Michael

    . emphasizes diboson over difermion production { in contrast to e + e machines. #15; Pair-production of charged of speci#12;c CP #15; Since photons couple only to electric charge, production of neutral particles to be tied to the data { not unlike hadronic machines. #12; Michael Schmitt Physics at a -Collider 20-March

  1. Closing up on Dark Sectors at Colliders: from 14 to 100 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Philip; Spannowsky, Michael; Williams, Ciaran

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the reach of the LHC Run 2 and that of a future circular hadron collider with up to 100 TeV centre of mass energy for the exploration of potential Dark Matter sectors. These dark sectors are conveniently and broadly described by simplified models. The simplified models we consider provide microscopic descriptions of interactions between the Standard Model partons and the dark sector particles mediated by the four basic types of messenger fields: scalar, pseudo-scalar, vector or axial-vector. Our analysis extends and updates the previously available results for the LHC at 8 and 14 TeV to 100 TeV for models with all four messenger types. We revisit and improve the analysis at 14 TeV, by studying a variety of analysis techniques, concluding that the most discriminating variables correspond to the missing transverse energy and the azimuthal angle between jets in the final state. Going to 100 TeV, the limits on simplified models of Dark Matter are enhanced significantly, in particular for heavier me...

  2. Future hadron physics at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appel, Jeffrey A.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    Today, hadron physics research occurs at Fermilab as parts of broader experimental programs. This is very likely to be the case in the future. Thus, much of this presentation focuses on our vision of that future--a future aimed at making Fermilab the host laboratory for the International Linear Collider (ILC). Given the uncertainties associated with the ILC--the level of needed R&D, the ILC costs, and the timing--Fermilab is also preparing for other program choices. I will describe these latter efforts, efforts focused on a Proton Driver to increase the numbers of protons available for experiments. As examples of the hadron physics which will be coming from Fermilab, I summarize three experiments: MIPP/E907 which is running currently, and MINERvA and Drell-Yan/E906 which are scheduled for future running periods. Hadron physics coming from the Tevatron Collider program will be summarized by Arthur Maciel in another talk at Hadron05.

  3. Physics at International Linear Collider (ILC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2007-09-06

    International Linear Collider (ILC) is an electron-positron collider with the initial center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV which is upgradable to about 1 TeV later on. Its goal is to study the physics at TeV scale with unprecedented high sensitivities. The main topics include precision measurements of the Higgs particle properties, studies of supersymmtric particles and the underlying theoretical structure if supersymmetry turns out to be realized in nature, probing alternative possibilities for the origin of mass, and the cosmological connections thereof. In many channels, Higgs and leptonic sector in particular, ILC is substantially more sensitive than LHC, and is complementary to LHC overall. In this short article, we will have a quick look at the capabilities of ILC.

  4. Muon Muon Collider: Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallardo, J.C.; Palmer, R.B.; Tollestrup, A.V.; Sessler, A.M.; Skrinsky, A.N.; Ankenbrandt, C.; Geer, S.; Griffin, J.; Johnstone, C.; Lebrun, P.; McInturff, A.; Mills, Frederick E.; Mokhov, N.; Moretti, A.; Neuffer, D.; Ng, K.Y.; Noble, R.; Novitski, I.; Popovic, M.; Qian, C.; Van Ginneken, A. ,

    2012-04-05

    A feasibility study is presented of a 2 + 2 TeV muon collider with a luminosity of L = 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The resulting design is not optimized for performance, and certainly not for cost; however, it does suffice - we believe - to allow us to make a credible case, that a muon collider is a serious possibility for particle physics and, therefore, worthy of R and D support so that the reality of, and interest in, a muon collider can be better assayed. The goal of this support would be to completely assess the physics potential and to evaluate the cost and development of the necessary technology. The muon collider complex consists of components which first produce copious pions, then capture the pions and the resulting muons from their decay; this is followed by an ionization cooling channel to reduce the longitudinal and transverse emittance of the muon beam. The next stage is to accelerate the muons and, finally, inject them into a collider ring wich has a small beta function at the colliding point. This is the first attempt at a point design and it will require further study and optimization. Experimental work will be needed to verify the validity of diverse crucial elements in the design. Muons because of their large mass compared to an electron, do not produce significant synchrotron radiation. As a result there is negligible beamstrahlung and high energy collisions are not limited by this phenomena. In addition, muons can be accelerated in circular devices which will be considerably smaller than two full-energy linacs as required in an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider. A hadron collider would require a CM energy 5 to 10 times higher than 4 TeV to have an equivalent energy reach. Since the accelerator size is limited by the strength of bending magnets, the hadron collider for the same physics reach would have to be much larger than the muon collider. In addition, muon collisions should be cleaner than hadron collisions. There are many detailed particle reactions which are open to a muon collider and the physics of such reactions - what one learns and the necessary luminosity to see interesting events - are described in detail. Most of the physics accesible to an e{sup +} - e{sup -} collider could be studied in a muon collider. In addition the production of Higgs bosons in the s-channel will allow the measurement of Higgs masses and total widths to high precision; likewise, t{bar t} and W{sup +}W{sup -} threshold studies would yield m{sub t} and m{sub w} to great accuracy. These reactions are at low center of mass energy (if the MSSM is correct) and the luminosity and {Delta}p/p of the beams required for these measurements is detailed in the Physics Chapter. On the other hand, at 2 + 2 TeV, a luminosity of L {approx} 10{sup 35} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is desirable for studies such as, the scattering of longitudinal W bosons or the production of heavy scalar particles. Not explored in this work, but worth noting, are the opportunities for muon-proton and muon-heavy ion collisions as well as the enormous richness of such a facility for fixed target physics provided by the intense beams of neutrinos, muons, pions, kaons, antiprotons and spallation neutrons. To see all the interesting physics described herein requires a careful study of the operation of a detector in the very large background. Three sources of background have been identified. The first is from any halo accompanying the muon beams in the collider ring. Very carefully prepared beams will have to be injected and maintained. The second is due to the fact that on average 35% of the muon energy appears in its decay electron. The energy of the electron subsequently is converted into EM showers either from the synchrotron radiation they emit in the collider magnetic field or from direct collision with the surrounding material. The decays that occur as the beams traverse the low beta insert are of particular concern for detector backgrounds. A third source of background is e{sup +} - e{sup -} pair creation from {mu}{sup +} - {mu}{sup -} interaction. Studies of

  5. CLIC e+e- Linear Collider Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominik Dannheim; Philippe Lebrun; Lucie Linssen; Daniel Schulte; Frank Simon; Steinar Stapnes; Nobukazu Toge; Harry Weerts; James Wells

    2012-08-07

    This document provides input from the CLIC e+e- linear collider studies to the update process of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. It is submitted on behalf of the CLIC/CTF3 collaboration and the CLIC physics and detector study. It describes the exploration of fundamental questions in particle physics at the energy frontier with a future TeV-scale e+e- linear collider based on the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration technique. A high-luminosity high-energy e+e- collider allows for the exploration of Standard Model physics, such as precise measurements of the Higgs, top and gauge sectors, as well as for a multitude of searches for New Physics, either through direct discovery or indirectly, via high-precision observables. Given the current state of knowledge, following the observation of a \\sim125 GeV Higgs-like particle at the LHC, and pending further LHC results at 8 TeV and 14 TeV, a linear e+e- collider built and operated in centre-of-mass energy stages from a few-hundred GeV up to a few TeV will be an ideal physics exploration tool, complementing the LHC. Two example scenarios are presented for a CLIC accelerator built in three main stages of 500 GeV, 1.4 (1.5) TeV, and 3 TeV, together with the layout and performance of the experiments and accompanied by cost estimates. The resulting CLIC physics potential and measurement precisions are illustrated through detector simulations under realistic beam conditions.

  6. Interim report on the Global Design Effort Global International Linear Collider (ILC) R&D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, M.

    2011-04-30

    The International Linear Collider: A Technical Progress Report marks the halfway point towards the Global Design Effort fulfilling its mandate to follow up the ILC Reference Design Report with a more optimised Technical Design Report (TDR) by the end of 2012. The TDR will be based on much of the work reported here and will contain all the elements needed to propose the ILC to collaborating governments, including a technical design and implementation plan that are realistic and have been better optimised for performance, cost and risk. We are on track to develop detailed plans for the ILC, such that once results from the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN establish the main science goals and parameters of the next machine, we will be in good position to make a strong proposal for this new major global project in particle physics. The two overriding issues for the ILC R&D programme are to demonstrate that the technical requirements for the accelerator are achievable with practical technologies, and that the ambitious physics goals can be addressed by realistic ILC detectors. This GDE interim report documents the impressive progress on the accelerator technologies that can make the ILC a reality. It highlights results of the technological demonstrations that are giving the community increased confidence that we will be ready to proceed with an ILC project following the TDR. The companion detector and physics report document likewise demonstrates how detector designs can meet the ambitious and detailed physics goals set out by the ILC Steering Committee. LHC results will likely affect the requirements for the machine design and the detectors, and we are monitoring that very closely, intending to adapt our design as those results become available.

  7. Is Particle Physics Ready for the LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lykken, Joseph

    2009-09-01

    The advent of the Large Hadron Collider in 2007 entails daunting challenges to particle physicists. The first set of challenges will arise from trying to separate new physics from old. The second set of challenges will come in trying to interpret the new discoveries. I will describe a few of the scariest examples.

  8. Top quark property measurements at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Hawkings

    2014-10-29

    Measurements of top quark properties performed at the Large Hadron Collider are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on top-pair charge asymmetries, spin correlations and polarization measurements performed by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. The measurements are generally in good agreement with predictions from next-to-leading-order QCD calculations, and no deviations from Standard Model expectations have been seen.

  9. hhjj production at the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigationmore »of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.« less

  10. Prospects for Higgs properties measurements at future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Almeida Dias, Flavia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The LHC Run-1 was very successful and included the discovery of a new particle with mass of about 125 GeV compatible with the Higgs boson predicted by the Standard Model. The prospects for Higgs physics at the high-luminosity LHC and at future colliders are presented. In particular, the ultimate precision attainable for the couplings measurements of the 125 GeV particle with elementary fermions and bosons is discussed along with prospects for self-coupling measurement, for the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the upgraded LHC.

  11. The Next Linear Collider: NLC2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Burke et al.

    2002-01-14

    Recent studies in elementary particle physics have made the need for an e{sup +}e{sup -} linear collider able to reach energies of 500 GeV and above with high luminosity more compelling than ever [1]. Observations and measurements completed in the last five years at the SLC (SLAC), LEP (CERN), and the Tevatron (FNAL) can be explained only by the existence of at least one particle or interaction that has not yet been directly observed in experiment. The Higgs boson of the Standard Model could be that particle. The data point strongly to a mass for the Higgs boson that is just beyond the reach of existing colliders. This brings great urgency and excitement to the potential for discovery at the upgraded Tevatron early in this decade, and almost assures that later experiments at the LHC will find new physics. But the next generation of experiments to be mounted by the world-wide particle physics community must not only find this new physics, they must find out what it is. These experiments must also define the next important threshold in energy. The need is to understand physics at the TeV energy scale as well as the physics at the 100-GeV energy scale is now understood. This will require both the LHC and a companion linear electron-positron collider. A first Zeroth-Order Design Report (ZDR) [2] for a second-generation electron-positron linear collider, the Next Linear Collider (NLC), was published five years ago. The NLC design is based on a high-frequency room-temperature rf accelerator. Its goal is exploration of elementary particle physics at the TeV center-of-mass energy, while learning how to design and build colliders at still higher energies. Many advances in accelerator technologies and improvements in the design of the NLC have been made since 1996. This Report is a brief update of the ZDR.

  12. Les Houches 2011: Physics at TeV Colliders New Physics Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooijmans, G; Moortgat, F; Santiago, J; Skands, P; Vásquez, D Albornoz; Allanach, B C; Alloul, A; Arbey, A; Azatov, A; Baer, H; Balázs, C; Barr, A; Basso, L; Battaglia, M; Bechtle, P; Bélanger, G; Belyaev, A; Benslama, K; Bergström, L; Bharucha, A; Boehm, C; Bondarenko, M; Bondu, O; Boos, E; Boudjema, F; Bringmann, T; Brown, M; Bunichev, V; Calvet, S; Campanelli, M; Carmona, A; Cerdeño, D G; Chala, M; Chivukula, R S; Chowdhury, D; Christensen, N D; Cirelli, M; Cox, S; Cranmer, K; Da Silva, J; Delahaye, T; De Roeck, A; Djouadi, A; Dobson, E; Dolan, M; Donato, F; La Rochelle, G Drieu; Duda, G; Duhr, C; Dumont, B; Edsjö, J; Ellis, J; Evoli, C; Falkowski, A; Felcini, M; Fuks, B; Gabrielli, E; Gaggero, D; Gascon-Shotkin, S; Ghosh, D K; Giammanco, A; Godbole, R M; Gondolo, P; Goto, T; Grasso, D; Gris, P; Guadagnoli, D; Gunion, J F; Haisch, U; Hartgring, L; Heinemeyer, S; Hirsch, M; Hewett, J; Ismail, A; Jeltema, T; Kadastik, M; Kakizaki, M; Kannike, K; Khalil, S; Kneur, J-L; Krämer, M; Kraml, S; Kreiss, S; Lavalle, J; Leane, R; Lykken, J; Maccione, L; Mahmoudi, F; Mangano, M; Martin, S P; Maurin, D; Moreau, G; Moretti, S; Moskalenko, I; Moultaka, G; Muhlleitner, M; Niessen, I; O'Leary, B; Orlando, E; Panci, P; Polesello, G; Porod, W; Porter, T; Profumo, S; Prosper, H; Pukhov, A; Racioppi, A; Raidal, M; de Traubenberg, M Rausch; Renaud, A; Reuter, J; Rizzo, T G; Robens, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Salati, P; Savage, C; Scott, P; Sekmen, S; Semenov, A; Shan, C -L; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C; Simmons, E H; Slavich, P; Speckner, C; Staub, F; Strong, A; Taillet, R; Thomas, F S; Thomas, M C; Tomalin, I; Tytgat, M; Ughetto, M; Valéry, L; Walker, D G E; Weiler, A; West, S M; White, C D; Williams, A J; Wingerter, A; Wymant, C; Yu, J -H; Yuan, C -P; Zerwas, D

    2012-01-01

    We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.

