Sample records for habitat conservation plan

  1. Beyond biology: understanding regional, multi-species habitat conservation plans from an ecological, economic, and sociopolitical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Jennifer

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    through a survey measuring people's attitudes towards regional, multi-species habitat conservation plans in three general areas: ecological, economical, and socio-political costs and benefits of the plans. I have also studied the actual texts of habitat...

  2. Hawaii Habitat Conservation Plans Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI Reference LibraryAddHawaii Habitat Conservation

  3. The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimeno, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 2001. p. 108. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat ConservationA; Nation; Federal Report, Pg. A8. Beatley, Timothy. Habitatof California Press, 1981. Beatley, Timothy. Habitat

  4. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under the Endangered Species...

  5. A Review of Tennessee's Regulatory Framework Relative to Habitat Conservation Planning on the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Industrial & Municipal Wastewater Stormwater - Municipal (MS4) - Construction Habitat Alteration Section 404 SUPPLY PROJECTS INSTREAM FLOW STORMWATER/ POLLUTED RUNOFF WASTEWATER TREATMENT #12;3 Cumberland HCP, land use regulations #12;5 State Implementation PERMITS Federal Clean Water Act TN Water Pollution

  6. Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Management and Conservation Plan December 2005 #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan Page 2 of 24 Table of Contents Section One: Executive: Reporting Progress #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan

  7. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy and conservation of Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) through fishery management, and environmental review of nonAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2006

  8. Water & Energy Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    Poornima Group of Colleges, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India #12;Executive Summary This document for Poornima Group's conservation efforts over the next eight years. PGC currently maintains an unsustainable method of water use Environmental Crisis Poornima Group of Colleges Water

  9. Conservation Plan Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Capacity Base Plan - Least Cost January Sustained Peak Reserve 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2010 2011 2012 Sustained Peak Reserve 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020

  10. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2004 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  11. Accomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conservation and Management Act, Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act, National Environmental Policy Act, FederalAccomplishments of the Alaska Region's Habitat Conservation Division in Fiscal Year 2005 This report provides a summary of Habitat Conservation Division (HCD) activities in support of the sustainable

  12. Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Golder Associates, Inc.

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

  13. HOSPITAL LAUNDRY STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A PROGRAM PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battles, Donald R.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: LAWRENCE A PROGRAM PLANLAUNDRY STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A PROGRAM PLANLAUNDRY STANDARDS AND ENERGY CONSERVATION: A PROGRAM PLAN

  14. Jocko River Watershed conservation easement protects trout habitat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6.25 acre habitat acquisition in Montana's Jocko River Watershed for fish habitat mitigation (see map). Located in Lake County in northwestern Montana, this property was selected...

  15. Management and Conservation Influence of Habitat Features and Hunter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Université

    the habitat characteristics (e.g., abundance of deer forage, visibility of the deer from the hunter's point

  16. PICEANCE BASIN Conservation Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................................................... 20 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Piceance area. .......... 22. This report serves as a comprehensive update to the 2008 plan. The primary audience is intended

  17. Texas Tech University Energy Conservation Plan -Quarterly Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    Texas Tech University Energy Conservation Plan - Quarterly Update April 2006 Executive Order RP-49 from the Governor's Office requires each state agency to develop an energy conservation plan and set Plan, reporting to the State Energy Conservation Office (SECO) is the two-year energy reduction goal

  18. Conservation plan for protected species on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otten, M.R.M.; Cypher, B.L.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitats in and around Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) support populations of various vertebrates and plants, including a number of threatened and endangered species. Adequate conservation of habitats and species, particularly protected species, can be facilitated through development and implementation of management plans. This document provides a comprehensive plan for the conservation of protected species on NPR-1, through compliance with terms and conditions expressed in Biological Opinions rendered by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for NPR-1 activities. Six conservation strategies by which threatened and endangered species have been, and will be, protected are described: population monitoring, mitigation strategies, special studies, operating guidelines and policies, information transfer and outreach, and the endangered species conservation area. Population monitoring programs are essential for determining population densities and for assessing the effects of oil field developments and environmental factors on protected species. Mitigation strategies (preactivity surveys and habitat reclamation) are employed to minimize the loss of important habitats components and to restore previously disturbed lands to conditions more suitable for species` use. A number of special studies were undertaken between 1985 and 1995 to investigate the effectiveness of a variety of population and habitat management techniques with the goal of increasing the density of protected species. Operating guidelines and policies governing routine oil field activities continue to be implemented to minimize the potential for the incidental take of protected species and minimize damage to wildlife habitats. Information transfer and outreach activities are important means by which technical and nontechnical information concerning protected species conservation on NPR-1 is shared with both the scientific and non-scientific public.

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards the model conservation standards should provide reliable savings to the power system. The Council also................................................ 8 Buildings Converting to Electric Space Conditioning or Water Heating Systems

  20. Ecology, habitat preference, and conservation of Neotropical non-volant mammal communities in Costa Rica's Caribbean lowlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero, Andrea

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiversity in the tropics is continually being threatened by anthropogenic disturbances such as habitat degradation and fragmentation. Unfortunately, conservation decisions and management of wildlife are difficult tasks ...

  1. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

  2. Hay Creek conservation easement protects trout habitat in Flathead...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    map). Once the proposed land is acquired, which is expected in spring 2009, Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks would convey a conservation easement on the property to BPA to ensure...

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, Brian

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

  4. Developing conservation plan for the Edwards Aquifer: Stakeholders reach consensus resolution to balance protection of endangered species and water use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Courtney

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fall 2012 tx H2O 17 Story by Courtney Smith ] Comal and San Marcos springs are the only known habitats for eight federally listed threatened or endangered species. Photo courtesy of the Edwards Aquifer Authority. What does it take... Aquifer region of Texas achieved a milestone in a struggle that has lasted nearly six decades. Working together, participants in the Edwards Aquifer Recovery Implementation Program (EARIP) developed a habitat conservation plan that will protect...

  5. Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation Area,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hödl, Walter

    Comparison of anuran acoustic communities of two habitat types in the Danum Valley Conservation frequency and demand acoustic adaptations to increase the signal-to-noise ratio. Selective logging represents a major threat to stream-breeding anurans in Sabah. Pollution of clear water threatens the stream

  6. Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative- Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative offers an incentive for members to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes and facilities through the Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program. The loan...

