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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage Author State of Hawaii Division of Forestry and...

2

GRR/Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 195D-21 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

3

The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan: A Decade of Delays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes the history of the Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan (CVMSHCP), ... than a decade to complete, and the long duration of these processes often results in...

Peter S. Alagona; Stephanie Pincetl

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The Coachella Valley Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan: A Decade of Delays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity conservation planning process began, in 1994, local par- ticipants and supporters had numerous Biodiversity conservation Á Endangered species Á California Á Coachella Valley Introduction In 1994, residents of promoting both regional economic development and long-term biodiversity conservation. If enacted

Handy, Susan L.

5

United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

6

WATER CONSERVATION PLAN  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

i WATER CONSERVATION PLAN TONOPAH TEST RANGE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY January 10, 2011 Prepared for: Tonopah Test Range Post Office Box 871 Tonopah, Nevada 89049 (702)...

7

Beyond biology: understanding regional, multi-species habitat conservation plans from an ecological, economic, and sociopolitical perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributed, the survey instrument secured the approval of the Texas A&M University Institutional Review Board (IRB). The survey package included: ~ A cover letter explaining the purpose of the study (Appendix B); ~ The survey instrument (Appendix B...) The National Academy of Sciences b) Environmental groups c) United States Geological Survey d) Independent Scientists e) Recovery plans for the species covered f) USFWS/NMFS g) other After gaining further knowledge of the resources commonly used in plan...

Schmidt, Jennifer

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming Trevon Fuller,1 David P biodiversity features worldwide have prompted the development of a systematic planning framework biol- ogy, biodiversity. 9.1 Introduction Conservation areas are broadly defined as sites administered

Morton, David

9

Measuring and Incorporating Vulnerability into Conservation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity in situ. To do this, conservation areas must be able to mitigate at least some of the proximate the persistence of biodiversity in situ. Conservation areas can be important in mitigating proximate threats to biodiversity, conservation plan

Queensland, University of

10

The conservation planning analysis model. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper contains the source code for a program on conservation planning analysis for residential, commercial and industrial customers.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Integrating economic costs into conservation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biodiversity losses, ecologists and conservation biologists have focused on how conservation plans affectIntegrating economic costs into conservation planning Robin Naidoo1 , Andrew Balmford2 , Paul J. Ferraro3 , Stephen Polasky4 , Taylor H. Ricketts1 and Mathieu Rouget5 1 Conservation Science Program, WWF

Vermont, University of

12

Energy Conservation Plans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Plans Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Headquarters Program and Staff Office Energy Conservation Plans As part of the Department's Energy Efficiency campaign, each Headquarters Program and Staff Office participated in a contest early in 2010 to develop the best Energy Conservation Plan. These plans involved simple changes that employees could implement as part of their daily routines to help conserve energy. Plans were then divided into categories and reviewed by a panel to determine the best plan in each category. Employee Participation Category: Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Lighting Category: Office of Management (MA) Copier, Scanner, Fax Category: Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EE) Best Overall Plan: Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)

13

Energy Conservation Plans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Headquarters Program and Staff Office Energy Conservation Plans As part of the Department's Energy Efficiency campaign, each Headquarters Program and Staff Office participated in a contest early in 2010 to develop the best Energy Conservation Plan. These plans involved simple changes that employees could implement as part of their daily routines to help conserve energy. Plans were then divided into categories and reviewed by a panel to determine the best plan in each category. Employee Participation Category: Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Lighting Category: Office of Management (MA) Copier, Scanner, Fax Category: Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EE) Best Overall Plan: Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)

14

Information, Planning, and Conservation (IPAC) online screening...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information, Planning, and Conservation (IPAC) online screening tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Information,...

15

Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Eagle Conservation Plan (ECP) process and requirements. Calls for: 1) Preliminary landscape-level assessments to assess potential wildlife interactions; 2) Site-specific...

16

MA - Office of Management - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MA Energy Conservation Plan MA Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 1 Office of Management Office-Level Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 I. BACKGROUND This energy conservation plan represents an effort to reduce energy consumption within Office of Management (MA) office spaces and to increase employee awareness of and participation in energy conservation measures. II. SCOPE The plan and procedures in this document apply to all Office of Management (MA) office suites in the Forrestal and Germantown Facilities as well as the 950 L'Enfant Plaza Building. The actions and procedures set forth in this plan apply to each separate MA office suite as follows: MA-1: 4A-107 MA-43: 1F-039 MA-70: 7E-074 MA-1.1: 7E-028 MA-43: 1F-037 MA-70: 7E-054 MA-30: GH-081 MA-43:

17

Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contributed Paper Biodiversity Conservation in Local Planning JAMES R. MILLER, MARTHA GROOM-use policy is increasingly being recognized as fundamental to biodiversity conservation in the United States to support the conservation of biodiversity at local scales. Yet little is known about the pervasiveness

Miller, James R.

18

Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9 Planning for Biodiversity Conservation Using Stochastic Programming Trevon Fuller,1 David P biol- ogy, biodiversity. 9.1 Introduction Conservation areas are broadly defined as sites administered for the protection of threatened species and other features of biodiversity. However, many conservation ar- eas

Sarkar, Sahotra

19

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

20

ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AND BIODIVERSITY AS CONCEPTS FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECOLOGICAL DIVERSITY AND BIODIVERSITY AS CONCEPTS FOR CONSERVATION PLANNING: COMMENTS ON RICOTTA Sahotra Sarkar Biodiversity and Biocultural Conservation Laboratory, Section of Integrative Biology of measures of biodiversity which can be used for systematic conservation planning. Moreover, these measures

Sarkar, Sahotra

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FE - Fossil Energy - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(1) (1) Office of Fossil Energy Energy Conservation Plan The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) strongly supports the implementation of strategies to reduce energy consumption in the Headquarters buildings. FE engaged its employees by sending an office-wide email soliciting input for this plan; the ideas were then compiled into this document. The focus of this plan is on how FE employees can change their behavior to reduce energy consumption. This plan purposefully excludes measures that would require any significant capital investment. The measures outlined below in each category can be implemented without much effort and with minimal cost and will reduce the energy used by Fossil Energy employees in the Forrestal and Germantown buildings. FE recognizes that transparency is a key element of a successful energy conservation

22

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Action Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are organized by resource areas, Bonneville Power Administration, and Council monitoring activities. In manySixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Action Plan Introduction ................................................. 15 Future Role of Bonneville

23

Zena conservation easement protects habitat in Willamette Valley...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

central Willamette Valley for fi sh and wildlife habitat mitigation. Located in the Eola Hills about eight miles northwest of Salem (see map), this property provides refuge for...

24

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix E: Conservation Supply Curve  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix E: Conservation Supply Curve....................................................................................................... 11 Value of Energy Saved ............................................................................................................. 11 Value of Deferred Transmission and Distribution Capacity

25

RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unconsciously Unconsciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Positive Behaviors Unconsciously Positive Behaviors Education Motivation Repetition Permanent Change Figure 1 - The Phases of Behavior Change Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Energy Conservation Plan Summary: Development and implementation of this plan is being treated as a project. This serves two purposes. First, it increases familiarity with the precepts of project management and DOE Order 413. Secondly, project management provides a great structure for organizing and implementing the activities that will facilitate energy savings through behavioral changes. A project structure also helps define how the effort will begin and what constitutes success at the

26

Author's personal copy Conservation planning in a changing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of biodiversity and other natural values. Conservation planning is inher- ently spatial. The science behind it has, conservation planning must deal better with two types of change. First, biodiversity is not static in time for considering processes in conservation planning. First, most of our depictions of biodiversity are snapshots [5

Queensland, University of

27

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ecology, habitat preference, and conservation of Neotropical non-volant mammal communities in Costa Rica's Caribbean lowlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity in the tropics is continually being threatened by anthropogenic disturbances such as habitat degradation and fragmentation. Unfortunately, conservation decisions and management of wildlife are difficult tasks ...

Romero, Andrea

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) ENERGY CONSERVATION PLAN NE has heavily emphasized the use of flexiplace, both regular and situational. Since approximately 56 percent of NE staff use flexiplace, our plan is based on the Forrestal/Germantown (FORS/GTN) office spaces, and flexiplace office space. There are other common sense actions and policies that will be used to improve energy efficiency in the offices at both FORS and GTN. In the FORS/GTN office space: 1. Use flexiplace to the maximum extent possible. Saving an average of 1.5 gallons of gasoline per day per person (e.g., 13 miles per work x 2 = 26 miles, an average of 17 mpg), on a normal workday, NE employees save (56 percent of 145 = 71 times 1.2 days per pay period = 85.2 workdays x 1.5 gals = 127.8 gallons/pay

30

Dragonflies of freshwater pools in lignite spoil heaps: Restoration management, habitat structure and conservation value  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although numerous studies of several terrestrial groups have revealed high conservation potential of post-industrial sites, freshwater habitats in post-mining sites still remain little explored. Here we present a study of dragonflies (Odonata) colonizing 61 freshwater pools newly established at 9 lignite spoil heaps in the north-western Czech Republic, Central Europe. We aimed mainly on effects of the three prevailing pool restoration methods (spontaneously inundated depressions at non-reclaimed sites, at reclaimed sites; and novel technically constructed ponds) along with several factors of the local habitat and surrounding landscape on species richness, conservation values, and species composition of the dragonfly communities. By recording of 32 species of lentic dragonflies (including 8 threatened ones) and 2 additional threatened lotic species, we documented the conservation value of post-industrial habitats also for aquatic arthropods. None of the three restoration methods supported dragonfly communities of distinctly higher conservation value then did the two others, each method generated habitats for different threatened species. Similar patterns were revealed also for vegetation heterogeneity, bottom substrate, water shading, and surrounding terrestrial habitats. We thus conclude that a mosaic-like combination of the restoration methods and creating of heterogeneous water pools will be most effective for restoring of freshwater biodiversity in highly degraded sites.

Filip Harabi; Filip Tichanek; Robert Tropek

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Texas Tech University Energy Conservation Plan -Quarterly Update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plan, reporting to the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) is the two-year energy reduction goal Energy Reduction Plans 1. Campus Energy Use Texas Tech is currently seeking funding from Texas Public Energy Conservation Office. The Fleet Fuel Management Plan, reporting to the State Office of Vehicle

Gelfond, Michael

32

Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

Smith, Courtney

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

California Natural Community Conservation Plan Act | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Plan ActLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation Fish and Game Code Section 2800 et seq. DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

34

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................... 8 Electricity Generation of these services more efficiently are the equivalent of generating additional electricity. In fact, the ActSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction Purpose of the Power

35

FWS - Habitat Conservation Plans and Incidental Take Permits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

webpage outlines the requirements for incidental take permits from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service. Author U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Published U.S. Fish and...

36

Through Voluntary Conservation Regional Step-Down Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II. Regional Overview..................................................................................................................... 3 Wetland Habitat Types............................................................................................................... 3 Coastal Upland Habitat Types................................................................................................... 4

unknown authors

37

Implementation planning for industrial energy conservation: approach and methodology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Details of an industry-specific Conservation Technology Implementation Branch implementation plan is described in detail. CTIB has conducted implementation planning in the steel, pulp/paper, and agriculture/food processing industries, but in FY 1981, CTIB plans to conduct planning for the chemicals, petroleum refining, aluminum, glass, cement, and textile industries. Guidelines are presented for each contractor for each industry toward a common methodology in terms of approach, areas of analysis, assumptions, and reporting. The major parts of the CTIB plan are: an implementation study consisting of technology selection, market demand analysis, and policy analysis, and a plan consisting of a detailed description and schedule of future CTIB actions, followed by a recommended system for monitoring market results when the plan is implemented. (MCW)

Alston, T.G.; Falk, G.; Grogan, P.J.; Katz, D.; Tatar, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District by Andrew K. Doi B. A may not be produced in whole or in part by photocopy or other means, without permission of the author. #12;ii APPROVAL #12;iii ABSTRACT Instances of water scarcity are recurring with greater frequency

39

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Demand Response in the Council's Fifth Power Plan......................................................................................................................... 3 Estimate of Potential Demand Response

40

Approaches to landscape-and seascape-scale conservation planning: convergence, contrasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-economic and biodiversity data and identify- ing explicit conservation objectives. Even here, however, the approaches tend Biodiversity, conservation planning, costs, data, guidelines, implementation, stakeholders, threats conservation re- sources to minimize the loss of biodiversity, ecosystem services and other valued aspects

Queensland, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response Summary of Key.............................................................................................................. 1 Demand Response in the Fifth Power Plan........................................................................................... 3 Demand Response in the Sixth Power Plan

43

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The habitat- monitoring plan is based in part on the Estuary RME Plan. To place the review of the habitat-monitoring project in the proper context, Bonneville and the Council requested that the ISRP review the draft planIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th

44

Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to other tropical estuarine systems, they appear to provide important habitat for several economically- and ecologically-valued species. In the GOM, I examined the fish and invertebrate communities of adjacent oyster reef (oyster), vegetated marsh edge (VME...

Shervette, Virginia Rhea

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Agency/Company /Organization Government of China Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.beconchina.org/ener Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China EE[1] Overview "Energy conservation is a long-term strategic guideline in China's economic and social development, and an extremely urgent matter at present. The NDRC has therefore formulated the Plan of Energy Conservation, which aims to push the whole society towards energy conservation and energy intensity reduction, to remove energy bottlenecks, to build an energy

46

Building indicator groups based on species characteristics can improve conservation planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is in identifying important areas for the conservation of biodiversity. As networks of areas encompassing biodiversity to select networks of areas for conservation? In the literature, reliable indicator groupsBuilding indicator groups based on species characteristics can improve conservation planning

Manne, Lisa

47

Combined Use of Systematic Conservation Planning, Species Distribution Modelling, and Connectivity Analysis Reveals Severe Conservation gaps in a Megadiverse Country (Preu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation planning is crucial for megadiverse countries where biodiversity is coupled with incomplete reserve systems and limited resources to invest in conservation. Using Peru as an example of a megadiverse country, we asked whether...

Fajardo, Javier; Lessmann, Janeth; Bonaccorso, Elisa; Devenish, Christian; Munoz, Jesus

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

Incorporating costs and processes into systematic conservation planning in a biodiversity hotspot  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given inadequate budgets with which to stem the rapid destruction of biodiversity, conservationists must set clear priorities for action. Systematic Conservation Planning (SCP) is an approach that uses spatially explicit data to identify areas...

Green, Jonathan Michael Halsey

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast Energy Demand ........................................................................ 28 Possible Future Trends for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles .............................................................. 23 Electricity Demand Growth in the West

50

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost-effectiveness for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix G: MCS Cost, cost and savings assumptions used to establish the efficiency level that achieves all electricity..................................................................................................................................... 1 Regional Cost Effectiveness

51

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................................................................................ 7 Natural Gas-Fired Generation generation, and natural gas-fired generation. In addition, the region needs to better utilize, expandSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy Key Findings

52

Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, providing technical expertise and ensuring the draft Environmental Assessment was completed on schedule. EFH Power Act, and other laws. HCD has two principal programs: identification and conservation of Essential submission of the proposals, HCD assisted Council staff in conducting a technical review of all proposals

53

Ingraham Bay, Prince of Wales Island: photo courtesy of the Shorezone Project This report summarizes highlights of Habitat Conservation Division activities during the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Act, and other directives. HCD has two principal programs: first, the identification, conservation responsibilities, HCD also supports habitat restoration projects in conjunction with the National Oceanic Ocean Service's Office of Response and Restoration, and the NOAA Invasive Species Program. Outside NOAA

54

Draft Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Plan May 28, 2004 Appendix D: Focal Habitat Descriptions D-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix D: Information on Focal Habitats from IBIS No. 5. Interior Mixed Conifer Forest Author: Rex C. Crawford Geographic Distribution: The Eastside Mixed Conifer Forest habitat appears primarily the Blue River Gorge. Physical Setting: The Eastside Mixed Conifer Forest habitat is primarily mid

55

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

57

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Kennecott Energy comments on 5 year plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy is one of the most fundamental contributors to economic development and quality of life. EnergyNorthwest Power and Conservation Council Kennecott Energy comments on 5 year plan The availability recommendation in the plan for the next five years states, "Develop resources that can reduce cost and risk

58

Assessment of state plans for Title III of the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NECPA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study reported is to assess the quality of the state plans for managing federal funds granted under the Institutional Conservation Program (ICP) to support energy conservation activities in schools, hospitals, local government buildings, and public care institutions, and to estimate the effects of the various state plans on the overall ability of the national ICP to meet its objectives, which are to save energy, reduce budget pressures on local institutions, and to encourage the use of more abundant fuel types. A further goal was to insure that active state involvement in the short-term CIP effort would foster the longer ragne state commitment to this national policy of energy conservation. The state planws and their energy conservation measure formulas are assessed, and their energy conservation measure scenarios are ranked and analyzed. (LEW)

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

................................................ 8 Buildings Converting to Electric Space Conditioning or Water Heating Systems......................................................................................................................................... 1 New Site Built Electrically Heated Residential Buildings and New Electrically Heated Manufactured model conservation standards. These include the standard for new electrically heated residential

60

Habitat Niche Modeling in the Texas Horned Lizard (Phrynosoma cornutum): Applications to Planned Translocation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??I studied translocation of Texas horned lizards on Tinker Air Force Base, Midwest City, Oklahoma, using correlative and mechanistic habitat suitability models. My goals were (more)

Bogosian III, Victor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects: 1998 Habitat Evaluation Surveys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from the various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories, (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were, (a) create more pools, (b) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (c) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (d) increase fencing to limit livestock access; additionally, the actions are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, and protect private property. Fish species of main concern in Asotin Creek are summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), and bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus). Spring chinook in Asotin Creek are considered extinct (Bumgarner et al. 1998); bull trout and summer steelhead are below historical levels and are currently as ''threatened'' under the ESA. In 1998, 16 instream habitat projects were planned by ACCD along with local landowners. The ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife's (WDFW) Snake River Lab (SRL) was contracted by the ACCD to take pre-construction measurements of the existing habitat (pools, LOD, width, depth, etc.) within each identified site, and to eventually evaluate fish use within these sites. All pre-construction habitat measurements were completed between 6 and 14 July, 1998. 1998 was the first year that this sort of evaluation has occurred. Post construction measurements of habitat structures installed in 1998, and fish usage evaluation, will be conducted in 1999. As such, this report is confined to 1998 habitat data summaries for each site, with no analytical evaluation.

Bumgarner, Joseph D.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

International Workshop: Advancing Conservation Planning in the Mediterranean Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Environmental offshore oil and gas drilling guidelines 11:45 ­ 12:00 ­ Dror Zurel ­ Statutory tools for nature Argyrou ­ Update on the state of marine environmental planning in Cyprus 11:00 ­ 11:45 -­ Ilan Nissim

Kark, Salit

63

Overview of energy-conserving development planning and design techniques based on five case studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Findings and recommendations are presented of a review of five case studies of ways to conserve energy through development planning and site design in communities. Two approaches were used. In the first approach, a conventional, pre-existing plan was analyzed to determine potential energy use. Once energy-conservation options were identified and evaluated, the conventional plan was modified by employing those options. This approach was used in The Woodlands, Burke Center, and Radisson studies. In the second approach, energy-conservation options are independently identified and evaluated. Those options that passed specific criteria screening were then utilized in developing one or more totally new plans based on energy objectives. This approach was used in Greenbrier and Shenandoah. Radisson is a new town on the outskirts of Syracuse, New York. Greenbrier is a 3000 acre planned community adjacent to Norfolk and Virginia Beach. Shenandoah is a proposed new town in the Atlanta urbanized area. The Woodlands is a new community under development north of Houston. Burke Center is a residential planned unit development in Fairfax County, Virgnia. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of California Press, 1987). Lubell, Mark et al, Watershedelevated occupational status (Lubell et al 2002). A numberSalvensen 1995, Thomas 2001, Lubell et al 2002). Local land

Jimeno, Nancy A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Cross-shelf coral reef biodiversity : does data and ecological theory fit with habitat-based species conservation models?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??[Truncated abstract] Selection of priority areas for Marine Park conservation is often compromised by the lack of comprehensive biodiversity data and the resources and expertise (more)

Radford, Benedict

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Landscape heterogeneity in relation to variations in epigaeic beetle diversity of a Mediterranean ecosystem. Implications for conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat heterogeneity is a determinant cause of biological diversity in natural ecosystems, and therefore its preservation should be a priority when planning conservation strategies. Sierra de Baza, in souther...