  13. Les Houches 2011: Physics at TeV Colliders New Physics Working Group Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brooijmans; B. Gripaios; F. Moortgat; J. Santiago; P. Skands; D. Albornoz Vásquez; B. C. Allanach; A. Alloul; A. Arbey; A. Azatov; H. Baer; C. Balázs; A. Barr; L. Basso; M. Battaglia; P. Bechtle; G. Bélanger; A. Belyaev; K. Benslama; L. Bergström; A. Bharucha; C. Boehm; M. Bondarenko; O. Bondu; E. Boos; F. Boudjema; T. Bringmann; M. Brown; V. Bunichev; S. Calvet; M. Campanelli; A. Carmona; D. G. Cerdeño; M. Chala; R. S. Chivukula; D. Chowdhury; N. D. Christensen; M. Cirelli; S. Cox; K. Cranmer; J. Da Silva; T. Delahaye; A. De Roeck; A. Djouadi; E. Dobson; M. Dolan; F. Donato; G. Drieu La Rochelle; G. Duda; C. Duhr; B. Dumont; J. Edsjö; J. Ellis; C. Evoli; A. Falkowski; M. Felcini; B. Fuks; E. Gabrielli; D. Gaggero; S. Gascon-Shotkin; D. K. Ghosh; A. Giammanco; R. M. Godbole; P. Gondolo; T. Goto; D. Grasso; P. Gris; D. Guadagnoli; J. F. Gunion; U. Haisch; L. Hartgring; S. Heinemeyer; M. Hirsch; J. Hewett; A. Ismail; T. Jeltema; M. Kadastik; M. Kakizaki; K. Kannike; S. Khalil; J-L. Kneur; M. Krämer; S. Kraml; S. Kreiss; J. Lavalle; R. Leane; J. Lykken; L. Maccione; F. Mahmoudi; M. Mangano; S. P. Martin; D. Maurin; G. Moreau; S. Moretti; I. Moskalenko; G. Moultaka; M. Muhlleitner; I. Niessen; B. O'Leary; E. Orlando; P. Panci; G. Polesello; W. Porod; T. Porter; S. Profumo; H. Prosper; A. Pukhov; A. Racioppi; M. Raidal; M. Rausch de Traubenberg; A. Renaud; J. Reuter; T. G. Rizzo; T. Robens; A. Y. Rodríguez-Marrero; P. Salati; C. Savage; P. Scott; S. Sekmen; A. Semenov; C. -L. Shan; C. Shepherd-Themistocleous; E. H. Simmons; P. Slavich; C. Speckner; F. Staub; A. Strong; R. Taillet; F. S. Thomas; M. C. Thomas; I. Tomalin; M. Tytgat; M. Ughetto; L. Valéry; D. G. E. Walker; A. Weiler; S. M. West; C. D. White; A. J. Williams; A. Wingerter; C. Wymant; J. -H. Yu; C. -P. Yuan; D. Zerwas

    2012-04-20

    We present the activities of the "New Physics" working group for the "Physics at TeV Colliders" workshop (Les Houches, France, 30 May-17 June, 2011). Our report includes new agreements on formats for interfaces between computational tools, new tool developments, important signatures for searches at the LHC, recommendations for presentation of LHC search results, as well as additional phenomenological studies.

  14. Search for heavy resonances decaying into the fully hadronic di-tau final state with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgenstern, Marcus Matthias

    The discovery of a heavy neutral particle would be a direct hint for new physics beyond the Standard Model. In this thesis searches for new heavy neutral particles decaying into two tau leptons, which further decay into hadrons, are presented. They cover neutral Higgs bosons in the context of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) as well as $Z'$ bosons, predicted by various theories with an extended gauge sector. Both analyses are based on the full 2012 proton-proton collision dataset taken by the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The extended Higgs sector in the MSSM suggests additional heavy neutral Higgs bosons which decay into tau leptons in about 10\\% of the time. Given that the dominant final state, $\\phi\\to b\\bar{b}$, suffers from tremendous QCD initiated backgrounds, the decay into two tau leptons is the most promising final state to discover such new resonances. The fully hadronic final state is the dominant one with a branching fraction of about 42\\%. I...

  15. The Higgs boson and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borzumati, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    The Higgs boson will be subject of intense experimental searches in future high-energy experiments. In addition to the effort made at the Large Hadron Collider, where it was discovered, it will be the major subject of study at the International Linear Collider. We review here the reasons for that and some of the issues to be tackled at this future accelerator, in particular that of the precision of the Higgs-boson couplings.

  16. The Higgs boson and the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Borzumati; Eriko Kato

    2014-07-08

    The Higgs boson will be subject of intense experimental searches in future high-energy experiments. In addition to the effort made at the Large Hadron Collider, where it was discovered, it will be the major subject of study at the International Linear Collider. We review here the reasons for that and some of the issues to be tackled at this future accelerator, in particular that of the precision of the Higgs-boson couplings.

  17. Overview of the LHC Magnets other than the Main Dipoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siegel, N

    2000-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider, due for commissioning in 2005, features a large and complex magnet system that includes about 3000 double aperture magnets and 5000 single aperture ones. Most of these magnets are super-conducting, using conductors made of NbTi alloy, with a coil bore of 56 mm and operating in a static bath of su-perfluid helium at 1.9 K, fully exploiting the conductor limit at these low temperatures. Only a few particular magnets will operate at 4.5 K. For special applications in the long straight sections and for beam injection and ex-traction, highly specialised room temperature magnets are used. The paper discusses the underlying concepts, which lead to the design and layout of the interaction region magnets, required to obtain the very demanding beam parameters at the four main LHC experiments. The focus will then be on the magnetic elements of matching re-gions, dispersion suppressors and main arcs, with a dis-cussion of the functionality of the different magnet fami-lies. The report will be c...

  18. The Beam Loss Detection System of the LHC Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gschwendtner, E; Ferioli, G; Friesenbichler, W; Kain, V

    2002-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed in the arc, dispersion suppressor and the straight regions for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy partially in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. The primary and secondary halo of the beam is absorbed by the collimation system. The tertiary halo will be lost at aperture limits in the ring. Its loss distribution along the magnets has been studies. At the positions, where most of the beam losses are expected, simulations of the particle fluences outside the cryostat and induced by lost protons at the aperture have been performed with the Monte Carlo Code Geant 3.2.1. This allows determining the most suitable positions of the detectors, the needed number of monitors and the impact on the dynamic range of the detectors. The design of the beam loss monitor system is presented that meet the required sensitivity, dynamic range and ...

  19. LARP Long Quadrupole: A "Long" Step Toward an LHC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Giorgio Ambrosio

    2010-01-08

    The beginning of the development of Nb3Sn magnets for particle accelerators goes back to the 1960?s. But only very recently has this development begun to face the challenges of fabricating Nb3Sn magnets which can meet the requirements of modern particle accelerators. LARP (the LHC Accelerator Research Program) is leading this effort focusing on long models of the Interaction Region quadrupoles for a possible luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. A major milestone in this development is to test, by the end of 2009, 4m-long quadrupole models, which will be the first Nb3Sn accelerator-type magnets approaching the length of real accelerator magnets. The Long Quadrupoles (LQ) are ?Proof-of-Principle? magnets which are to demonstrate that Nb3Sn technology is sufficiently mature for use in high energy particle accelerators. Their design is based on the LARP Technological Quadrupole (TQ) models, under development at FNAL and LBNL, which have design gradients higher than 200 T/m and an aperture of 90 mm. Several challenges must be addressed for the successful fabrication of long Nb3Sn coils and magnets. These challenges and the solutions adopted will be presented together with the main features of the LQ magnets. Several R&D lines are participating to this effort and their contributions will be also presented.

  20. The LHCb RICH silica aerogel performance with LHC data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perego, D L

    2010-01-01

    In the LHCb detector at the Large Hadron Collider, powerful charged particle identification is performed by Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technology. In order to cover the full geometric acceptance and the wide momentum range (1-100 GeV/c), two detectors with three Cherenkov radiators have been designed and installed. In the medium (10-40 GeV/c) and high (30-100 GeV/c) momentum range, gas radiators are used (C4F10 and CF4 respectively). In the low momentum range (1 to a few GeV/c) pion/kaon/proton separation will be done with photons produced in solid silica aerogel. A set of 16 tiles, with the large transverse dimensions ever (20x20 cm$^2$) and nominal refractive index 1.03 have been produced. The tiles have excellent optical properties and homogeneity of refractive index within the tile of ~1%. The first data collected at LHC are used to understand the behaviour of the RICH: preliminary results will be presented and discussed on the performance of silica aerogel and of the gas radiators C4F10 and CF4.

  1. Maximizing the Efficiency of LHC Maintenance during Operation Times using a Mobile Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martel, Pedro; Mallon Amerigo, Sonia; Pater, Lukasz; Petit, Stephan; Widegren, David

    2010-01-01

    The operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) imposes minimum maintenance time, when needed corrections to all systems are to be carried out. Today's maintenance management tools at CERN are seen as too slow and cumbersome for such a challenge. The short duration of the technical stops (72 h/month) requires preparation of jobs in advance, and coordination of all involved teams; at the same time, the radio-protection of personnel in the LHC underground areas imposes a strict "As Low As Reasonably Achievable"(ALARA) policy for the works' duration. In order to perform a maximum of tasks in a short time, a mobile tool for the manipulation of job and equipment data has been created. The ability to signal a new job to a team in the field will avoid unnecessary trips to the tunnel; the signalling of a job's completion (and its details) will allow subsequent jobs to start promptly and with more information; finally, the possibility to consult equipment's full manufacturing and installation data "in situ" will help...

  2. Characterization of Prototype Superfluid Helium Safety Relief Valves for the LHC Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dufay, L; Van Weelderen, R

    1999-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will use high field superconducting magnets operating in pressurized superfluid helium (He II) at 1.9 K. Cold safety valves, with their inlet in direct contact with the He II bath, will be required to protect the cold masses in case of a magnet resistive transition. In addition to the safety function, the valves must limit their conduction heat load to the He II to below 0.3 W and limit their mass leakage when closed to below 0.01 g/s at 1.9 K with 100 mbar differential pressure. The valves must also have a high tolerance to contaminating particles in the liquid helium. The compliance with the specified performance is of crucial importance for the LHC cryogenic operation. An extensive test program is therefore being carried out on prototype industrial valves produced by four different manufacturers. The behavior of these valves has been investigated at room temperature and at 77 K. Precise heat load and mass leak measurements have been performed on a dedicated test faci...

  3. Modelling of Quench Limit for Steady State Heat Deposits in LHC Magnets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bocian, D; Siemko, A

    2008-01-01

    A quench, the transition of a conductor from the superconducting to the normal conducting state, occurs irreversibly in the accelerator magnets if one of the three parameters: temperature, magnetic field or current density exceeds a critical value. Energy deposited in the superconductor by the particle beams provokes quenches detrimental for the accelerator operation. In particular if particles impacting on the vacuum chamber and their secondary showers depose energy in the magnet coils. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) nominal beam intensity is 3.2 ldr 10^14 protons. A quench occurs if a fraction of the order of 10^7 protons per second is lost locally. A network model is used to simulate the thermodynamic behaviour of the magnets. The heat flow in the network model was validated with measurements performed in the CERN magnet test facility. A steady state heat flow was introduced in the coil by using the quench heaters implemented in the LHC magnets. The value of the heat source current is determined by the ne...

  4. Threshold Resummed and Approximate NNLO results for W+W- Pair Production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dawson; Ian M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

    2013-09-19

    The next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD radiative corrections to W+W- production at hadron colliders are well understood. We combine NLO perturbative QCD calculations with soft-gluon resummation of threshold logarithms to find a next-to-next-to leading logarithmic (NNLL) prediction for the total cross section and the invariant mass distribution at the LHC. We also obtain approximate next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) results for the total W+W- cross section at the LHC which includes all contributions from the scale dependent leading singular terms. Our result for the approximate NNLO total cross section is the most precise theoretical prediction available. Uncertainties due to scale variation are shown to be small when the threshold logarithms are included. NNLL threshold resummation increases the W+W- invariant mass distribution by ~ 3-4% in the peak region for both \\sqrt{S}=8 and 14 TeV. The NNLL threshold resummed and approximate NNLO cross sections increase the NLO cross section by 0.5-3% for \\sqrt{S}=7, 8, 13, and 14 TeV.

  5. The Hot QCD White Paper: Exploring the Phases of QCD at RHIC and the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasuyuki Akiba; Aaron Angerami; Helen Caines; Anthony Frawley; Ulrich Heinz; Barbara Jacak; Jiangyong Jia; Tuomas Lappi; Wei Li; Abhijit Majumder; David Morrison; Mateusz Ploskon; Joern Putschke; Krishna Rajagopal; Ralf Rapp; Gunther Roland; Paul Sorensen; Urs Wiedemann; Nu Xu; W. A. Zajc

    2015-02-09

    The past decade has seen huge advances in experimental measurements made in heavy ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and more recently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). These new data, in combination with theoretical advances from calculations made in a variety of frameworks, have led to a broad and deep knowledge of the properties of thermal QCD matter. Increasingly quantitative descriptions of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP) created in these collisions have established that the QGP is a strongly coupled liquid with the lowest value of specific viscosity ever measured. However, much remains to be learned about the precise nature of the initial state from which this liquid forms, how its properties vary across its phase diagram and how, at a microscopic level, the collective properties of this liquid emerge from the interactions among the individual quarks and gluons that must be visible if the liquid is probed with sufficiently high resolution. This white paper, prepared by the Hot QCD Writing Group as part of the U.S. Long Range Plan for Nuclear Physics, reviews the recent progress in the field of hot QCD and outlines the scientific opportunities in the next decade for resolving the outstanding issues in the field.

  6. Colliding Crystalline Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, J.

    2008-01-01

    6] J. Wei, et ai, Crystalline Beams and Related Issues,LABORATORY Colliding Crystalline Beams Jie Wei and A.M.CBP Note-262 Colliding Crystalline Beams* Jie Wei Brookhaven

  7. Estimation of charm production cross section in hadronic interactions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. M. Vereshkov; Yu. F. Novoseltsev

    2004-04-24

    Results of processing experimental data on charm production in hadron-hadron interactions are presented. The analysis is carried out within the frame of phenomenological model of diffraction production and quark statistics based on additive quark model (AQM). In low energy region sqrt s = 20 - 40GeV, the cross sections si_ {pN to c bar cX} (s), si_ {pi N to c bar cX} (s) are fitted by logarithmic function with the parameters connected by relationship of AQM. At collider energies 200, 540, 900, 1800 GeV, the values of si_{bar pp to c bar cX} (s) were obtained by a quark statistics method from the data on diffraction dissociation. It is established, that logarithmic function with universal numerical parameters describes the whole set of low-energy and high-energy data with high accuracy. The expected values of cross sections are si_{pp to c bar cX} = 250 pm 40 mu b and 355 pm 57 mu b at TEVATRON energy sqrt {s} = 1.96 TeV and LHC energy sqrt {s} = 14 TeV accordingly. Opportunities of use of the obtained results for calibration of a flux of "prompt" muons in high-energy component of cosmic rays are discussed.

  8. Type II Seesaw at LHC: the Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandra Melfo; Miha Nemevsek; Fabrizio Nesti; Goran Senjanovic; Yue Zhang

    2012-12-22

    In this Letter we revisit the type-II seesaw mechanism based on the addition of a weak triplet scalar to the standard model. We perform a comprehensive study of its phenomenology at the LHC energies, complete with the electroweak precision constraints. We pay special attention to the doubly-charged component, object of collider searches for a long time, and show how the experimental bound on its mass depends crucially on the particle spectrum of the theory. Our study can be used as a roadmap for future complete LHC studies.

  9. Type II Seesaw at LHC: the Roadmap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melfo, Alejandra; Nesti, Fabrizio; Senjanovic, Goran; Zhang, Yue

    2012-01-01

    In this Letter we revisit the type-II seesaw mechanism based on the addition of a weak triplet scalar to the standard model. We perform a comprehensive study of its phenomenology at the LHC energies, complete with the electroweak precision constraints. We pay special attention to the doubly-charged component, object of collider searches for a long time, and show how the experimental bound on its mass depends crucially on the particle spectrum of the theory. Our study can be used as a roadmap for future complete LHC studies.

  10. Direct searches of extra Higgs boson at future colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    We study direct searches of additional Higgs bosons in multi-top-quarks events at the LHC with the collision energy of 14 TeV as well as the International Linear Collider (ILC) with the collision energy of 1 TeV. As a benchmark model, we consider two Higgs doublet models with a softly-broken discrete $Z_2$ symmetry, where the $t\\bar t$ decay mode of additional neutral Higgs bosons can be dominant if their masses are heavy enough. Thus, the multi-top-quarks events become an important probe of the extended Higgs sector at future colliders. We estimate the discovery reach at the LHC and the ILC, and find that the search at the ILC can survey the parameter regions where the LHC cannot cover.