  7. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Fifth Northwest Power Plan Statement of Basis and Purpose for the Fifth Power Plan and Response to Comments on the Draft Fifth Power Plan February 2005 #12;I. Background.........................................................................................................................................3 B. Developing the Fifth Power Plan

  8. Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Fired Generating Resources #12;Sixth Power Plan AssessMenT reporT Resource Adequacy 40Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council March 13, 2013 Mid-term assessment report #12;PaGe 2 > Mid-TerM AssessMenT reporT > Sixth Power Plan Contents 04 Executive Summary 06 Situation

  9. FWS - Habitat Conservation Plans and Incidental Take Permits webpage | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFACEnergy Information

  10. Hawaii State Habitat Conservation Plan Permit Brief | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG|Information OpenEI ReferenceNoise Forms

  11. Nevada Fish & Wildlife Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAir QualityBureau

  12. United States Fish and Wildlife Service - Habitat Conservation Plans Under

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtleCooperative Place: Beaver Redirect

  13. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A Review of Water Conservation Planning for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    remains weak; half of the local water districts lack conservation programs all together. This revealsEXECUTIVE SUMMARY A Review of Water Conservation Planning for the Atlanta, Georgia Region (August, 2006) To better understand the Atlanta, Georgia region's potential to reduce water waste in order

  14. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission Summary of Key, both in operating the existing system and in planning for new major transmission lines. Since then transmission system is an integral part of the regional power system. It functions roughly like the highway

  15. FE - Fossil Energy - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic Plan| Department of Energy 088:EnergyFAR27.pdf FAR27.pdfEnclosure (1)

  16. Eagle Conservation Plan Guidance | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale,South, NewDyerTier2Latvia) JumpEnergysource HistoryPlan

  17. Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

  18. Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

  19. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix H: Demand Response Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 1 Demand Response in the Council's Fifth Power Plan......................................................................................................................... 3 Estimate of Potential Demand Response

  20. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast Role of the Economic Forecast..................................................................................................................................... 2 Economic Growth Assumptions

  1. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    My research in coastal Ecuador and the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) elucidated differences in value of shallow estuarine habitats for fishes and invertebrates. I focused on mangrove and tidal river habitats in Ecuador, ...

  2. Results of preconstruction surveys used as a management technique for conserving endangered species and their habitats on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, T.T.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Johnson, J.W.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1976 an intensive program of petroleum production at maximum efficient rate was initiated on the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills) in western Kern County, California. In a Biological Opinion required by the Endangered Species Act, the US Fish and Wildlife Service concluded that proposed construction and production activities may jeopardize the continued existence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and the blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus, inhabiting the Reserve. DOE committed itself to carrying out a compensation/mitigation plan to offset impacts of program activities on endangered species and their habitats. One compensation/mitigation strategy was to develop and implement preconstruction surveys to assess potential conflicts between proposed construction activities, and endangered species and their critical habitats, and to propose reasonable and prudent alternatives to avoid conflicts. Between 1980 and 1984, preconstruction surveys were completed for 296 of a total of 387 major construction projects encompassing 3590 acres. Fewer than 22% of the projects potentially conflicted with conservation of endangered species, and most conflicts were easily resolved by identifying sensitive areas that required protection. Only 8% of the projects received minor modification in their design or locations to satisfy conservation needs, and only three projects had to be completely relocated. No projects were cancelled or delayed because of conflicts with endangered species, and costs to conduct preconstruction surveys were minimal. 27 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 5: Demand Response Summary of Key.............................................................................................................. 1 Demand Response in the Fifth Power Plan........................................................................................... 3 Demand Response in the Sixth Power Plan

  4. Use of Calibrated Simulation for the Evaluation of Residential Energy Conservation Options of Two Habitat for Humanity Houses in Houston, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soebarto, V.; Reddy, A.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a project where selected energy conservation measures in two Habitat for Humanity houses in Houston, Texas were measured using side-by- side measurements of identical houses and calibrated simulation. The measures include shell...

  5. Assessment of estuarine habitats for resident and estuarine-dependent species: tools for conservation and management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shervette, Virginia Rhea

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    and provide us with countless other services. In spite of all this, humans all over the world continue to negatively impact estuarine ecosystems through activities such as alteration of habitat, pollution, and compromising freshwater input. In general, we... Salt marsh ecosystems in Gulf of Mexico................................ 6 Nursery habitat hypothesis ....................................................... 7 Dissertation objectives...

  6. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................................................... 19 Smart Grid ............................................................................................. 10 Adequacy of System Integration Services-free generation. The region is increasing its efforts to accomplish conservation through integrated resource

  7. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix J THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    buildings, the standard for utility residential conservation programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation programs, the standard for conversions THE MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARDS FOR NEW ELECTRICALLY HEATED RESIDENTIALAND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region

  8. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix L: Climate Change and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demand for electricity and production of hydroelectric generation. Global climate change models all seem. There are at least two ways in which climate can affect the power plan. First, warming trends will alter electricitySixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix L: Climate Change and Power Planning

  9. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife.............................................................................................................. 1 Integrating the Fish and Wildlife Program and Power Planning Under the Northwest Power Act 2 Power Resource Planning that Accommodates the Power System Effects of the Fish and Wildlife Program

  10. Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhiping, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plans Organization and Implementation of Energy ConservationIndustrial Energy Conservation Investment Funding 3.Case Studies of Energy Conservation Investments by Industry

  11. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix D: Wholesale Electricity Price Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix D: Wholesale Electricity Price.................................................................................................................................. 27 INTRODUCTION The Council prepares and periodically updates a 20-year forecast of wholesale to forecast wholesale power prices. AURORAxmp® provides the ability to inco

  12. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................... 12 Oil Price Forecast Range. The price of crude oil was $25 a barrel in January of 2000. In July 2008 it averaged $127, even approachingSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction

  13. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 2: Key Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at zero and increase to $47 per ton of CO2 emissions by 2030. Higher electricity prices reduce demandSixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 2: Key Assumptions Summary of Key................................................................ 10 Wholesale Electricity Prices

  14. Transitions between town and metropolis : planning strategies for development and conservation of colonial Zacatecas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee Chibli, Jose Arturo

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the planning strategies critical for the conservation and development of cities full of historic, traditional and cultural value. The colonial city of Zacatecas in central Mexico, was chosen for this ...

  15. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Cost and Availability of Wind Integration and Conservation Council Wind Integration Costs · Reserving capacity for within-hour balancing is costly the system without the need to reserve flexible capacity for within-hour balancing of wind generation #12;3 5

  16. Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

  17. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

  18. Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

  19. Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs et des gorilles en Afrique Centrale Plan d'action rgional pour la conservation des chimpanzs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    les lacunes en connaissances qu'il faut combler, à travers l'amélioration des méthodes de recensement par les chercheurs suggérant qu'ils avaient eu peu de contacts avec des humains auparavant. ©Nick gorilles de plaine d'Afrique Centrale. ©NickNichols,NGS #12;Plan d'action régional pour la conservation des

  20. H.R.S. 195D-21 - Habitat Conservation Plans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG| Open EnergyGuntersville ElectricControlon State HighwaysR.S.