Eduardo Romero-Alcaraz; J.M. vila

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located near Houston, including 22,000 acres; the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center (Metro), and a Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Included within the program for each village are schools and commercial activities, as well as employment activities. The Woodlands is planned to be developed over a 26-year period (commenced in 1972) with an ultimate population of 150,000. Following a summary chapter, Chapter II presents background material on The Woodlands and results of the study are summarized. Chapter III describes the project team and its organizational structure. Chapter IV outlines and documents the methodology that was employed in developing, analyzing, and evaluating the case study. The next chapter describes and analyzes the conventional plan, documents the process by which energy-conserving methods were selected, and evaluates the application of these methods to the Metro Center Study area. Chapter VI discusses constraints to implementation and is followed by a final chapter that presents the general conclusions from the case study and suggests directions for further investigation.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

Collins, E.T.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservation in a Micro-Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production System Planning for Natural Resource Conservationa case study watershed. Production Systems Planning (PSP) isWatershed Management, Production Systems Planning (PSP)

Ramakrishna, Nallathiga

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning 202of Land- scape Architecture and Environmental Planning, andof Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning and

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

A web-based GIS Decision Support System for managing and planning USDA's Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A web-based GIS Decision Support System for managing and planning USDA's Conservation Reserve of a prototype web-GIS Decision Support System (DSS), CRP-DSS, for use in resource management and assessment enrollments. The DSS is based on the emerging industry-standard ArcIMS GIS platform and integrates a mapping

Fan, Guoliang

74

An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

Shaw, Margaret Miller

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Asotin Creek Instream Habitat Alteration Projects : Habitat Evaluation, Adult and Juvenile Habitat Utilization and Water Temperature Monitoring : 2001 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Asotin Creek originates from a network of deeply incised streams on the slopes of the Blue Mountains of southeastern Washington. The watershed drains an area of 322 square miles that provides a mean annual flow of 74 cfs. The geomorphology of the watershed exerts a strong influence on biologic conditions for fish within the stream. Historic and contemporary land-use practices have had a profound impact on the kind, abundance, and distribution of anadromous salmonids in the watershed. Fish habitat in Asotin Creek and other local streams has been affected by agricultural development, grazing, tilling practices, logging, recreational activities and implementation of flood control structures (Neilson 1950). The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Master Plan was completed in 1994. The plan was developed by a landowner steering committee for the Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD), with technical support from various Federal, State and local entities. Actions identified within the plan to improve the Asotin Creek ecosystem fall into four main categories: (1) Stream and Riparian, (2) Forestland, (3) Rangeland, and (4) Cropland. Specific actions to be carried out within the stream and in the riparian area to improve fish habitat were: (1) create more pools, (2) increase the amount of large organic debris (LOD), (3) increase the riparian buffer zone through tree planting, and (4) increase fencing to limit livestock access. All of these actions, in combination with other activities identified in the Plan, are intended to stabilize the river channel, reduce sediment input, increase the amount of available fish habitat (adult and juvenile) and protect private property. Evaluation work described within this report was to document the success or failure of the program regarding the first two items listed (increasing pools and LOD). Beginning in 1996, the ACCD, with cooperation from local landowners and funding from Bonneville Power Administration began constructing instream projects to improve fish habitat. In 1998, the ACCD identified the need for a more detailed analysis of these instream projects to fully evaluate their effectiveness at improving fish habitat. Therefore, ACCD contracted with WDFW's Snake River Lab (SRL) to take pre- and post-construction measurements of the habitat (i.e., pools, LOD, width, depth) at each site, and to evaluate fish use within some of the altered sites. These results have been published annually as progress reports to the ACCD (Bumgarner et al. 1999, Wargo et al. 2000, and Bumgarner and Schuck 2001). The ACCD also contracted with the WDFW SRL to conduct other evaluation and monitoring in the stream such as: (1) conduct snorkel surveys at habitat alteration sites to document fish usage following construction, (2) deploy temperature monitors throughout the basin to document summer water temperatures, and (3) attempt to document adult fish utilization by documenting the number of steelhead redds associated with habitat altered areas. This report provides a summary of pre-construction measurements taken on three proposed Charley Creek habitat sites during 2001, two sites in main Asotin Creek, and one site in George Creek, a tributary that enters in the lower Asotin Creek basin. Further, it provides a comparison of measurements taken pre- and post-construction on three 1999 habitat sites taken two years later, but at similar river flows. It also presents data collected from snorkel surveys, redd counts, and temperature monitoring.

Bumgarner, Joseph D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Texas Transportation Institute, Agency 727 Energy Management and Conservation Plan (RP-49)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office (SECO) to implement programs reducing consumption and improving efficiency. In addition, TTI has an Energy Conservation Committee, TAMU Energy Office Website/Hotline and an Energy Awareness Marketing) as provided by the Office of Vehicle Fleet Management (OVFM), Texas Building and Procurement Commission (TBPC

78

Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management Area to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact Review/Final Regulatory Flexibility Analysis analyzes Amendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan Island Habitat Conservation Area Environmental Assessment/ Regulatory Impact Review/ Final RegulatoryAmendment 94 to the Fishery Management Plan for Groundfish of the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands

79

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review to ISRP comments requested Report Page # 24001 Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research Idaho Fish and Game No and conserve high priority bull and westslope cutthroat trout habitat in Trestle Creek. Idaho Department

80

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix N: Financial Assumptions and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, a higher discount rate would tend to value a combustion turbine over a wind project, for example plan, which can be used directly by the various regional entities responsible for meeting loads, the discount rate used in the Council's analysis is a composite rate that will not be directly applicable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Marine Conservation Resource overexploitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Marine vs, terrestrial? ), Ocean habitat spatially labile · Upwelling# downwelling · Currents % Bluefin tunas# Southern Ocean · )!& million hooks in peak year )1*& · Wandering albatrosses declined Marine conservation laws: fisheries Open ocean fisheries: · 4Tragedy of the Commons5 % Individuals

83

Energy conservation and CO2 emission reduction in China's 11th Five-Year Plan: A performance evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the 11th Five-Year Plan (FYP) (20052010), the Chinese Government initiated a series of energy-saving and emission reduction policies in many key fields in response to environmental pollution and climate change. This paper quantitatively evaluates the performance of energy conservation and CO2 emission reduction in this period, the impact of these policies and potentials, by integrating the contributions of energy conversion efficiency and energy utilization efficiency improvement, industrial restructuring, fuel mix shift and renewable energy development in a unified framework, as a first attempt to introduce energy conversion efficiency improvement into a decomposition approach. Comprehensive and specific policies are summarized as a policy list to be investigated. The results show that energy intensity and conversion efficiency effects were mainly responsible for driving down energy consumption, by 637.4Mtce and 85.4Mtce respectively, and they reduced CO2 emissions by 1345.3Mt and 243.8Mt respectively due to a significant improvement in the 11th FYP period. Most of the contributions made by the conversion efficiency effect (94%) come from thermal power generation, and the emission coefficient effect reduced CO2 emissions by 17.4Mt through developing renewable energy. Economic growth is still the biggest driver of energy consumption and increasing emissions, while industrial restructuring and fuel mix shift effects contributed relatively little. Developing renewable energy and promoting economic restructuring to limit the increase of energy-intensive sectors are still the main challenges and the next policy focus to achieve the targets for energy saving and carbon emission reduction in the 12th Five-Year Plan.

Jin-Hua Xu; Ying Fan; Song-Min Yu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Bird Habitats  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

85

Agent Program Planning Information Money Smart  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agent Program Planning Information Money Smart http participated in Money Smart classes: Habitat for Humanity, Head Start, workforce center clients, adult Planning Model plans have been developed for a Money Smart outcome plan and a Money Smart output plan

86

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects in British Columbia By Matthew Justice B of Resource Management (Planning) Title of Project: Volunteering in Fish-Habitat Rehabilitation Projects #12;ABSTRACT This research explores the motivations of volunteers within fish-habitat rehabilitation

87

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy The Future at Rutgers University Facilities & Capital Planning Operations & Services Utilities Operations 6 Berrue Circle Piscataway, NJ 08854 #12;Energy Conservation Wh C ti ? R bl EWhy Conservation? Renewable Energy · Climate control reduces green house gases · Reduces

Delgado, Mauricio

88

Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

stocks, to insure conservation, to facilitate long-term protection of essential fish habitats, and to realize the full potential of the nation's fishery resources....

89

Darwinian shortfalls in biodiversity conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Darwinian shortfalls in biodiversity conservation Jose´ Alexandre F. Diniz-Filho1 , Rafael D, and biodiversity conservation Species are considered indisputable units in conservation and biodiversity analyses in conservation planning and biodiversity analyses has been continuously dis- cussed [3,4]. However, species

Mooers, Arne

90

Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

Smith, Brent

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Behind the scenes of Trinity Waters project: Partnerships and technology deliver cooperative conservation in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration, wildlife and livestock management, and educational and economic resources. #31;e website has contact information for water and land management experts, tips on becoming involved, information on ongoing conservation projects, #25;nancial... plans and determining implementation costs. #31;ese datasets and tools provide baseline support for projects addressing wildlife habitat management and water quality, particularly native grassland and wetland restoration, and bo#26;omland hardwood...

Alldredge, Blake; Kalisek, Danielle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

UF in New Zealand Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UF in New Zealand Biodiversity and Conservation Summer B: June 30-August 4, 2014 Learn About Ways to Conserve, Manage, and Restore Natural Habitats and to Promote Biodiversity in Urban and Rural Environments and Policymakers, Developers, and the Public, and their Roles in Conserving Biodiversity. Explore the Unique Flora

Jawitz, James W.

93

Methods and workflow for spatial conservation prioritization using Zonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spatial conservation prioritization concerns the effective allocation of conservation action. Its stages include development of an ecologically based model of conservation value, data pre-processing, spatial prioritization analysis, and interpretation ... Keywords: Conservation planning, Decision analysis, Decision support tool, Spatial conservation prioritization, Systematic conservation planning, Zonation software

Joona Lehtomki; Atte Moilanen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

95

ORIGINAL PAPER Impacts of species-led conservation on ecosystem services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity conservation organisations have recently begun to consider a wider ecosystem services context targeted biodiversity conservation initiatives have been successful at con- serving species and habitats) demonstrates that biodiversity conservation often loses out to other interests (Wilcove et al. 1998

Vermont, University of

96

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix D, Conservation, Load Management and Fuel Switching Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various conservation, load management, and fuel switching programs were considered as ways to reduce or shift system peak load. These programs operate at the end-use level, such as residential water heat. Figure D-1a shows what electricity consumption for water heat looks like on normal and extreme peak days. Load management programs, such as water heat control, are designed to reduce electricity consumption at the time of system peak. On the coldest day in average winter, system load peaks near 8:00 a.m. In a winter with extremely cold weather, electricity consumption increases fr all hours, and the system peak shifts to later in the morning. System load shapes in the Puget Sound area are shown in Figure D-1b for a normal winter peak day (February 2, 1988) and extreme peak day (February 3, 1989). Peak savings from any program are calculated to be the reduction in loads on the entire system at the hour of system peak. Peak savings for all programs are measured at 8:00 a.m. on a normal peak day and 9:00 a.m. on an extreme peak day. On extremely cold day, some water heat load shifts to much later in the morning, with less load available for shedding at the time of system peak. Models of hourly end-use consumption were constructed to simulate the impact of conservation, land management, and fuel switching programs on electricity consumption. Javelin, a time-series simulating package for personal computers, was chosen for the hourly analysis. Both a base case and a program case were simulated. 15 figs., 7 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Marine biodiversity: patterns, threats and conservation needs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marine biodiversity is higher in benthic rather than pelagic ... is high at high latitides. Losses of marine diversity are highest in coastal areas largely ... coastal habitats. The best way to conserve marine di...

John S. Gray

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which holds an energy conservation product trade fair everyState Economic and Trade Commission (SETC), organized energyOffice of Energy Conservation Work State Economie and Trade

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Please cite this article in press as: Gosnell, H., et al., Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence. Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2010.05.012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.elsevier.com/locate/landusepol Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence HannahPlease cite this article in press as: Gosnell, H., et al., Is Oregon's land use planning program conserving forest and farm land? A review of the evidence. Land Use Policy (2010), doi:10.1016/j

Kurapov, Alexander

102

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Optimal Design of Investments in Biodiversity Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Optimal Design of Investments in Biodiversity Conservation q1 p1 Area Price q2 p2 qd qc Paul R to terrestrial biodiversity and financial investment in habitat conservation efforts has become a cornerstone the needs of biodiversity leads to ineffective conservation programmes and may even risk conservation

Gray, Matthew

104

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

conservation laws  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conservation Laws Conservation Laws Conservation Laws - Data Analysis Using Graphs - Histograms - Units or Vectors in Particle Physics In all of physics there are only six conservation laws. Each describes a quantity that is conserved, that is, the total amount is the same before and after something occurs. These laws have the restriction that the system is closed, that is, the system is not affected by anything outside it. Conservation of charge Conservation of momentum Conservation of mass/energy Conservation of angular momentum Conservation of baryons Conservation of leptons Let's review the conservation laws that you know from classical physics. Then, we will describe two particle physics conservation laws. Conservation of Charge This is used all the time in chemistry. The total charge in the system is

106

Conservation: Tactics for a Constant Crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...intellectual leader-ship and sustainable funding for planning...the Environment, and a Sustainable Future (Beacon, Boston...located islands and other real estate where secure facilities...habitats and, just as on real islands, major extinctions...

MICHAEL E. SOUL

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Strategic Energy Planning Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The nine-step process for community strategic energy planning helps Tribes establish a comprehensive understanding of current energy use and costs, get insight into efficiency and conservation...

108

DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT Fifteenmile Management Plan 5. Fifteenmile Subbasin Management Plan DRAFT May 25 2004 Compiled by Wasco County Soil and Water Conservation District in cooperation with Fifteenmile Coordinating Group 5. FIFTEENMILE SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN

109

2006 Nature Publishing Group Prioritizing global conservation efforts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for biodiversity conservation1­3 . Approaches such as biodiversity hotspots4 , endemic bird areas5 and ecoregions6 on biodiversity, threat and cost, and is rigorously formulated. Allocation of conservation resources, like any biodiversity conservation through the creation of reserves, given ongoing habitat destruction

Cai, Long

110

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado Michelle Fink, David and conifer forests in western Colorado. Twenty-two forest-based bird species were used as conservation opportunities for conservation of Neotropical migratory birds in coniferous and aspen forest habitats in Western

111

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Action or Project Description The Ponca Tribe of Nebraska proposes to 1) employ and train one full-time employee to oversee the energy efficiency and conservation plan...

112

Intermountain Province Subbasin Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and stakeholders. The IMP subbasin plan includes: · an assessment providing the technical foundation for the plan Power and Conservation Council Portland, Oregon O N B E H A L F O F : Intermountain Province Oversight Planning in the Intermountain Province The Northwest Power Planning Council1 's (Council) 2000 Fish

113

Conservation IEAB Independent Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interactions Between the Fish and Wildlife Program andand Wildlife Program and the Sixth Power Plan (Phase 1)the Sixth and the Fish and Wildlife ProgramProgram #12;Northwest Power and Conservation Council IEAB Independent Economic integration of wind and solar generationImpacts from integration of wind and solar generation Impacts from

114

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape connectivity promotes plant biodiversity spillover into non-target habitats Lars A for review September 26, 2008) Conservation efforts typically focus on maximizing biodiversity in protected increasingly consider how management of protected areas can promote biodiversity beyond reserve borders

115

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

116

Contrasting bee foraging in response to resource scale and local habitat management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mexico, we investigated the influence of coffee floral resource levels and habitat management on native of environmental cues in order to conserve energy and maximize resource acquisition. Because most habitats have is provisioned to offspring and the latter of which is mostly consumed by bees in order to sustain their high

117

Conservation Genetics of Five Species of Dionda in West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are important relative to monitoring habitat deterioration. This study used genetic data from geographic samples of the five nominal species of Dionda in Texas waters to document the conservation-genetics status of populations in each species. Fish were...

Hanna, Ashley

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Conservation on the edge : landscape scale conservation at Colorado's urban-rural interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landscape scale conservation is an emerging framework that refers to the ability to conceive, plan, finance and manage projects with significant natural conservation value while incorporating the cultural and economic ...

Ericson, Peter, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance Program, State...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance Program, State Energy Program and Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants Monitoring Plan for Weatherization Assistance...

120

Investigating habitat value to inform contaminant remediation options: Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Rebecca A. Efroymson; Mark J. Peterson; Christopher J. Welsh; Daniel L. Druckenbrod; Michael G. Ryon; John G. Smith; William W. Hargrove; Neil R. Giffen; W. Kelly Roy; Harry D. Quarles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Contaminant Remediation Decisions: Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods are most often developed and used to prioritize candidate lands for conservation. In this study the intent of habitat valuation was to inform the decision-making process for remediation of chemical contaminants on specific lands or surface water bodies. Methods were developed to summarize dimensions of habitat value for six representative aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Several general valuation metrics were developed for three broad categories: site use by groups of organisms, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Examples of use value metrics are taxa richness, a direct measure of number of species that inhabit an area, complexity of habitat structure, an indirect measure of potential number of species that may use the area, and land use designation, a measure of the length of time that the area will be available for use. Measures of rarity included presence of rare species or communities. Examples of metrics for habitat use value added from spatial context included similarity or complementarity of neighboring habitat patches and presence of habitat corridors. More specific metrics were developed for groups of organisms in contaminated streams, ponds, and terrestrial ecosystems. For each of these metrics, cutoff values for high, medium, and low habitat value were suggested, based on available information on distributions of organisms and landscape features, as well as habitat use information. A companion paper describes the implementation of these habitat valuation metrics and scoring criteria in the remedial investigation for ETTP.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Welsh, Christopher John Edward [ORNL; Druckenbrod, Daniel L [ORNL; Ryon, Michael G [ORNL; Smith, John G [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL; Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Roy, W Kelly [ORNL; Quarles III, Harry Dewitt [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

State Energy State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

123

Bonneville's conservation policy analysis models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes computer simulation models used by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) to help analyse conservation policies for the Pacific Northwest. We begin with a description of electricity resource planning in the Pacific Northwest in general and conservation planning at Bonneville in particular. We describe the purpose, structure and applications of two models developed for Bonneville's Office of Conservation. Our description emphasizes the special features which make the models useful in resource strategy studies where a wide variety of policies are to be analysed in a short time period. We present results from recent applications including an analysis of conservation programme impacts in the face of a capacity surplus. We also discuss a simple analysis of the relative risk of alternative conservation strategies in the face of long-term uncertainties in loads and resources.

Andrew Ford; Michael Bull; Roger F. Naill

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is endemic to the Western Great Plains and Colorado Plateau (Mengel, 1970). The bird has become of greaterPOTENTAIL HABITAT FOR MOUNTAIN PLOVERS ON COLORADO SPRINGS UTILITIES PROPERTY A Report to Colorado Springs Utilities By The Colorado Natural Heritage Program Colorado State University January 2003 Martin

125

Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act : Legislative History of the Act to Assist the Electrical Consumers of the Pacific Northwest through use of the Federal Columbia River Power System to Achieve Cost-Effective Energy Conservation : P.L. 96-501, 94 Stat. 2697.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act became effective when it was signed into law by President Carter on December 5, 1980. This ended a four-year debate over legislation designed to plan and coordinate the region's energy future. This legislative history is an abbreviated version taken from the larger historical file maintained by the BPA Law Library. It is intended to assist BPA personnel and others who are studying the Northwest Power Act and working on its implementation. The documents included were selected for their value in determining what Congress meant in enacting the statute and to provide the researcher with a starting point for further investigation. These documents include: a history of the Act, a chronology of the legislative action leading to passage of the law; a section-by-section analysis of the Act; the Congressional Records of Senate and House debates on the bill and its amendments, and a list of Congressional committee hearings.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

BRIEF COMMUNICATION ``Turtle watching'' conservation guidelines: green turtle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BRIEF COMMUNICATION ``Turtle watching'' conservation guidelines: green turtle (Chelonia mydas.V. 2009 Abstract We propose a conservational opportunity for humans to `use' the green turtle (Chelonia, as applied to the sustainability of tourism-dependent turtle watching, has focused on beach-nesting habitats

Taggart, Christopher

128

REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with this requirement. Waste management guidance and plan template can be downloaded at http://www.energy that generate waste. Attachments: Energy Commission Waste Management Plan Guidance Waste Management Plan1 REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA) STATE ENERGY PROGRAM (SEP) AMERICAN

129

Identification and characterization of conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for the Yucca Mountain site characterization project: Quality Assurance Project Plan, Revision 1; Quarterly progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to identify and characterize candidate conservative organic tracers for use as hydrologic tracers for experiments to be conducted at the Yucca Mountain C-well complex. During this quarter the main effort was directed towards rewriting the quality assurance program in preparation for a review and audit by the USGS. However, due to budget constraints the review and audit were not carried out. The tracer QA plan and standard operating procedures (SOPs) were revised and copies are included in the report. Instrumental problems were encountered and corrected with the addition of new integration and sample control software. In the sampling, there was an unexplained peak in the chromatograms of the tracers being tested in the light tuff. This was not correctable and these experiments will be repeated in the next quarter.