  11. High-energy high-luminosity electron-ion collider eRHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvinenko, Vladimir N; Belomestnykh, Sergei; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Blaskiewicz, Michael M; Calaga, Rama; Chang, Xiangyun; Fedotov, Alexei; Gassner, David; Hammons, Lee; Hahn, Harald; Hao, Yue; He, Ping; Jackson, William; Jain, Animesh; Johnson, Elliott C; Kayran, Dmitry; Kewisch, Jrg; Luo, Yun; Mahler, George; McIntyre, Gary; Meng, Wuzheng; Minty, Michiko; Parker, Brett; Pikin, Alexander; Pozdeyev, Eduard; Ptitsyn, Vadim; Rao, Triveni; Roser, Thomas; Skaritka, John; Sheehy, Brian; Tepikian, Steven; Than, Yatming; Trbojevic, Dejan; Tsentalovich, Evgeni; Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Tuozzolo, Joseph; Wang, Gang; Webb, Stephen; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Wencan; Zelenski, Anatoly

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a future electron-ion collider (EIC), based on the existing Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) hadron facility, with two intersecting superconducting rings, each 3.8 km in circumference. A new ERL accelerator, which provide 5-30 GeV electron beam, will ensure 10^33 to 10^34 cm^-2 s^-1 level luminosity.

  12. Measurement of the nuclear modification factor of electrons from heavy-flavour hadron decays in Pb-Pb collisions at {\\surd}sNN = 2.76 TeV with ALICE at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Fasel; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2012-02-29

    We present a measurement of the nuclear modification factor of electrons from heavy- flavour hadron decays at midrapidity in Pb-Pb collisions at {\\surd}sNN = 2.76 TeV. Electrons are identified in the pt range 1.5 GeV/c < pt < 6 GeV/c. A suppression is seen for pt larger than 3.5 GeV/c in the most central collisions.

  13. Parton-Parton Elastic Scattering and Rapidity Gaps at SSC and LHC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vittorio Del Duca

    1993-08-02

    The theory of the perturbative pomeron, due to Lipatov and collaborators, is used to compute the probability of observing parton-parton elastic scattering and rapidity gaps between jets in hadron collisions at SSC and LHC energies.

  14. Civil engineering studies for major projects after LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, John; Perez-Duenas, Eliseo

    2011-01-01

    CERN civil engineers are heavily involved in studying several major potential collider projects to succeed/complement the LHC. Infrastructure works typically represent one third of the cost of major physics projects, so it's critical that the construction costs are well understood from the conceptual stage. For example, CERN are studying infrastructure requirements for the Linear Collider (CLIC & ILC) and the LHeC projects. This paper presents some of the key civil engineering challenges faced in such large scale projects.

  15. Testing Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions Using Higgs Boson Searches at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genevieve Belanger; Alexander Belyaev; Matthew Brown; Mitsuru Kakizaki; Alexander Pukhov

    2012-12-13

    Large Hadron Collider (LHC) searches for the SM Higgs boson provide a powerful limit on models involving Universal Extra Dimensions (UED) where the Higgs production is enhanced. We have evaluated all one-loop diagrams for Higgs production from gluon fusion and decay to two photons within "minimal" UED (mUED), independently confirming previous results, and we have evaluated enhancement factors for Higgs boson production and decay over the mUED parameter space. Using these we have derived limits on the parameter space, combining data from both ATLAS and CMS collaborations for the most recent 7 TeV and 8 TeV LHC data. We have performed a rigorous statistical combination of several Higgs boson search channels which is important because mUED signatures from the Higgs boson are not universally enhanced. We have found that 1/R 1000 GeV) around m_h = 118 GeV are left. The latter is likely to be excluded as more data becomes available whereas the region around 125 GeV is where the recently discovered Higgs-like particle was observed and therefore where the exclusion limit is weaker. It is worth stressing that mUED predicts an enhancement for all channels for Higgs production by gluon fusion and decay while the vector boson fusion process WW/ZZ -> h -> AA is generically suppressed and WW/ZZ -> h -> WW*/ZZ* is standard. Therefore, as more 8 TeV LHC data becomes available, the information on individual Higgs boson production and decay processes provided by the CMS and ATLAS experiments can be effectively used to favour mUED or exclude it further.

  16. Signature of the $?$+jet and dijet production mediated by an excited quark with QCD next-to-leading order accuracy at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Chuan Zhan; Chong Sheng Li; Ze Long Liu; Shi Ang Li

    2015-08-10

    We present a detailed study of the production and decay of the excited quark at the QCD next-to-leading order (NLO) level at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), using the narrow width approximation and helicity amplitudes method. We find that the QCD NLO corrections can tighten the constraints on the model parameters and reduce the scale dependencies of the total cross sections. We discuss the signals of the excited quark production with decay mode $q^{\\ast}\\rightarrow q\\gamma$ and $q^{\\ast}\\rightarrow qg$, and present several important kinematic distributions. Moreover, we give the upper limits of the excited quark excluded mass range and the allowed parameter space for the coupling constants and the excited quark mass.

  17. Physics at the $e^+ e^-$ Linear Collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moortgat-Picka, G.; Kronfeld, A. S.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e+e? linear collider in the energy range of s?=92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focusses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  18. Physics at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. List

    2006-05-18

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is the next large project in accelerator based particle physics. It is complementary to the LHC in many aspects. Measurements from both machines together will finally shed light onto the known deficiencies of the Standard Model of particle physics and allow to unveil a possible underlying more fundamental theory. Here, the possibilities of the ILC will be discussed with special emphasis on the Higgs sector and on topics with a strong connection to cosmological questions like extra dimensions or dark matter candidates.

  19. Particle production sources at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georg Wolschin

    2013-02-18

    Particle production sources at RHIC and LHC energies are investigated in pseudorapidity space. A nonequilibrium-statistical relativistic diffusion model (RDM) with three sources is applied to the analysis of charged-hadron distributions in AuAu collisions at RHIC energies, in PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy of 2.76 TeV, in pPb at 5.02 TeV, and in pp. The size of the midrapidity source relative to the fragmentation sources in heavy-ion collisions is investigated as function of the incident energy. At LHC energies, the midrapidity value is mostly determined by particle production from gluon-gluon collisions.

  20. Beam-beam Effects of 'Gear-changing' in Ring-Ring Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Yue; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    In ring-ring colliders, the collision frequency determines the bunch structures, e.g. the time between the bunches in both rings should be identical. Because of relatively low relativistic speed of the hadron beam in sub-TeV hadron-hadron- and electron-ions-colliders, scanning the hadron beam's energy would require either a change in the circumference of one of the rings, or a switching of the bunch (harmonic) number in a ring. The later would cause so-called 'gear-changing', i.e. the change of the colliding bunches turn by turn. In this article, we study the difficulties in beam dynamics in this 'gear-changing' scheme.

  1. Photon-Photon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01

    diverse pairs of particles are produced. In photon-photon colliders. the intensity of the light is so strongunpolarized electrons or photons and fully polarized photons

  2. Light-by-light scattering with intact protons at the LHC: from Standard Model to New Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Fichet; Gero von Gersdorff; Bruno Lenzi; Christophe Royon; Matthias Saimpert

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the discovery potential of light-by-light scattering at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), induced by the Standard Model (SM) and by new exotic charged particles. Our simulation relies on intact proton detection in the planned forward detectors of CMS and ATLAS. The full four-photon amplitudes generated by any electrically charged particles of spins $1/2$ and $1$, including the SM processes involving loops of leptons, quarks and $W$ bosons are implemented in the Forward Physics Monte Carlo generator. Our method provides model-independent bounds on massive charged particles, only parametrized by the spin, mass and "effective charge" $Q_{\\rm eff}$ of the new particle. We find that a new charged vector (fermion) with $Q_{\\rm eff}=4$ can be discovered up to $m=700~\\rm GeV$ ($m=370~\\rm GeV$) with an integrated luminosity of $300~\\rm fb^{-1}$ at the LHC. We also discuss the sensitivities to neutral particles such as a strongly-interacting heavy dilaton and warped Kaluza-Klein gravitons, whose effects could be discovered for masses in the multi-TeV range.

  3. Jets from Jets: Re-clustering as a tool for large radius jet reconstruction and grooming at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Nachman; Pascal Nef; Ariel Schwartzman; Maximilian Swiatlowski; Chaowaroj Wanotayaroj

    2014-12-11

    Jets with a large radius $R\\gtrsim 1$ and grooming algorithms are widely used to fully capture the decay products of boosted heavy particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Unlike most discriminating variables used in such studies, the jet radius is usually not optimized for specific physics scenarios. This is because every jet configuration must be calibrated, insitu, to account for detector response and other experimental effects. One solution to enhance the availability of large-$R$ jet configurations used by the LHC experiments is {\\it jet re-clustering}. Jet re-clustering introduces an intermediate scale $rjets are calibrated and used as the inputs to reconstruct large radius jets. In this paper we systematically study and propose new jet re-clustering configurations and show that re-clustered large radius jets have essentially the same jet mass performance as large radius groomed jets. Jet re-clustering has the benefit that no additional large-R calibration is necessary, allowing the re-clustered large radius parameter to be optimized in the context of specific precision measurements or searches for new physics.

  4. Light top squarks in $U(1)_{R}$-lepton number model with a right handed neutrino and the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Huitu, Katri; Roy, Sourov; Waltari, Harri

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenology of top squarks at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in a supersymmetric model where lepton number is identified with an approximate $U(1)_R$ symmetry in such a way that one of the left chiral sneutrinos can acquire a large vacuum expectation value ($vev$) and can play the role of the down-type Higgs. This $R$-symmetry allows a subset of trilinear $R$-parity violating interactions, which determine the collider phenomenology of this model in a significant way. The gauginos are Dirac particles and gluinos are relatively heavy in this class of models. The model contains a right handed neutrino superfield, which gives a tree level mass to one of the active neutrinos. An order one neutrino Yukawa coupling also helps enhance the Higgs boson mass at the tree level and results in a very light bino-like neutralino ($\\widetilde \\chi_2^0$) with mass around a few hundred MeV, which is a carrier of missing (transverse) energy (\\met). The model can accommodate two rather light top squarks, com...

  5. An analysis of the impact of LHC Run I proton-lead data on nuclear parton densities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armesto, Néstor; Penín, José Manuel; Salgado, Carlos A; Zurita, Pía

    2015-01-01

    We report on an analysis of the impact of available experimental data on hard processes in proton-lead collisions during Run I at the Large Hadron Collider on nuclear modifications of parton distribution functions. Our analysis is restricted to the EPS09 and DSSZ global fits. The measurements that we consider comprise production of massive gauge bosons, jets, charged hadrons and pions. This is the first time a study of nuclear PDFs includes this number of different observables. The goal of the paper is twofold: i) checking the description of the data by nPDFs, as well as the relevance of these nuclear effects, in a quantitative manner; ii) testing the constraining power of these data in eventual global fits, for which we use the Bayesian reweighting technique. We find an overall good, even too good, description of the data, indicating that more constraining power would require a better control over the systematic uncertainties and/or the proper proton-proton reference from LHC Run II. Some of the observables,...

  6. Charged particle multiplicities in pA interactions at the LHC from the Color Glass Condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir H. Rezaeian

    2012-01-05

    The forthcoming LHC measurement of hadron multiplicity in proton-nucleus collisions is a crucial test of the k_t factorization and gluon saturation based models. Here, we provide quantitative predictions for the pseudorapidity distribution of charged particles produced in minimum bias proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC based on the idea of gluon saturation in the color-glass condensate framework. Our formulation gives good descriptions of the LHC and RHIC data for the charged-hadron multiplicities in both proton-proton and nucleus-nucleus collisions, and also the deep inelastic scattering at HERA at small Bjorken-x.

  7. Energy flow in a hadronic cascade: Application to hadron calorimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groom, Donald E.

    2006-01-01

    Detector at the International Linear Collider,” http://connection with International Linear Collider (ILC) detectorfor the International Linear Collider[59]. Improved

  8. Elastic nucleon scattering at small angles at LHC energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Goloskokov; S. P. Kuleshov; O. V. Selyugin

    1997-07-02

    Predictions of the elastic proton-proton cross sections at energies of LHC are calculate on the base of the high energy dynamical model. The growth of $ds/dt$ at fixed transfer momenta are shown. The form of eikonal of elastic hadron scattering at super high energies is discussed.

  9. Soft hadron production in pp interactions up to ISR energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Mueller

    2000-11-28

    Soft hadron production is described as a two-step process, where the interaction of the partonic constituents of the colliding hadrons leads to the production of intermediate subsystems (fireballs), which decay subsequently into hadrons. The weights of the various final states are derived from the corresponding phase-space factors modified by empirical transition elements. The results compare well with data at energies between particle production thresholds and ISR energies. Special emphasis is put on correlation data, which offer the opportunity to shed some light on the question whether particle production proceeds via fireballs or strings.

  10. LHC luminosity upgrade with large Piwinski angle scheme: a recent look

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; Zimmermann, f.; /CERN

    2011-09-01

    Luminosity upgrade at the LHC collider using longitudinally flat bunches in combination with the large crossing angle (large Piwinski angle scheme) is being studied with renewed interest in recent years. By design, the total beam-beam tune shift at the LHC is less than 0.015 for two interaction points together. But the 2010-11 3.5 TeV collider operation and dedicated studies indicated that the beam-beam tune shift is >0.015 per interaction point. In view of this development we have revisited the requirements for the Large Piwinski Angle scheme at the LHC. In this paper we present a new set of parameters and luminosity calculations for the desired upgrade by investigating: (1) current performance of the LHC injectors, (2) e-cloud issues on nearly flat bunches and (3) realistic beam particle distributions from longitudinal beam dynamics simulations. We also make some remarks on the needed upgrades on the LHC injector accelerators.

  11. Preliminary risk analysis of the LHC cryogenic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorowski, M; Riddone, G

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the study is to identify all risks to personnel, equipment or environment resulting from cryogenic failures that may accidentally occur within the cryogenic system of Large Hadron Collider in any phase of the machine operation, and that could not be eliminated by design. We then formulate recommendations concerning lines of preventive and corrective defence, as well as further, more detailed studies.

  12. W, Z and photon production at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masahiro Kuze; on behalf of ATLAS; CMS Collaborations

    2014-10-24

    Recent results on $W$, $Z$ and photon production at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. Inclusive $W$ and $Z$/$\\gamma^*$ production, their production in association with jets and heavy flavors, and prompt photon, $\\gamma\\gamma$ and $\\gamma$+jets production are discussed.

  13. High Energy Colliders as Tools to Understand the Early Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tait, Tim (ANL) [ANL

    2008-08-16

    Cosmological observations have reached a new era of precision, and reveal many interesting and puzzling features of the Universe. I will briefly review two of the most exciting mysteries: the nature of the dark components of the Universe, and the origin of the asymmetry between matter and anti-matter. I will argue that our best hope of unraveling these questions will need to combine information from the heavens with measurements in the lab at high energy particle accelerators. The end of run II of the Tevatron, the up-coming Large Hadron Collider and proposed International Linear Collider all have great potential to help us answer these questions in the near future.

  14. Luminosity Measurement at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iftach Sadeh

    2010-10-28

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a proposed electron-positron collider with a center-of-mass energy of 500~GeV, and a peak luminosity of $2 \\cdot 10^{34}~\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$. The ILC will complement the Large Hadron Collider, a proton-proton accelerator, and provide precision measurements, which may help in solving some of the fundamental questions at the frontier of scientific research, such as the origin of mass and the possible existence of new principles of nature. The linear collider community has set a goal to achieve a precision of $10^{-4}$ on the luminosity measurement at the ILC. This may be accomplished by constructing a finely granulated calorimeter, which will measure Bhabha scattering at small angles. The Bhabha cross-section is theoretically known to great precision, yet the rate of Bhabha scattering events, which would be measured by the luminosity detector, will be influenced by beam-beam effects, and by the inherent energy spread of the collider. The electroweak radiative effects can be calculated to high precision and partially checked with events with final state photon radiation by distinguishing between the observable energy deposits of electrons and of photons in the luminosity calorimeter, using a clustering algorithm. In order to achieve the design goal, the geometrical parameters of the calorimeter need to be reevaluated. This must be done in a generalized manner, so as to facilitate future modifications, the need for which is foreseen, due to expected changes in the detector concept. This work demonstrates that the clustering approach is viable, and that a luminosity calorimeter may be designed to match the precision requirements on the luminosity measurement.