  1. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix I ENVIRONMENTAL COST METHODOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I-1 Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix I APPENDIX I ENVIRONMENTAL COST METHODOLOGY METHOD FOR DETERMINING QUANTIFIABLE ENVIRONMENTAL COSTS AND BENEFITS Priority or measure is cost-effective. Quantifiable environmental costs and benefits are among the direct costs

  2. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 10: Resource Strategy Key Findings, and preserve its existing electric infrastructure and research and develop technologies for the long-term improvement of the region's electricity supply. Scenario analysis showed that the electric power sector

  3. UTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to jointly purchase NEMS ­ John Saven No one else needs much power either Only 1 other I-937 utility in groupUTILITY PLANNING ISSUES Northwest Power and Conservation Council August 9, 2011 #12;Inland Overview - Power Don't need a lot of additional power 3 MW by 2016; 8 by 2020 Formed group of 20 smaller utilities

  4. Standby Energy Conservation Plan No. 2: Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. Environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the environmental impacts of the proposed Building Temperature Restrictions Plan. The Plan would result in fuel and energy savings which could be diverted to other areas. Environmental impacts, with emphasis on air quality, were analyzed and found to result in a very minor improvement in air quality. Public health impacts are also minimal, and although some individuals may experience discomfort, it can be minimized by adjustments in clothing. The change in temperature is insufficient to have any significant impact on persons suffering from most diseases.

  5. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    portfolio standards, improved efficiency will help delay investments in more expensive and less clean forms or renewable energy opportunities. The plan encourages investment in these resources when cost development of energy efficiency could constitute a resource comparable in size to the Northwest federal

  6. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bissell, Gael

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

  7. Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mundinger, John

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Multibeam Sonar Surveys and Geological Habitat Mapping of the Seafloor within the Cowcod Conservation Areas (CCA), Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfinger, Chris

    and Conservation Engineering Division, 7600 Sand Point Way NE, Seattle, WA 98115 Oregon State University Active, October 26, 2003 ­ November 6, 2003, was a multibeam only survey of 43 Fathom Bank, Cherry Bank, Osborn.2 Pilgrim and Kidney Banks 17 3.3 Potato Bank 18 3.4 43 Fathom Bank 18 3.5 Osborn Bank 19 3.6 Tanner Bank 19

  9. The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located near Houston, including 22,000 acres; the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center (Metro), and a Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Included within the program for each village are schools and commercial activities, as well as employment activities. The Woodlands is planned to be developed over a 26-year period (commenced in 1972) with an ultimate population of 150,000. Following a summary chapter, Chapter II presents background material on The Woodlands and results of the study are summarized. Chapter III describes the project team and its organizational structure. Chapter IV outlines and documents the methodology that was employed in developing, analyzing, and evaluating the case study. The next chapter describes and analyzes the conventional plan, documents the process by which energy-conserving methods were selected, and evaluates the application of these methods to the Metro Center Study area. Chapter VI discusses constraints to implementation and is followed by a final chapter that presents the general conclusions from the case study and suggests directions for further investigation.

  10. What difference does local participation make? : contexts of engagement in regional conservation planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Caroline Worthen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Natural Resources. Beatley, Timothy. 1994. HabitatAnderson and Yaffee 1998; Beatley 1994; Koontz 2004). Thisresource management (Beatley 1994; Feldman and Jonas 2000;

  11. alternative nursery habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . Birds . Conservation Boyer, Edmond 12 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT Assessing the Effects of Management Alternatives on Habitat Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  12. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Closure Plan Summary for Interim reasctive Waste Treatment Area (IRWTA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This closure plan has been prepared for the interim Reactive Waste Treatment Area (IRWT'A) located at the Y-12 Pkmt in oak Ridge, Tennessee (Environmental Protection Agency [EPA] Identification TN 389-009-0001). The actions required to achieve closure of the IRWTA are outlined in this plan, which is being submitted in accordance with Tennessee Ruie 1200- 1-1 1-.0S(7) and Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 265, Subpart G. The IRWTA was used to treat waste sodium and potassium (NaK) that are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The location of the IRWT'A is shown in Figures 1 and 2, and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.and a diagram is shown in Figure 3. This pkm details all steps that wdi be petiormed to close the IRWTA. Note that this is a fmai ciosure.

  13. Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

  14. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix B HYDROPOWER AVAILABILITY IN RESPONSE TO SALMON RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    addresses only those measures that affect the operation of the Northwest's hydroelectric power system of the hydroelectric power system. Some energy is lost when it is spilled and some energy is shifted out of winterB-1 Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix B APPENDIX B HYDROPOWER

  15. NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION For students entering after 8 for the major = 77-78 credits, plus an additional 18 credits in conservation/environmentally related courses Completion of a plan that incorporates 18 additional credits in conservation or environmentally related

  16. Population modeling in conservation planning of the Lower Keys marsh rabbit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaFever, David Howard

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Schmidt (and Gem), Christa Iocono and Ninja, Anna Munoz and Karlos Sachs (and the 3 who shall not be named), Michael Parkes, Sir Reginald James Pinkerton Esq., ?Robo? Robert Powell (and Scouter Marie and Magnolia Pearl), the Fontaine Family (Lance, Eve... than half of the suitable LKMR habitat in the Lower Keys has been lost due to human activities (USFWS, 1999). The USFWS (1999) cited habitat loss and fragmentation caused by development as the primary 5 reasons for the subspecies? decline...

  17. Starting a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program: an energy planning sourcebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, V; Mathews, R

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A city planner or a neighborhood activist may wish to initiate a local conservation and passive solar retrofit program but may not have previous experience in doing so. This sourcebook is designed to assist interested individuals with their energy planning efforts, from determining retrofit potential, to financing and implementing the program. An approach or methodology is provided which can be applied to determine retrofit potential in single-family residences, mobile homes, multifamily residences, and nonresidential buildings. Case studies in Albuquerque, New Mexico, are given as examples. Guidelines are provided for evaluating the economic benefits of a retrofit program through benefit-cost analysis and economic base studies at the city and neighborhood levels. Also included are approaches to community outreach, detailing how to get started, how to gain local support, and examples of successful programs throughout the US. The need for financing, the development of a local strategy, public and private financing techniques, and community energy service organizations are examined. In addition to the Albuquerque case studies, a brief technology characterization, heat-loss calculations, economic tools, and a list of resources are appended.

  18. December 18, 2008 Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 December 18, 2008 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Resource Assessment Status and Remaining Work Jeff King Northwest Power and Conservation Council Generating Resources Advisory Committee Portland

  19. Hungry Horse Dam Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project: Long-Term Habitat Management Plan, Elk and Mule Deer Winter Range Enhancement, Firefighter Mountain and Spotted Bear Winter Ranges.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project goals are to rehabilitate 1120 acres of big game (elk and mule deer, Odocoileus hemionus) winter range on the Hungry Horse and Spotted Bear Districts of Flathead National Forest lands adjacent to Hungry Horse Reservoir. This project represents the initial phase of implementation toward the mitigation goal. A minimum of 547 acres Trust-funded enhancements are called for in this plan. The remainder are part of the typical Forest Service management activities for the project area. Monitor and evaluate the effects of project implementation on the big game forage base and elk and mule deer populations in the project area. Monitor enhancement success to determine effective acreage to be credited against mitigation goal. Additional enhancement acreage will be selected elsewhere in the Flathead Forest or other lands adjacent'' to the reservoir based on progress toward the mitigation goal as determined through monitoring. The Wildlife Mitigation Trust Fund Advisory Committee will serve to guide decisions regarding future enhancement efforts. 7 refs.