Stetzenbach, K.J.

1993-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

RACKHAM SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RACKHAM ­ SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology Subplan Requirements SubPlan: CONECOL RG 11066 CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) RQ 7287 Conservation Ecology Core Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) LN 0010 Aquatic Sciences Specialization LN 0020 Conservation

Eustice, Ryan

131

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

6 Management Plan Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enhance the fish and wildlife populations and the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that exist within for restoration of fish and wildlife habitat and populations which form the bulk of the management plan is derived or the inventory. The assessment and inventory are designed and may be used to guide restoration and management

133

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) (2006(2006--006006--00)00)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP)CBFWA Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP 101HEP 101 Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed byHabitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP

134

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing biodiversity conservation conflict on military installations Grace D. Lee Jenni a, , M for biodiversity conservation given the US mili- tary alone manages over 12 million ha of land providing habitat can be addressed by both acknowledging biodiversity conservation conflict exists and allowing dissent

Peterson, M. Nils

135

Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Biodiversity and Wildlife Habitat Considerations for Opportunity Harvesting Prepared for considerations for biodiversity and wildlife habitat values during their development of a discussion paper paper. #12;2 A. INTRODUCTION When evaluating the biodiversity and wildlife habitat implications

136

Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

green, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Investigating habitat value to inform contaminant remediation options: Case study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Habitat valuation methods were implemented to support remedial decisions for aquatic and terrestrial contaminated sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN, USA. The habitat valuation was undertaken for six contaminated sites: Contractor's Spoil Area, K-901-N Disposal Area, K-770 Scrapyard, K-1007-P1 pond, K-901 pond, and the Mitchell Branch stream. Four of these sites are within the industrial use area of ETTP and two are in the Black Oak Ridge Conservation Easement. These sites represent terrestrial and aquatic habitat for vertebrates, terrestrial habitat for plants, and aquatic habitat for benthic invertebrates. Current and potential future, no-action (no remediation) scenarios were evaluated primarily using existing information. Valuation metrics and scoring criteria were developed in a companion paper, this volume. The habitat valuation consists of extensive narratives, as well as scores for aspects of site use value, site rarity, and use value added from spatial context. Metrics for habitat value were expressed with respect to different spatial scales, depending on data availability. There was significant variation in habitat value among the six sites, among measures for different taxa at a single site, between measures of use and rarity at a single site, and among measures for particular taxa at a single site with respect to different spatial scales. Most sites had aspects of low, medium, and high habitat value. Few high scores for current use value were given. These include: wetland plant communities at all aquatic sites, Lepomid sunfish and waterbirds at 1007-P1 pond, and Lepomid sunfish and amphibians at K-901 pond. Aquatic sites create a high-value ecological corridor for waterbirds, and the Contractor's Spoil Area and possibly the K-901-N Disposal Site have areas that are part of a strong terrestrial ecological corridor. The only example of recent observations of rare species at these sites is the gray bat observed at the K-1007-P1 pond. Some aspects of habitat value are expected to improve under no-action scenarios at a few of the sites. Methods are applicable to other contaminated sites where sufficient ecological data are available for the site and region.

Rebecca A. Efroymson; Mark J. Peterson; Neil R. Giffen; Michael G. Ryon; John G. Smith; William W. Hargrove; W. Kelly Roy; Christopher J. Welsh; Daniel L. Druckenbrod; Harry D. Quarles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Residential heating conservation in Krakow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A four-building conservation experiment was conducted in Krakow, Poland, during the 1992--1993 and 1993--1994 winters, aimed at determining potential savings of heat in typical multifamily residential buildings connected to the district heat network. Four identical multifamily buildings were selected for measurement and retrofitting. Together with the U.S. team, the local district heat utility, the Krakow development authority, and a Polish energy-efficiency foundation designed and conducted the 264-residence test of utility, building, and occupant conservation strategies during the 1992--1993 winter Baseline data were collected on each building prior to any conservation work. A different scope of work was planned and executed for each building, ranging from controls at the building level only to thermostatic valve control and weatherization. The project team has identified and demonstrated affordable and effective conservation technologies that can be applied to Krakow`s existing concrete-element residential housing. The results suggest that conservation strategies will be key to many alternatives in Krakow`s plan to eliminate low-emission air pollution sources. Conservation can allow connecting more customers to the utility network and eliminating local boilers without requiring construction of new combined heat and power plants. It can reduce heat costs for customers converting from solid-fuel heat sources to less polluting sources. By reducing heat demand, more customers can be served by existing gas and electric distribution systems.

Markel, L.C. [Electrotek Concepts, Knoxville, TN (United States); Reeves, G. [George Reeves Associates, Lake Hopatcong, NJ (United States); Gula, A.; Szydlowski, R.F. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title HI-County-Maui Location: County Maui HI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Energy efficiency and conservation strategy planning activities including hiring program manager; 2)

140

Management and Conservation Article Sensitivity Analyses of a Population Projection Model of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat) and Palo Alto County (high composition of perennial habitat) into a 2-stage (young and adult whereas estimated kiid was !1 in 88% of simulations from Palo Alto. Our analyses of the relativeManagement and Conservation Article Sensitivity Analyses of a Population Projection Model of Ring

Clark, William R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

142

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

envisioned in an earlier Step One habitat restoration master plan that the ISRP reviewed in September 2008 (ISRP 2008-11). In that review, the ISRP found that the Yankee Fork restoration plan did not meet, but instead warrant a standard ISRP and Council proposal review. The Tribes' submittal including a cover

143

Geopressured habitat: A literature review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Landscaping Water Conservation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landscaping Water Conservation Landscaping Water Conservation Landscaping Water Conservation April 13, 2012 - 6:39pm Addthis This colorful water-conserving landscape requires only one-quarter the water a bluegrass lawn would use. | Photo courtesy of Jim Knopf. This colorful water-conserving landscape requires only one-quarter the water a bluegrass lawn would use. | Photo courtesy of Jim Knopf. What does this mean for me? A waterwise landscape can be colorful and interesting if you follow xeriscape principles. How does it work? Xeriscaping requires planning and careful plant selection, but often requires less attention and maintenance than traditional landscapes. You can design a landscape that conserves water as well as energy. Here is a brief overview of some water-conserving landscaping strategies.

145

he Northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into account in deci- Fifth Northwest Power Plan Recommends Conservation, Wind Power to Reduce Risk of Future Adopts 23 Subbasin 8 Plans to Guide Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Success Stories: Flathead River 9 Flow on the Natural Resources; Fish, Wildlife and Parks; and Judiciary committees. Whiting, a member of the Confeder

146

Energy Conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...planning for the total life cycle in the use of resources, to...Smoothing the daily demand cycle in order to reduce heavy peak...problems at both applied and fundamental levels. The more promising...power include advanced power cycles, mag-netohydrodynamics...

G. A. Lincoln

1973-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

147

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NE-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe NE-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA NE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Ponca Tribe of Nebraska proposes to 1) employ and train one full-time employee to oversee the energy efficiency and conservation plan development, establish the Ponca Energy Office, and implement activities proposes in the energy efficiency and conservation plan; 2) maintain an Energy Team that will provide advice and guidance to the energy planner and develop programming to educate the community about energy efficiency, conservation, and renewable energy; the planner will research renewable energy by attending training and pursuing funding to obtain renewable energy; and 3) create a recycling plan at

148

Strategic Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Strategic Plan science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Strategic Plan x Strategic Plan Los Alamos National Laboratory Strategic Plan - 2014 (pdf) Our Strategic Plan...

149

Climate change, scenarios and marine biodiversity conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper explores the utility of qualitative scenario approaches to examine the potential impacts of climate change on marine biodiversity conservation on the east coast of Australia. This region is large and diverse, with considerable variation in marine biodiversity and, concomitantly, considerable diversity in the likely impacts from climate change. The results reinforce a number of key points. Engaging with stakeholders in scenario planning provides not only a focus to discuss the future in a disciplined way, but also provides ongoing reference points for contemporary decision making and planning. The paper illustrates how qualitative scenario planning provides opportunities to address the challenges of marine biodiversity conservation in a changing environment.

Marcus Haward; Julie Davidson; Michael Lockwood; Marc Hockings; Lorne Kriwoken; Robyn Allchin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Mapping the Economic Costs and Benefits of Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resources for biodiversity conservation are severely limited, requiring strategic investment. Understanding of conservation. PLoS Biol 4(11): e360. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0040360 Introduction Investments in biodiversity, approaches for designing conservation plans that systematically represent a region's biodiversity have prolif

Vermont, University of

151

ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Introduction Ontario Regulation 397/11 under the Green Energy Act 2009 requires public agencies and implement energy Conservation and Demand Management (CDM) plans starting in 2014. Requirementsofthe ConservationandDemand ManagementPlan 2014-2019 #12

Abolmaesumi, Purang

152

Energy Conservation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Goal 1: Energy Conservation LANL strives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to meet and surpass Department of Energy goals. The Lab's goal is to reduce emissions from energy use in our facilities and driving vehicles in our fleet by 28 percent. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Renewable energy goals: With the newly installed low flow turbine, LANL will be able to meet nearly half of its renewable energy goals for 2013. LANL was one of the original investors in renewable energy through the high flow turbines at Abiquiu Dam. Engineer Campbell of the Abiquiu Dam Facility demonstrates the use of the low flow turbine for electricity generation. The Abiquiu Dam power station's water flow and electrical output is controlled from monitors in Los Alamos. Inside the TA-03 Steam Plant: Replacement or reconfiguration of the 50 year old steam plant and piping system could provide significant energy savings for LANL.

153

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Florida  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm 2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County (HabitatPBC) in completing three high-performance prototype houses that achieved HERS index scores of less than 60, which is about 30% better than typical HabitatPBC construction, at a payback of less than 4 years. The HabitatPBC is planning to implement these strategies in future homes they build. This has the potential for significant and affordable energy savings as HabitatPBC has built more than 111 affordable houses and served an additional 125 families worldwide through their affiliation with HFH International (today serving >20 families a year). Building America (through the Florida Solar Energy Center, a member of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team) achieved

154

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

SUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION Plan Name: MCWAH Vision Plan [Plan # 505  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to pay for such coverage. Review this summary plan description and the documents governing the planSUMMARY PLAN DESCRIPTION Plan Name: MCWAH Vision Plan [Plan # 505] Plan Type: Group Vision Insurance Plan Year: July 1 ­ June 30 Employer\\Policyholder\\Plan Administrator\\Plan Sponsor: Medical College

156

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the ISRP reviewed a three-year progress report for the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board's (UCSRB1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Subject: Review of Progress Reports for Upper Columbia Programmatic Habitat Restoration Projects (#2010

158

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Second Follow-up Review of the Yakama Nations' Project, Rock Creek Fish and Habitat Assessment1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th (#2007-156-00) Background At the Council's February 3, 2012 request, the ISRP reviewed a revised proposal

159

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Igiugig Village Council plans to work toward implementing the energy efficiency and conservation strategic plan for the Igiugig Village by planning for new community development such as tribal housing, infrastructure, and facilities to include energy-efficient features that contribute to lower energy demand. A subcontractor will be contracted to provide planning and design assistance (planning/design only) for new tribal buildings and infrastructure and 2) the Igiugig Village Council proposes to purchase, install, and

160

Marine Biodiversity: Climate Impact and Conservation Planning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effects of climate change on terrestrial ecosystems are well-known. Though over 70% of the Earths surface is covered by water, still little is known about the effects of global warming on aquatic ecosyste...

Leonard Sonnenschein

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EE - Energy Efficiency - Energy Conservation Plan  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Saving Behavior * Institutionalizing Supervisor Energy Saving Behavior * Implementing an Energy Ideas Contest * Green IT Awareness Additionally, in 2007, FEMP facilitated an...

162

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation Speaker(s): Julie Osborn Date: January 23, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Successful conservation projects must address human influences on species and their habitat by integrating local residents into the conservation solution. Involving local students in research can serve as a catalyst to gain community participation in protection efforts; educate those who have the most immediate connection to the issues; and empower individuals with tangible ways they can contribute to conservation. Effective community response requires the collaboration of educational institutions, NGOs, landowners, government agencies, and individual community members. Ecology Project International (EPI) has integrated local students in conservation

163

Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

In August 2013, Southeast Volusia County Habitat for Humanity (VolusiaHabitat) completed its first U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Zero EnergyReady Home in Edgewater, on the Atlantic coast of...

164

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HSU Matt Johnson ADVANCED HABITAT ECOLOGY BACKGROUND MATERIAL HSU WILDLIFE 531 Dr. Matt Johnson;39 #12;HSU Matt Johnson CHI-SQUARE GOODNESS-OF-FIT TESTS OF WILDLIFE HABITAT SELECTION In a nutshell

Johnson, Matthew

165

Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

BJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2.1 Previous Habitat Valuations of Land Areas and Water Bodies on the Oak Ridge ReservationBJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Remedial Decisions: A Case Study of Six Sites at the East Tennessee Technology Park #12;BJC/OR-2268 Investigating Habitat Value in Support of Remedial

Hargrove, William W.

167

Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that would help design a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. Existing surveys present comprehensive information about regional manufactured home occupants and their homes that are relevant to a potential conservation marketing plan. An independent analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various efficiency improvements provides background information for designing a marketing plan. This analysis focuses on the economic impacts of alternative energy conservation options as perceived by the home owner. Identifying impediments to conservation investments is also very important in designing a marketing plan. A recent report suggests that financial constraints and the need for better information and knowledge about conservation pose the major conservation investment barriers. Since loan interest rates for new manufactured homes typically exceed site-built rates by a considerable amount and the buyers tend to have lower incomes, the economics of manufactured home conservation investments are likely to significantly influence their viability. Conservation information and its presentation directly influences the manufactured home buyer's decision. A marketing plan should address these impediments and their implications very clearly. Dealers express a belief that consumer satisfaction is the major advantage to selling energy efficient manufactured homes. This suggests that targeting dealers in a marketing plan and providing them direct information on consumers' indicated attitudes may be important. 74 refs.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an iterative review of the Estuary RME Plan. The ISRP and the ISAB first reviewed a September 2003 draft of the Estuary RME Plan during their review of the Action Agencies/NOAA Fisheries RME Plan in fall 2003 1 SeeIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

169

Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power Planning Council,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power Planning Council, the National Marine 97204 ISAB@nwppc.org A Review of Strategies for Recovering Tributary Habitat Robert E. Bilby Peter ADonald David Philipp Brian Riddell March 31, 2003 ISAB 2003-2 #12;ISAB 2003-2 Tributary Habitat i ISAB Review

170

Unexpected coherence and conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...December 2001 research-article Unexpected coherence and conservation Bernard Cazelles 1...out-of-phase synchrony| Unexpected coherence and conservation. | The effects of migration...Behavior Stochastic Processes Unexpected coherence and conservation Bernard Cazelles1...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy EECBG Success Story: Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses...

173

Draft 2009 ISRP Programmatic Habitat Project Proposal 1 Programmatic Proposal for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

assistance and review in recovery planning and in the development of regional monitoring and evaluation Proposer Yakama Nation Fisheries Resource Management Short Description Upper Columbia Habitat Restoration of supporting sustainable populations. Towards achieving this goal, the Yakama Nation proposes to begin

174

Conservation and drought management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fall 2012 tx H2O 5 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director Conservation and Drought Management WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future Water conservation and drought... management are related, but they are not the same. Water conservation is a long-term e#27;ort to reduce the amount of water it takes to manufacture goods, manage households and care for landscapes. Drought management is water-use rules initiated to deal...

Finch, Calvin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

GRANDE RONDE RIVER BASIN FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kathy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration #12;CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . · · . . · . . . . . . i INTRODUCTION

176

HABITAT PROFILE New Hampshire Wildlife Action Plan B-209  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hardwood ­ conifer systems. 1.2 Justification Lowland spruce-fir forest covers approximately 10% of New spruce-fir or northern hardwood-conifer forest. Past harvesting in some of these areas have resulted in conversion of former spruce-fir sites to northern hardwood-conifer forest. 2.3 Protection and Regulatory

New Hampshire, University of

177

Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habitat for Humanity Habitat for Humanity Jump to: navigation, search Name Habitat for Humanity Place Americus, GA Website http://www.habitat.org/ References NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home[1] Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2005 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Habitat for Humanity is a company located in Americus, GA. References ↑ "NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home" ↑ "Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Habitat_for_Humanity&oldid=38172

178

Tennessee Valley Shorebird Assessment Project SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION AND MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment Project SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER WADES IN DEEPER WATER, NOTE LONG BILL DUNLIN #12;5 Tennessee Valley1 Tennessee Valley Shorebird Assessment Project SHOREBIRD CONSERVATION AND MONITORING Tennessee Valley Shorebird Assessment Project RESOURCES US SHOREBIRD CONSERVATOIN PLAN http

Gray, Matthew

179

Political Economy of Compensatory Conservation: A Case Study of proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex, India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposed Omkareshwar National Park Complex (ONPC), is a planned park in Madhya Pradesh (central India) that is being designed as a compensatory conservation plan to overcome the loss of wildlife and forest by the construction and submergence from...

Goel, Abhineety

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

After the Conservation Reserve Program: Land Management with Wildlife in Mind  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conser- vation Service office about the Environmental Quality Incentive Program, which offers cost-share funding for cross-fencing, watering, controlling brush, managing grazing and prescribed burning. Carefully consider wild- life needs when managing... brush. Landowners who want to provide habitat for rare or declining species should check on cost-share funding for these practices. The Natural Resources Conservation Service?s Wildlife Habitat Incentive Program, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service...

Cearley, Kenneth A.; Kowaleski, Chuck

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title MN-County-Ramsey Location: County Ramsey MN American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Comprehensive energy plan and energy/sustainability coordinator to administer energy efficiency and

182

Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Author Western Governors' Association Published...

183

Integrating Deer, Quail and Turkey Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the proper management strategies, white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and Rio Grande turkey habitat can be integrated in one wildlife enterprise....

Lyons, Robert K.; Ginnett, Tim F.

2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

2004-12 3-1 Conservation Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on conversion from electricity to natural gas as an electric efficiency measure. In the Council's power plan for meeting future electrical energy needs. Each kilowatt-hour of electricity conserved means that one less of other factors. For example, more conservation would be available if the region grows at a faster pace

185

Habitat-Mediated Predator-Prey Interactions in the Eastern Gulf of Primary Investigator: Doran Mason -NOAA /GLERL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Mexico using an energy-balanced bioenergetics approach (growth = food ingested minus metabolicHabitat-Mediated Predator-Prey Interactions in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico Primary Investigator Overview The Sustainable Fisheries Act of 1996 and the amended Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation

186

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council; 851 SW 6th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Conservation Council From: ISRP and ISAB Subject: Review of the Draft Columbia River Basin Research Plan as a planning and prioritizing tool. The ISAB/RP understood that to be a preliminary review and suggested a follow-up review of a revised plan. The November 2005 version of the plan is much improved from the draft

188

MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region should acquire all electric energy conservation measure designed model conservation standards to produce all electricity savings that are cost, architectural styles, and so forth) found in typical buildings constructed before the first standards were

189

Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dispersing brush mice prefer habitat like home Karen E Mabry * Judy A Stamps * Author...habitat similar to that at our study site, home ranges were 0.11-0.15ha, and no between-sex difference in adult home range size was detected (Kalcounis-Ruppell...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Presence and absence of bats across habitat scales in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract During 2001, we used active acoustical sampling (Anabat II) to survey foraging habitat relationships of bats on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Using an a priori information-theoretic approach, we conducted logistic regression analysis to examine presence of individual bat species relative to a suite of microhabitat, stand, and landscape-level features such as forest structural metrics, forest type, proximity to riparian zones and Carolina bay wetlands, insect abundance, and weather. There was considerable empirical support to suggest that the majority of the activity of bats across most of the 6 species occurred at smaller, stand-level habitat scales that combine measures of habitat clutter (e.g., declining forest canopy cover and basal area), proximity to riparian zones, and insect abundance. Accordingly, we hypothesized that most foraging habitat relationships were more local than landscape across this relatively large area for generalist species of bats. The southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius) was the partial exception, as its presence was linked to proximity of Carolina bays (best approximating model) and bottomland hardwood communities (other models with empirical support). Efforts at SRS to promote open longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) and loblolly pine (P. taeda) savanna conditions and to actively restore degraded Carolina bay wetlands will be beneficial to bats. Accordingly, our results should provide managers better insight for crafting guidelines for bat habitat conservation that could be linked to widely accepted land management and environmental restoration practices for the region.