  15. The International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jim Brau; Paul Grannis; Mike Harrison; Michael Peskin; Marc Ross; Harry Weerts

    2013-04-09

    We present a brief summary of the International Linear Collider as documented in the 2013 Technical Design Report. The Technical Design Report has detailed descriptions of the accelerator baseline design for a 500 GeV e+e- linear collider, the R&D program that has demonstrated its feasibility, the physics goals and expected sensitivities, and the description of the ILD and SiD detectors and their capabilities.

  16. Detectors for Linear Colliders: Physics Requirements and Experimental Conditions (1/4)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    How is the anticipated physics program of a future e+e- collider shaping the R&D; for new detectors in collider particle physics ? This presentation will review the main physics requirements and experimental conditions comparing to LHC and LEP. In particular, I shall discuss how e+e- experimentation is expected to change moving from LEP-2 up to multi-TeV energies.

  17. CERN SL -AP EUROPEAN ORGANIZATION FOR NUCLEAR RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, Eberhard

    discussions of the super-conducting dipoles and their development are in Chap- ter VI. The radio The Large Hadron Collider LHC E. Keil The Large Hadron Collider Project LHC was approved by the CERN Council Collider Project CERN CH - 1211 Geneva 23 Switzerland LHC Project Report 79 Abstract 23/10/96 1 #12;The

  18. Hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei collisions at high energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giacomelli; R. Giacomelli

    2000-11-15

    A brief review is made of the present situation of hadron-hadron and hadron-nuclei total elastic and inelastic cross sections at high energies

  19. Updated measurements of hadronic B decays at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morello, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The CDF experiment at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider established that extensive and detailed exploration of the b-quark dynamics is possible in hadron collisions, with results competitive and supplementary to those from e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. This provides a rich, and highly rewarding program that has currently reached full maturity. In the following I report some recent results on hadronic decays: the evidence for the charmless annihilation decay mode B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and the first reconstruction in hadron collisions of the suppressed decays B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0})K{sup -} and B{sup -} {yields} D({yields} K{sup +} {pi}{sup -}){pi}{sup -}.

  20. Physics at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ellis

    2006-11-17

    The prospects for physics at the LHC are discussed, starting with the foretaste, preparation (and perhaps scoop) provided by the Tevatron, in particular, and then continuing through the successive phases of LHC operation. These include the start-up phase, the early physics runs, the possible search for new physics in double diffraction, the continuation to nominal LHC running, and the possible upgrade of the LHC luminosity. Emphasis is placed on the prospects for Higgs physics and the search for supersymmetry. The progress and discoveries of the LHC will set the time-scale and agenda for the major future accelerator projects that will follow it.

  1. A Large Hadron Electron Collider at CERN (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M. ; Brookhaven ; Barber, D. ; Daresbury DESY Liverpool U. ; Bartels, J. ; Hamburg, Tech. U. ; Behnke, O. ; DESY ; Behr, J. ; DESY ; Belyaev, A.S. ; Rutherford...

  2. Searching for Top Squarks at the Large Hadron Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kechen

    2014-08-01

    (“heavy slepton” case). The final states have at least 2 jets, 2 opposite-sign same flavor leptons and missing energy. The opposite-sign same flavor dilepton mass distribution after subtracting the opposite-sign different flavor distribution shows a clear...

  3. Establishing the Mirage Mediation Model at the Large Hadron Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kechen

    2012-10-19

    of the Lower Energy Tau PT ?slope Distribution of Benchmark Point.................... 22 Figure 5 The Effective Mass M eff Distribution of Benchmark Point....................... 23 vi LIST OF TABLES... of the up-type and down-type Higgs, /), (iv) sign(?) (? is the biliear Higgs coupling constant), (v) ni (modular weights of matter fields and Higgs fields), (vi) la (specifying how the visible sector is constructed). I assumed ? > 0...

  4. First Beam for Large Hadron Collider | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report to CongressApril 6,Final9Reportjobs can0 3:00PM

  5. ALCF helps tackle the Large Hadron Collider's big data challenge |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of rare Kaonforsupernovae2 Publications6 SmartInformation A to

  6. Dark matter signals in dilepton production at hadron colliders (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing BacteriaConnect Collidertransfer (Journal Article)Journal Article:

  7. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport)elastase-2;

  8. The Very Large Hadron Collider: The farthest energy frontier (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties ofThe MaximumReport)elastase-2;SciTech Connect

  9. The 125 GeV Higgs signal at the LHC in the CP Violating MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amit Chakraborty; Biswaranjan Das; J. Lorenzo Diaz-Cruz; Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Stefano Moretti; P. Poulose

    2014-08-15

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations have observed independently at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a new Higgs-like particle with a mass $M_h \\sim$ 125 GeV and properties similar to that predicted by the Standard Model (SM). Although the measurements indicate that this Higgs-like boson is compatible with the SM hypothesis, however due to large uncertainties in some of the Higgs detection channels, one still has the possibility of testing this object as being a candidate for some Beyond the SM (BSM) physics scenarios, for example, the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM), in the CP-conserving version (CPC-MSSM). In this paper, we evaluate the modifications of these CPC-MSSM results when CP-violating (CPV) phases are turned on explicitly, leading to the CP-violating MSSM (CPV-MSSM). We investigate the role of the CPV phases in (some of) the soft Supersymmetry (SUSY) terms on both the mass of the lightest Higgs boson $h_1$, and the rates for the processes $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow \\gamma \\gamma$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow ZZ^*\\rightarrow 4l$, $gg \\rightarrow h_1 \\rightarrow WW^*\\rightarrow l \

  10. There is no explosion risk associated with superfluid Helium in the LHC cooling system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malcolm Fairbairn; Bob McElrath

    2008-09-23

    We evaluate speculation about the possibility of a dangerous release of energy within the liquid Helium of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) cryogenic system due to the occurrence of a "Bose-Nova". Bose-Novae are radial bursts of rapidly moving atoms which can occur when a Bose-Einstein Condensate (BEC) undergoes a collapse due the interatomic potential being deliberately made attractive using a magnetic field close to the Feshbach resonance. Liquid 4He has a monatomic structure with s-wave electrons, zero nuclear spin, no hyperfine splitting, and as a consequence no Feshbach resonance which would allow one to change its normally repulsive interactions to be attractive. Because of this, a Bose-Nova style collapse of 4He is impossible. Additional speculations concerning cold fusion during these events are easily dismissed using the usual arguments about the Coulomb barrier at low temperatures, and are not needed to explain the Bose-Einstein condensate Bose-Nova phenomenon. We conclude that that there is no physics whatsoever which suggests that Helium could undergo any kind of unforeseen catastrophic explosion.

  11. Testing nuclear parton distributions with pA collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paloma Quiroga-Arias; Jose Guilherme Milhano; Urs Achin Wiedemann

    2010-02-12

    Global perturbative QCD analyses, based on large data sets from electron-proton and hadron collider experiments, provide tight constraints on the parton distribution function (PDF) in the proton. The extension of these analyses to nuclear parton distributions (nPDF) has attracted much interest in recent years. nPDFs are needed as benchmarks for the characterization of hot QCD matter in nucleus-nucleus collisions, and attract further interest since they may show novel signatures of non-linear density-dependent QCD evolution. However, it is not known from first principles whether the factorization of long-range phenomena into process-independent parton distribution, which underlies global PDF extractions for the proton, extends to nuclear effects. As a consequence, assessing the reliability of nPDFs for benchmark calculations goes beyond testing the numerical accuracy of their extraction and requires phenomenological tests of the factorization assumption. Here we argue that a proton-nucleus collision program at the LHC would provide a set of measurements allowing for unprecedented tests of the factorization assumption underlying global nPDF fits.

  12. The Higgs Portal from LHC to ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Englert

    2012-04-20

    Interpretations of searches for the Higgs boson are governed by model-dependent combinations of Higgs production cross sections and Higgs branching ratios. Mixing of the Higgs doublet with a hidden sector captures modifications from the Standard Model Higgs phenomenology in the standard search channels in a representative way, in particular because invisible Higgs decay modes open up. As a consequence, LHC exclusion bounds, which disfavor a heavy Standard Model Higgs can be consistently understood in terms of a standard-hidden mixed Higgs system. Shedding light on the possible existence of such an admixture with a hidden sector and quantifying the resemblance of an eventually discovered scalar resonance with the Standard Model Higgs crucially depends on measurement of invisible decays. This task will already be tackled at LHC, but eventually requires the clean environment of a future linear collider to be ultimately completed.

  13. Physics Opportunities of a 100 TeV Proton-Proton Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Mangano, Michelangelo; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson at the LHC exposes some of the most profound mysteries fundamental physics has encountered in decades, opening the door to the next phase of experimental exploration. More than ever, this will necessitate new machines to push us deeper into the energy frontier. In this article, we discuss the physics motivation and present the physics potential of a proton-proton collider running at an energy significantly beyond that of the LHC and a luminosity comparable to that of the LHC. 100 TeV is used as a benchmark of the center of mass energy, with integrated luminosities from 3 inverse ab to 30 inverse ab.

  14. High energy hadron-hadron collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1991-12-01

    Results of a study on high energy collision with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation. More recent studies are highlighted below. For elastic scattering, a modified form for the hadronic matter form factor of the proton was proposed which remains to be dipole in form but contains an energy-dependent range parameter. This new expression of the opacity function fits the elastic {bar p}p scattering very well from the ISR to S{bar p}pS energies. Extrapolation of this theory also yielded results in good agreement with the {bar p}p differential cross section measured at the Tevatron. For inelastic hadron-hadron collisions, we have made a systematic investigation of the single-particle momentum spectra in the entire S{bar p}pS energy region. Results are useful for the extrapolation of angular distribution to the higher SSC energies. In e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation, a detailed analysis of all available experimental multiplicity data from PETRA to LEP energies has been performed. We discovered that the cluster size of emitted hadrons increases steadily with energy and is close to 2 as we predicted.

  15. Top quark physics in hadron collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Wagner

    2007-08-03

    The top quark is the heaviest elementary particle observed to date. Its large mass makes the top quark an ideal laboratory to test predictions of perturbation theory concerning heavy quark production at hadron colliders. The top quark is also a powerful probe for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model of particle physics. In addition, the top quark mass is a crucial parameter for scrutinizing the Standard Model in electroweak precision tests and for predicting the mass of the yet unobserved Higgs boson. Ten years after the discovery of the top quark at the Fermilab Tevatron top quark physics has entered an era where detailed measurements of top quark properties are undertaken. In this review article an introduction to the phenomenology of top quark production in hadron collisions is given, the lessons learned in Tevatron Run I are summarized, and first Run II results are discussed. A brief outlook to the possibilities of top quark research a the Large Hadron Collider, currently under construction at CERN, is included.

  16. Photon collider at TESLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Telnov

    2001-03-06

    High energy photon colliders (gamma-gamma, gamma-electron) based on backward Compton scattering of laser light is a very natural addition to e+e- linear colliders. In this report we consider this option for the TESLA project. Recent study has shown that the horizontal emittance in the TESLA damping ring can be further decreased by a factor of four. In this case the gamma-gamma luminosity luminosity in the high energy part of spectrum can reach (1/3)L_{e+e-}. Typical cross sections of interesting processes in gamma-gamma collisions are higher than those in e+e- collisions by about one order of magnitude, so the number of events in gamma-gamma collisions will be more than that in e+e- collisions. Photon colliders can, certainly, give additional information and they are the best for the study of many phenomena. The main question is now the technical feasibility. The key new element in photon colliders is a very powerful laser system. An external optical cavity is a promising approach for the TESLA project. A free electron laser is another option. However, a more straightforward solution is ``an optical storage ring (optical trap)'' with diode pumped solid state laser injector which is today technically feasible. This paper briefly reviews the status of a photon collider based at TESLA, its possible parameters and existing problems.

  17. Transverse-Momentum and Pseudorapidity Distributions of Charged Hadrons in pp Collisions at [sqrt] s=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    Charged-hadron transverse-momentum and pseudorapidity distributions in proton-proton collisions at [sqrt]s=7??TeV are measured with the inner tracking system of the CMS detector at the LHC. The charged-hadron yield is ...

  18. Study of Higgs boson production and its b-bbar decay in gamma-gamma processes in proton-nucleus collisions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria; Jean-Philippe Lansberg

    2010-01-11

    We explore for the first time the possibilities to measure an intermediate-mass (mH = 115-140 GeV/c^2) Standard-Model Higgs boson in electromagnetic proton-lead (pPb) interactions at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) via its b-bbar decay. Using equivalent Weizsaecker-Williams photon fluxes and Higgs effective field theory for the coupling gamma-gamma --> H, we obtain a leading-order cross section of the order of 0.3 pb for exclusive Higgs production in elastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> p H Pb) and semielastic (pPb --> gamma-gamma --> Pb H X) processes at sqrt(s) = 8.8 TeV. After applying various kinematics cuts to remove the main backgrounds (gamma-gamma --> b-bbar and misidentified gamma-gamma-->q-qbar events), we find that a Higgs boson with mH = 120 GeV/c^2 could be observed in the b-bbar channel with a 3sigma-significance integrating 300 pb^-1 with an upgraded pA luminosity of 10^31 cm^-2s^-1. We also provide for the first time semielastic Higgs cross sections, along with elastic t-tbar cross sections, for electromagnetic pp, pA and AA collisions at the LHC.

  19. Top physics at LHC with ttbar events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hubaut

    2006-05-10

    The new CERN proton-proton collider, the LHC, is about to start in 2007 its data taking. Millions of top quarks will be available out of these data, allowing to perform a wide range of precision measurements and searches for new physics. An overview of the planned top physics program accessible with ttbar events is given for the ATLAS and CMS experiments. A particular emphasis is put on the precision measurements of the top mass, top polarization and searches for new physics in top production and decay.

  20. Jets and Underlying Events at LHC Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Agócs; G. G. Barnaföldi; P. Lévai

    2010-11-24

    Jet-matter interaction remains a central question and a theoretical challenge in heavy-ion physics and might become important in high-multiplicity events in proton-proton collisions at LHC energies. Full jet measurement at LHC offer the proper tool to investigate energy loss process and fragmentation of hard parton in the medium. Since jet reconstruction will be constrained to small cone sizes, then study of the connection between jets and surrounding environment provides a further possibility to extend our exploration. We study jets at s = (14 TeV)^2 and pp collisions at s = (7 TeV)^2. We analyze the flavor components in jet-like environments. We introduce a definition for surrounding cones/belts and investigate flavor dependence and correlation of different hadron species produced in jets. Here, we focus on proton-triggered correlations. Our analysis can be extended for heavy ion collisions.

  1. New Perspectives for QCD Physics at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Stanford U. /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins

    2011-02-07

    I review a number of topics where conventional wisdom relevant to hadron physics at the LHC has been challenged. For example, the initial-state and final-state interactions of the quarks and gluons entering perturbative QCD hard-scattering subprocesses lead to the breakdown of traditional concepts of factorization and universality for transverse-momentum-dependent observables at leading twist. These soft-gluon rescattering effect produce single-spin asymmetries, the breakdown of the Lam-Tung relation in Drell-Yan reactions, as well as diffractive deep inelastic scattering, The antishadowing of nuclear structure functions is predicted to depend on the flavor quantum numbers of each quark and antiquark. Isolated hadrons can be produced at large transverse momentum directly within a hard higher-twist QCD subprocess, rather than from jet fragmentation, even at the LHC. Such 'direct' processes can explain the observed deviations from pQCD predictions of the power-law fall-off of inclusive hadron cross sections as well as the 'baryon anomaly' seen in high-centrality heavy-ion collisions at RHIC. The intrinsic charm contribution to the proton structure function at high x can explain the large rate for high p{sub T} photon plus charm-jet events observed at the Tevatron and imply a large production rate for charm and bottom jets at high p{sub T} at the LHC, as well as a novel mechanism for Higgs and Z{sup 0} production at high x{sub F}. The light-front wavefunctions derived in AdS/QCD can be used to calculate jet hadronization at the amplitude level. The elimination of the renormalization scale ambiguity for the QCD coupling using the scheme-independent BLM method will increase the sensitivity of searches for new physics at the LHC. The implications of 'in-hadron condensates' for the QCD contribution to the cosmological constant are also discussed.