  20. Landscape level planning in alluvial riparian floodplain ecosystems: Using geomorphic modeling to avoid conflicts between human infrastructure and habitat conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Eric W; Girvetz, E H; Fremier, A K

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group,USDA, http://www.usda.gov/stream restoration. Ward, J.V. ,USDA, 2001. Stream Corridor Restoration: Principles, Process

  1. March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottgens, Hans

    March 4, 16, and 18 Chapter 6: Habitat Degradation and Loss Chapter 7: Habitat Fragmentation Chapter 12: Landscape Ecology and Management #12;· What constitutes habitat degradation? When is habitat habitat degradation · Pollution as a form of habitat degradation · Protect what's left · Conservation

  2. Human dimension of conservation planning: the case of Madagascar at national and regional scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramaharitra Tondrasoa, Tendro

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    survey Forest inventory Development of contract Development of details Development of management plan

  3. An Analysis of Hybrid Life Support Systems for Sustainable Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Margaret Miller

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of sustainable habitats on Earth, on other planetary surfaces, and in space, has motivated strategic planning with respect to life support (LS) system technology development and habitat design. Such planning ...

  4. Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

  5. Industrial sector energy conservation programs in the People`s Republic of China during the seventh five-year plan (1986--1990)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Zhiping [State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Energy Research Inst.; Sinton, J.E.; Yang Fuqiang; Levine, M.D.; Ting, M.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impetus at the national level to invest in energy conservation is quite strong and has long been reflected not only in official pronouncements, but also in the investments and organizational activities of the Chinese government. In the early 1980s the central government began a program of direct investments in industrial energy conservation that continues to the present. In addition, concurrently established governmental and quasi-governmental agencies have pursued conservation through administrative and educational measures. In Section 2 of this paper the authors outline the policies and institutions that supported China`s program of energy conservation investments in the Sixth and Seventh Five-Year Plans (FYPs) (1981--1985 and 1986--1990). In Section 3 they describe examples of the types of conservation projects pursued in four industrial subsectors: ferrous metals manufacturing; non-ferrous metals mining and manufacturing; chemicals manufacturing; and building materials manufacturing. Section 4 presents a simple methodology for comparing the costs of energy conservation to those of energy supply. Further discussion points out the applicability and limitations of this methodology to State Planning Commission published statistical material on the overall results of energy conservation investments. Though problematic, such analysis indicates that energy conservation investments were probably substantially cheaper than investments in equivalent energy supply would have been. They end with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered in carrying out the conservation investment programs.

  6. PPC Recommendations to Amend the Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. A. The Council's Mainstem Plan, the Federal Agencies and the BiOp It is not helpful to have dueling plans for operation of the FCRPS. PPC would therefore like to see all the Federal agencies take efforts (both fish and power). Some federal agencies have ignored or denigrated the Act and Council

  7. Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix C FUEL PRICE FORECASTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Figure C-1 illustrates this for world oil prices, and similar patterns apply to natural gas. The last. Figure C-1 World Oil Prices Have Been Following the 1991 Plan Low Forecast 0.00 5.00 10.00 15.00 20.00 25 and earlier Council plans, natural gas prices were dependent on the assumptions about world oil prices

  8. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Kennecott Energy comments on 5 year plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    applaud the NPCC's forward thinking when it comes to coal gasification and Kennecott Energy is involved in a number of initiatives that would help make coal gasification an economic reality. However, until plan and would like to submit comments on the plan as it pertains to the future use of coal. Kennecott

  9. CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

  10. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix N: Financial Assumptions and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a higher discount rate would tend to value a combustion turbine over a wind project, for example, the discount rate used in the Council's analysis is a composite rate that will not be directly applicable, typically has to compare projects with different time patterns of costs. A conservation project or a wind

  11. Microsoft Word - CX_West Chewuch Conservation Easement_FINAL...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation) for the acquisition of a conservation easement for fish habitat mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington. The conservation easement would...

  12. Assessing the Situation at El Pilar: Chronology, Survey, Conservation, and Management Planning for the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Anabel; Wernecke, Clark

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHRONOLOGY, SURVEY, CONSERVATION, AND MANAGEMENT PLANNINGsurvey inventory, resource conservation, and managementsurvey protocol and field test would be important to the development of management

  13. Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creveling, Jennifer

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

  14. Kootenai River Native Fish Conservation Aquaculture Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /incomplete incubation · predation · larval food limitation/starvation · over-wintering energy deficiency Result: Aging Idaho Dept of Fish and Game #12;Burbot conservation strategy · conservation aquaculture · habitat) · Continue small scale extensive rearing experiments in local ponds · Monitor experimental releases

  15. Nature Conservancy University of Ottawa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

    . Natural Area Conservation Planning. 5. Natural Area Plan for the Frontenac Arch. 6. Management Planning is enough? Less than 10% of Canada's natural lands are in protected status. #12; Conservation of Private. The Conservancy is a non- advocacy, non- confrontational, private lands organization. Natural Area Property

  16. Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, D.C.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

  17. WATER CONSERVATION PLAN

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronic Input Options Gary L. Hirsch SNLMay 20102UNCLASSIFIEDOffice of

  18. Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gontier, Mikael, E-mail: gontier@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Moertberg, Ulla, E-mail: mortberg@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

  19. Conservation IEAB Independent Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ~300,000s Wildlife Mitigation Program has protected ~300,000 acres that have carbon sequestration benefitsacres that have carbon sequestration benefits Can the carbon credits from habitat projects offset carbon Sixth Power Plan will address theSixth Power Plan will address the ""carbon footprintcarbon footprint

  20. Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    world: its, fisheries, habitats, and biological diversity. Secondary focus is on materials conservation and facilitate its recovery in the interest of long-term sustainability. Module 5: Management, Conservation world: its, fisheries, habitats, and biological diversity. Secondary focus is on materials conservation

  1. Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

  2. Energy Conservation Renewable Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgado, Mauricio

    Energy Conservation Renewable Energy The Future at Rutgers University Facilities & Capital Planning Operations & Services Utilities Operations 6 Berrue Circle Piscataway, NJ 08854 #12;Energy Conservation Wh C ti ? R bl EWhy Conservation? Renewable Energy · Climate control reduces green house gases · Reduces

  3. Assessing the Situation at El Pilar: Chronology, Survey, Conservation, and Management Planning for the 21st Century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Anabel; Wernecke, Clark

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plan, critical to resource management, and imperative to archaeological study of the urban qualities of ancient El Pilar, the complete survey

  4. Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Brent

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

  5. Energy Conservation: Policy Issues and End-Use Scenarios of Savings Potential -- Part 4, Energy Efficient Recreational Travel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornwall, B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recreation Planning for Energy Conservation. Ecology, VolumeRecreation Planning for Energy Conservation. Inter- nationalMicrofiche, LBL 7896 ENERGY CONSERVATION: POLICY ISSUES AND

  6. Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s to develop comprehensive programs and plans to conserve soil resources, control and prevent soil erosion, prevent floods...