Ford, W.Mark; Menzel, Jennifer M.; Menzel, Michael A.: Edwards, John W.; Kilgo, John C.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.arlettaz@iee.unibe.ch www.conservation.unibe.ch Grassland management: designing tomorrow's farmland for biodiversity 1ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION CONSERVATION BIOLOGY Prof. Dr Raphaël Arlettaz Head of the division of Conservation Biology Office: Erlachstrasse 9a Mail: Baltzerstrasse 6 CH­3012 Bern +41 31 631 31 61 +41 79 637

Richner, Heinz

192

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Biodiversity Conservation Priorities T. M. Brooks,1,2,3 * R. A. Mittermeier,1 G. A. B. da is essential to minimize biodiversity loss. To address this need, biodiversity conservation organizations have conservation funding. H uman actions are causing a biodiversity crisis, with species extinction rates up

Wilmers, Chris

193

December 18, 2008 Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat transfer fluid & thermal storage) (1998 - 1999), Barstow, CA. Power sales agreements for 6 Council Northwest Power and Conservation Council Dish/Engine Heat-driven engine/generator (usually1 December 18, 2008 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Northwest Power and Conservation

194

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

BPA's Eighth Annual Energy Conservation Management Conference : Proceedings.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The five-year energy conservation program at Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is described at the conference. An overview of the program is presented. Topics covered in panel discussions include: how utilities can work effectively with weatherization contractors, homebuilders, energy auditors, and weatherization material suppliers; mechanisms for implementing conservation programs in the commercial sector; experiences gained in existing residential weatherization programs; and streamlining relationships between consumers, utilities, and BPA in providing services and getting feedback. The planning, programming, technical assistance, and engineering thrusts of BPA's conservation programs are discussed. Indoor air quality, renewable energy, and the regulator's role in relationships to energy conservation are discussed. Passive solar programs, DOE initiatives in solar and conservation for buildings, conservation potential in the commercial and industrial sectors, and current conservation research and development are also discussed. (MCW)

Energy Conservation Management Conference (8th : 1981); United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Deep conservation of cis-regulatory elements in metazoans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remained elusive. Here, we review recent studies that revealed...commonalities in how animal body plans are built. The early...distances. Here, we review studies searching for...thus became the gold standard for the search for functional...conserved vertebrate body plan [24,28], providing...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

component to the master planning effort. 2005 Step One Review In 2005, the ISRP conducted a Step One review of the hatchery program's Master Plan (ISRP 2005-23 ). Step One is the preliminary review at the feasibility stageIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

198

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................... 16 #12;1 ISRP Review of the Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan Background At the Northwest by the Council (Chapter 3 of the Master Plan provides a reference to the review elements). This projectIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th

199

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted a Step Two review of the Yakama Nation's Klickitat River Anadromous Fisheries Master Plan (project Step One review of the Klickitat Master Plan in 2008 (ISRP 2008-6; also see ISRP 2005-7). OverallIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

200

Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Markets for Conservation (COMACO) links biodiversity conservation with sustainable linked challenges to rural development and biodiversity conservation. Both household coping strategies, business-oriented model for poverty alleviation, food production, and biodiversity conservation

Lehmann, Johannes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form: Alaska Fish Habitat Permit Application Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Fish Habitat Permit Organization Alaska Department of Fish and Game Published Publisher Not...

202

EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards 81: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 20, 2011 EA-1881: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts (October 2011) October 5, 2011 EA-1881: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent

203

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

205

Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,617 acres of wetland habitat and the inundation of 8,900 acres of deep-water marsh. Estimated wildlifeDRAFT Monitoring and Evaluation Plan For The Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project (BPA Project on vegetation monitoring. Their contributions to this project are greatly appreciated. #12;1 Introduction

206

Facilities Operations, Planning, and Engineering Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilities Operations, Planning, and Design Engineering Services Energy Management & Water and In- house Engineering Mechanical Electrical Engineering Data Analysis Construction Services In Conservation Capital Project-Bldg Systems Review Commissioning BSL3/DLAM Engineer Building Systems Engineering

McLaughlin, Richard M.

207

Fifteenmile Subbasin Plan May 25, 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as building blocks in recovery planning to meet the some of their requirements of the 2000 Federal Columbia of the resource-based economy in the Basin; #12; Promote sustainability and conservation consistent

208

The need for speed: informed land acquisitions for conservation in a dynamic property market  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.mcdonaldmadden@uq.edu.au Abstract Land acquisition is a common approach to biodiversity conservation but is typically subject of biodiversity assets, costs and land tenures demand a dynamic approach to conservation planning (PossinghamLETTER The need for speed: informed land acquisitions for conservation in a dynamic property market

Queensland, University of

209

Giant otter population responses to habitat expansion and degradation induced by a mega hydroelectric dam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Large hydroelectric dams are major drivers of habitat loss and degradation in lowland Amazonia. Hydroelectric reservoirs reduce the habitat available for terrestrial species, but create new open-water and shoreline lake habitat that can potentially boost populations of aquatic and semi-aquatic species, such as the threatened giant otter (Pteronura brasiliensis). To assess the impacts of mega-dams on this apex-predator, we surveyed the giant otter population across the 443,772-hectare Balbina Hydroelectric Reservoir of central Brazilian Amazonia between 14 and 25years after this reservoir creation. We compared changes in habitat area and estimated giant otter population size between the reservoir pre- and post-filling stages. The Balbina dam created ?3525 islands and increased the open-water surface and total reservoir perimeter available to otters by a factor of 62.7 and 8.9, respectively. Some 25years after damming, however, the estimated post-filling giant otter population size was only twice greater than that estimated before filling and 4.5 times smaller than would be predicted given the total available habitat area and density of dens quantified at a neighbouring undisturbed area used as a surrogate of the pre-filling phase. The observed mismatch between the proportional increase in otter population size and the much greater newly available reservoir habitat area is likely due to low habitat quality in terms of low fish prey productivity and scarcity of suitable sites for denning and territory demarcation. This should be considered in strategic environmental impact assessments of planned hydroelectric dams and in managing existing and future hydropower development in lowland tropical forests.

Ana Filipa Palmeirim; Carlos A. Peres; Fernando C.W. Rosas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards 774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the adoption of amended energy conservation standards as required by The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended) for direct heating equipment, as contained in the final rule titled, "Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating quipment," would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 22, 2010

211

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

Hair, Don

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

towards a better knowledge of sparse habitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is largely governed by the Habitats Directive, whose objectives are promoting the maintenance of biodiversity landscape units of the National Inventory of the Landscape in Sweden (NILS). To gather sufficient

213

Fish Habitat Regulations | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Fish Habitat Regulations Author Alaska Department of Fish & Game Published Alaska Department of Fish &...

214

Using Livestock to Manage Wildlife Habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Livestock grazing can be an effective tool in managing wildlife habitat. This publication explains how grazing affects various wildlife species such as white-tailed deer, bobwhite quail and turkeys, and how to select the type of livestock needed...

Lyons, Robert K.; Wright, Byron D.

2003-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

215

MODELING NEKTON HABITAT USE IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING NEKTON HABITAT USE IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS: AN APPROACH TO DEFINE ESSENTIAL FISH HABITAT IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS: AN APPROACH TO DEFINE ESSENTIAL FISH HABITAT (EFH) Project Team: Randall D. Clark.A. Matthews. 1999. Modeling nekton habitat selection in Galveston Bay, Texas: An approach to define essential

216

Conservation and Renewables Timeline  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSERVATION, RENEWABLES & RECs FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014 FY 2015 1012008 1012009 1012010 1012011 1012012 1012013 1012014 1012015 By June 1,...

217

Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

218

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

PLANNING Guiding Principles Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is conducted in a timely manner, in accordance with statutory, regulatory,...

219

STRATEGIC PLAN  

Energy Savers [EERE]

STRATEGIC PLAN 2015 - 2018 Message from the Associate Under Secretary for Environment, Health, Safety and Security I am proud to introduce this strategic plan for the Office of...

220

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program OK-TRIBE-KIOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE-KIOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma proposes to 1) conduct energy audits at tribal members housing, provide advice to tribal members, and develop plans for families to reduce energy wasted; attend training classes for conducting audits and providing training to tribal members; purchase equipment to sustain a viable energy audit program; and develop a plan for conducting tribal housing audits; and 2) install wind turbines (approximately 10 kW) at the Kiowa Tribal Headquarters Building (1978/79) and the Kiowa Head Start Classroom Building (1984). The wind turbines will feed wind-generated electrical power to the buildings

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2008 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades. It includes time-zero monitoring results for planting activities conducted in January 2008, annual survival monitoring for all planting years (2007 and 2008), and recommendations for the successful completion of DOE habitat mitigation commitments for this project.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MT-City-Missoula MT-City-Missoula Location: City Missoula MT American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Conservation strategy refinement (expand current Conservation Strategy into a foundation for a long- term Climate Action plan), 2) develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 3) City Parks and Recreation Exterior Lighting Project and City Shops Building exterior lighting retrofits, 4) development of revolving fund for energy efficiency projects, 5) development of sub-grant program for energy audits, and 6) fleet vehicle electric conversion. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

223

Energy Conservation Through Education and Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

training materi a1. Projects complete Corporate profitability guidelines Long range plan Capital cost M$ Current year capital budget Complex Energy Conservation Capital Projects: EDUCATIONAL AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Examples of some of the programs... presentation conta"j ns: Projects under consideration not completeapproved Energy savings MGLFEB/Yr Capital cost M$ Energy savings MGLFEB/Yr Capital cost M$ Energy savings MGLFEB/Yr Projects National and international overview Company overview...

Sorotzkin, J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

SPECIAL OFFER Conservation Science Trade-offs in Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation and Poverty Reduction 10. The Power of Traditions in Conservation Economics of Knowledge Future Challenges 18. Climatic Change and Conservation 19. Drivers of Biodiversity Change 20SPECIAL OFFER Conservation Science Trade-offs in Conservation Deciding What to Save NIGEL LEADER

225

Measuring biodiversity for conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring biodiversity for conservation Summary Policy document 10/03 May 2003 ISBN 0 85403 592 3. 2002). Conserving biodiversity is essential to sustainability. Biodiversity provides substantial socio This report can be found at www.royalsoc.ac.uk #12;The reality of ongoing biodiversity loss The living world

Reynolds, John D.

226

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A Qualified Energy Conservation Bond (QECB) is a bond that enables qualified state, tribal, and local government issuers to borrow money at attractive rates to fund energy conservation projects (it is important to note that QECBs are not grants). A QECB is among the lowest-cost public financing tools because the U.S. Department of the Treasury subsidizes the issuer's borrowing costs.

227

Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gauthreaux, Sidney, A., and Steven J. Wagner. 2005. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS). Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 48 pp. Abstract: During the 1970's and 1980's a dramatic decline occurred in the populations of Neotropical migratory birds, species that breed in North America and winter south of the border in Central and South America and in the Caribbean. In 1991 an international initiative was mounted by U. S. governmental land management agencies, nongovernmental conservation agencies, and the academic and lay ornithological communities to understand the decline of Neotropical migratory birds in the Americas. In cooperation with the USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (FS - SR) we began 1992 a project directed to monitoring population densities of breeding birds using the Breeding Bird Census (BBC) methodology in selected habitats within the Savannah River Site SRS. In addition we related point count data on the occurrence of breeding Neotropical migrants and other bird species to the habitat data gathered by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service and data on habitat treatments within forest stands.

Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Steven J. Wagner.

2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

228

Owyhee Subbasin Plan Chapter 2 Technical Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technical Assessment. Steven C. Vigg, Editor. Final Draft. Submitted to the Northwest Power and ConservationOwyhee Subbasin Plan Chapter 2 Technical Assessment Prepared By: The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes Program. #12;Owyhee Subbasin Plan Chapter 2 OSP Technical Assessment Final Draft May 28, 2004i Document

229

Climate Change Action Plan Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

Hansen, Andrew J.

230

Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of Environment, Abadeh Branch, Islamic Azad University, Abadeh, Iran. Address: No.475, 90 alley, Ghasrodasht Av

Rubenstein, Daniel I.

231

I-SAVE conservation program. Implementing title II of NECPA residential conservation service. Final draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The I-SAVE (Iowa Saves America's Vital Energy) conservation plan provides comprehensive energy-conservation information and services to residential consumers served by large investor-owned electric and gas utilities and participating home-heating suppliers. The overall objective of the I-SAVE plan is to conserve energy by facilitating cost-effective retrofit of existing housing and promoting more-efficient energy use. The ultimate benefit available to the customer under the I-SAVE plan - reduction in energy use - is dependent upon the action he or she takes as a result of the program audit. Benefits to the utility and the ratepayers as a whole, however, will accrue only upon widespread customer acceptance and utilization of program services. This degree of program acceptance and the resulting benefits to ratepayers can be attained only through an aggressive educational and promotional effort by the covered utilities. All electric and gas utilities which have sales, other than resale, exceeding 750 million kWh of electricity or 10 billion cubic feet of gas and participating home-heating suppliers, shall provide a program announcement and shall offer conservation services to their customers who occupy a residential building containing at least one, but not more than four units, in a manner as provided by the rules. The text of the rules is presented. (MCW)

None

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conservation The Role of Energy EfficiencyThe Role of Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to "Engineering and Economic Determinist's" Forecastsand Economic Determinist's" Forecasts Utilities planned and and Economic Determinist's"Engineering and Economic Determinist's Forecasts and PlansForecasts and Plans #12Northwest Power and Conservation Council The Role of Energy EfficiencyThe Role of Energy Efficiency

233

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified in the ISRP Step 1 review of the Master Plan (ISRP 2012- 13). As described in the Master Plan to address ISRP questions and concerns raised in its initial review of the Master Plan. Nevertheless, someIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

234

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

236

2014-10-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, Request for Information 2014-10-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program:...

237

Environmental Studies and Planning Page 147Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Department Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in environmental studies energy management and Design Water Quality and hazardous materials management minor / Energy Management and Design Laura Watt / Environmental Conservation and Restoration, Planning *Faculty and the environment energy management and Design environmental conservation and restoration Outdoor Leadership

Ravikumar, B.

238

Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation in Tropical Agroecosystems A New Conservation Paradigm Ivette Perfectoa areas of the world. Although most ecologists con- cerned with biodiversity conservation would agree. This conclusion has major consequences for biodiversity con- servation in fragmented tropical forests

239

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromous species habitat Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

species habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predicting the distribution of anadromous fish in fresh water using habitat models Steve Lindley Summary: , critical habitat, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadronous fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadronous fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadronous fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Habitat Management:...

242

Microsoft Word - CX_West Chewuch Conservation Easement_FINAL.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Jay Marcotte Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) would provide funds to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation) for the acquisition of a conservation easement for fish habitat mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington. The conservation easement would preserve anadromous fish habitat through the Columbia Basin Fish Accords and would be held and managed by the Methow Conservancy. Budget Information: Work Order # 00266311 Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00, CR#42460 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A7. Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal property...if property use is to remain unchanged;

243

A multi-scale qualitative approach to assess the impact of urbanization on natural habitats and their connectivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Habitat loss and fragmentation are often concurrent to land conversion and urbanization. Simple application of GIS-based landscape pattern indicators may be not sufficient to support meaningful biodiversity impact assessment. A review of the literature reveals that habitat definition and habitat fragmentation are frequently inadequately considered in environmental assessment, notwithstanding the increasing number of tools and approaches reported in the landscape ecology literature. This paper presents an approach for assessing impacts on habitats on a local scale, where availability of species data is often limited, developed for an alpine valley in northern Italy. The perspective of the methodology is multiple scale and species-oriented, and provides both qualitative and quantitative definitions of impact significance. A qualitative decision model is used to assess ecological values in order to support land-use decisions at the local level. Building on recent studies in the same region, the methodology integrates various approaches, such as landscape graphs, object-oriented rule-based habitat assessment and expert knowledge. The results provide insights into future habitat loss and fragmentation caused by land-use changes, and aim at supporting decision-making in planning and suggesting possible ecological compensation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many environmental assessments inadequately consider habitat loss and fragmentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-perspective for defining habitat quality and connectivity is claimed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-based tools are difficult to be applied with limited availability of data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a species-oriented and multiple scale-based qualitative approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advantages include being species-oriented and providing value-based information.

Scolozzi, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.scolozzi@fmach.it [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all& #x27; Adige, (Italy); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides an in-depth description of qualified energy conservation bonds, including process and mechanics, case studies, utilization trends, barriers, and regulatory and legal issues. Author: Energy Programs Consortium

245

Nonprice incentives and energy conservation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

individual choices about energy efficiency. Proc. Natl.4. Costa DL, Kahn ME (2013) Energy conservation nudges andInformation strategies and energy conservation behavior: a

Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

247

Hoax' of Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-national companies, it is not difficult to visualize the extent of air pollution in these two Peace and Democracy in South Asia, Volume 2, Numbers 1 & 2, 2006. 117 countries in near future. The whole race in the third world countries is about approximating... , or curb consumption and control generation of waste. Under these circumstances, this paper argues that idea of conservation is a hoax. Introduction The idea about conservation appears to be so noble, righteous and rational that any thinking...

Misra, P K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Doyle Conservation Center (DCC)  

High Performance Buildings Database

Leominster, MA Built on a 50-acre reservation in Leominster, the Doyle Conservation Center (DCC) houses core Trustees staff and serves as a central training facility that showcases the organization's conservation activities. The DCC's LEED Gold rating reflects the mission of the Trustees of Reservations, which is "To preserve, for public use and enjoyment, properties of exceptional scenic, historic, and ecological value in Massachusetts." The DCC is accessible to the public and is often rented out by various groups and organizations.

249

Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Preserving deep-sea natural heritage: Emerging issues in offshore conservation and management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Human activity in the deep sea is extending ever deeper, with recent research showing that this environment is more sensitive to human and natural impacts than previously thought. Some deep-water fish stocks have collapsed and fishing methods such as bottom trawling have raised international concern over the habitat damage they cause. It is likely that in its current form, deep-sea fishing is unsustainable. Diminishing reserves of hydrocarbons in shallow water are pushing exploration and production into deeper waters, which may cause damage to little known deep-sea habitats. The deep sea is also proposed as an environment where anthropogenic carbon dioxide could be stored to minimise the effect of its release into the atmosphere. At the same time, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may be altering the chemical equilibrium of the global ocean by lowering pH. Many countries are now beginning to designate some deep-sea habitats as marine protected areas in measures to reduce the damage caused by fishing and other anthropogenic activities. This review examines these current and emerging issues in deep-sea conservation and discusses conservation status and the designation of protected areas. The enforcement of protected areas using satellite tracking of vessels is discussed and applied to an internationally agreed deep-water conservation area, which aims to protect cold-water coral habitats on the Darwin Mounds in the north east Atlantic Ocean.

Andrew J. Davies; J. Murray Roberts; Jason Hall-Spencer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Improving sampling designs for measuring restoration in aquatic habitats  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Restoration of degraded habitat is an increasingly important toll for management. Unfortunately, much of the emphasis has been on restoring large structural elements of habitat (e.g. planting vegetation,removi...