  2. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S

    2010-05-17

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  3. The Muon Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zisman, Michael S.

    2011-01-05

    We describe the scientific motivation for a new type of accelerator, the muon collider. This accelerator would permit an energy-frontier scientific program and yet would fit on the site of an existing laboratory. Such a device is quite challenging, and requires a substantial R&D program. After describing the ingredients of the facility, the ongoing R&D activities of the Muon Accelerator Program are discussed. A possible U.S. scenario that could lead to a muon collider at Fermilab is briefly mentioned.

  4. Secondary Charmonium Production at LHC Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Braun-Munzinger; K. Redlich

    1999-08-06

    We consider the production of charmonium by $D\\bar D$ annihilation during the mixed and hadronic phase of Pb-Pb collision at LHC energy. The calculations for secondary $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi^,$ production are performed within a kinetic model taking into account the space-time evolution of a longitudinally and transversely expanding medium. It is shown that the yield of secondary $J/\\psi$ mesons depends strongly on the $J/\\psi$ dissociation cross section with co-moving hadrons. Within the most likely scenario for the dissociation cross section it will be negligible. The secondary production of $\\psi^,$ mesons, however, due to their large cross section above the threshold, can substantially exceed the primary yield.

  5. International linear collider reference design report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aarons, G.

    2008-01-01

    A. Loew, et al. , “International Linear Collider Technologyfor the International Linear Collider”, in preparation [37]for the International Linear Collider,” in PAC05,http://

  6. Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barletta, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Research Division Stochastic Cooling in Muon Colliders W.A.AC03-76SFOOO98. STOCHASTIC COOLING IN MUON COLLIDERS Williamcan consider the stochastic cooling option as more than a

  7. Rare decays of B mesons and baryons at the Tevatron and the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volpi, Guido; /INFN, Pisa /Siena U.

    2008-07-01

    The experimental study of rare decays of hadrons containing the b quark has been a fertile ground for some time, and keeps being one of the most interesting subjects in high energy physics. It has improved our understanding of hadronic processes, and allows investigating various aspects of the Standard Model and searching for hints of physics beyond the Standard Model. Examples are the comparison of branching fractions of charmless modes with predictions of models, the constraints on CKM angles (B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B {yields} DK, with D in suppressed modes), the observation of purely leptonic modes (B{sup {+-}} {yields} {tau}{sup {+-}}{nu}), the recently established difference in A{sub CP} between B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and B{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}, suspected to be a hint new physics. All of them came from a long and successful experimental activity with e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. With hadronic colliders now coming into play, the study of rare decays is reaching new heights. Given the high cross section for production of all kinds of B hadrons, the record luminosities now provided by the Tevatron collider, and the LHC program in view for the next years, there is the potential for a rich program of interesting new measurements, including even rarer modes as the B{sub (s)}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, strongly suppressed in the standard model but very sensitive to many NP scenarios. The complexity of the hadronic collision environment, however, requires detectors with high precision and high quality tracking, and a trigger system capable of complex event selections at high rates. The CDF experiment, thanks to a fast trigger on impact parameter, has been able to reconstruct many rare B decays, including previously unobserved modes B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the latter being particularly interesting for its relationship with the puzzling difference in CP asymmetry between neutral and charged modes. In this thesis we go beyond B mesons, and present the first measurements of Branching fractions and CP asymmetries in charmless b-baryon modes. We study two-body {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decays into final states with a proton and a charged pion or kaon. Their branching fractions can be significantly affected by New Physics contributions; under supersymmetric models with R-parity violation, they can be increased by two orders of magnitude. Their CP-violating asymmetries are also interesting to measure in search for possible further anomalies: then may reach significant size {Omicron}(30%) in the Standard Model, and are also sensitive to possible new physics sources.

  8. Top quark pair production cross section at LHC in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John David Morris

    2014-10-24

    Measurements of the top quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider are presented. The measurements require no, one or two electrons or muons in the final state (single lepton, dilepton, hadronic channel). In addition, the decay modes with tau leptons are tested (channels with tau leptons). The main focus is on measurements of differential spectra of $t\\bar{t}$ final states, in particular, measurements that are able to constrain the modelling of additional parton radiation like the jet multiplicity distribution.

  9. Spin and diffractive physics with a fixed-target experiment at the LHC (AFTER-LHC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorce, C.; Chambert, V.; Didelez, J. P.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Lansberg, J. P.; Rosier, P.; Brodsky, S. J.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Fleuret, F.

    2013-04-15

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose f xed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic f xed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The f xed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  10. Energy Dependent Growth of Nucleon and Inclusive Charged Hadron Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hongmin Wang; Zhao-Yu Hou; Xian-Jing Sun

    2015-01-06

    In the Color Glass Condensate formalism, charged hadron p_{T} distributions in p+p collisions are studied by considering an energy-dependent broadening of nucleon's density distribution. Then, in the Glasma flux tube picture, the n-particle multiplicity distributions at different pseudo-rapidity ranges are investigated. Both of the theoretical results show good agreement with the recent experimental data from ALICE and CMS at \\sqrt{s}=0.9, 2.36, 7 TeV. The predictive results for p_{T} and multiplicity distributions in p+p and p+Pb collisions at the Large Hadron Collider are also given in this paper.

  11. Shooting string holography of jet quenching at RHIC and LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ficnar, Andrej; Gubser, Steven S.; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2014-10-13

    We derive a new formula for jet energy loss using finite endpoint momentum shooting strings initial conditions in SYM plasmas to overcome the difficulties of previous falling string holographic scenarios. We apply the new formula to compute the nuclear modification factor RAA and the elliptic flow parameter v2 of light hadrons at RHIC and LHC. We show furthermore that Gauss–Bonnet quadratic curvature corrections to the AdS5 geometry improve the agreement with the recent data.

  12. arXiv:acc-phys/9602001v112Feb1996 MUON COLLIDERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    , A. Garren3,7 , M. Green3 , S. Kahn1 , H. Kirk1 , Y. Y. Lee1 , F. Mills5 , N. Mokhov5 , G. Morgan1 on upgrades of the FERMILAB machines would also be possible (see second Ref. [4]). Hadron collider energies are limited by their size and technical constraints on bending magnetic fields. At very high energies it would

  13. Nuclear effects on hadron production in d plus Au collisions at root S(NN)=200 GeV revealed by comparison with p plus p data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanad, M.; Csorgo, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; d'Enterria, D.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deak, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S. -Y; Gadrat, S.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; de Cassagnac, R. Granier; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Perdekamp, M. Grosse; Gustafsson, H. -A; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Hartouni, E. P.; Harvey, M.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Ichihara, T.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, G. -B; Kim, H. J.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, A.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Le Bornec, Y.; Lebedev, A.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McGaughey, P. L.; Miake, Y.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, Saskia; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J. L.; Nakamura, T.; Newby, J.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, H.; Okada, K.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J. -C; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T. -A; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sullivan, J. P.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Taranenko, A.; Tarjan, P.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Tydesjo, H.; Tyurin, N.; Uam, T. J.; van Hecke, H. W.; Velkovska, J.; Velkovsky, M.; Veszpremi, V.; Vinogradov, A. A.; Volkov, M. A.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, Y.; White, S. N.; Willis, N.; Wohn, F. K.; Woody, C. L.; Xie, W.; Yanovich, A.; Yokkaichi, S.; Young, G. R.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zhang, C.; Zhou, S.; Zimanyi, J.; Zolin, L.; Zong, X.; PHENIX Collaboration.

    2006-01-01

    To study heavy ion collisions at energies available from the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we have developed a multiphase transport model that includes both initial partonic and final hadronic interactions. ...

  14. Challenges for LHC and Demands on Beam Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenninger, J

    2003-01-01

    The LHC machine presently under construction at CERN will exceed existing super-conducting colliders by about one order of magnitude for luminosity and beam energies for pp collisions. To achieve this performance the bunch frequency is as large as 40 MHz and the range in beam intensity covers 5 x 10^9 protons to 3 x 10^14 protons with a normalized beam emittance as small as 3 microrad. This puts very stringent demands on the beam instrumentation to be able to measure beam parameters like beam positions, profiles, tunes, chromaticity, beam losses or luminosity. This document highlights selected topics in the field of LHC beam instrumentation. The examples will be chosen to cover new detection principles or new numerical data treatments, which had to be developed for the LHC as well as aspects of operational reliability for instrumentation, which will be used for machine protection systems.

  15. Non-custodial warped extra dimensions at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dillon, Barry M

    2015-01-01

    With the prospect of improved Higgs measurements at the LHC and at proposed future colliders such as ILC, CLIC and TLEP we study the non-custodial Randall-Sundrum model with bulk SM fields and compare brane and bulk Higgs scenarios. We compute the electroweak precision observables and argue that incalculable contributions to these, in the form of higher dimensional operators, could have a non-negligable impact. This could potentially reduce the bound on the lowest Kaluza-Klein gauge boson masses to the 5 TeV range, making these states detectable at the LHC. In a second part, we compute the misalignment between fermion masses and Yukawa couplings caused by vector-like Kaluza-Klein fermions. The deviation of the top Yukawa can easily reach 10%, making it observable at the high-luminosity LHC. Corrections to the bottom and tau Yukawa couplings can be at the percent level and detectable at ILC, CLIC or TLEP.

  16. ERL BASED ELECTRON-ION COLLIDER ERHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LITVINENKO,V.N.; BEN-ZVI,I.; ANDERSON,D.; ET AL.

    2005-05-16

    In this paper we describe eRHIC design based on the RHIC hadron rings and 10-to-20 GeV energy recovery electron linac. RHIC requires a very large tunability range for c.m. energies while maintaining very high luminosity up to 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} per nucleon. The designs of this future polarized electron-hadron collider, eRHIC, based on a high current super-conducting energy-recovery linac (ERL) with energy of electrons up to 20 GeV, have a number of specific requirements on the ERL optics. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance. Two of the most attractive features of this scheme are full spin transparency of the ERL at all operational energies and the capability to support up to four interaction points. We present two main layouts of the eRHIC, the expected beam and luminosity parameter, and discuss the potential limitation of its performance.

  17. Measuring Supersymmetric Particle Masses at the LHC in Scenarios with Baryon-Number R-Parity Violating Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. C. Allanach; A. J. Barr; L. Drage; C. G. Lester; D. Morgan; M. A. Parker; P. Richardson B. R. Webber

    2001-02-14

    The measurement of sparticle masses in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model at the LHC is analysed, in the scenario where the lightest neutralino decays into three quarks. Such decays, occurring through the baryon-number violating coupling lambda"\\_ijk, pose a severe challenge to the capability of the LHC detectors since the final state has no missing energy signature and a high jet multiplicity. We focus on the case of non-zero lambda"\\_212 which is the most difficult experimentally. The proposed method is valid over a wide range of SUGRA parameter space with lambda"\\_212 between 10^{-5}-0.1. Simulations are performed of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Using the lightest neutralino from the decay chain left-squark to quark + next-to-lightest neutralino to right-slepton + lepton + quark and finally to lightest neutralino + lepton pair + quark, we show that the lightest and next-to-lightest neutralino masses can be measured by 3-jet and 3-jet + lepton pair invariant mass combinations. At the SUGRA point M_0=100 GeV, M_{1/2}=300 GeV, A_0=300 GeV, tan beta=10, sign of mu positive and with lambda"\\_212=0.005, we achieve statistical (systematic) errors of 3 (3), 3 (3), 0.3 (4) and 5 (12) GeV respectively for the masses of the lightest neutralino, next-to-lightest neutralino, right-slepton and left-squark, with an integrated luminosity of 30 fb^{-1}.

  18. Search for New Heavy Resonances Decaying To t+t^- Pairs at the LHC with Square Root S= 7 TEV (L = 5.0 FB^-1) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Indara

    2015-01-22

    for Heavy Resonances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 3. THE LARGE HADRON COLLIDER AND THE CMS DETECTOR . . . 21 3.1 The Large Hadron Collider . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.2 The Compact Muon Solenoid Detector...V center-of-mass energy to the CMS detector. CMS recorded 5.55 fb?1 of data. . . . . . . . . . . 23 3.3 Cross-sectional View of the CMS Detector. The subdetectors in or- der from the interaction point outward are the pixel detector, the sili- con tracker...

  19. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smirnov, S Yu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 ?m resolution for charged particle tracks with |?| 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor above 1000, thus e...

  20. Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and First High Energy Collisions at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mashinistov, R; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 ?m resolution for charged particle tracks with |?| < 2 and pT > 0.5 GeV. The TRT is immersed in a 2 T magnetic field generated by the central solenoid, significantly contributing together with the other two Inner Detector sub-systems to the particle momentum reconstruction. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. As expected from the production of transition radiation (TR), the first collision results show the increase in the number of detected TR-photons for particles with a gamma-factor abo...

  1. Fragmentation and Hadronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1999-12-10

    Experimental data, theoretical ideas and models concerning jet fragmentation and the hadronization process are reviewed, concentrating on the following topics: factorization and small-x resummation of fragmentation functions, hadronization models, single-particle yields and spectra in Z decay, comparisons between quark and gluon jets, current and target fragmentation in deep inelastic scattering, heavy quark fragmentation, Bose-Einstein correlations and WW fragmentation.

  2. Civil Engineering Feasibility Studies for Future Ring Colliders at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruning, O; Myers, S; Osborne, J; Rossi, L; Waaijer, C; Zimmermann, F

    2013-01-01

    CERN civil engineers are studying the feasibility of several potential ring colliders to complement the LHC: an 80km circular tunnel to house the TLEP and VHE-LHC, and the ring-ring and linac-ring options for the LHeC. The feasibility of these projects is largely dependent on civil design and geotechnical and environmental risks. As civil infrastructure works typically represent one third of the cost of major physics projects, it is critical that the construction costs are well understood from the conceptual stage. This proceeding presents the first results of the feasibility studies for the 80km tunnel and the linac-ring LHeC. Presented at IPAC'13 Shanghai, 12-17 May 2013

  3. CMS physics highlights in the LHC Run 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David d'Enterria for the CMS Collaboration

    2015-05-18

    The main physics results obtained by the CMS experiment during the first three years of operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (2010--2013, aka. Run 1) are summarized. The advances in our understanding of the fundamental particles and their interactions are succinctly reviewed under the following physics topics: (i) Quantum Chromodynamics, (ii) Quark Gluon Plasma, (iii) Electroweak interaction, (iv) Top quark, (v) Higgs boson, (vi) Flavour, (vii) Supersymmetry, (viii) Dark Matter, and (ix) other searches of physics beyond the Standard Model.

  4. Longitudinally Polarized Photoproduction of Inclusive Hadrons Beyond the Leading Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Jager; M. Stratmann; W. Vogelsang

    2003-09-04

    We present a complete next-to-leading order QCD calculation for single-inclusive large-pT hadron production in longitudinally polarized lepton-nucleon collisions, consistently including ``direct'' and ``resolved'' photon contributions. This process could be studied experimentally at a future polarized lepton-proton collider like eRHIC at BNL. We examine the sensitivity of such measurements to the so far completely unknown parton content of circularly polarized photons.