  7. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konopacky, Richard C.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

  8. Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asotin County Conservation District

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

  9. Conservation Overview of Draft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of wind will require increased reserves for within-hour balancing ­ There are actions that can be taken1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Overview of Draft Sixth Power Plan Power Committee Web Conference May 19, 2009 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Conditions Facing the Region · Slower demand

  10. Conservation Focus and Executive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - $78 to $239 per MWh ­ Constrained by RPS requirements ­ Limited alternatives in early years of plan geothermal, combined-cycle and simple- cycle turbines #12;Northwest Power and Conservation Council Portfolio and Conservation Council Electricity Rates · In all futures electricity rates are expected to increase (roughly 30

  11. Long road to recovery: Bastrop team develops plan to restore Lost Pines region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Laura

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the September #28;re. ?In terms of the recovery, the Lost Pines Recovery Team put together a #28;ve-year plan that includes erosion control, reseeding, replanting and hazardous fuels management,? said Roxanne Hernandez, habitat conservation... challenges Erosion has proven to be one of the most di#27;cult challenges to recovery. Initially, the #28;re caused much fertile soil to erode. Hernandez said until vegetation grows to provide ground cover, erosion will continue. Newly planted pine tree...

  12. Technical Report 20061 COASTAL HABITATS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Report 2006­1 COASTAL HABITATS IN PUGET SOUND: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership Prepared in support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership November 2006 Logsdon, University of Washington Doug Myers, Puget Sound Action Team Jan Newton, University of Washington

  13. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  14. Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, Sheryl

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

  15. Digital Games and Biodiversity Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandbrook, Chris; Adams, William M.; Monteferri, Bruno

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for mobile devices such as Endomondo), or the virtual world (e.g. the ability to „like? material on Facebook, creating a competitive dynamic and encouraging further engagement). 3. Digital games and the conservation of biodiversity This article... ConservationPark, a Facebook game, claims to support conservation, but gives no details of what proportion of in-game purchases are donated, or to which organisations. 3.2.3 Games for Conservation Research, Monitoring and Planning The use of games...

  16. Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myra, D.; Ready, C.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

  17. Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and Management Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Energy as a Framework for Prioritizing Conservation Vulnerabilities and Management Strategies - trophic structure - evolutionary processes - available energy. Theoretical Roots of Conservation Biology - habitat area - trophic structure - evolutionary processes - available energy Theoretical Roots

  18. Assessing Perpetual Conservation Easements as a Tool for Land Protection: The Private Landowner Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stroman, Dianne A

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Perpetual conservation easements have become one the primary tools used for long-term land protection and are credited with helping protect endangered species, preventing habitat fragmentation, maintaining ecosystem functions and conserving working...

  19. MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................................... 15 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Middle Park area .... 16 2010 follow-up workshop. The primary audience is intended to be the workshop participants and other

  20. PERSPECTIVE Predicting species distributions for conservation decisions Antoine Guisan,1,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    for analysis and learning. Furthermore, the decision framework within which SDMs are used is rarely made explicit. Using case studies from biological invasions, identification of critical habitats, reserve planning, critical habitats, environmental suitability, reserve selection, species distribution model

  1. Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind, Klickitat, Hood and Fifteen Mile Habitat Site Visits April 17-19th, 2013 ISRP Review Team (4 at the Sheraton Airport at 7:15 a.m. Site Visits: Depart airport and head east: Wind, Klickitat, White Salmon in this review: 1998-019-00 Wind River Watershed Underwood Conservation District (UCD), US Forest Service (USFS

  2. Waterfowl habitats on reclaimed surface mined lands in southwestern Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, W.G.; Klimstra, W.D.; Nawrot, J.R.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of quality wetland habitat is probably the most important factor affecting populations of waterfowl in the United States. To counteract this problem programs for protecting critical habitats have been established and research for innovative methods to create wetlands are being pursued. Recently, attention has been given to evaluation of wetland habitats on lands surface-mined and to methods of reclamation to enhance their development as part of future planning. These data indicate quality wetland habitats can be a legitimate aspect of reclaimed surface-mined lands; and selective overburden handling, grading so as to maximize biologically productive zones and selective plantings contribute importantly to their value. Currently bond release criteria by the Illinois regulatory authority for wildlife habitat and developed water resources discourages reclamation that would maximize quality wetland habitats. Suggested changes in these criteria include alternative vegetation requirements for wetland habitats, more leniency on seasonally inundated shallow water areas, and variation from topsoil requirements when adequate unconsolidated substitute material is available. It is believed that such allowances would result in incentives for the industry to develop wetland habitats so vital to continued enjoyment of waterfowl resources.

  3. Conservation on the edge : landscape scale conservation at Colorado's urban-rural interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ericson, Peter, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape scale conservation is an emerging framework that refers to the ability to conceive, plan, finance and manage projects with significant natural conservation value while incorporating the cultural and economic ...

  4. POTENTAIL HABITAT MOUNTAIN PLOVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that is bordered by I-25 to the east, property boundaries to the north and west, and the power plant to the south cover of yucca and cholla on hills characterize the area bordered by the solar evaporation ponds by the guard shack to the south, the plant to the west, and I-25 to the east is potential habitat. This town

  5. Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avista 2011 Integrated Resource Plan Clint Kalich Manager, Resource Planning & Power Supply Other #12;Conservation Avoided Cost Calculations For 1 MW Measure With Flat Delivery Item $/MWh Energy

  6. Environmental Studies and Planning Page 137Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES AND PLANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Environmental Studies and Planning Page 137Sonoma State University 2012-2013 Catalog ENVIRONMENTAL / Conservation and Restoration Thomas Jacobson / Planning Steven Orlick / Planning Rocky Rohwedder / Energy Management and Design, Education and the Environment, Outdoor Leadership Laura A. Watt / Conservation

  7. Northwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Geospatial Information Technologies at the National Academy of Sciences; Lead for the Spatial ApplicationNorthwest Habitat Institute Integrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information SystemIntegrated Habitat and Biodiversity Information System (IBIS) for the Columbia River Basin(IBIS) for the Columbia

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991 to coordinate the planning, selection, and implementation of BPA-funded wildlife mitigation projects. In 1997, the Oregon wildlife managers developed a programmatic project for mitigation planning and implementation within Oregon. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions project is one of many habitat acquisition and restoration projects proposed under the Oregon wildlife managers programmatic project that have been approved and recommended for funding by the NWPPC. The Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area Additions mitigation project will protect and restore wetland, riparian and other habitats on newly acquired parcels at ODFW's Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area (LMWA). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the acquisition and enhancement of Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area lands will contribute towards mitigating for habitat lost as a result of the development and operation of the Columbia Basin hydropower system. This report summarizes the HEP survey conducted in June 2001 to document the baseline habitat values on four parcels recently added to the Ladd Marsh Wildlife Area: the 309.66-acre Wallender property, the 375.54-acre Simonis property, the 161.07-acre Conley Lake property, and the 74.55-acre Becker property. The 2001 HEP Team was comprised of the following members and agencies: Susan Barnes (ODFW), Allen Childs (CTUIR), Tracy Hames (Yakama Indian Nation), Dave Larson (ODFW), Cathy Nowak (Cat Tracks Wildlife Consulting), and Ken Rutherford (ODFW). Results of the HEP will be used to (1) determine the pre-restoration habitat values of the project sites, (2) the number of Habitat Units to be credited to BPA for protection of habitats within the project area, (3) determine the enhancement potential of the sites, and (4) develop a habitat management plan for the area.