M.G. Chapman

253

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 for Marine Science and Technology Curtin University of Technology GPO Box U1987, Perth, WA 6845, Australia y understand- ing of the acoustic backscatter from marine macro-benthos (MMB), including mainly seagrass, algae

Fernandez, Thomas

255

Glasgow and Clyde Valley Integrated Habitat Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of expert stakeholder workshops. The model outputs are GIS maps that can be used to assess habitats and how & Clyde Valley Green Network Partnership 7th November 2008 All maps reproduced from Ordnance Survey using digital data on a geographic information system (GIS) to identify IHNs in the GCV area

256

DRAFT MANAGEMENT PLAN APPENDIX A-1 Contract Entities and Plan Participants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Province (USP) Plan in addition to those contracted by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC of three primary elements: Part I. An Assessment of the current and potential physical and biological AND PLAN PARTICIPANTS BOI043620001.DOC/KG A1-2 IDFG organized a technical team of natural resource

257

Misadventures in Conservation and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Governance issues are at the heart of successful biodiversity conservation and sustainable development between biodiversity conservation and human development. She has studied Integrated ConservationMisadventures in Conservation and Development Friday, September 28, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch

Hall, Sharon J.

258

The Integration of Conservation Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Function and the Law · Conservation Science, Biodiversity, and the 2005 U.S. Forest Service Regulations Tool Kit for Ecologists and Biodiversity Managers Some selected titles of recent papers in ConservationChapter 17 The Integration of Conservation Science and Policy Conservation Biology ­ April 22, 2010

Gottgens, Hans

259

Energy Conservation Contract (4 activities)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Students learn about saving energy and encourage their families to conserve by completing the following activities

260

SAVEnergy Action Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is charged with carrying out key sections of EPACT and Executive Order 12903, to make the Federal government operate more efficiently. A congressionally mandated energy and water conservation audit program is one component of this growing DOE program. This paper traces the SAVEnergy Action Plan program throughout its development from (1) identifying projects and Agency champions, (2) establishing a protocol and fitting auditors into the program, (3) developing a data base to track the audits and measure their success, and (4) evaluating the process, learning from mistakes, and charting and transferring successes. A major tenet of the SAVEnergy program is to proactively prescreen all audit activities to ensure that -- where audits are done and Action Plans completed -- projects will be done.

Mayo, K.; Westby, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); deMonsabert, S. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Ginsberg, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)] [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Guam Energy Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Noise and Hearing Conservation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hearing Conservation Hearing Conservation Mary L. Doyle NOISE & HEARING CONSERVATION Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 16, 2002 1.0.1.~ CAUSES OF HEARING LOSS * Congenital * Environmental Exposures * Hereditary * Illness *Injury * Noise * Occupational * Non-Occupational * Sociacusis S.O.S. eon.ua.nt. OTOTOXIC DRUGS Can Affect Cochlea or Vestibular System * Aminoglycoside Antibiotics * Diuretics * Cancer Chemotherapy * Aspirin * Quinines * Usually Permanent * Consider Benefit-Risk Ratio S.O.S. eon.ua.nts HEARING * Modification of Acoustic Wave by Outer Ear * Conversion of Modified Acoustic Wave to Vibration of Eardrum * Middle Ear * Inner Ear * Transformation of Mechanical Movement to Nerve Impulses S.O.S. CoMubRis OTOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL

263

Energy-conserving development regulations: current practice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost every aspect of land development has an effect on energy use, from minute architectural details to broad considerations of urban density. Energy-efficiency depends in part on how development is planned and carried out. Conventional development regulations, such as zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, can be adapted in many ways to promote energy conservation at the community level. This report is about energy-efficient site and neighborhood design. It examines recent experiences of local governments that have adopted new development regulations or amended existing ones to promote energy conservation, more efficient generation and distribution, or a switch to alternative, renewable sources. Although much has been written in recent years about saving energy through community design, actual experience in applying these new ideas is still limited. To date, most communities have focused their efforts on studying the problem, documenting consumption patterns, and writing reports and plans. Only a handful have amended their land-use controls for the express purpose of saving energy. This study identifies 13 of these pioneering communities, after undertaking a survey of over 1400 local, regional, and state planning agencies. It takes a look at their experiences, to learn what has been done, how well it has worked, and what problems have been encountered.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A compendium of energy conservation success stories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Compendium of Energy Conservation Success Stories  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office{endash}Energy Utilization Research{endash}sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

1988-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

266

Conservation Easements: Biodiversity Protection and Private Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Easements: Biodiversity Protection and Private Use ADENA R. RISSMAN, LYNN LOZIER.S.A. Abstract: Conservation easements are one of the primary tools for conserving biodiversity on private land easements for biodiversity conservation. Keywords: biodiversity protection, conservation easement, land

Rissman, Adena

267

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AK-TRIBE-YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE AK-TRIBE-YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Yakutat Tlingit Tribe of Alaska proposes to 1) hire a technical consultant to assist the Tribe in developing a strategic energy plan, 2) prepare a comprehensive energy efficiency and conservation strategy for the Tribe, and 3) hire a technical consultant to conduct energy audits of select Tribal-owned buildings and facilities. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

268

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ID-TRIBE-NEZ PERCE TRIBE ID-TRIBE-NEZ PERCE TRIBE Location: Tribe ID-TRIBE-NEZ ID PERCE TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho proposes to 1) hire staff to develop, submit, and administer the energy efficiency and conservation strategy document; 2) develop a comprehensive strategic energy plan, 3) provide educational materials at various community events regarding energy efficiency and conservation measures, rebates, etc.; 3) conduct energy efficiency retrofits at the Water Resources Building (1978) to include replacing ballasts and lighting, determine the feasibility of installing dimming sensors in the building, and replacing windows; and installing motion sensors in the Boys and Girls Club.

269

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF MEKORYUK Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF MEKORYUK AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Mekoryuk proposes to implement energy efficiency upgrades to Indian Reorganization Act buildings. These planned upgrades includes installing approximately ten energy efficient Toyostove heating units, approximately six energy efficient heat saving windows, and approximately two energy efficient doors. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

270

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF SAINT MICHAEL Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF SAINT MICHAEL AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Saint Michael of Alaska proposes to 1) develop a comprehensive energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire a technical consultant to assist in developing a strategic energy plan, and 3) hire a technical consultant to conduct energy audits of Village-owned facilities and housing. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

271

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NJ-City-Edison, Township of NJ-City-Edison, Township of Location: City Edison, Township of NJ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Hire a Project Administrator to oversee energy efficiency and conservation grant and administrative costs associated with application, 2) develop an energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a comprehensive plan to provide long-term guidance for energy efficiency improvements, and 3) install a roof-mounted, approximately 165 kW, photovoltaic solar energy system with UPS battery backup on Edison Municipal Complex. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

272

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

Task Plans  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Task Plans Task Plans This page contains links to a tentative listing of active and closed TEC Task Plans. Final status of these task plans will be determined after the July 2000 TEC meeting. Task Plan Number/Title DOE Lead Staff Last Update Comment Status/ New No. After 7/27/00 GP-1, Section 180(c) Coordination (begun 1/96) C. Macaluso 7/98 DOE published a Revised Proposed Policy and Procedures in April 1998; no final policy will be issued until a definitive date for NWPA shipments is determined, based on site suitability or other legislative direction. To the extent that any issues related to Section 180(c) arise in TEC meetings, they are being discussed in the context of the consolidated grant topic group which is covered by another task plan. Closed

274

Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................ 2 1. Review of NOAA Fisheries' Recovery Plan and Life-cycle Modeling ProductsIndependent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council, Columbia 97204 Independent Scientific Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2014 Statement of Work October 1, 2013 through

275

Independent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................. 3 2. Review of NOAA Fisheries' Recovery Plan and Life-cycle Modeling ProductsIndependent Scientific Advisory Board for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council, Columbia 97204 Independent Scientific Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2012 Statement of Work October 1, 2011 through

276

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Master Plan for the Snake River Sockeye Program (#2007's responses to the Step 1 scientific review elements specified by the Council. Although this is a Step 1

277

Energy-conserving site design: case study, The Woodlands, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located north of Houston. It includes 22,000 acres and the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center called the Metro Center and several additional tracts, such as the Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Each village is to be structured around one large and several supporting neighborhood centers. Ultimate population is planned to be 150,000. Included in this report are sections on background, team structure and organization, methodological considerations, the conventional and energy-conserving plan, constraints to implementation, and general conclusions and next phases.

Swanson, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Causes of habitat loss in a Neotropical landscape: The Panama Canal corridor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied drivers of habitat conversion in the Panama Canal region, where rich biodiversity in tropical rainforests currently coexists with two major growing cities and a plethora of economic opportunities. We examined existing administrative units (counties) with known biophysical (e.g., rainfall, topography) and socio-economic (e.g., population density, road density) characteristics. To identify associations between those characteristics and likelihood of habitat conversion to agriculture or urbanization, we used canonical correlation analysis. Two axes accounted for most of the variation among administrative units: one for urbanization and the other for agriculture. Rainfall and topography were negatively associated with urbanization, whereas population wealth was positively associated with land conversion to urban. Agriculture was most strongly associated with elevation variability and topographic complexity. To a lesser extent, agriculture was associated with rural population density, mean annual human population growth and poverty level. We hypothesize that most future habitat loss in the Panama Canal region will be from urbanization as Panama City expands and populations grow along the highway system. Decision-makers will need to emphasize preservation of forests on the edge of developments, where risk of loss is highest. These forested lands tend to become more expensive as urbanization approaches, putting them at greater risk of being converted. Nevertheless, they are still important for protection of the Canal watershed and the high levels of biodiversity in watershed forests. Land planners and decision-makers should consider the influence of socio-economic and biophysical factors when selecting forests to protect for conservation.

Ghislain Rompr; W. Douglas Robinson; Andr Desrochers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Spatial Designation of Critical Habitats for Endangered and Threatened Species in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Establishing biological reserves or "hot spots" for endangered and threatened species is critical to support real-world species regulatory and management problems. Geographic data on the distribution of endangered and threatened species can be used to improve ongoing efforts for species conservation in the United States. At present no spatial database exists which maps out the location endangered species for the US. However, spatial descriptions do exists for the habitat associated with all endangered species, but in a form not readily suitable to use in a geographic information system (GIS). In our study, the principal challenge was extracting spatial data describing these critical habitats for 472 species from over 1000 pages of the federal register. In addition, an appropriate database schema was designed to accommodate the different tiers of information associated with the species along with the confidence of designation; the interpreted location data was geo-referenced to the county enumeration unit producing a spatial database of endangered species for the whole of US. The significance of these critical habitat designations, database scheme and methodologies will be discussed.

Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Sabesan, Aarthy [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Supersymmetric non conservative systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give the generalization of a recent variational formulation for nonconservative classical mechanics, for fermionic and sypersymmetric systems. Both cases require slightly modified boundary conditions. The supersymmetric version is given in the superfield formalism. The corresponding Noether theorem is formulated. As expected, like the energy, the supersymmetric charges are not conserved. Examples are discussed.

Martnez-Prez, N E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Conservation Alternative  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Of all of the issues involved in our national energy dilemma, the matter of conservation of energy has, without a doubt, received major attention. Much has been said on the subject and certainly a great deal has been written on the many facets...

Allaire, W. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Conservation of waterlogged linoleum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

???????.. 13 10. Cook stove ????????????????????? 13 11. Linoleum sent to APRL for conservation ?????????. 14 12. Frederick Walton ??????????????????.. 17 13. Floorcloth workers on scaffold ????????????.... 19 14. Armstrong... Cork Co. ? pouring linoleum ?cement? ????.? 21 15. Linoleum calenders ? Armstrong Cork Co. ???????.? 22 16. Rotary machine for producing straight line linoleum ? Armstrong Cork Co. ????????????????..?. 22 17. Workers hand piecing...

Coke, BobbyeJo Evon

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

The vacuum conservation theorem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A version of the vacuum conservation theorem is proved which does not assume the existence of a time function nor demands stronger properties than the dominant energy condition. However, it is shown that a stronger stable version plays a role in the study of compact Cauchy horizons.

Minguzzi, E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ME-County-Kennebec ME-County-Kennebec Location: County ME American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and conduct energy audit to improve energy efficiency in county facilities; 2) technical consultant services to conduct energy audits and develop a plan for implementation of retrofit projects; 3) building retrofits to historic facilities including replacing siding, installing insulation board, replacing HVAC chiller, and upgrading lighting and installing motion sensors at the County Government Center (1900); replacing pumps, upgrading lighting and installing motion sensors, installing direct digital control systems, and replacing windows at the County Correction Facility (1860); and

286

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

GA-County-Cherokee GA-County-Cherokee Location: County Cherokee GA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (SHPO approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately 1988); 5) develop an overall energy plan for energy management including audits and for replacement of older inefficient roof-top packaged HVAC equipment

287

SCOTTISH RED SQUIRREL ACTION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCOTTISH RED SQUIRREL ACTION PLAN 2006­2011 #12;#12;S C O T T I S H R E D S Q U I R R E L A C T I O.1 Background 1 1.2 Action Plan Working Group 1 1.3 Issues affecting the conservation of the red squirrel 1 1.2 Timescale and partnership working 3 2.3 Rationale 3 2.4 Key actions 4 2.4.1 Establish and monitor the red

288

Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (PlanCC) Peru Change (PlanCC) Peru Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

289

Biotype 24 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biotype 24 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland Ecology Branch Number 24 important to set clear management objectives. Low stock grazing is generally good for biodiversity but heavy over winter. Hence conservation of this UK Biodiversity Action Plan Priority Species requires a form

290

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity in woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROJECT SUMMARY The proposed research program uses the restoration and conservation of biodiversity and conservation planning process relates to biodiversity outcomes in complex metropolitan landscapes. Chicago, restoration and management of biodiversity on 360,000 acres of open space in the greater Chicago metropolitan

Illinois at Chicago, University of

291

S. Decout et al. 2010. Connectivity loss in human dominated landscape Forest Landscapes and Global Change-New Frontiers in Management, Conservation and Restoration. Proceedings of the IUFRO Landscape Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Change-New Frontiers in Management, Conservation and Restoration. Proceedings of the IUFRO Landscape between forest and aquatic habitats for breeding. Face to the growing need for maintaining connectivity conservation and for the maintenance of natural ecosystems stability and integrity. Landscape connectivity

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

STUDENT PROFILE A junior in biomedical engineering, Caroline plans to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT PROFILE A junior in biomedical engineering, Caroline plans to use her education her come to NC State to study engineering. Her Dean's Merit Scholarship has given her the opportunity been an Engineering Ambassador, volunteered with Habitat for Humanity during a spring break trip

293

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Behavioral ecology and conservation of large mammals: historical distribution, reintroduction and the effects of fragmented habitat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including effects of migration corridors; (2) identification of possible predators of the reintroduced species; and (3) a post-reintroduction assessment including an evaluation of the species' population dynamics. In this study I examine the suitability...

Gilad, Oranit

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Modeling the choice to switch from fuelwood to electricity Implications for giant panda habitat conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was explained by demographic and electricity factors (price, voltage, and outage frequency). In addition, lowering electricity prices and increasing electricity quality would encourage local residents to switchANALYSIS Modeling the choice to switch from fuelwood to electricity Implications for giant panda

An, Li

296

Habitat collapse due to overgrazing threatens turtle conservation in marine protected areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Evolutionary Studies (CEES), University of Groningen, , PO Box 11103, 9700 CC Groningen, The Netherlands 5 Marine Spatial Ecology...Ecological and Evolutionary Studies (CEES), Groningen University, Groningen, The Netherlands...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Management and Conservation Article Habitat Use and Selection by California Spotted Owls in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years after fire. Three nests were located in mixed-conifer forests, 2 in areas of moderate decade (U.S. Forest Service [USFS] 2001, 2004, 2005). Sierran mixed-conifer forests are a particularly are positively associated with forest charac- teristics, including the amount of older conifer-dominated forest

DeSante, David F.

298

The Use of Fire and Grazing to Improve Grassland Habitats for Species of Greatest Conservation Need  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with local farmers to extend what is learned on experimental pastures. All treatment variables remain pastures, four of each treatment type, serve as study sites in our efforts to assess the effectiveness workshops to explain the use of fire and grazing for grassland management. We also conduct in

Koford, Rolf R.

299

Fish-habitat modeling for gap analysis to conserve the endangered Topeka shiner (Notropis topeka)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the endangered Topeka shiner (Notropis topeka) using stream condition variables (stream size, groundwater trees) in streams characteristic of the North American Great Plains. The stream condition and land plaines de l'Amérique du Nord. Les modèles ba- sés sur les conditions hydrographiques et le couvert

300

Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation Area,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Area, Sabah, Malaysia Abstract.We compared advertisement callsof frog assemblagesin two different represents a major threat to stream-breeding anurans in Sabah. Pollution of clear water threatens the stream

Hödl, Walter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

302

Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand for water is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected. The Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas are carrying out a number of successful programs in the areas of education and public awareness, technical assistance...

Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

303

Managing the Transition State for Energy Strategic Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANAGING THE TRANSITION STATE FOR ENERGY STRATEGIC PLANNING a Thomas A. Koehler Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Corporate energy conservation programs have made substantial gains in reducing energy consumption during... the last decade. The responses to survive the mid-1970's global energy uncertainties were made in a crisis environment. Now, there is a transition from energy conservation to energy strategic planning. Energy engineers and managers need to im prove...

Koehler, T. A.

304

Water for Texas 2012: What is the plan?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management strategies can include conservation, drought management, reservoirs, wells, water reuse, desalination plants and others. How much will it cost? #31;e estimated total capital cost of the #25;#24;#23;#25; state water plan, representing... management strategies can include conservation, drought management, reservoirs, wells, water reuse, desalination plants and others. How much will it cost? #31;e estimated total capital cost of the #25;#24;#23;#25; state water plan, representing...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Duck Valley Habitat Enhancement and Protection, 2001-2002 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Duck Valley Indian Reservation's Habitat Enhancement project is an ongoing project designed to enhance and protect critical riparian areas, natural springs, the Owhyee River and its tributaries, and native fish spawning areas on the Reservation. The project commenced in 1997 and addresses the Northwest Power Planning Council's measures 10.8C.2, 10.8C.3, and 10.8C.5 of the 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The performance period covers dates from April 2001 through August 2002.

Allen, Mattie H.; Sellman, Jake (Shoshone-Paiute Nation, Duck Valley Indian Reservation, Owyhee, NV)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Energy-conservation indicators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of Energy Conservation Indicators were developed for the Department of Energy to assist in the evaluation of current and proposed conservation strategies. As descriptive statistics that signify current conditions and trends related to efficiency of energy use, indicators provide a way of measuring, monitoring, or inferring actual responses by consumers in markets for energy services. Related sets of indicators are presented in some 30 one-page indicator summaries. Indicators are shown graphically, followed by several paragraphs that explain their derivation and highlight key findings. Indicators are classified according to broad end-use sectors: Aggregate (economy), Residential, Commercial, Industrial, and transportation. In most cases annual time series information is presented covering the period 1960 through 1981.

Belzer, D.B.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Technology in water conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

through water conservation, introduction of new technology does not automati- cally result in water savings. #27;e new evapotrans- piration-based irrigation controllers illustrate the point. A lawn?s need for water is dependent on the weather... conditions. #27;e new controllers link operation of the sprinkler system to weather conditions collected on site or through an ongoing feed from radio- or web-based data. If businesses and homeowners are over-watering lawns, the technology could result...

Finch, Dr. Calvin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation This resource guide aims to provide useful, detailed, high quality sources of information on biodiversity and conservation for students in Higher and Further into biodiversity and government bodies trying to implement conservation measures, but there are many others

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

309

Animal conservation, carbon and sustainability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...different routes by which conservation can be achieved. Phil...systems are available for conservation? (a) Protected areas...inter- est in common pool resources. Somewhat...A (2002) Animal conservation 1797 Towns have difficulty supplying potable water, treatment for human...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy Conservation | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

will review their own home energy audits to construct a plan to reduce their energy usage. Curriculum Language Arts, Mathematics, Economics Plan Time 60+ minutes Materials...

311

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages on a large scale for the past 8 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measures of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Petrosky, Charles E. (idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production on the Warm Springs Reservation. Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The number of anadromous fish returning to the Columbia River and its tributaries has declined sharply in recent years. Changes in their freshwater, estuarine, and ocean environments and harvest have all contributed to declining runs of anadromous fish. Restoration of aquatic resources is of paramount importance to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation of Oregon. Watersheds on the Warm Springs Reservation provide spawning and rearing habitat for several indigenous species of resident and anadromous fish. These streams are the only ones in the Deschutes River basin that still sustain runs of wild spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus, tshawytscha. Historically, reservation streams supplied over 169 km of anadromous fish habitat. Because of changes in flows, there are now only 128 km of habitat that can be used on the reservation. In 1981, the CTWS began a long-range, 3-phase study of existing and potential fish resources on the reservation. The project, consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, was designed to increase the natural production of anadromous salmonids on the reservation.