  5. Longitudinally Polarized Photoproduction of Inclusive Hadrons Beyond the Leading Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, B; Vogelsang, W

    2003-01-01

    We present a complete next-to-leading order QCD calculation for single-inclusive large-pT hadron production in longitudinally polarized lepton-nucleon collisions, consistently including ``direct'' and ``resolved'' photon contributions. This process could be studied experimentally at a future polarized lepton-proton collider like eRHIC at BNL. We examine the sensitivity of such measurements to the so far completely unknown parton content of circularly polarized photons.

  6. Higgs portal dark matter at a linear collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takehiro Nabeshima

    2012-02-23

    We investigate the possibility of detecting dark matter at TeV scale linear colliders in the scenario where the dark matter interacts with standard model particles only via the Higgs boson. In this scenario, the dark matter would be difficult to be tested at the LHC especially when the decay of the Higgs boson into a dark matter pair is not kinematically allowed. In this talk, we discuss whether even such a case can be explored or not at the ILC and CLIC via the Z boson fusion process. This talk is mainly based on Phys. Rev. D 82, 055026 (2010) and Phys. Lett. B 701, 591 (2011).

  7. Illuminating Dark Photons with High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Curtin; Rouven Essig; Stefania Gori; Jessie Shelton

    2015-02-27

    High-energy colliders offer a unique sensitivity to dark photons, the mediators of a broken dark U(1) gauge theory that kinetically mixes with the Standard Model (SM) hypercharge. Dark photons can be detected in the exotic decay of the 125 GeV Higgs boson, h -> Z Z_D -> 4l, and in Drell-Yan events, pp -> Z_D -> ll. If the dark U(1) is broken by a hidden-sector Higgs mechanism, then mixing between the dark and SM Higgs bosons also allows the exotic decay h -> Z_D Z_D -> 4l. We show that the 14 TeV LHC and a 100 TeV proton-proton collider provide powerful probes of both exotic Higgs decay channels. In the case of kinetic mixing alone, direct Drell-Yan production offers the best sensitivity to Z_D, and can probe epsilon >~ 9 x 10^(-4) (4 x 10^(-4)) at the HL-LHC (100 TeV pp collider). The exotic Higgs decay h -> Z Z_D offers slightly weaker sensitivity, but both measurements are necessary to distinguish the kinetically mixed dark photon from other scenarios. If Higgs mixing is also present, then the decay h -> Z_D Z_D can allow sensitivity to the Z_D for epsilon >~ 10^(-9) - 10^(-6) (10^(-10) - 10^(-7)) for the mass range 2 m_mu < m_(Z_D) < m_h/2 by searching for displaced dark photon decays. We also compare the Z_D sensitivity at pp colliders to the indirect, but model-independent, sensitivity of global fits to electroweak precision observables. We perform a global electroweak fit of the dark photon model, substantially updating previous work in the literature. Electroweak precision measurements at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC exclude epsilon as low as 3 x 10^(-2). Sensitivity can be improved by up to a factor of ~2 with HL-LHC data, and an additional factor of ~4 with ILC/GigaZ data.

  8. Physics at the e?e? linear collider

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moortgat-Picka, G.; Kronfeld, A. S.

    2015-08-14

    A comprehensive review of physics at an e?e? linear collider in the energy range of ?s = 92 GeV–3 TeV is presented in view of recent and expected LHC results, experiments from low-energy as well as astroparticle physics. The report focuses in particular on Higgs-boson, top-quark and electroweak precision physics, but also discusses several models of beyond the standard model physics such as supersymmetry, little Higgs models and extra gauge bosons. The connection to cosmology has been analysed as well.

  9. Muon Colliders and Neutrino Factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, Steve; /Fermilab

    2009-11-01

    Over the past decade, there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture, and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons per year. These developments have paved the way for a new type of neutrino source (neutrino factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (muon collider). This article reviews the motivation, design, and research and development for future neutrino factories and muon colliders.

  10. Muon colliders and neutrino factories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Over the last decade there has been significant progress in developing the concepts and technologies needed to produce, capture and accelerate {Omicron}(10{sup 21}) muons/year. This development prepares the way for a new type of neutrino source (Neutrino Factory) and a new type of very high energy lepton-antilepton collider (Muon Collider). This article reviews the motivation, design and R&D for Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders.

  11. Colliding Nuclei at High Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Brookhaven Lab

    2010-01-08

    Physicist Peter Steinberg explains what happens when atomic nucleii travelling at close to the speed of light smash together in Brookhaven Lab's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC).

  12. Collider Phenomenology with Split-UED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Kyoungchul; /SLAC; Park, Seong Chan; /Tokyo U., IPMU; Rizzo, Thomas G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-15

    We investigate the collider implications of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. The non-vanishing fermion mass in the bulk, which is consistent with the KK-parity, largely modifies the phenomenology of Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions. We scrutinize the behavior of couplings and study the discovery reach of the Tevatron and the LHC for level-2 Kaluza-Klein modes in the dilepton channel, which would indicates the presence of the extra dimensions. Observation of large event rates for dilepton resonances can result from a nontrivial fermion mass profile along the extra dimensions, which, in turn, may corroborate extra dimensional explanation for the observation of the positron excess in cosmic rays. The Minimal Universal Extra Dimensions scenario has received great attention. Recently non-vanishing bulk fermion masses have been introduced without spoiling the virtue of KK-parity. The fermion profiles are no longer simple sine/cosine functions and depend upon the specific values of bulk parameters. The profiles of fermions are split along the extra dimensions while the wave functions of the bosons remain the same as in UED. A simple introduction of a KK-parity conserving bulk fermion mass has significant influences on collider aspects as well as astrophysical implications of UED. For instance, the DM annihilation fraction into certain SM fermion pairs is either enhanced or reduced (compared to the MUED case) so that one can perhaps explain the PAMELA positron excess while suppressing the anti-proton flux. In this paper, we have concentrated on collider phenomenology of Split Universal Extra Dimensions. We have revisited the KK decomposition in detail and analyzed wave function overlaps to compute relevant couplings for collider studies. We have discussed general collider implication for level-1 KK modes and level-2 KK with non-zero bulk mass and have computed LHC reach for the EW level-2 KK bosons, {gamma}{sub 2} and Z{sub 2}, in the dilepton channel. The LHC should able to cover the large parameter space (up to M{sub V{sub 2}} {approx} 1.5 TeV for {mu}L {ge} 1) even with early data assuming {approx}100 pb{sup -1} or less. The existence of double resonances is one essential feature arising from extra dimensional models. Whether or not one can see double resonances depends both on how degenerate the two resonances are and on the mass resolution of the detector. The very high P{sub T} from the decay makes resolution in dimuon channel worse than in dielectron final state. This is because one can reconstruct electron from ECAL but muon momentum reconstruction relies on its track, which is barely curved in this case. Further indication for SUED might be the discovery of W'-like signature of mass close to Z{sub 2}. The MUED predicts a somewhat lower event rate due to 1-loop suppressed coupling of level-2 bosons to SM fermion pair, while it exists at tree level in SUED. Therefore in UED, one has to rely on indirect production of level-2 bosons, whose collider study requires complete knowledge of the model: the mass spectrum and all the couplings. On the other hand, in the large {mu} limit of SUED, the dependence on mass spectrum is diminished since level-2 KK bosons decay only into SM fermion pairs. This allows us to estimate the signal rate from their direct production, so that they can be discovered at the early phase of the LHC. The indirect production mechanism only increases production cross sections, improving our results. Once a discovery has been made, one should try to reconstruct events and do further measurements such as spin and coupling determination, with more accumulated data, which might discriminate KK resonances from other Z' models. The coupling measurement is directly related to the determination of the bulk masses. A challenging issue might be the existence of two resonances which are rather close to each other.

  13. Inclusive Higgs Boson Searches in Four-Lepton Final States at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evelyne Delmeire

    2007-05-15

    The inclusive search for the Standard Model Higgs boson in four-lepton final states with the ATLAS and CMS detectors at the LHC pp collider is presented. The discussion focusses on the H-> ZZ^(*)->4l+X decay mode for a Higgs boson in the mass range 120 ~Higgs boson properties is also given.

  14. 2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yayu

    2014 8 22 4:00PM-5:00PM Title: "Exploration of the Higgs boson and the Physics case for the Large Hadron Electron Collider" Abstract: With the discovery of a Higgs boson at the Large Hadron) Prof. Mellado is an expert on the Higgs boson ­ a sub-atomic particle that is thought to give matter

  15. Jet energy scale setting with "photon+Jet" events at LHC energies. Generalities, selection rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. V. Bandourin; V. F. Konoplianikov; N. B. Skachkov

    2000-12-14

    "photon+Jet" events, based on the q~q-> g+photon and qg-> q+photon subprocesses, are proposed for jet energy scale setting and hadron calorimeter calibration at LHC energies. General features and selection criteria of "photon+Jet" events that would provide a good photon Pt - jet Pt balance are described. CMS detector geometry is taken as the basement.

  16. First measurement of hadronic event shapes in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    Hadronic event shapes have been measured in proton–proton collisions at ?s =7 TeV, with a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 pb-1. Event-shape ...

  17. The Electron-Ion Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Guzey

    2009-07-23

    The future Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) is a proposed new facility to collide high-energy electrons with beams of polarized protons/light nuclei and unpolarized nuclei. We overview the goals of the project and key measurements at the EIC. We also briefly comment on recent developments of the project.

  18. Positrons for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecklund, S.

    1987-11-01

    The requirements of a positron source for a linear collider are briefly reviewed, followed by methods of positron production and production of photons by electromagnetic cascade showers. Cross sections for the electromagnetic cascade shower processes of positron-electron pair production and Compton scattering are compared. A program used for Monte Carlo analysis of electromagnetic cascades is briefly discussed, and positron distributions obtained from several runs of the program are discussed. Photons from synchrotron radiation and from channeling are also mentioned briefly, as well as positron collection, transverse focusing techniques, and longitudinal capture. Computer ray tracing is then briefly discussed, followed by space-charge effects and thermal heating and stress due to showers. (LEW)

  19. Fermilab | Newsroom | Press Releases | July 4, 2012: Search for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that scientists, engineers and students from Fermilab have made to the LHC." Search for Higgs boson at Large Hadron Collider reveals new particle Physicists on experiments at the...

  20. Quark Flavors and Conserved Charges at Finite Density in the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN near Geneva, Switzerland. This project is pursuing a microscopic understanding of the QGP properties near...

  1. Estimate of the Hadronic Production of the Doubly Charmed Baryon $?_{cc}$ under GM-VFN Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Hsi Chang; Cong-Feng Qiao; Jian-Xiong Wang; Xing-Gang Wu

    2006-01-05

    Hadronic production of the doubly charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$ ($\\Xi^{++}_{cc}$ and $\\Xi^{+}_{cc}$) is investigated under the general-mass variable-flavor-number (GM-VFN) scheme. The gluon-gluon fusion mechanism and the intrinsic charm mechanisms, i.e. via the sub-processes $g+g\\to(cc)[^3S_1]_{\\bar 3}+\\bar{c}+\\bar{c}$, $g+g\\to(cc)[^1S_0]_6+\\bar{c}+\\bar{c}$; $g+c\\to (cc)[^3S_1]_{\\bar 3}+\\bar{c}$, $g+c\\to (cc)[^1S_0]_6+\\bar{c}$ and $c+c\\to (cc)[^3S_1]_{\\bar 3}+g$, $c+c\\to (cc)[^1S_0]_6+g$, are taken into account in the investigation, where $(cc)[^3S_1]_{\\bar 3}$ (in color {\\bf $\\bar 3$}) and $(cc)[^1S_0]_6$ (in color {\\bf 6}) are two possible $S$-wave configurations of the doubly charmed diquark pair $(cc)$ inside the baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$. Numerical results for the production at hadornic colliders LHC and TEVATRON show that both the contributions from the doubly charmed diquark pairs $(cc)[^1S_0]_6$ and $(cc)[^3S_1]_{\\bar 3}$ are sizable with the assumption that the two NRQCD matrix elements are equal, and the total contributions from the `intrinsic' charm mechanisms are bigger than those of the gluon-gluon fusion mechanism. For the production in the region of small transverse-momentum $p_t$, the intrinsic mechanisms are dominant over the gluon-gluon fusion mechanism and they can raise the theoretical prediction of the $\\Xi_{cc}$ by almost one order.

  2. Top Jets at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeida, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    Top Jets at the LHC Leandro G. Almeida, Seung J. Lee, GiladWIS/17/08-SEPT-DPP Top Jets at the LHC Leandro G. Almeidareconstructed as a single jet, a “top-jet”. The most basic “

  3. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical...

  4. Search for massive long-lived highly ionising particles with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    A search is made for massive highly ionising particles with lifetimes in excess of 100 ns, with the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, using 3.1 pb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data taken at ?s = 7 TeV. The ...

  5. Nuclear modification factor for light and heavy flavors within pQCD and recent data from the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2012-10-15

    We examine the flavor dependence of the nuclear modification factor $R_{AA}$ in the pQCD calculations at LHC energies. The computations are performed accounting for radiative and collisional parton energy loss with running coupling constant. Our results show that the recent LHC data on the $R_{AA}$ for charged hadrons, D-mesons and non-photonic electrons agree reasonably with the pQCD picture of the parton energy loss with the dominating contribution from the radiative mechanism.

  6. Mean pt scaling with m/nq at the LHC: Absence of (hydro) flow in small systems?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio Ortiz

    2015-06-01

    In this work, a study of the average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of the mid-rapidity charged hadron multiplicity (Nch) and hadron mass (m) in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC is presented. For the events producing low Nch, the average pT is found to scale with the reduced hadron mass, i.e., mass divided by the number of quark constituents (m/nq), this scaling also holds for minimum bias pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The scaling is broken in high multiplicity p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions, namely, for dNch/deta hydro calculations, where a universal scaling with the hadron mass (and not with m/nq) is predicted for all the multiplicity event classes. Only the 0-60% Pb-Pb collisions behave as expected from hydro.

  7. Mean pt scaling with m/nq at the LHC: Absence of (hydro) flow in small systems?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a study of the average transverse momentum (pT) as a function of the mid-rapidity charged hadron multiplicity (Nch) and hadron mass (m) in p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at the LHC is presented. For the events producing low Nch, the average pT is found to scale with the reduced hadron mass, i.e., mass divided by the number of quark constituents (m/nq), this scaling also holds for minimum bias pp collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. The scaling is broken in high multiplicity p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions, namely, for dNch/deta hydro calculations, where a universal scaling with the hadron mass (and not with m/nq) is predicted for all the multiplicity event classes. Only the 0-60% Pb-Pb collisions behave as expected from hydro.