  9. opinion: Political erosion dismantles the conservation network existing in the Canary Islands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández?Palacios, José María; de Nascimento, Lea

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plans of Natural Protected Areas and Habitats  of the has been declared as Natural Protected Areas, four Canarian National Parks, natural protected areas, political corrup?

  10. Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act : Legislative History of the Act to Assist the Electrical Consumers of the Pacific Northwest through use of the Federal Columbia River Power System to Achieve Cost-Effective Energy Conservation : P.L. 96-501, 94 Stat. 2697.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act became effective when it was signed into law by President Carter on December 5, 1980. This ended a four-year debate over legislation designed to plan and coordinate the region's energy future. This legislative history is an abbreviated version taken from the larger historical file maintained by the BPA Law Library. It is intended to assist BPA personnel and others who are studying the Northwest Power Act and working on its implementation. The documents included were selected for their value in determining what Congress meant in enacting the statute and to provide the researcher with a starting point for further investigation. These documents include: a history of the Act, a chronology of the legislative action leading to passage of the law; a section-by-section analysis of the Act; the Congressional Records of Senate and House debates on the bill and its amendments, and a list of Congressional committee hearings.

  11. Conserving Farmland… But For Whom? Using agricultural conservation easements to improve land ownership by next generation’s farmers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kendra

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-Valley Conservancy successfully collaborated with the CountyCounty Agricultural Preservation and Open Space District www.sonomaopenspace.org Sonoma Land Trust www.sonomalandtrust.org The Nature Conservancy www.nature.org Tri-Tri Valley area. ” “To “protect the farm, open space and habitat lands in Yolo County”.

  12. A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marmorek, David

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

  13. Conservation Regional ConservationRegional Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wild Ride for the PNW''s Energy Efficiency Industrys Energy Efficiency Industry 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Ahead ­­ Are We In for AnotherAre We In for Another ""Mister ToadMister Toad''s Wild Ride?s Wild Ride?"" #12;slide 3 Northwest Power and Conservation Council PNW Energy Efficiency AchievementsPNW Energy

  14. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    RACKHAM ­ SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENT Conservation Ecology Subplan Requirements SubPlan: CONECOL RG 11066 CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) RQ 7287 Conservation Ecology Core Effective FA13/1960 (09/03/2013) LN 0010 Aquatic Sciences Specialization LN 0020 Conservation

  15. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  16. REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with this requirement. Waste management guidance and plan template can be downloaded at http://www.energy that generate waste. Attachments: Energy Commission Waste Management Plan Guidance Waste Management Plan1 REFERENCE GUIDE ENERGY CONSERVATION ASSISTANCE ACT (ECAA) STATE ENERGY PROGRAM (SEP) AMERICAN

  17. Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Technical Memorandum #12;COPYRIGHT DECEMBER Series 2 and Pond Series 3 Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses Prepared for Bureau of Reclamation HILL, INC. III Hydraulic and Habitat Suitability Analyses

  18. National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Region Habitat Conservation Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Maintenance Dredge Project Area BMPs for turbidity control required Hydraulic Dredge, no overflow Sand (>80 of dredging activities Yes Dredging activities cease until turbidity dissipates No Modify dredging operation (reduced bucket deployment...etc.) Yes No N Eelgrass is present within 250 m buffer of Maintenance Dredge

  19. Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul R.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

  20. Omak Creek acquisition protects endangered salmonid habitat ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to protect habitat for endangered salmon and steelhead along Omak Creek in Okano- gan County. This acquisition would protect spawning, rearing and migratory habitat of...

  1. Conservative Nutrition: The Industrial Food Supply and Its Critics, 1915-1985

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renner, Martin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning Division, the opportunity to push for new legislation that prioritized soil conservation practices over production control

  2. Afrotherian Conservation 6 (GDACEL) to classify the Bronberg Ridge as a Class 2 Ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extinction, leading to an increased risk of species extinction. Species that occupy specialist niches within tools in conservation management for endangered species as small isolated populations resulting from habitat fragmentation are highly vulnerable to demographic and environmental stochastic related extinction

  3. Many voices, one wilderness : collaborative conservation in the greater Chicago region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Justin (Justin Timothy)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a growing recognition in the conservation community that landscape-scale networks of preserves and habitat corridors are needed to adequately protect native biodiversity. While most of the efforts to protect ...

  4. Guidance for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidelines Guidance for Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program grantees on planning and conducting program evaluations on Recovery Act funded EECBG programs...

  5. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

  6. Geopressured habitat: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, Jane

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

  7. The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    1 The Effects of Timber as a Biofuel on the Occupancy and Habitat Suitability of the Indiana Bat of Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Introduction · Biofuel: ­ National Security ­ Stimulate Local Economies Negative Impacts of Biofuel Production ­ Decreased Site Productivity/Decreased Soil Conservation

  8. A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A landscape approach to sustainable forest management and habitat quality modelling Luque, S.(1) (1 on biodiversity conservation as a proxy for ecological dimensions of sustainable forest management the work to be met by forest landscape managers. This is particular challenging nowadays because of the increasing

  9. Employment Information for Master of Urban Planning Graduates Working

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    and Environment, Inc. Houston, TX ESRI Redlands, CA The Futures Company New York, NY The Habitat Company Ann ArborEmployment Information for Master of Urban Planning Graduates Working in Planning Related Jobs Boulder County Land Use Planning Division Boulder, CO Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning Chicago, IL

  10. Workshop report: planning for Coastal Climatologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, Douglas W.

    : agriculture, coastal transportation, energy conservation and planning, environmental quality, fishery as stakeholder response and feedback received at the workshop. Based on stakeholder input, a coastal climatology

  11. Energy-conserving site design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, E.G. (ed.)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information useful to landscape architects, architects, planners, engineers, students, and homeowners is presented. The concepts and examples needed to create more energy-efficient landscapes are described. The book is organized into five sections, including: an overview and history of energy-efficient design research; detailed information and new strategies on site analysis and planning; energy-efficient landscape design of clustered and single residences; alternative energy-conserving scenarios for the future; and appendices. The appendices contain such technical information as: lists of energy-conserving design options, formulas to calculate solar radiation and soil temperatures, tools for climatic analysis, and techniques for precision planting for solar control and access.