Fritsch, Mark A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Plans and Schedules | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Plans and Schedules Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Plans and Schedules Plans and Schedules The Appliances and Equipment Standards program maintains a multi-year rulemaking schedule. The currently scheduled rulemaking activities are described in the program's semi-annual implementation report to Congress. The program will also issue other plans and schedules when needed. The most recent 5-year plan was released in October 2010 and outlines how the program planned to meet all the statutory requirements established in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended. Expedited Rulemakings In November 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) adopted new procedures that enable certain rulemakings to be expedited or improve the efficiency of the rulemaking process:

314

CORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................................33 Staffing & workforce planningCORPORATE AND STRATEGIC PLANNING Faculty planning workbook Humanities, Law & Social Studies Outcomes from 2008/09 Confirmation of progress during 2009/10 Faculty planning for 2010/11 ­ 2012/13 #12

315

Proactive Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, rainwater harvesting, stream bank stabilization, and educational programs to prevent urban and agricultural nonpoint source pollution. Project leaders plan to have the Cedar Creek Watershed Protection Plan finalized by the summer of 2008. ?We... on watershed management, stream restoration practices, agricultural best man- agement practices, rainwater harvesting, non- point source pollution control, on-site septic system maintenance, and other water quality issues facing urban and rural...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to

317

Habitat Variability and Complexity in the Upper San Francisco Estuary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can be found in the salinity gradients of Suisun Marsh (diverse habitats and gradients in salinity, depth, and othershowed a strong gradient in salinity and other variables,

Moyle, Peter B; Lund, Jay R.; Bennett, William A; Fleenor, William E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A habitat-use model to determine essential fish habitat for juvenile brown shrimp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Farfantepenaeus aztecus) in Galveston Bay, Texas Randall D. Clark John D. Christensen Mark E. Monaco Biogeography Fisheries Science Center Laboratory National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA Galveston, Texas 77550- terns of habitat use in Galveston Bay, Texas. Sixteen years of quantitative density data were used

319

HOSPITAL LAUNDRY STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fighting cross infection in hospital linen. Service Bulletina marker organism in a hospital ward. Br. Med. J. ii: 282-E.R. (1959). Sluicing of hospital linen in automatic washing

Battles, Donald R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A Review of Water Conservation Planning for the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efficiency improvements, recycling, and reuse can be expanded be- yond projected levels. Key Findings by incorporating the full benefits of water recycling and reuse. Analysis underestimates economic value, and wastewater bills. This misses important cost savings that make many efficiency measures extremely cost

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................................................................15 E. Wind power................................................................................................................................................24 M. Fish and Wildlife

322

Introduction The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the Florida Panther National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Nancy M. Steigerwalt Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of Florida, Gainesville) will be collected. Seed will be germinated in plug trays in a controlled environment greenhouse. Stem and rhizome reduced misting and increased light, and further grown and aclimatized in the FLPNWR facility prior

Mazzotti, Frank

323

2009 RARE PLANT CONSERVATION INITIATIVE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (May 4, 2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

process Susan organize mtg by March 20, 2009 Use fall RPTC symposium 2 Prioritize the 32 B1 Important Lead/Team Process/Direction Timeline and Immediate Needs 1 Prioritize the 119 G1/G2 plant species values for CCLT CCLT table ­ mid-March 09 #12;2 # Recommended Action Lead/Team Process/Direction Timeline

324

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

325

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

326

CFN Ops Plan | Work Planning  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations Plan Operations Plan Work Planning & Control for Experiments and Operations All experimental work will be conducted in accordance with Work Planning and Control for Experiments and Operations, which ensures proper design and operation of all experiments prior to their commencement. CFN will use the SBMS provided standard form for the formal documentation. The Lead Experimenter/Responsible person will notify the Experimental Safety Review Committee of any new experiments or modifications to existing experiments. CFN will appoint an Experimental Safety Review Committee. This committee will consist of the Experiment Review Coordinator, CFN personnel, Facility Support Representative (FSR), Environmental Compliance Representative (ECR). Additional subject matter experts may be appointed on an ad-hoc

327

COMMONWEALTH OF PENNSYLVANIA STATE CONSERVATION COMMISSION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Plan Development Assistance and Financial Assistance................... 5 III. Review of Plans.......................................... 16 I. Plan Review and Approval ................................................................ 19 II...................................................................... A-16 IV. Plan Review Checklist

Guiltinan, Mark

328

The Essentials for GA Water Planning The Relationship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Plan and the Alabama-Florida-Georgia Water Sharing Dispute (The failure to agree on the two Management F. Conservation & Reuse a. Programs for Water Use Efficiency b. Consumptive Use & Return Flows GThe Essentials for GA Water Planning The Relationship Between the Proposed GA State Comprehensive

Rosemond, Amy Daum

329

SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMART WATER GRID PLAN B TECHNICAL REPORT FALL 2014 PREPARED BY: OLGA MARTYUSHEVA IN PARTIAL demand linked to the global population increase. A Smart Water Grid (SWG) is a two-way real time network, and others. A review of the benefits of Smart Water Grids is presented in the context of water conservation

Julien, Pierre Y.

330

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Wetlands Inventory Draft Strategic Plan: Conserving America's Wetlands for Future America's Wetlands for Future Generations Cover Photo: Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, on Virginia's Chesapeake Bay, showing combined climate change and other impacts on wetlands, with dead or dying trees from

Gray, Matthew

331

Compare Activities by Energy Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Compare Activities by ... Energy Conservation Inpatient health care buildings had the highest incidence of conservation features among all building types. For almost all building types, at least half of the buildings reported having a regularly scheduled maintenance program for the heating and/or cooling equipment. Reference: Definitions of Conservation Features Number of Buildings With Conservation Features by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Variable Air-Volume System Economizer Cycle HVAC Maintenance Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) Specular Reflector Electronic Ballasts All Buildings 4,657 550 567 2,786 460 843 2,167 Principal Building Activity Education 327 53 76 262 112 75 208 Food Sales 174

332

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

334

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) -Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

335

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 2011) January 2011) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

336

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OCTOBER 2010) OCTOBER 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

337

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PLANNING PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 6 Competition Requirements 4. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 5. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 6. FAR Part 9 Contractor Qualifications 7. FAR Part 10 Market Research 8. FAR Part 11 Describing Agency Needs 9. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 10. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 11. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 12. FAR 17 Special Contracting Methods 13. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 14. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 15. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy

338

Mathematical analysis of the optimal habitat configurations for species persistence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

susceptible to internal and external extinction factors. These theoretical results are supported that they are of two main types - ball-shaped or stripe-shaped. We formally prove that these optimal shapes depend that the optimal shape of the habitat realises a compromise between reducing the detrimental habitat edge effects

Hamel, François

339

RESEARCH ARTICLE Habitat variables explain Loggerhead Shrike occurrence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the spatial scales of habitat associations relevant to this species? Our study area was Fort Bliss Army are indicative of habitat quality in the vicinity of Fort Bliss. Local- and intermediate-scale variables best B. A. Locke Á D. Bash DPW, Division of Environment, IMWE-PWD-E, Bldg 624, Pleasanton Rd, Fort Bliss

Radeloff, Volker C.

340

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research Article Nesting Habitat Characteristics of the Marbled Murrelet in Central California 94720, USA Abstract The marbled murrelet (Brachyramphus marmoratus) is a threatened seabird that nests published on murrelet nesting habitat in the coast redwood (Sequoia sempervirens) region. Here we present

Mladenoff, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

31 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Department that the density of animals in a habitat #12;MEASURING HABITAT QUALITY · Johnson Trans. W. Sect. Wildl. Soc. 41

Johnson, Matthew

342

Biodiversity conservation and state sovereignty.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis examines the influence of contemporary approaches to biodiversity conservation on conceptions of state sovereignty over natural resources. Traditional approaches to state sovereignty have (more)

Echeverria, Hugo.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement C, White River Habitat Inventory, 1983 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 130 miles of stream fish habitat was inventoried and evaluated on the Mt. Hood National Forest during the first year of this multi-year project. First year tasks included field inventory and evaluation of habitat conditions on the White River and tributary streams thought to have the highest potential for supporting anadromous fish populations. All streams inventoried were located on the Mt. Hood National Forest. The surveyed area appears to contain most of the high quality anadromous fish habitat in the drainage. Habitat conditions appear suitable for steelhead, coho, and chinook salmon, and possibly sockeye. One hundred and twenty-four miles of potential anadromous fish habitat were identifed in the survey. Currently, 32 miles of this habitat would be readily accessible to anadromous fish. An additional 72 miles of habitat could be accessed with only minor passage improvement work. About 20 miles of habitat, however, will require major investment to provide fish passage. Three large lakes (Boulder, 14 acres; Badger, 45 acres; Clear, 550 acres) appear to be well-suited for rearing anadromous fish, although passage enhancement would be needed before self-sustaining runs could be established in any of the lakes.

Heller, David

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Diversity and conservation status of large branchiopods (Crustacea) in ponds of western Poland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A survey on temporary ponds has been conducted in search for large branchiopod crustaceans (Anostraca, Notostraca, Spinicaudata and Laevicaudata) in Wielkopolska province (western Poland). 728 pools have been studied and large branchiopods have been found in 221 of them. Seven species have been recorded, including three anostracans: Branchipus schaefferi, Chirocephalus shadini and Eubranchipus grubii; two notostracans: Lepidurus apus and Triops cancriformis; one spinicaudatan, Cyzicus tetracerus and one laevicaudatan, Lynceus brachyurus. According to the analysis of co-occurrence, the species form three groups, differing in habitat preferences and conservation status. The number of species shows that the diversity of globally threatened large branchiopods is still relatively high in the region. On the other hand, their conservation status is highly diverse and in most species unfavourable. Distribution of all species is highly clustered: large branchiopods have been generally found in 33 UTM squares (10נ10km) of 96 squares studied. However, only two species, i.e. E. grubii and L. apus occurred in more than five such squares and could be assessed as moderately widespread. Most water bodies inhabited by large branchiopods occur in groups forming patches of suitable habitats which are dispersed among prevailing seemingly unsuitable areas. Sustaining the existence of large metapopulations seems, therefore, to be essential for conservation of branchiopod species diversity. Field observations also bring some examples of human activities unintentionally supporting the branchiopod conservation.

Bart?omiej Go?dyn; Rafa? Bernard; Micha? Jan Czy?; Anna Jankowiak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

grazing systems on La Copita Research Area, Jim Wells County, Texas. 51 Pooled within-groups correlations between habitat variables and discriminant scores produced by canonical discriminant analysis for two separate comparisons of available and quail... slapped reality into me and Dr. Folse helped me to comprehend some complex analyses. Ben Koerth, Jim Mutz, Dave McKown, James Tepera, Dave Martin, and Chafer Lite kept my spirits high and my tail in gear while I was doing my field work. Ben's advice...

Wilkins, Robert Neal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - anadromus fish habitat Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

anadromus fish habitat Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anadromus fish habitat Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Sierra Nevada Ecosystem...

347

FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUSION OF HYPERSPECTRAL AND BATHYMETRY DATA FOR IMPROVED BENTHIC HABITAT MAPPING Maria C. Torres, coastal remote sensing, underwater unmixing, benthic habitat mapping, data fusion. #12;

Gilbes, Fernando

348

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Habitat for Humanity South...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL, Affordable DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, FL...

349

CAMBRIDGE ARCHITECTURAL RESEARCH LTD CONSERVATION DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other sources Statutory listings SECTION 5 PLANS 123 Key plan Site plan Chronological plan: 1969 Chronological plan: 1974 Chronological plan: 1982 Chronological plan: 1995 Chronological plan: 2004 Listed review How the Strategy is organised How to use the Strategy Updating the Strategy SECTION 1

Everest, Graham R

350

Energy Challenges and Conservation Achievements in the Aluminum Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The apparent danger and the emotional impact could prove to be a serious setback for the development of nuclear power. We are not certain yet whether President Carter and the Congress will attempt to write more meaningful energy legislation this year.... The lack of an aggressive, coordinated, national energy development plan is a disappointment. But it is not having a profound impact on the aluminum industry or Alcoa. We are doing a great deal to conserve energy and improve our operating methods...

Sheldon, A. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Buildings andConservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Buildings and

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

Reiser, Dudley W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

California Energy Resources Conservation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to retrofit state buildings to make them more energy efficient and to provide job skills training for workersCalifornia Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission It Is Not Fully Prepared Audits (bureau) concerning the preparedness of the California Energy Resources Conservation

354

Conservation Farming in New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In contrast, conservation tillage is any tillage or planting practice that maintains at least 30% crop residue of conventional tillage is wind and water erosion. Additionally, cultivation increases oxidation of soil organic Costs Conservation tillage provides cost savings in three principal areas: energy, time and labor

Johnson, Eric E.

355

Tax-Advantaged Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plans Tax-Advantaged Plans A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact...

356

Life in a patchy world: species-habitat relationships link macroalgal communities to higher trophic levels in temperate rocky reefs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algae creates significant habitat for small, mobile invertebrates that fuelalgae creates significant habitat for small, mobile invertebrates that fuel

Mahoney, Brenna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate 90,000 Program Info Expiration Date 11/29/2013 State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Rebate Amount 50 percent of eligible costs Ontario is supporting local energy planning by introducing the Municipal Energy Plan (MEP) program. The MEP program is designed to help municipalities better understand their local energy needs and conservation opportunities, set goals and develop implementation plans. A MEP takes an integrated approach to energy planning by aligning energy, infrastructure and land use planning. MEPs will help municipalities:

358

Conserving Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Guidelines » Conserving Energy Conserving Energy Conserving Energy During an energy emergency, customers can reduce stress on infrastructure by conserving energy. This will help you and your community recover more quickly. Officials can ask the public to conserve energy, including: Cutting back on driving, using public transportation, and telecommuting when possible; Refraining from using non-essential lights and appliances, especially during peak hours (typically around 4:00-6:00 p.m.); and Lowering thermostat and water heating settings. Officials can ask transmission operators to activate demand-response programs in regions where those programs have been established. Under these programs, end-users are compensated to reduce their demand on the system

359

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Palm Bay Palm Bay Location: City Palm Bay FL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a sustainability and energy master plan (completed); 2) energy efficiency audits at seven municipal facilities; 5) energy efficient retrofits at six municipal buildings; 3) community-wide greenhouse gas inventory; 4) review and upgrade existing building codes; 5) municipal building retrofits to include interior lighting retrofits, upgrade appliances, building management system design proposal and retrofits, solar water heaters, and parking lot LED conversions; 6) installation of electric car charging stations at strategic locations in city; 7) residential light bulb exchange program; and 8) technical consultant services for energy efficiency website

360

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

NJ-City-Paterson NJ-City-Paterson Location: City Paterson NJ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Conduct energy audits on city buildings; 2) develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy that will identify buildings eligible for free/reduced energy audits and where matching funds can be sought to maximize energy retrofits, prepare climate action plan, pre-feasibility studies, and conceptual design and develop a program for the Paterson Renewable Energy Education Center to be located in the historic district; and 3) energy efficiency retrofits to be defined after audits are completed (Activity 3 Excluded from NEPA Approval) Conditions: None-NEPA APPROVAL EXCLUDES RETROFITS IN ACTIVITY 3 Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IA-City-Des Moines IA-City-Des Moines Location: City Des Moines IA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Reimbursement for the cost of preparing the energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) perform energy audits to benchmark the energy performance of municipal buildings and fund public education/outreach campaign, 3) revolving loan program for energy efficiency retrofits and incremental costs for purchasing hybrid vehicles, 4) energy efficiency window retrofits at City Hall and the Police Station, 5) fund program to increase cycling and walking opportunities in the city including safety training and bicycle rodeo, 6) technical consultant services to develop long-term energy plan, 7) technical services to assist with building energy audits, and 8) replace high pressure sodium lighting with light-emitting diode

362

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IL-City-Champaign IL-City-Champaign Location: City Champaign IL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) technical consultant to coordinate technical work on retrofit work in Activities 6 and 7, 3) technical consultant to assist in developing Sustainability Plan, 4) audit program for non-profit groups, 5) grants to non-profit groups for energy efficient upgrades (attic and ceiling insulation; replace cooling units and/or furnaces; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) maintenance and replacement; upgrade lighting; replace boiler; air sealing; replace/insulate water heaters; replace/install pneumatic controls), 6) energy efficient retrofits at

363

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The All Mission Indian Housing Authority (AMIHA), with input from the La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians (DUNS 172879231), proposes to utilize the services of a technical consultant to assist the Tribe with developing a Tribal Energy Plan which will include a chapter on energy efficiency and conservation and also conduct as many residential and tribal building audits as funding would allow. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

364

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AK-TRIBE-NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA AK-TRIBE-NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Ninilchik Village of Alaska proposes to 1) develop a planning document and strategy to address the needs of the community; 2) conduct home energy audit assessment surveys; 3) disseminate information on energy conservation, weatherization, and alternative energy usage for the tribe and the community; 4) perform assessments and data collection to measure change and success of the programs from those attending the Home Energy Education training course and develop a GIS database; 5) perform community outreach to distribute information through local newsletters and training programs.

365

IDAHO HABITAT EVALUATION FOR OFFSITE MITIGATION RECORD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy Mitigation Record, Annual Report FY 1984, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1984BP13381, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act. The Clearw

366

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7.1 (May 2010) 7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 13. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy Guiding Principles

367

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

--Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) --Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles

368

Maps and Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shrouded door to box seats. Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing Places 20.1 Rose / Maps and Plans Re-Placing PlacesMaps and Plans Thomas Rose Architectural plans create the

Rose, Thomas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Project Based Energy Conservation vs. Management Based Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic American Foods (BAF) is the largest potato dehydrator worldwide. This paper will trace the shift from a Project Based to Management Based energy conservation program. Second only to raw material, energy is one of the highest expenses at BAF...

Judy, K.; O'Brien, S.

372

Annual Training Plan Template  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

373

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ireland's Global University MSc World Heritage Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for conservation · Cultural heritage, sustainable development and diversity · Global biodiversity and heritageIreland's Global University MSc World Heritage Conservation (Three Years Part Time) (Online facing conservation challenges, there is a growing need for professionals who understand how

375

Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is approximately 1.52 miles long. The site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Defense for underground nuclear testing in the 1960s. The site was decontaminated, remediated, and decommissioned in 1972, and all buildings and equipment were removed at that time. Two small, shallow pockets of contamination were left for remediation by natural attenuation. A subsequent remedial investigation was completed in 1999. Final site

376

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

377

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Posted By Office of Public Affairs Guy painter Girl painter A number of Pantexans volunteered Friday, March 30, to help renovate two

378

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eisenhower Consortium Bulletin 12 September 1982 RIPARIAN HABITATS AND RECREATION recreational pressures on these ecotones between water and surrounding uplands are forcing management agencies and Recreational History ............................................... 4 Impacts to Riparian Ecosystems

379

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. DOEZERHManateeCountyHabitat2013 More Documents & Publications DOE Zero...

380

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

COMPLETION REPORT Identifying Habitats for Greater Sage-Grouse Population  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,093 km2 Atlantic Rim Project Area (ARPA) of south-central, Wyoming, which is being developed for coalbed methane natural gas (CBNG) resources. To reach our objective we modeled habitat selection, as resource

Beck, Jeffrey L.

383

Communications on energy Household energy conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study assesses the influence of attitudinal and socio-economic factors on household energy conservation actions. A household interview survey in Regina, Saskatchewan found that respondents perceive an energy problem, although no association with energy conservation actions was determined. Two attitudinal and five socio-economic variables influence household energy conservation. Energy and monetary savings are available to households through energy conservation. Public awareness of household energy conservation through the media can reinforce existing energy conservation actions and encourage new actions.

Fred A. Curtis; P. Simpson-Housley; S. Drever

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Impacts of habitat fragmentation on neotropical migrants in east Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF SCIENCE December 1996 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences IMPACTS OF HABITAT FRAGMENTATION ON NEOTROPICAL MIGRANTS IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by ALIX DENISE DOWLING Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... and Fisheries Sciences ABSTRACT Impacts of Habitat Fragmentation on Neotropical Migrants in East Texas. (December 1996) Alix Denise Dowling, B. S. , Indiana University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. I&eith Arnold In this study, point counts were used...