  8. Symmetry restored in dibosons at the LHC?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brehmer, Johann; Hewett, JoAnne; Kopp, Joachim; Rizzo, Thomas; Tattersall, Jamie

    2015-10-28

    A number of LHC resonance search channels display an excess in the invariant mass region of 1.8–2.0 TeV. Among them is a 3.4? excess in the fully hadronic decay of a pair of Standard Model electroweak gauge bosons, in addition to potential signals in the HW anddijetfinalstates. Weperformamodel-independentcross-sectionfittotheresults of all ATLAS and CMS searches sensitive to these final states. We then interpret these results in the context of the Left-Right Symmetric Model, based on the extended gauge group SU(2) L × SU(2) R × U(1)', and show that a heavy right-handed gauge boson W R can naturally explain the currentmore »measurements with just a single coupling gR ~ 0.4. Thus, we discuss a possible connection to dark matter.« less

  9. Recent ALICE results on hadronic resonance production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angela Badalà for the ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-22

    Hadronic resonances are a valuable tool to study the properties of the medium formed in heavy-ion collisions. In particular, they can provide information on particle-formation mechanisms and on the properties of the medium at chemical freeze-out. Furthermore they contribute to the systematic study of parton energy loss and quark recombination. Measurements of resonances in pp and in p-Pb collisions provide a necessary baseline for heavy-ion data and help to disentangle initial-state effects from medium-induced effects. In this paper the latest ALICE results on mid-rapidity K*(892)^0 and {\\phi}(1020) production in pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb collisions at LHC energies are presented

  10. hhjj production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Matthew J.; Englert, Christoph; Greiner, Nicolas; Nordstrom, Karl; Spannowsky, Michael

    2015-08-25

    The search for di-Higgs production at the LHC in order to set limits on the Higgs trilinear coupling and constraints on new physics is one of the main motivations for the LHC high-luminosity phase. Recent experimental analyses suggest that such analyses will only be successful if information from a range of channels is included. We therefore investigate di-Higgs production in association with two hadronic jets and give a detailed discussion of both the gluon- and the weak boson-fusion (WBF) contributions, with a particular emphasis on the phenomenology with modified Higgs trilinear and quartic gauge couplings. We perform a detailed investigation of the full hadronic final state and find that hhjj production should add sensitivity to a di-Higgs search combination at the HL-LHC with 3 ab-1. Since the WBF and GF contributions are sensitive to different sources of physics beyond the Standard Model, we devise search strategies to disentangle and isolate these production modes. In addition, while gluon fusion remains non-negligible in WBF-type selections, sizeable new physics contributions to the latter can still be constrained. As an example of the latter point we investigate the sensitivity that can be obtained for a measurement of the quartic Higgs–gauge boson couplings.

  11. Determination of Dark Matter Properties at High-Energy Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltz, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    at the planned International Linear Collider (ILC) will makecollider, the International Linear Collider (ILC), which

  12. Pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 13 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-07-21

    The pseudorapidity distribution of charged hadrons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) =13 TeV is measured using a data sample obtained with the CMS detector, operated at zero magnetic field, at the CERN LHC. The yield of primary charged long-lived hadrons produced in inelastic pp collisions is determined in the central region of the CMS pixel detector (abs(eta)energies.

  13. Flat bunch creation and acceleration: a possible path for the LHC luminosity upgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhat, C.M.; /Fermilab

    2009-05-01

    Increasing the collider luminosity by replacing bunches having Gaussian line-charge distribution with flat bunches, but with same beam-beam tune shift at collision, has been studied widely in recent years. But, creation of 'stable' flat bunches (and their acceleration) using a multiple harmonic RF system has not been fully explored. Here, we review our experience with long flat bunches in the barrier RF buckets at Fermilab.We presentsome preliminary results from beam dynamics simulations and recent beam studies in the LHC injectors to create stable flat bunches using double harmonic RF systems. The results deduced from these studies will be used to model the necessary scheme for luminosity upgrade in the LHC. We have also described a viable (and economical) way for creation and acceleration of flat bunches in the LHC. The flat bunch scheme may have many advantages over the LHC baseline scenario, particularly because of the reduced momentum spread of the bunch for increased intensities.

  14. Quantum Black Holes and their Lepton Signatures at the LHC with CalCHEP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Belyaev; Xavier Calmet

    2014-12-08

    We discuss a field theoretical framework to describe the interactions of non-thermal quantum black holes (QBHs) with particles of the Standard Model. We propose a non-local Lagrangian to describe the production of these QBHs which is designed to reproduce the geometrical cross section for black hole production. This model is implemented into CalcHEP package and is publicly available at the High Energy Model Database (HEPMDB) for simulation of QBH events at the LHC and future colliders. We present the first phenomenological application of the QBH@HEPMDB model with spin-0 neutral QBH giving rise the $e^+e^-$ and $e\\mu$ signatures at the LHC@8TeV and LHC@13TeV and produce the respective projections for the LHC in terms of limits on the reduced Planck mass and the number of the extra-dimensions.

  15. LHC Collimation with Bent Crystals - LUA9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scandale, W; Assmann, R; Losito, R; Cavoto, G; Ivanov, Yu-M; Hall, G; Markiewicz, T; Taratin, A-M; Chesnokov, Yu-A; CERN. Geneva. The LHC experiments Committee; LHCC

    2011-01-01

    An experiment to demonstrate the feasibility of multi-stage collimation assisted by bent crystals in the Large Hadron Collider is proposed. Bent silicon crystals acting as primary collimators are expected to direct the beam halo promptly onto secondary absorbers thus ideally reducing outscattering, beam losses and the radiation load in critical regions of the ring. Extensive tests conducted by the UA9 Collaboration in the SPS and in H8 with proton and lead ion beams have shown that crystal-assisted collimation can improve the efficiency of a one-stage collimation system. The proposed experiment, called LUA9, has received full support from the CERN management, and expression of interest from three Russian Institutions (PNPI, IHEP, JINR), INFN, LAL-Orsay, Imperial College and SLAC (through the US LARP programme). This document reviews the scope, goals, organization, costs, manpower needed and the schedule of LUA9.

  16. Discovering colorons at the early stage LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dicus, Duane A. [Center for Particles and Fields and Texas Cosmology Center, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Kao, Chung; Sayre, Joshua [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy and Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Nandi, S. [Department of Physics and Oklahoma Center for High Energy Physics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Prospects are investigated for the discovery of massive hypergluons using data from the early runs of the Large Hadron Collider. A center of mass energy of 7 TeV and an integrated luminosity of 1 fb{sup -1} or 5 fb{sup -1} are assumed. A phenomenological Lagrangian is adopted to evaluate the cross section of a pair of colored vector bosons (colorons, {rho}-tilde) decaying into four colored scalar resonances (hyperpions, {pi}-tilde), which then decay into eight gluons. The dominant eight-jet background from the production of 8g, 7g1q, 6g2q, and 5g3q is included. We find an abundance of signal events and that realistic cuts reduce the background enough to establish a 5{sigma} signal for the coloron mass of up to 733 GeV with 1 fb{sup -1} or 833 GeV with 5 fb{sup -1}.

  17. Electron-Ion Collider - taking us to the next QCD frontier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Wei Qiu

    2014-12-08

    In this talk, I demonstrate that the proposed Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) will be an ideal and unique future facility to address many overarching questions about QCD and strong interaction physics at one place. The EIC will be the world's first polarized electron-proton (and light ion), as well as the first electron-nucleus collider at flexible collision energies. With its high luminosity and beam polarization, the EIC distinguishes itself from HERA and the other fixed target electron-hadron facilities around the world. The EIC is capable of taking us to the next QCD frontier to explore the glue that binds us all.

  18. Final Report - The Decline and Fall of the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RIORDAN, MICHAEL

    2011-11-29

    In October 1993 the US Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider — at the time the largest pure-science project ever attempted, with a total cost estimated to exceed $10 billion. It was a stunning loss for the US highenergy physics community, which until that moment had perched for decades at the pinnacle of American science. Ever since 1993, this once-dominant scientific community has been in gradual decline. With the 2010 startup of research on the CERN Large Hadron Collider and the 2011 shutdown of the Fermilab Tevatron, world leadership in elementary-particle physics has crossed the Atlantic and returned to Europe.

  19. Hadronic physics in peripheral heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Natale

    2002-01-22

    We discuss the production of hadronic resonances in very peripheral heavy ion collisions, where the ions collide with impact parameter larger than twice the nuclear radius and remain intact after the collision. We compare the resonance production through two-photon and double Pomeron exchange, showing that when we impose the condition for a peripheral interaction the $\\gamma \\gamma$ process dominates over the Pomeron interaction, due to the short range propagation of this last one. We also discuss the observation of light resonances through the subprocess $\\gamma \\gamma \\to R \\to \\gamma \\gamma $, which is a clean signal for glueball candidates as well as one way to check the existence of a possible scalar $\\sigma$ meson.

  20. EIS-0138: Superconducting Super Collider

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy developed this EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of constructing the Superconducting Super Collider, a large proton accelerator, at each of seven alternative locations.

  1. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Devetak; Andrei Nomerotski; Michael Peskin

    2011-07-27

    We present a study of the experimental determination of the forward-backward asymmetry in the process $e^+e^-\\to t\\bar t$ and in the subsequent $t\\to Wb$ decay, studied in the context of the International Linear Collider. This process probes the elementary couplings of the top quark to the photon, the $Z$ and the $W$ bosons at a level of precision that is difficult to achieve at hadron colliders. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry requires excellent $b$ quark identification and determination of the quark charge. The study reported here is performed in the most challenging all-hadronic channel $e^+e^- \\to b\\bar b q\\bar q q\\bar q$. It includes realistic details of the experimental environment, a full Monte Carlo simulation of the detector, based on the Silicon Detector concept, and realistic event reconstruction. The forward-backward asymmetries are determined to a precision of approximately 1% for each of two choices of beam polarization. We analyze the implications for the determination of the $t\\bar t Z$ and $Wtb$ couplings.

  2. Probing Baryogenesis with Displaced Vertices at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanou Cui; Brian Shuve

    2015-07-08

    The generation of the asymmetric cosmic baryon abundance requires a departure from thermal equilibrium in the early universe. In a large class of baryogenesis models, the baryon asymmetry results from the out-of-equilibrium decay of a new, massive particle. We highlight that in the interesting scenario where this particle has a weak scale mass, this out-of-equilibrium condition requires a proper decay length larger than O(1) mm. Such new fields are within reach of the LHC, at which they can be pair produced leaving a distinctive, displaced-vertex signature. This scenario is realized in the recently proposed mechanism of baryogenesis where the baryon asymmetry is produced through the freeze-out and subsequent decay of a meta-stable weakly interacting massive particle ("WIMP baryogenesis"). In analogy to missing energy searches for WIMP dark matter, the LHC is an excellent probe of these new long-lived particles responsible for baryogenesis via the low-background displaced vertex channel. In our paper, we estimate the limits on simplified models inspired by WIMP baryogenesis from two of the most sensitive collider searches by CMS and ATLAS with 8 TeV LHC data. We also estimate the LHC reach at 13 TeV using current strategies, and demonstrate that O(10) improvements in cross-section limits can be achieved by requiring two displaced vertices while lowering kinematic thresholds. For meta-stable WIMPs produced through electroweak interactions, the high luminosity LHC is sensitive to masses up to 2.5 TeV for lifetimes around 1 cm, while for singlets pair-produced through the off-shell-Higgs portal, the LHC is sensitive to production cross sections of O(50) ab for benchmark masses around 150 GeV. Our analysis and proposals also generally apply to displaced vertex signatures from other new physics such as hidden valley models, twin Higgs models and displaced supersymmetry.

  3. The LHC Higgs Boson Discovery: Implications for Finite Unified Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Heinemeyer; M. Mondragon; G. Zoupanos

    2014-12-18

    Finite Unified Theories (FUTs) are N = 1 supersymmetric Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) which can be made finite to all-loop orders, based on the principle of reduction of couplings, and therefore are provided with a large predictive power. We confront the predictions of an SU(5) FUT with the top and bottom quark masses and other low-energy experimental constraints, resulting in a relatively heavy SUSY spectrum, naturally consistent with the non-observation of those particles at the LHC. The light Higgs boson mass is automatically predicted in the range compatible with the Higgs discovery at the LHC. Requiring a light Higgs-boson mass in the precise range of M_h = 125.6 +- 2.1 GeV favors the lower part of the allowed spectrum, resulting in clear predictions for the discovery potential at current and future pp, as well as future e+e- colliders.

  4. Closure testing NNPDF3.0 with LHC observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher S. Deans

    2015-06-24

    A thorough understanding of PDFs and their uncertainties is important for the LHC and for future collider experiments. The recently released NNPDF3.0 set was presented alongside results from closure tests, where PDF fits were performed on pseudo-data generated from a chosen input PDF set. The results there demonstrate the validity of the NNPDF methodology and also provide some information about different contributions to the PDF uncertainties. Here I present a number of additional closure test results, specifically an investigation into the effect of using cross-validation in the fits, and an assessment of the successful reproduction of LHC cross-sections in closure tests. The results are consistent with those previously shown in the NNPDF3.0 paper.

  5. From constituent quarks to hadrons in course of nuclear matter expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. D. Chernavskaya; I. I. Royzen

    2002-01-13

    The up-dated three-phase concept of nuclear matter evolution in course of cooling down - from the phase of quark-qluon plasma (QGP) through the intermediate phase allowing for massive constituent quarks (valons), pions and kaons (QPK) to the phase of hadronic matter (H) - is exploited for the treatment of relative hadronic yields in the central region of heavy ion collisions. The most attention is paid to the description of the QPK-phase which is argued to be a gaseous one and lasts until the valonic spacing approaches the confinement radius (at the temperature about 110 MeV), when the valons start fusing to be locked, in the end, within the hadrons. The hadronic yields emerged from thermal treatment of QPK-phase and simple combinatorial approach to the hadronization process are shown to fit the available experimental data from AGS, SPS and RHIC quite well. This provides an alternative insight into the real origin of the observed relative hadronic yields which is (to a considerable extent) free of the well known puzzle inherent in some conventional models where the early chemical freeze-out is assumed: namely, why the gaseous thermal approach to actually tightly packed (even overlapping) hadrons seems workable? Many predictions for the other hadronic yields which could be observed at these machines as well as at LHC are given.

  6. Measurement of the b-hadron production cross section using decays to D*[superscript +]?[superscript ?]X final states in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The b-hadron production cross section is measured with the ATLAS detector in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV, using 3.3 pb[superscript ?1] of integrated luminosity, collected during the 2010 LHC run. The b-hadrons are selected ...

  7. The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results from Run I and preparation for Run II Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The PDF4LHC report on PDFs and LHC data: results...

  8. hhh Coupling in SUSY models after LHC run I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei Wu; Jin Min Yang; Chien-Peng Yuan; Mengchao Zhang

    2015-04-29

    We examine the Higgs triple coupling in MSSM and NMSSM under current constraints, which include the LHC measurements, Higgs data, B physics, electroweak precision observables, relic density and so on. The ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm MSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ is above 0.97, due to the highly constrained parameter space. While the ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm NMSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ can reach 0.1 under current constraints. The precise measurement in future collider will give a tighter constraint to the Higgs triple coupling in MSSM and NMSSM.

  9. hhh Coupling in SUSY models after LHC run I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Lei; Yuan, Chien-Peng; Zhang, Mengchao

    2015-01-01

    We examine the Higgs triple coupling in MSSM and NMSSM under current constraints, which include the LHC measurements, Higgs data, B physics, electroweak precision observables, relic density and so on. The ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm MSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ is above 0.97, due to the highly constrained parameter space. While the ratio $\\lambda^{\\rm NMSSM}_{hhh}/\\lambda^{\\rm SM}_{hhh}$ can reach 0.1 under current constraints. The precise measurement in future collider will give a tighter constraint to the Higgs triple coupling in MSSM and NMSSM.

  10. Spin and diffractive physics with A Fixed-Target ExpeRiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorce, C; Arnaldi, R; Brodsky, S J; Chambert, V; Didelez, J P; Ferreiro, E G; Fleuret, F; Genolini, B; Hadjidakis, C; Lansberg, J P; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Rosier, P; Schienbein, I; Scomparin, E; Uggerhoj, U I

    2012-01-01

    We report on the spin and diffractive physics at a future multi-purpose fixed-target experiment with proton and lead LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic fixed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more than 3 orders of magnitude. The fixed-target mode has the advantage to allow for measurements of single-spin asymmetries with polarized target as well as of single-diffractive processes in the target region.

  11. Rare Hadronic B Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevan, A.J.

    2006-06-07

    Rare hadronic B-meson decays allow us to study CP violation. The class of B-decays final states containing two vector mesons provides a rich set of angular correlation observables to study. This article reviews some of the recent experimental results from the BABAR and Belle collaborations.