  12. Wildlife management plan, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Farrell, T.P.; Scrivner, J.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the Naval Petroleum Act of 1976, Congress directed the Secretary of the Navy and subsequently the Secretary of Energy, to produce petroleum products from Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) in Kern County, California, at the maximum efficient rate consistent with sound engineering practices. Because of the presence of two endangered species and the quality, quantity, and contiguous nature of habitat on NPR-1, the area is unique and management of its resources deserves special attention. The purpose of this wildlife management plan is to: (1) draw together specific information on NPR-1 wildlife resources; (2) suggest management goals that could be implemented, which if achieved, would result in diverse, healthy wildlife populations; and (3) reinitiate cooperative agreements between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other conservation organizations regarding the management of wildlife on NPR-1. NPR-1 supports an abundant and diverse vertebrate fauna. Twenty-five mammalian, 92 avian, eight reptilian, and two amphibian species have been observed on Elk Hills. Of these, three are endangered (San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica; giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens; blunt-nosed leopard lizard, Gambelia silus). Nine vertebrates, six invertebrates, and four plant species known to occur or suspected of occurring on Elk Hills are potential candidates for listing. A major objective of this management plan is to minimize the impact of petroleum development activities on the San Joaquin kit fox, giant kangaroo rat, blunt-nosed leopard lizard, and their essential habitats. This will mainly be achieved by monitoring the status of these species and their habitat and by restoring disturbed habitats. In general, management policies designed to benefit the above three species and other species of concern will also benefit other wildlife inhabiting NPR-1.

  13. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th in the original solicitation. Statements about outstanding habitat units (HUs) and calculations from tables, reporting, and acquisitions are sufficiently improved. Those relating to actual management activities

  14. Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    1 Marine Conservation Science and Policy Service learning Program Scientists have divided the ocean where light can no longer penetrate. These deep zones are where some of the most bizarre and fascinating in order of depth. Module 1: Ocean and Coastal Habitats Sunshine State Standards SC.912.E.7.2, SC.912.E.7

  15. Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

  16. Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Regulation Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act enacts the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan, which is a joint state and federal effort to provide for the conservation of the Everglades region. The plan regulates land and water...

  17. Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, Richard

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

  18. Management Plan Management Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have communities" J. Lichatowich et al. 1998. A Conceptual Foundation for the Management of Native Salmonids

  19. Systematic review of the influence of foraging habitat on red-cockaded woodpecker reproductive success.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garabedian, James E. [North Carolina State University

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relationships between foraging habitat and reproductive success provide compelling evidence of the contribution of specific vegetative features to foraging habitat quality, a potentially limiting factor for many animal populations. For example, foraging habitat quality likely will gain importance in the recovery of the threatened red-cockaded woodpecker Picoides borealis (RCW) in the USA as immediate nesting constraints are mitigated. Several researchers have characterized resource selection by foraging RCWs, but emerging research linking reproductive success (e.g. clutch size, nestling and fledgling production, and group size) and foraging habitat features has yet to be synthesized. Therefore, we reviewed peer-refereed scientific literature and technical resources (e.g. books, symposia proceedings, and technical reports) that examined RCW foraging ecology, foraging habitat, or demography to evaluate evidence for effects of the key foraging habitat features described in the species’ recovery plan on group reproductive success. Fitness-based habitat models suggest foraging habitat with low to intermediate pine Pinus spp. densities, presence of large and old pines, minimal midstory development, and herbaceous groundcover support more productive RCW groups. However, the relationships between some foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success are not well supported by empirical data. In addition, few regression models account for > 30% of variation in reproductive success, and unstandardized multiple and simple linear regression coefficient estimates typically range from -0.100 to 0.100, suggesting ancillary variables and perhaps indirect mechanisms influence reproductive success. These findings suggest additional research is needed to address uncertainty in relationships between foraging habitat features and RCW reproductive success and in the mechanisms underlying those relationships.

  20. Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................................................. 12 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Pagosa Springs area 13's viability and threats by participants of a June 2008 workshop. The primary audience is intended

  1. Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .................................................................................................................................... 10 Attachment 1. Additional key species and plant communities in the Piceance area........... 12 and threats by participants of a July 2008 workshop. The primary audience is intended to be the workshop

  2. Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    records (H ranked minutes records), and one is an occurrence that is considered to have very poor. The species identification of these records has not been confirmed; they are therefore beyond the scope species, quality of the occurrences, urgency of the management and protection actions, and other

  3. Invited Paper Wildlife Conservation Planning Under the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Martin

    the need for additional listings under the Endangered Species Act and facilitate delisting. Although

  4. Energy Conservation Plans | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen O'Kane Tauscher -The OCHO31, 2014

  5. RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - TProcuring SolarNo.Frequency | Department ofUnconsciously

  6. MA - Office of Management - Energy Conservation Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing |Prepare For more(Version 3.0) | DepartmentMA

  7. NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 attheMohammed Khan - Technology ProjectEnergyNAICS

  8. EE - Energy Efficiency - Energy Conservation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |FinalEESS-7 to export electricCanada.Grid CITE:Energy

  9. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that would help design a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. Existing surveys present comprehensive information about regional manufactured home occupants and their homes that are relevant to a potential conservation marketing plan. An independent analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various efficiency improvements provides background information for designing a marketing plan. This analysis focuses on the economic impacts of alternative energy conservation options as perceived by the home owner. Identifying impediments to conservation investments is also very important in designing a marketing plan. A recent report suggests that financial constraints and the need for better information and knowledge about conservation pose the major conservation investment barriers. Since loan interest rates for new manufactured homes typically exceed site-built rates by a considerable amount and the buyers tend to have lower incomes, the economics of manufactured home conservation investments are likely to significantly influence their viability. Conservation information and its presentation directly influences the manufactured home buyer's decision. A marketing plan should address these impediments and their implications very clearly. Dealers express a belief that consumer satisfaction is the major advantage to selling energy efficient manufactured homes. This suggests that targeting dealers in a marketing plan and providing them direct information on consumers' indicated attitudes may be important. 74 refs.

  10. Conservation Districts (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Conservation District can be established by petition of registered voters within the territory proposed for organization into the district, with the approval of the State Conservation Commission....

  11. Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Groundwater Conservation Districts, as created following procedures described in Water Code 36, are designed to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of...