Dowling, Alix Denise

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Water Conservation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Water Conservation Water Conservation Water Conservation Mission The team facilitates the reduction of water consumption intensity at LM sites in support of requirements of Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, as approved by LM. The Water Conservation Team advocates natural resource sustainability by continually improving water use efficiencies. Scope LM and the contractor evaluate, make recommendations, and implement approved programs to maintain and operate its buildings and facilities in a manner that beneficially reduces water use, loss, and waste at LM sites. The team strives to reduce water use intensity annually. Water efficiency

386

Energy Conservation in Process Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY CONSERVATION IN PROCESS HEATERS Roger l~. Bagge Neste Engineering Porvoo, Finland ABSTRACT OPTIMIZATION OF EMER~Y USE Energy savings in refinery and petrochemical fired heaters can basically be achieved in two ways: Thru optimization...

Bagge, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

California's Energy Policy: Conservation Works  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation is the foundation of California's energy policy and the largest single source of the state's 'new energy supply'. Our goal is to use economic market forces and government programs to direct energy Investments away from our current...

Greene, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Athletic Fields and Water Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following an 18-step procedure for performing an irrigation audit will help athletic field managers conserve water while maintaining a pleasing facility for recreational use. To perform the audit correctly, a field manager must determine the answers...

Taylor, Gene R.; White, Richard; Abernathy, Scott; Smith, David

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

390

The Universally Conserved Prokaryotic GTPases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...broadly conserved and indispensable proteins that are crucial for fundamental...potential target because of its disordered C terminus (10). Intrinsically disordered proteins exist as dynamic structural ensembles without fixed secondary structures...

Natalie Verstraeten; Maarten Fauvart; Wim Verses; Jan Michiels

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Energy Conservation in Sensor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Energy Conservation in Sensor and Sensor-Actuator Networks Ivan Stojmenovic 4 wireless network, and must work unattended. The limited energy budget at the individual sensor level

Stojmenovic, Ivan

392

Energy Conservation in Public Buildings  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Energy Conservation and Sustainable Buildings Act requires the use of energy-efficient equipment and design, and solar energy devices for heating and cooling state buildings where life...

393

Commutation Relations and Conservation Laws  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of a physical system to external electromagnetic and gravitational fields, as embodied in the electric current and stress tensor conservation laws, is used to derive the equal-time commutation relations for charge density and energy density.

Julian Schwinger

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the Montana Grass Conservation Commission to coordinate between the Department and Conservation Districts

395

Conserving Electric Energy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conserving Electric Energy Conserving Electric Energy A classroom activity whereby students participate in two experiments in which they gain an appreciation for their dependency...

396

Avian Conservation Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Avian Conservation ResourcesLegal Abstract Resources and...

397

Energy Conservation & Behavior Modification Programs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and general public ?Teaches occupants to become more energy conscious and take the message of conservation and sustainability to those around them ?Seeks to engage and empower and provide organized leadership opportunities ?Built upon our culture..., and general public ?Teaches occupants to become more energy conscious and take the message of conservation and sustainability to those around them ?Seeks to engage and empower and provide organized leadership opportunities ?Built upon our culture...

Goodin, E.; Hanner, S.; Mitchel, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure sumamry for the Uranium Treatment Unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This closure summary has been prepared for the Uranium Treatment Unit (UTU) located at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The actions required to achieve closure of the UTU area are outlined in the Closure Plan, submitted to and approved by the Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation staff, respectively. The UTU was used to store and treat waste materials that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This closure summary details all steps that were performed to close the UTU in accordance with the approved plan.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

City of Aspen Climate Action Plan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aspen Climate Action Plan Aspen Climate Action Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Aspen Climate Action Plan Agency/Company /Organization City of Aspen Sector Energy, Water, Land Focus Area Buildings, Commercial, Residential, Offsets and Certificates, Economic Development, Goods and Materials - Embodied Energy, Industry - Industrial Processes, Greenhouse Gas, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Renewable Energy, Biomass - Biofuels, Biomass, Geothermal, Water Power, Biomass - Landfill Gas, Solar, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar Pv, Wind Phase Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Create Early Successes Resource Type Case studies/examples Availability Free - Publicly Available Publication Date 5/1/2007

400

Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Jump to: navigation, search Name Antigua and Barbuda-Regional Implementation Plan for CARICOM's Climate Change Resilience Framework Agency/Company /Organization Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), United Kingdom Department for International Development, Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) Partner Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC), Caribbean Community Heads of State (CARICOM) Sector Climate, Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Food Supply, Forestry, Water Conservation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, - Health, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Market analysis, Pathways analysis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Open Platform of Climate-Smart Planning Instruments | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Climate-Smart Planning Instruments of Climate-Smart Planning Instruments Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Platform of Climate-Smart Planning Instruments Agency/Company /Organization World Bank, Korean Trust Fund Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Food Supply, Forestry, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Grid Assessment and Integration, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment, Technology characterizations

402

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate and Air Pollution Planning Assistant (CAPPA) Agency/Company /Organization: ICLEI Sector: Climate Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Buildings, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, - Anaerobic Digestion, Ground Source Heat Pumps, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, Wind, Transportation, Forestry, People and Policy, Water Conservation, Offsets and Certificates, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Guide/manual User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.icleiusa.org/action-center/tools/cappa-decision-support-tool/

403

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs Newsletter HabitatsHabitats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of New Hampshire Cooperative Extension · Forestry, Wildlife and Water Resources Programs. Conservation organizations have encouraged the planting of autumn olive for erosion control and wildlife food (dispersed by a bird or the wind, or planted by a gardener), native plants suffer. The diversity of the site

New Hampshire, University of

404

MTRG/Ascension Management Plan 2002 SECTION 5: THREATS AND RECOMMENDED MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MTRG/Ascension Management Plan 2002 14 SECTION 5: THREATS AND RECOMMENDED MANAGEMENT and control of pet cats 8) Continuation of ban on harvest of turtle products We give an account of all threats.1 General Habitat Degradation 5.1.1. Mining of Beach Sand 5.1.2. Light Pollution 5.1.3 Threat of Fuel Spill

Exeter, University of

405

PROJECT MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MANAGEMENT PLANS MANAGEMENT PLANS Project Management Plans  Overview  Project Management Plan Suggested Outline Subjects  Crosswalk between the Suggested PMP Outline Subjects and a Listing of Project Planning Elements  Elements of Deactivation Project Planning  Examples From Project Management Plans Overview The purpose here is to assist project managers and project planners in creating a project plan by providing examples and pointing to information that have been successfully used by others in the past. Section 4.2 of DOE Guide 430.1-3, DEACTIVATION IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE discusses the content and purpose of deactivation project management plans. It is presented as a suggested outline followed by other potential subjects. For the convenience of readers, that information is repeated below.

406

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Multiplex modeling of physical habitat for endangered freshwater mussels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quantification of the potential habitat available for endangered freshwater mussels can be a challenging task, as habitat use criteria are very complex and often only low numbers of species observations are available. To address this problem in a riverine environment, we developed a concept of a multivariate, multi-scale, and multi-model (multiplex) habitat simulation through combining multivariate time-series analysis of complex hydraulics (CART and logistic regression), micro-scale (River2D), and meso-scale (MesoHABSIM) habitat models, to develop macro-scale management criteria. This concept has been applied and tested on the Upper Delaware River (USA) for the protection and enhancement of existing populations of Alasmidonta heterodon, an endangered freshwater mussel. The physical habitat conditions of approximately 125km of the Delaware River were described using digital aerial imagery and ground-based surveys. The temporal and spatial variabilities of complex hydraulics simulated by a River2D model at 1547 locations were statistically analyzed to select ranges of attributes that corresponded to mussel presence. We applied these criteria to the river's meso-scale hydromorphological unit mappings to identify suitable mesohabitats, which then served as a calibration data set for the coarser scale model. The final meso-scale model's predictions were hydraulically validated offering encouraging results. The meso-scale habitat suitability criteria defined moderately deep, slow-flowing, and non-turbulent hydromorphologic units as providing good conditions for A. heterodon. All three of the developed suitability models (descriptive statistics, CART and logistic regression model) indicated the species preference for hydraulically stable habitats.

Piotr Parasiewicz; Elena Castelli; Joseph N. Rogers; Ethan Plunkett

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

BL4268 Conservation and Management of Biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BL4268 ­ Conservation and Management of Biodiversity Conservation of biological diversity is one understanding of some of the current issues associated with conservation and biodiversity management. Emphasis decision makers and the general public. Why is biodiversity important? What should be conserved? Alfredo F

Brierley, Andrew

409

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to energy conservation. The Springfield, Illinois Cityof Illinois, 1977. Public Reactions to Wind Energy Devices.

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Implementation Plan and Schedule; 2005-2010, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kootenai River white sturgeon have been declining for at least 50 years and extinction of the wild population is now imminent (Paragamian et al. 2005). Only 630 adults were estimated to remain in 2002 from a population ten times that size just 20 years ago. Significant recruitment of young sturgeon has not been observed since the early 1970s and consistent annual recruitment has not been seen since the 1950s. The remaining wild population consists of a cohort of large, old fish that is declining by about 9% per year as fish die naturally and are not replaced. At this rate, the wild population will disappear around the year 2040. Numbers have already reached critical low levels where genetic and demographic risks are acute. The Kootenai River White Sturgeon Recovery Team was convened in 1994, provided a draft Recovery Plan in 1996 and the first complete Recovery Plan for Kootenai River white sturgeon in 1999 (USFWS 1996, 1999). The Plan outlined a four part strategy for recovery, including: (1) measures to restore natural recruitment, (2) use of conservation aquaculture to prevent extinction, (3) monitoring survival and recovery, and (4) updating and revising recovery plan criteria and objectives as new information becomes available. Sturgeon recovery efforts are occurring against a backdrop of a broader ecosystem protection and restoration program for the Kootenai River ecosystem. With abundance halving time of approximately 8 years, the Kootenai River white sturgeon population is rapidly dwindling, leaving managers little time to act. Decades of study consistently indicate that recruitment failure occurs between embryo and larval stages. This assertion is based on four key observations. First, almost no recruitment has occurred during the last 30 years. Second, thousands of naturally produced white sturgeon embryos, most viable, have been collected over the past decade, resulting from an estimated 9 to 20 spawning events each year. Third, Kootenai River white sturgeon spawning has been documented during most years from 1990 through 2005. Finally, no larvae and very few wild juveniles have been collected during recent decades despite years of intensive sampling. Concurrently, post-release hatchery reared juveniles (as young as 9 months of age at release) consistently exhibit successful growth and survival (Ireland et al. 2002). Recruitment has failed, in part because fish are currently spawning at sites where or when conditions appear unsuitable for successful incubation and early rearing. Research to date suggests that recruitment failure is caused by egg or larval suffocation, predation and/or other mortality factors associated with these early life stages. A variety of interrelated factors have clearly contributed to the decline of Kootenai white sturgeon; various hypotheses for recruitment failure are not mutually exclusive. Anders et al. (2002) suggested that Kootenai River white sturgeon recruitment failure is likely the result of additive mortality from: (1) increased predation efficiencies due to low turbidity, velocity, and an relative increase in predatory fishes, (2) a reduced number of eggs produced by a dwindling spawning population, and (3) spawning in habitat lacking interstitial space (embryo suffocation). Quite simply, the combined egg and embryo mortality from all biotic and abiotic factors kills more eggs and embryos than the dwindling wild population is currently capable of producing. Thus, natural recruitment failure appears to be caused by some combination of habitat and stock limitation, by the mechanisms mentioned above. Although past research has helped narrow the range of possible causes of natural recruitment failure, the relative significance of each potential impact remains uncertain because multiple ecological, biological, and physical habitat changes occurred simultaneously. This makes it difficult to choose among competing hypotheses and difficult to know where exactly to focus recovery efforts for maximum benefit. In an ideal world, specific recovery measures would be identified and imple

Anders, Paul

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organizations quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

Carlsbad Field Office

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conservation Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint to a Voluntary Price Premium * By Matthew J. Kotchen y Department of Economics Williams College and Michael R. Moore School of Natural Resources & Environment University of Michigan October 19, 2004 We are grateful for helpful comments from Jim Andreoni, Jon Bakija, Bill Gentry, Joe Herriges, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Steve Polasky, Steve Salant, Lucie Schmidt, Joel Slemrod, Klaas van ' t Veld, and seminar participants at the University of Minnesota, Williams College, Yale University, and the 2004 NBER Workshop on Public Policy and the Environment. This research was supported in part by a grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. y Corresponding author: Department of Economics, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267; Email: mkotchen@williams.edu; Telephone (413) 597-2101; Fax (413) 597-4045. Conservation

413

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In 1965 the Solid Waste Disposal Act [Public Law (Pub. L.) 89-72] was enacted to improve solid waste disposal methods. It was amended in 1970 by the Resource Recovery Act (Pub. L. 91-512), which provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with funding for resource recovery programs. However, that Act had little impact on the management and ultimate disposal of hazardous waste. In 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Pub. L. 94-580). RCRA established a system for managing non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Specifically, it provides for the management of hazardous wastes from the point of origin to the point of final disposal (i.e., "cradle to grave"). RCRA also promotes resource recovery and waste minimization.

414

Building Energy Conservation in China  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Energy Conservation in China Building Energy Conservation in China Speaker(s): Zhang Fulin Date: January 29, 2013 - 11:15am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Haley Gilbert Mr. Zhang Fulin is a Senior Engineer and Director of the Division of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Science &Technology of the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) in China. He is tasked with developing China building energy conservation policies and regulations and is responsible for the approval of major China building energy efficiency projects. Mr. Zhang has been working in the field of building energy efficiency for more than two decades. He will speak about current laws and regulations governing building energy efficiency practice in China,

415

Water conservation behavior in Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ensuring a nation's long term water supply requires the use of both supply-sided approaches such as water augmentation through water recycling, and demand-sided approaches such as water conservation. Conservation behavior can only be increased if the key drivers of such behavior are understood. The aim of this study is to reveal the main drivers from a comprehensive pool of hypothesized factors. An empirical study was conducted with 3094 Australians. Data was analyzed using multivariate linear regression analysis and decision trees to determine which factors best predict self-reported water conservation behavior. Two key factors emerge: high level of pro-environmental behavior; and pro-actively seeking out information about water. A number of less influential factors are also revealed. Public communication strategy implications are derived.

Sara Dolnicar; Anna Hurlimann; Bettina Grn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

LANS DB PENSION PLAN  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

December 2010 December 2010 u:\my documents\pension plan\revised tcp1 db plan spd dec 2010.doc LANS Defined Benefit Pension Plan Summary Plan Description This Summary Plan Description (SPD) is intended to provide a summary of the principal features of the LANS Defined Benefit Pension Plan ("Plan") and is not meant to interpret, extend or change the Plan in any way. This SPD will continue to be updated. Please check back on a regular basis for the most recent version. Nothing in the Plan and/or this SPD shall be construed as giving any member the right to be retained in service with LANS or any affiliated company, or as a guarantee of any rights or benefits under the Plan. LANS, in its sole discretion, reserves the right to amend the SPD or Plan, or to terminate the Plan, at any time.

417

Knowledge Preconditions for Plans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Original Articles Knowledge Preconditions for Plans ERNEST DAVIS...of time and a possible worlds model of knowledge. The definitions strictly subsume previous...semantics of plans|formal theory of knowledge.| Knowledge Preconditions for Plans......

ERNEST DAVIS

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

STRATEGIC TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STRATEGIC TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN Prepared in Support of the 2007. Blevins #12; i ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The 2007 Strategic Transmission Investment Plan was prepared Investment Plan. California Energy Commission, Engineering Office. CEC7002007018CTF. #12; ii #12; iii

419

STRATEGIC TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION STRATEGIC TRANSMISSION INVESTMENT PLAN Prepared in Support of the 2007 Investment Plan was prepared with contribution from the following Energy Commission staff and consultants Kondoleon, Chuck Najarian. 2007 Strategic Transmission Investment Plan. California Energy Commission

420

ISSUANCE 2014-12-11: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ISSUANCE 2014-12-31: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers, Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers, Final Rule

422

ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

423

Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration a Roadmap for Venus Exploration (RVE) that is consistent with VEXAG priorities as well as Planetary Decadal Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology

Rathbun, Julie A.

424

Habitat Management -- Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Invasive Species Publications Wildlife What's New Habitat Management Some of the documents on this page are in Portable Document Format (PDF) and can only be viewed with Adobe Acrobat Reader. You can download a free copy from the Adobe site. The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) is covered with mostly contiguous native eastern deciduous hardwood forest. Within that framework are found many ecological communities (e.g., cedar barrens, river bluffs, wetlands) with unique biota, often including rare species. Many research park habitats are managed to protect their ecosystem values, furnish food and shelter for wildlife, and provide sites for research and monitoring. Habitats that receive special attention include prairies, forests, and wetlands and riparian areas.

425

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Marine Resources Commission The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches, and other shores. A permit from the Commission is required to dredge, fill, or otherwise disturb these

426

Integrating Habitat Fragmentation Analysis into Transportation Planning Using the Effective Mesh Size Landscape Metric  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Technology Zurich (ETH Zurich), Switzerland with Prof.Kiel, Germany and at the ETH Zurich, and received his Ph.D.Environmental Sciences at the ETH Zurich. He held a position

Girvetz, Evan H; Thorne, James H.; Berry, Alison M; Jaeger, Jochen A.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

4865 recreation planning [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

landsc. plan. pol. recr....(Development of policies, strategies and measures for the provision of recreation areas and facilities; ? urban area recreation planning ...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Marketing Planning: Feeniks Koulu.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Degree Thesis Marketing Planning: Feeniks Koulu demonstrates structured marketing planning process with the help of case company Feeniks Koulu. The central idea of Thesis is (more)

Raut, Biranjan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Changes in Habitat and Populations of Steelhead Trout, Coho Salmon, and Chinook Salmon in Fish Creek, Oregon; Habitat Improvement, 1983-1987 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, began in 1982 as a cooperative venture between the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (1982-1987) to be financed with Forest Service funds. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to cooperatively fund work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is guided by the Fish Creek Habitat Rehabilitation-Enhancement Framework developed cooperatively by the Estacada Ranger District, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Pacific Northwest Research Station. The framework examines potential factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin, and the appropriate habitat improvement measures needed to address the limiting factors. Habitat improvement work in the basin has been designed to: (1) improve quantity, quality, and distribution of spawning habitat for coho and spring chinook salmon and steelhead trout, (2) increase low flow rearing habitat for steelhead trout and coho salmon, (3) improve overwintering habitat for coho salmon and steelhead trout, (4) rehabilitate riparian vegetation to improve stream shading to benefit all species, and (5) evaluate improvement projects from a drainage wide perspective. The objectives of the evaluation include: (1) Drainage-wide evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Benefit-cost analysis of habitat improvements.

Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B.; Cain, Thomas C. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Biodiversity Conservation: Challenges Beyond 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...areas can be an effective tool for conserving biodiversity...progress in developing valuation techniques that quantify...visibility achieved by energy and climate change as issues...Vaissiere B. E. , Economic valuation of the vulnerability...Pathways to 2050: Energy and Climate Change...

Michael R. W. Rands; William M. Adams; Leon Bennun; Stuart H. M. Butchart; Andrew Clements; David Coomes; Abigail Entwistle; Ian Hodge; Valerie Kapos; Jrn P. W. Scharlemann; William J. Sutherland; Bhaskar Vira

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

431

Energy Conservation and the Optical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Conservation and the Optical Theorem P Scott Carney I INTRODUCTION nservation of energy;Acknowledgments · John Scotland · Emil Wolf · Girish Agarwal #12;References · D R Lytle II, P S Carney, J C power · Power extinguished= Power not in incident mode the volume integral as Ps = - 4 k0 Im V d3 r k2

432

Conservation and Global Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

Landweber, Laura

433

Conservation of Ca2+ /Calmodulin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation of Ca2+ /Calmodulin Regulation across Na and Ca2+ Channels Manu Ben-Johny,1 Philemon S-gated Na and Ca2+ channels comprise distinct ion channel superfamilies, yet the carboxy tails of these channels exhibit high homology, hinting at a long-shared and purposeful module. For different Ca2+ channels

Niebur, Ernst

434

Conservation Laws in Weak Interactions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

Notes are presented on four lectures given at Harvard University in March 1957 on elementary particle physics, the theta-tau problem, validity of parity conservation, tests for invariance under P, C, and T, and the two-component theory of the neutrino. (W.D.M.)