  12. Spin physics and TMD studies at A Fixed-Target ExpeRiment at the LHC (AFTER@LHC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lansberg, J P; Arnaldi, R; Brodsky, S J; Chambert, V; Dunnen, W den; Didelez, J P; Genolini, B; Ferreiro, E G; Fleuret, F; Gao, Y; Hadjidakis, C; Hrvinacova, I; Lorce, C; Massacrier, L; Mikkelsen, R; Pisano, C; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Rosier, P; Schienbein, I; Schlegel, M; Scomparin, E; Trzeciak, B; Uggerhoj, U I; Ulrich, R; Yang, Z

    2014-01-01

    We report on the opportunities for spin physics and Transverse-Momentum Dependent distribution (TMD) studies at a future multi-purpose fixed-target experiment using the proton or lead ion LHC beams extracted by a bent crystal. The LHC multi-TeV beams allow for the most energetic fixed-target experiments ever performed, opening new domains of particle and nuclear physics and complementing that of collider physics, in particular that of RHIC and the EIC projects. The luminosity achievable with AFTER@LHC using typical targets would surpass that of RHIC by more that 3 orders of magnitude in a similar energy region. In unpolarised proton-proton collisions, AFTER@LHC allows for measurements of TMDs such as the Boer-Mulders quark distributions, the distribution of unpolarised and linearly polarised gluons in unpolarised protons. Using the polarisation of hydrogen and nuclear targets, one can measure transverse single-spin asymmetries of quark and gluon sensitive probes, such as, respectively, Drell-Yan pair and quar...

  13. Reconstruction of Inert Doublet Scalars at the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayumi Aoki; Shinya Kanemura; Hiroshi Yokoya

    2013-08-19

    We study collider signatures for extra scalar bosons in the inert doublet model at the international linear collider (ILC). The inert doublet model is a simple extension of the standard model by introducing an additional isospin-doublet scalar field which is odd under an unbroken Z_2 symmetry. The model predicts four kinds of Z_2-odd scalar bosons, and the lightest of them becomes stable and a candidate of the dark matter as long as it is electrically neutral. Taking into account the constraints from various theoretical and phenomenological conditions, we perform a simulation study for the distinctive signatures of the extra scalars over the standard-model background contributions at the ILC with the center-of-mass energy of sqrt{s} = 250 GeV and 500 GeV. We further discuss observables for determination of the mass of the scalars. We find that the parameter regions which cannot be detected at the large hadron collider can be probed at the ILC.

  14. A Prototype ATM Network for Real Time Control of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, Werner; Wijnands, Thijs

    1999-01-01

    The LHC accelerator aims at injecting, accelerating and colliding beams with very well controlled beam parameters (e.g. momentum, orbit, tune and chromaticity). This is a non-trivial task since the super conducting main bending magnets will generate field errors with dynamic effects that may result in beam loss. To overcome this problem, real time control of beam parameters via the Power Converters has been proposed. This requires site wide deterministic communication of control data. In this paper we will outline some aspects of a prototype deterministic network for the LHC with a core based on ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode) communication technology.

  15. CGC, Full 3D Hydro, and Hadronic Cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirano, T; Kharzeev, D; Lacey, R; Nara, Y; Hirano, Tetsufumi; Heinz, Ulrich W.; Kharzeev, Dmitri; Lacey, Roy; Nara, Yasushi

    2007-01-01

    We investigate how robust the discovery of perfect fluid is through comparison of hydrodynamic calculations with elliptic flow coefficient v_2 at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sqrt{s_{NN}}=200 GeV. Employing the Glauber model for initial entropy density distributions, we reasonably reproduce centrality dependence of v_2 by using ideal fluid description of the early QGP stage and a hadronic cascade in the late hadronic stage. On the other hand, initial conditions based on the Colour Glass Condensate model are found to generate larger elliptic flow due to larger initial eccentricity epsilon. We further predict v_2/epsilon at a fixed impact parameter as a function of collision energy sqrt{s_{NN}} up to the LHC energy.

  16. Testing the electroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis at LHC and CEPC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Fa Peng; Yin, Peng-Fei; Yu, Zhao-Huan; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    We study the collider phenomenology of the eletroweak phase transition and electroweak baryogenesis in the framework of the effective field theory. Our study shows that the effective theory using the dimension-6 operators can enforce strong first order phase transition and provide sizable CP violation to realize a successful electroweak baryogenesis. Such dimension-6 operators can induce interesting Higgs phenomenology to verify at colliders such as the LHC and the planning CEPC. We then demonstrate this effective theory can originate from vector-like quarks and triplet Higgs.

  17. First Measurement of Hadronic Event Shapes in pp Collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-05-01

    Hadronic event shapes have been measured in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, with a data sample collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 3.2 inverse picobarns. Event-shape distributions, corrected for detector response, are compared with five models of QCD multijet production.

  18. Charmed hadron production at low transverse momentum in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. I. Abelev

    2014-04-25

    We report measurements of charmed hadron production from hadronic ($D^{0}\\rightarrow K\\pi$) and semileptonic ($\\mu$ and $e$) decays in 200 GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC. Analysis of the spectra indicates that charmed hadrons have a different radial flow pattern from light or multi-strange hadrons. Charm cross sections at mid-rapidity are extracted by combining the three independent measurements, covering the transverse momentum range that contributes to $\\sim$90% of the integrated cross section. The cross sections scale with number of binary collisions of the initial nucleons, a signature of charm production exclusively at the initial impact of colliding heavy ions. The implications for charm quark interaction and thermalization in the strongly interacting matter are discussed.

  19. Mass, Spin, and Physics Beyond the Standard Model at Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klemm, William Lathrop

    2011-01-01

    Proceedings of 2005 International Linear Collider Workshop (of Supersymmetry,” International Linear Collider Workshop (proposed for the International Linear Collider (ILC), it was

  20. Multi-Stage Bunch Compressors for the International Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenenbaum, Peter G.; Raubenheimer, Tor O.; Wolski, Andrzej

    2005-01-01

    FOR THE INTERNATIONAL LINEAR COLLIDER ? P. Tenenbaum † ,goals, the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires acompressors for the International Linear Collider. Each of

  1. Hadrons and Chiral Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas D. Cohen

    2009-11-16

    These lectures discuss the question of whether a key feature is seen in hadron spectroscopy--the near degeneracy of hadrons with different parity and/or spin. It has been conjectured that this is due to an effective restoration of chiral symmetry. The conjecture is that while these states are, of course, in the symmetry-broken (Nambu-Goldstone) phase, as one goes higher in the spectrum the states become progressively less sensitive to the dynamics of chiral symmetry breaking. These lectures discuss the current status of this conjecture. The motivations for the conjecture are discussed, as is evidence--both theoretical and experimental--in its favor. Possible alternative explanations for the data are also discussed.

  2. Freeze-out conditions for production of resonances, hadronic molecules, and light nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Sungtae; Lee, Su Houng

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the freeze-out conditions of a particle in an expanding system of interacting particles in order to understand the productions of resonances, hadronic molecules and light nuclei in heavy ion collisions. Applying the kinetic freeze-out condition with explicit hydrodynamic calculations for the expanding hadronic phase to the daughter particles of $K^*$ mesons, we find that the larger suppression of the yield ratio of $K^*/K$ at LHC than at RHIC compared to the expectations from the statistical hadronization model based on chemical freeze-out parameters reflects the lower kinetic freeze-out temperature at LHC than at RHIC. Furthermore, we point out that for the light nuclei or hadronic molecules that are bound, the yields are affected by the freeze-out condition of the respective particle in the hadronic matter, which leads to the observation that the deuteron production yields are independent of the size of deuteron, and depend only on the number of ground state constituents.

  3. Hadronic Final States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    1995-10-12

    The following aspects of hadronic final states in deep inelastic lepton scattering are reviewed: measuring $alpha_s$ from multi-jet production rates and event shapes; alternative jet algorithms for DIS; power-suppressed corrections to event shapes; comparing jet fragmentation in $e^+e^-$ annihilation and DIS; final states in the BFKL and CCFM formulations of small-$x$ dynamics; exotic (instanton-induced) final states.

  4. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every...

  5. VHEeP: A very high energy electron-proton collider based on proton-driven plasma wakefield acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Allen

    2015-01-01

    Based on current CERN infrastructure, an electron-proton collider is proposed at a centre-of-mass energy of about 9 TeV. A 7 TeV LHC bunch is used as the proton driver to create a plasma wakefield which then accelerates electrons to 3 TeV, these then colliding with the other 7 TeV LHC proton beam. The basic parameters of the collider are presented, which although of very high energy, has integrated luminosities of the order of 1 pb$^{-1}$/year. For such a collider, with a centre-of-mass energy 30 times greater than HERA, parton momentum fractions, $x$, down to about $10^{-8}$ are accessible for $Q^2$ of 1 GeV$^2$ and could lead to effects of saturation or some other breakdown of DGLAP being observed. The total photon-proton cross section can be measured up to very high energies and also at different energies as the possibility of varying the electron beam energy is assumed; this could have synergy with cosmic-ray physics. Other physics which can be pursued at such a collider are contact interaction searches, ...

  6. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedderke, Michael A; Wang, Lian-Tao

    2015-01-01

    We study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator $H^\\dagger H \\bar \\chi \\chi$. Measurements of precision electroweak $S$ and $T$ parameters and the $e^+e^- \\to Zh$ cross section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also provide full one-loop results for $S$ and $T$ in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.

  7. Probing the fermionic Higgs portal at lepton colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael A. Fedderke; Tongyan Lin; Lian-Tao Wang

    2015-06-17

    We study the sensitivity of future electron-positron colliders to UV completions of the fermionic Higgs portal operator $H^\\dagger H \\bar \\chi \\chi$. Measurements of precision electroweak $S$ and $T$ parameters and the $e^+e^- \\to Zh$ cross section at the CEPC, FCC-ee, and ILC are considered. The scalar completion of the fermionic Higgs portal is closely related to the scalar Higgs portal, and we summarize existing results. We devote the bulk of our analysis to a singlet-doublet fermion completion. Assuming the doublet is sufficiently heavy, we construct the effective field theory (EFT) at dimension-6 in order to compute contributions to the observables. We also provide full one-loop results for $S$ and $T$ in the general mass parameter space. In both completions, future precision measurements can probe the new states at the (multi-)TeV scale, beyond the direct reach of the LHC.

  8. Colliding axisymmetric pp-waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    1997-10-21

    An exact solution is found describing the collision of axisymmetric pp-waves with M=0. They are impulsive in character and their coordinate singularities become point curvature singularities at the boundaries of the interaction region. The solution is conformally flat. Concrete examples are given, involving an ultrarelativistic black hole against a burst of pure radiation or two colliding beam- like waves.

  9. Physics at high energy photon photon colliders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1994-06-01

    I review the physic prospects for high energy photon photon colliders, emphasizing results presented at the LBL Gamma Gamma Collider Workshop. Advantages and difficulties are reported for studies of QCD, the electroweak gauge sector, supersymmetry, and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  10. Proceedings of the International Linear Collider Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Proceedings of the International Linear Collider Workshop LCWS 2007 ILC 2007 Volume 1 Edited by Ariane Frey Sabine Riemann #12;Impressum Proceedings of the International Linear Collider Workshop LCWS

  11. Proceedings for TASI 2009 Summer School on "Physics of the Large and the Small": Introduction to the LHC experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Halkiadakis

    2010-04-30

    These proceedings are a summary of four lectures given at the Theoretical Advanced Study Institute in Elementary Particle Physics (TASI) in 2009. These lectures provide a basic introduction to experimental particle physics and the Large Hadron Collider experiments at CERN, with many general examples from the (still running) Fermilab Tevatron.

  12. Top Physics at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. de Jong

    2009-02-27

    The LHC will be a top quark factory. In this note, the central role of the top quark for LHC physics will be discussed, and an overview will be given of the studies of top quark properties in preparation, with an emphasis on the systematic uncertainties that will dominate most measurements.

  13. High energy hadron-hadron collisions. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, T.T.

    1992-01-01

    Results of a study on high energy collisions with the geometrical model are summarized in three parts: (1) the elastic hadron-hadron collision, (2) the inelastic hadron-hadron collision, and (3) e[sup +]e[sup [minus

  14. Non-Simplified SUSY: Stau-Coannihilation at LHC and ILC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berggren; A. Cakir; D. Krücker; J. List; I. A. Melzer-Pellmann; B. Safarzadeh Samani; C. Seitz; S. Wayand

    2015-08-18

    If new phenomena beyond the Standard Model will be discovered at the LHC, the properties of the new particles could be determined with data from the High-Luminosity LHC and from a future linear collider like the ILC. We discuss the possible interplay between measurements at the two accelerators in a concrete example, namely a full SUSY model which features a small stau_1-LSP mass difference. Various channels have been studied using the Snowmass 2013 combined LHC detector implementation in the Delphes simulation package, as well as simulations of the ILD detector concept from the Technical Design Report. We investigate both the LHC and ILC capabilities for discovery, separation and identification of various parts of the spectrum. While some parts would be discovered at the LHC, there is substantial room for further discoveries at the ILC. We finally highlight examples where the precise knowledge about the lower part of the mass spectrum which could be acquired at the ILC would enable a more in-depth analysis of the LHC data with respect to the heavier states.

  15. Muon Collider Physics at Very High Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Berger

    2000-01-03

    Muon colliders might greatly extend the energy frontier of collider physics. One can contemplate circular colliders with center-of-mass energies in excess of 10 TeV. Some physics issues that might be relevant at such a machine are discussed.

  16. Energy dependence of hadron spectra and multiplicities in p+p interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu?awski, Szymon

    2015-01-01

    The NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN SPS aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. In order to reach these goals measurements of hadron production properties are performed in nucleus-nucleus, proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and size of the colliding nuclei. Inclusive spectra of identified hadrons in p+p interactions at the SPS energies are presented as a function of transverse momentum, transverse mass and rapidity. The results are compared with the world data and theoretical models.

  17. Energy dependence of hadron spectra and multiplicities in p+p interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szymon Pu?awski; for the NA61 Collaboration

    2015-02-27

    The NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN SPS aims to discover the critical point of strongly interacting matter and study the properties of the onset of deconfinement. In order to reach these goals measurements of hadron production properties are performed in nucleus-nucleus, proton-proton and proton-nucleus interactions as a function of collision energy and size of the colliding nuclei. Inclusive spectra of identified hadrons in p+p interactions at the SPS energies are presented as a function of transverse momentum, transverse mass and rapidity. The results are compared with the world data and theoretical models.

  18. Jefferson Lab - Hadron 2015 Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hadron2015 Privacy and Security Notice PREX - Credit:NASA LINKS Circular Registration Sign-up for JLab Tour Call for Contributions Program Plenary Parallel Conference Venue Lodging...

  19. LHC - a "Why" Facility

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gordon Kane

    2010-01-08

    The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology describe the world we see, and how it works, very well. But we want to understand (not just accommodate) much more ? how does the Higgs mechanism work, what is the dark matter, why is the universe matter and not antimatter, why is parity violated, why are the particles (quarks and leptons) what they are, and why are the forces that act on them to make our world what they are, and more. Today is an exciting time to be doing particle physics ? on the experimental side we have data coming from LHC and dark matter experiments that will provide clues to these questions, and on the theoretical side we have a framework (string theory) that addresses all these ?why? questions. LHC data will not qualitatively improve our description ? rather, it may provide the data that will allow us to learn about the dark matter, the Higgs physics, the matter asymmetry, etc, to test underlying theories such as string theory, and begin to answer the ?why? questions. Supersymmetry is the best motivated discovery, and it would also open a window to the underlying theory near the Planck scale.

  20. Top quark pair production measurements using the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Inclusive and differential cross sections of top quark pair production at have been measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC at ?s = 7 TeV and ?s = 8 TeV. Inclusive measurements are in good agreement with Standard Model predictions. Differential cross section measurements are compared to different sets of generators, parton showering and hadronization simulations, PDF and calculations. This provides constraints to improve the MC modeling.