Lee, T. D.

1957-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

435

Prioritizing conservation investments for mammal species globally  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with the greatest risk of habitat loss...necessarily chosen for investment [20]. The choice...circumstances a more risk-averse approach to investment allocation will...the likelihood of investment success associated with political instability [79...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Conservation: Tactics for a Constant Crisis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...grazing, farming, energy production...purification and storage, habitat for...valued, such valuation is often left...increasing number of tools with which to...chemical and energy inputs (59...are germplasm storage facilities such...

MICHAEL E. SOUL

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

An Evolutionary Basis for Conservation Strategies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Community, the Environment, and a Sustainable Future (Beacon, Boston, 1989...strategically located islands and other real estate where secure facilities could be...island-like habitats and, just as on real islands, major extinctions are...

TERRY L. ERWIN

1991-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

438

Marine Biodiversity Conservation and Management in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coastal marine ecosystems play a vital role in India ... their natural resources, potential habitats, and wide biodiversity. India has a long coastline of 8...2...which is an important area both for explorat...

P. Nammalwar; V. S. Gowri; S. Satheesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Among- and within-patch components of genetic diversity respond at different rates to habitat fragmentation: an empirical demonstration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Among- and within-patch components of genetic diversity respond...both these responses to decreased habitat patch connectivity (Soule 1972; Hanfling Brandl...effects of habitat fragmentation and habitat patch isolation, this phenomenon has not previously...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Flooding and conservation in the Albuquerque bosque  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the conservation of the Middle Rio Grande bosque has grown rapidly in the last decade. During that period, private organizations as well as governmental agencies have sharpened their focus on the issue, and in doing so have contributed to the development of a bosque biological management plan for the river reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir. This increased regional attention reflects a growing national and international concern about human impacts on fluvial processes in large floodplain rivers. Because they impound large amounts of a river`s discharge and interfere with its natural flooding regime, dams can seriously disrupt the relationship between river basin hydrology and riparian zone functioning. In western North America, this interference reduces cottonwood germination and survival and, as will be discussed, negatively affects key ecological processes in riparian communities. In this paper the authors first review how the decoupling of basin hydrology from riparian forest processes has begun to affect the integrity of the Middle Rio Grande bosque ecosystem. Then they propose an alternative management scheme, with emphasis on the Albuquerque bosque, that centers on restoring its ecosystem functioning.

Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C. Jr.; Valett, H.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Mapping red squirrel (Sciurus vulgaris) habitat suitability using GIS and remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The British red squirrel population has dramatically declined in the last years. The survival of the species in the UK may depend on the careful selection and management of suitable habitats. A deep understanding of its habitat requirements...

de Lamo, Xavier

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

High-Performance Affordable Housing with Habitat for Humanity- Building America Top Innovation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Innovations profile describes Building America support of Habitat for Humanity including researchers who wrote Habitat construction guides and teams that have worked with affiliates on numerous field projects.

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - area habitat evaluation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

loss and fragmentation impacts... into populations that are too small to be self-sustaining. I Areas of habitats are so small that the core area... by creating new habitats...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing habitat quality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

< 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 HABITAT QUALITY: A BRIEF REVIEW FOR WILDLIFE BIOLOGISTS MATTHEW D. JOHNSON,1 Summary: There are 2 basic approaches to conceptualizing how to measure habitat...

445

Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1! Motion Planning ! Jana Kosecka! Department of Computer Science! ·Discrete planning, graph search://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien! Discrete Planning! · Review of some discrete planning methods! · Given state space is discrete) ! · Use well developed search and graph traversal algorithms to find the path! · Path: set

Kosecka, Jana

446

Climate change action plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

447

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid fitness across time and habitats Michael L. Arnold1 and Noland H. Martin2 1 Department­San Marcos, San Marcos, TX 78666, USA There has been considerable debate about the role of hybrids in the evolutionary process. One question has involved the relative fitness of hybrid versus non-hybrid genotypes

Aspbury, Andrea S. - Department of Biology, Texas State University

448

SAND AND GRAVEL MINING IN COLORADO RIPARIAN HABITATS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mines, but Western Colorado sand and gravel mining is also discussed. The similarities and differencesSAND AND GRAVEL MINING IN COLORADO RIPARIAN HABITATS Ma rk A. He i fner Supervising Mined Land Reclamation Specialist Colorado Division of Mined Land Reclamation 723 Centennial Building 1313 Sherman

449

Research Note Summer Habitat Use by Snowshoe Hare and Mountain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Key words habitat, Lepus americanus, New Mexico, subalpine conifer forest, Sylvilagus nuttallii and mostly anecdotal evidence suggests that it is restricted to high-elevation, subalpine conifer forests.) and pin~on pine (Pinus spp.) woodlands and middle-elevation montane conifer forests, which are dominated

450

IBIS Habitat Types Westside Lowlands Conifer-Hardwood Forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix C IBIS Habitat Types Westside Lowlands Conifer-Hardwood Forest Christopher B. Chappell elevations is Montane Mixed Conifer Forest. Along the coastline, it often occurs adjacent to Coastal Dunes and Beaches. In southwestern Oregon, it may border Southwest Oregon Mixed Conifer-Hardwood Forest. The primary

451

Biodiversity as spatial insurance: the effects of habitat fragmentation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

habitat destruction (e.g. strip min- ing or clear cutting of forests), conversion to agri- culture (e.g. conversion of grasslands to croplands or rangelands, or conversion of forests to planta- tions that these effects may be weaker or masked by other covarying factors in the environ- ment (Grace et al. 2007, Hector

Gonzalez, Andrew

452

Urban Forest Management Plan Samuel O. Oludunfe, BSF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#101, ISA #WE5889A, State Urban Forester, California Dept. of Forestry & Fire Protection; Charles E Conservation Policies 15 4.2.1. Tree Inventory 15 4.2.2. Tree Pruning and Tree Removal 20 4.2.3. Protection as "...the sustained planning, planting, protection, maintenance, and care of trees, forests, greenspace

Tsien, Roger Y.

453

White Salmon Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Northwest Power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i White Salmon Subbasin Plan 5/28/2004 Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Wildlife Heather Simmons-Rigdon, Yakama Nation White Nation, Steve VanderPloeg, WDFW, Lee VanTussenbrook, WDFW, and Joe Zendt, Yakama Nation White Salmon

454

White Salmon Subbasin Plan Prepared for the Northwest Power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;White Salmon Subbasin Plan 5/28/2004 Prepared for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council Rawding, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife Wildlife Heather Simmons-Rigdon, Yakama Nation White Nation, Steve VanderPloeg, WDFW, Lee VanTussenbrook, WDFW, and Joe Zendt, Yakama Nation White Salmon

455

Resource Conservation in Snack Food Processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

perceived as "free" by the manufacturing function. This perception, and the resulting practices, has resulted in significant opportunity for resource conservation. This paper describes Frito-Lay's Resource Conservation program, which is a nation...

Perry, L. E.; Meyers, G. R.

456

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

programs) · Audience: homeowners Outcome 4: Increase water reuse and recycling programs · Example program: Water harvesting ­ rain barrels and cisterns · Audience: home owners #12;: Water conservation. Conserve Florida's finite water resources by teaching rural, suburban and urban

Kane, Andrew S.

457

Conserve Energy by Optimizing Air Compressor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the plant would have to substantially increase the product shipments. This is not always possible; however, conserving energy is nearly always possible. How should one begin an energy conservation program within a major Industrial Plant? The same as any...

Williams, V. A.

458

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

Allard, Donna

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Avian Habitat Response to Grazing, Haying, and Biofuels Production in Native Warm-Season Forages in the Mid-South.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Declines in grassland birds have been attributed to loss of habitat, habitat degradation, and changes in land management. In the Mid-South, pasture and hayfield (more)

Birckhead, Jessie Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System (Redirected from LEAP) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Long range Energy Alternatives Planning (LEAP) System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Long range Energy Alternatives Planning System Agency/Company /Organization: Stockholm Environment Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, - Anaerobic Digestion, - Biofuels, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, - Central Plant, Food Supply, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, - Embodied Energy, - Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Ground Source Heat Pumps, Hydrogen, Industry, - Industrial Processes, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water, - Solar PV, - Solar Ventilation Preheat, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power, Wind

462

Conservation Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Logo: Conservation Technologies Name Conservation Technologies Address 4804 Oneota St Place Duluth, Minnesota Zip 55807 Sector Solar Product solar electric systems Phone number (218) 722-9003 Website http://www.conservtech.com/ Coordinates 46.7398823°, -92.1566468° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.7398823,"lon":-92.1566468,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

463

ESPC ENABLE: Energy Conservation Measures (ECMs) Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation slide outlining details on the energy conservation measures (ECMs) offered throughout the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) ENABLE program.

464

On the Conservation of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... remarks upon the interesting paper of Dr. C. William Siemens on the Conservation of Solar ...SolarEnergy ...

CHARLES MORRIS

1882-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

465

Thermodynamic Analysis for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS FOR ENERGY CONSERVATION William F. Kenney Exxon Chemical Company Florham Park, New Jersey , ,,~ This paper describes a methodology for per forming a thermodynamic analysis of a process, and it demonstrates how... fired. In a cracking furnace it can reduce lost work in combustion and in the convec tion section at the cost of more surface area in the convection section, reduced steam make, and slightly higher radiative temperature differences. Preheating air...

Kenney, W. F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

Kraft, Clifford E.

467

SHORT COMMUNICATION Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT COMMUNICATION Habitat patch size and isolation as predictors of occupancy and number Abstract How fully a suitable habitat patch is utilized by organisms depends crucially on patch size a "habitat patch", measuring its boarders, and relatively low detection probability of the inhabitants

Agnarsson, Ingi

468

Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark Chersophilus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

North African range, as well as on its preferred habitat, population density and size. Fieldwork), with important populations believed to be present in the steppe-like habitat of North Africa (Cramp, 1988Assessing the distribution, habitat, and population size of the threatened Dupont's lark

Oñate, Juan J.

469

Conservation International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International International Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Conservation International Name Conservation International Address 2011 Crystal Drive, Suite 500 Place Arlington, VA Zip 22202 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number of employees 501-1000 Year founded 1987 Phone number 1 (703) 341-2400 Website http://www.conservation.org/Pa Coordinates 38.85566°, -77.048668° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.85566,"lon":-77.048668,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

Assessment of the industrial energy-conservation program. Final report of the Committee on Assessment of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industrial operations in the United States account for some 37% of the nation's consumptions of energy. It has been estimated that this figure will increase to 50% by 1990 unless appropriate industrial energy conservation measures are adopted. However, such measures are difficult to implement in spite of the potential of various existing, emerging, and advanced technologies that can be applied to the problem. Specifically, the application of many industrial energy conservation measures entails high economic, technological, and institutional risks and uncertainties that constrain industries from adopting such measures. Accordingly, in 1975 the federal government started a program designed to mitigate these risks and uncertainties via government-industry partnership arrangements in the interests of national energy conservation. An important element of this program is the Industrial Energy Conservation Program in the Federal Department of Energy (DOE). In June 1980, DOE asked the National Materials Advisory Board, a unit of the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council, to form a study committee to assess the effectiveness of the Industrial Energy Conservation Program. The committee concluded that federal support embodied in the DOE program, present and planned, is important to conserving additional industrial energy. However, the committee also concluded that the program needs various improvements in project selection and management and in transfer of results to industry. The committee's findings and recommendations and the results of the deliberation of the committee's three panels, a special report on heat and power, and a report on the visit by four members of the committee to Japan are presented.

none,

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Conservation Cost-Effectiveness Determination Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation Cost-Effectiveness Determination Methodology CONSERVATION COST-EFFECTIVENESS As with all other resources, the Council uses its portfolio model to determine how much conservation is cost the amount of savings achievable at varying costs. In order to capture the impact of variations in wholesale

472

LABORATORY I: CONSERVATION OF ENERGY AND HEAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab I - 1 LABORATORY I: CONSERVATION OF ENERGY AND HEAT In 1101 labs, you used conservation are in thermal equilibrium · Use the latent heat to determine the internal energy change of a system during conservation of energy, you can then determine the metal's specific heat. However, you know that some energy

Minnesota, University of

473

Guidance for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Grantees...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Bonds and New Clean Renewable Energy Bonds Guidance for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Grantees on Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds and...

474

About the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

About the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program About the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program The Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant...

475

Conservation Screening Curves to Compare Efficiency Investments to Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conservation and Renewable Energy, Building EquipmentConservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Buildings andConservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Buildings and

Koomey, J.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Success...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy Efficiency & Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Success Stories Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant...

477

FY 2007 Operating Plan for DOE--March 16, 2007.xls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operating Plan by Appropriation Operating Plan by Appropriation (Dollars in Thousands) FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008 Current Operating Congressional Approp. Plan Request Discretionary Summary By Appropriation Energy And Water Development, And Related Agencies Appropriation Summary: Energy Programs Energy supply and conservation Operation and maintenance........................................... 1,781,242 2,065,474 2,187,943 Construction.................................................................... 31,155 89,030 ---- Total, Energy supply and conservation.............................. 1,812,397 2,154,504 2,187,943 Fossil energy programs Clean coal technology..................................................... -20,000 ---- -58,000 Fossil energy research and development....................... 580,669 592,621 566,801

478

Influence of beaver impoundments on vegetative composition, and modeling habitat suitability as a tool for wildlife management and conservation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Beavers (Castor canadensis) can have dramatic effects on vegetative communities through impounding streams and wetlands. These alterations may influence rare plant species where beaver create (more)

Bonner, Jerri LeAnne.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Report of Science Advisors Solano County  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Water and Sediment Quality 4.0 Specific Habitat Types and Areas of High Conservation Concern 4.1 Vernal1 Report of Science Advisors Solano County Natural Community Conservation Plan Habitat Conservation for Grasslands 3.4 Research Needs for Riparian Woodland 3.5 Research Needs for Vernal Pool Plant Communities 3

480

Plan - Data Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan Plan Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Plans NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program now requires that each proposal include a Data Management Plan (DMP) of up to two pages. A DMP for a proposal is a brief document that outlines what you will do with your data during and after your research, to ensure your data will be safe, documented, and accessible now and in the future. A DMP - developed early and used throughout the research project - will increase research efficiency by making the data understandable and usable in the future and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Guidance for Planning Exercises  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating for Planning, Conducting and Evaluating Transportation Emergency Preparedness Tabletops, Drills and Exercises Prepared for the Department of Energy Office of Transportation and Emergency Management 02B00215-10.p65 This page intentionally left blank table of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance f Guidance for Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Ev or Planning, Conducting and Evaluating aluating aluating aluating aluating T T T T Tr r r r ransportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emer ansportation Emergenc genc genc genc gency Pr y Pr y Pr y Pr y Prepar epar epar epar eparedness T

482

Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Districts (Texas) Conservation Districts (Texas) Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Groundwater Conservation Districts, as created following procedures described in Water Code 36, are designed to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater, and of groundwater reservoirs or their subdivisions, and to

483

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program Cullman Electric Cooperative - Energy Conservation Loan Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Heat Pump Rate: not specified Energy Conservation Rate: $2,000 Program Info State Alabama Program Type Utility Loan Program Provider Cullman Electric Cooperative Cullman Electric Cooperative, a Touchstone Electric Cooperative, has two loan programs. One is the [http://www.cullmanec.com/default.aspx?id=144 Energy Conservation Loan Program], which provides members a loan for insulation or storm windows. Maximum loan is $2,000, payable up to 60

484

Conservation Districts (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Districts (Montana) Conservation Districts (Montana) Conservation Districts (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation Local Conservation Districts in the state of Montana may be formed by

485

Land Conservation (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Land Conservation (Virginia) Land Conservation (Virginia) Land Conservation (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation has developed the

486

Conservation Standards Enforcement | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conservation Standards Enforcement Conservation Standards Enforcement Conservation Standards Enforcement The Office of the General Counsel is working to ensure that manufacturers of consumer products and commercial equipment meet the nation's conservation standards. Through its new focus on enforcement, the Department of Energy will save money for consumers and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. "For the sake of our environment and our economy, it's critical that we enforce our energy efficiency regulations," said Scott Blake Harris, former DOE General Counsel. "Strong enforcement of the rules will encourage compliance and keep manufacturers who break the law from having a competitive advantage over manufacturers who play by the rules." DOE enforces the energy and water conservation standards

487

Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Microsoft Word - prjct planning  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Planning Checklist Planning Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners, project managers, and other information system development and maintenance professionals with guidance in identifying and preparing project planning activities. The checklist reflects recognized project planning activities to be performed throughout the information systems project life cycle. Project planning is generally characterized as a process for selecting the strategies, policies, programs, and procedures for achieving the objectives and goals of the project. The objectives of project planning for information systems projects are summarized as the following: C User's environment is analyzed. C Project objectives and scope are defined. C High-level functional requirements are estimated.

490

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Tribal Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tribal Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook, published by the DOE Office of Indian Energy, is a tool for Tribes to use to help achieve energy goals in both the near- and long-term. This Handbook intends to help tribal leaders and community members define their unique energy goals and priorities through stakeholder input, dialog, and consensus-building.

492

Marketing Plan for Transmission Planning Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not specifically related to transmission planning and not to outside companies who may require the help in transmission planning. It is essential that we take the market opportunity that currently exists to expand our services to our existing and new clients...

Tu, Linh

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Bull Trout Population and Habitat Surveys in the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie Rivers, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bull trout in the Willamette River Basin were historically distributed throughout major tributaries including the Middle Fork Willamette and McKenzie rivers. Habitat degradation, over-harvest, passage barriers, fish removal by rotenone, and hybridization and competition with non-native brook trout are all likely factors that have led to the decline of bull trout in the Willamette Basin (Ratliff and Howell 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service listed the Columbia River bull trout population segment as Threatened under the federal Endangered Species Act in 1998. Four bull trout populations were isolated in the upper Willamette River following the construction of flood control dams on the South Fork McKenzie River, McKenzie River, and Middle Fork Willamette River that created Cougar, Trail Bridge, and Hills Creek reservoirs. Buchanan et al. (1997) described the population in the main stem McKenzie as 'of special concern', the South Fork McKenzie population as 'high risk of extinction', the population above Trail Bridge Reservoir as 'high risk of extinction', and bull trout in the Middle Fork Willamette as 'probably extinct'. Various management efforts such as strict angling regulations and passage improvement projects have been implemented to stabilize and rehabilitate bull trout habitat and populations in the McKenzie River over the past 10 years. Since 1997, bull trout fry from Anderson Creek on the upper McKenzie River have been transferred to the Middle Fork Willamette basin above Hills Creek Reservoir in an attempt to re-establish a reproducing bull trout population. This project was developed in response to concerns over the population status and management of bull trout in the McKenzie and Middle Fork Willamette Rivers by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife during the early 1990s. The project was conducted under measure 9.3G(2) of the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor the status, life history, habitat needs, and limiting factors for bull trout within sub basins of the Columbia River. Also, this project provides information to develop native fish recovery plans such as the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Bull Trout Recovery Plan.

Seals, Jason; Reis, Kelly

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Training Plan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Plan Training Plan This template is used to define the plan, scope, environment, roles and responsibilities for training needs for systemsoftware development and...

496

Green Development Plan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ninth Five-Year Plan introduced two changes: the economic system will change from a traditional planned economy to a socialist market economy; and the economic growth mode will change from extensive to int...

Angang Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Motion Planning Jana Kosecka  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slides thanks to http://cs.cmu.edu/~motionplanning, Jyh-Ming Lien Hard Motion Planning · Configuration Geometric Models S Sampling Based Motion Planner Discrete Search C-space planning Idea : Generate random

Kosecka, Jana

498

RM Capital Investment Plans  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capital Investment Plans FY 2004 (568kb pdf) FY 2005 (625kb pdf) FY 2006 (625kb pdf) FY 2007 (1.45mb pdf) Meter policy Capital Investment Plans...

499

Decommissioning Plan RM  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Decommissioning Plan Review (DPR) Module is a tool that assists DOE federal project review teams in evaluating the adequacy of the decommissioning plan prior to approval of the associated CD.

500

Sustainabiliity Sustainability Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainabiliity IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010­2020 Published Fall Semester 2010 www.iit.edu/campus_sustainability #12;IIT Campus Sustainability Plan 2010-2020 Fall Semester 2010 1 Section I: Background Sustainability ...................................................................................................................................................................8 IIT Academic Entities on Sustainability

Heller, Barbara