  12. Energy conserving site design case study: Shenandoah, Georgia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case study examines the means by which energy conservation can be achieved at an aggregate community level by using proper planning and analytical techniques for a new town, Shenandoah, Georgia, located twenty-five miles southwest of Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. A potentially implementable energy conservation community plan is achieved by a study team examining the land use options, siting characteristics of each building type, alternate infrastructure plans, possible decentralized energy options, and central utility schemes to determine how community energy conservation can be achieved by use of pre-construction planning. The concept for the development of mixed land uses as a passively sited, energy conserving community is based on a plan (Level 1 Plan) that uses the natural site characteristics, maximizes on passive energy siting requirement, and allows flexibility for the changing needs of the developers. The Level 2 Plan is identical with Level 1 plan plus a series of decentraized systems that have been added to the residential units: the single-family detached, the apartments, and the townhouses. Level 3 Plan is similar to the Level 1 Plan except that higher density dwellings have been moved to areas adjacent to central site. The total energy savings for each plan relative to the conventional plan are indicated. (MCW)

  13. PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to energy conservation, renewable resources, other resources, and protecting, mitigating, and enhancing fish Stat.2697.] 839(1)(8). the development of renewable resources within the Pacific Northwest; [Northwest and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, of the Columbia River and its tributaries

  14. The Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills HabitatThe Sandhills Habitat DescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescriptionDescription

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    by ancient oceans that rose and then receded in response to melting and freezing of polar ice caps. Beaches, characterized by rolling hills capped by deep coarse sands. They are wedged between the Coastal Plain, gopher tortoises are keystone species -- other animals and plants in the habitat are affected by tortoise

  15. Conservation and Environmentalism : an Encyclopedia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, James K.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of important environmental and conservation topics. Theof Environmental Protection Paheke, Robert, ed. Conservation

  16. Resource management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Volume 29, Rare plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunningham, M. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Pounds, L. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Oberholster, S. [USDA Forest Service, Montgomery, AL (United States); Parr, P.; Mann, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Edwards, L. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Rosensteel, B. [JAYCOR Environmental, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rare plant species listed by state or federal agencies and found on or near the Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are identified. Seventeen species present on the ORR are listed by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation as either endangered, threatened, or of special concern. Four of these are under review by the US Fish and Wildlife Service for possible listing as threatened or endangered species. Ten species listed by the state occur near and may be present on the ORR; four are endangered in Tennessee, and one is a candidate for federal listing. A range of habitats supports the rare taxa on the ORR: River bluffs, calcareous barrens, wetlands, and deciduous forest. Sites for listed rare species on the ORR have been designated as Research Park Natural Areas. Consideration of rare plant habitats is an important component of resource management and land-use planning; protection of rare species in their natural habitat is the best method of ensuring their long-term survival. In addition, the National Environmental Policy Act requires that federally funded projects avoid or mitigate impacts to listed species. The list of rare plant species and their location on the ORR should be considered provisional because the entire ORR has not been surveyed, and state and federal status of all species continues to be updated.

  17. Conservation and drought management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Calvin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conservation technologies are high e#19;ciency toilets, showerheads, washing machines and water heaters. Behavioral changes include turning the water o#27; except when rinsing while shaving and brushing teeth and pu#26;ing full loads in dishwashers...Fall 2012 tx H2O 5 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director Conservation and Drought Management WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future Water conservation and drought...

  18. GRANDE RONDE RIVER BASIN FISH HABITAT IMPROVEMENT IMPLEMENTATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife Kathy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration #12;CONTENTS ABSTRACT . . . . . · · . . · . . . . . . i INTRODUCTION

  19. FSM 2600 Wildlife, Fish, and Sensitive Plan Habitat Management | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOECategorical|FSM

  20. Striped Bass Habitat Selection Rules in Reservoirs without Suitable Summer Habitat Offer Insight into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .--The traditional view of habitat requirements for inland striped bass Morone saxatilis suggests that these fish 2 mg/L. Once hypoxia forced striped bass into warmer water, the fish concentrated at the top to provide suitable habitat for adult fish. In severe cases, suitable habitat for adult striped bass may

  1. Focal Species and Representative Habitats Chuck Peven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) recruitment, and flood control efforts that include LWD removal, berm construction, and stream channelization extensively at habitat use and conditions within the Wenatchee River Basin. They used the Habitat Quality any of the variation for bull trout, while the total salmonid density and biomass varied significantly

  2. Habitats keep commercial and recreational fisheries strong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sea level rise. So what can we do? Protect and restore habitat Investments by private groups not only for our fisheries but for the communities--and economies--that rely on them. San Francisco Bay Bay gone, but the dam or poorly designed culvert remains, still preventing fish from getting to habitat

  3. Global mapping of ecosystem services and conservation priorities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    and ecosystem services. biodiversity carbon hotspots Global 200 conservation planning Efforts to conserve wild: the goods and services from ecological systems that benefit people (e.g., water purification, carbon sequestration, and crop pollination). These ``ecosystem services'' are currently the focus of intensive re

  4. ISSUANCE 2014-12-31: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ISSUANCE 2014-12-31: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers, Final Rule ISSUANCE 2014-12-31: Energy Conservation Program:...

  5. Flathead River Watershed conservation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    proposing to fund the acquisition of several parcels of land in northwest Montana for fish habitat mitigation (see map). These parcels total about 95 acres and are located within...

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quaempts, Eric

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

  7. assurance project plans: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and water resources, while supporting the Pecos River Compact by delivering water to Texas 4. Project Objectives: Planning for a possible candidate conservation agreement will...

  8. assurance project plan: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and water resources, while supporting the Pecos River Compact by delivering water to Texas 4. Project Objectives: Planning for a possible candidate conservation agreement will...

  9. assurance plan project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and water resources, while supporting the Pecos River Compact by delivering water to Texas 4. Project Objectives: Planning for a possible candidate conservation agreement will...

  10. Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research Results and Priority Questions Wind Turbine Interactions with Birds, Bats, and their Habitats: A Summary of Research...

  11. Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents...

  12. arabiensis aquatic habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  13. aquatic habitat covariates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 15 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  14. anaerobic aquatic habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitat Hofmann, Hans A. 13 Aquatic Habitat Modifications in La Plata River Basin, Patagonia and Associated Marine Areas CiteSeer Summary: This paper describes the environmental...

  15. Stanford University Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University Hearing Conservation Program April 2006 #12;Stanford University HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION.2 Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S)..............................................4 3.3 Employees

  16. Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

  17. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4. Costa DL, Kahn ME (2013) Energy conservation “nudges” andstrategies and energy conservation behavior: a meta-analysisIn the electricity sector, energy conservation through

  18. ANOTHER LOOK AT ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RY Ah! D SfO::CTION Energy Conservation Lee Schipper AugustAnother Look at Energy Conservation Lee Schipper * Lawrencebecome associated with energy conservation during the past

  19. Technology in water conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  20. Technology in water conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 tx H2O Summer 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director WAT E R CONSERVATION & TECHNOLOGY CENTER Securing Our Water Future It is not unusual for individuals to describe water conservation as a... conservation, however, is just as dependent on technological factors. #27;e technology does not have to be complex to be important #20; consider high e#23;ciency toilets and showerheads. #27;ese everyday appliances largely rely on simple technologies...

  1. BPA's Eighth Annual Energy Conservation Management Conference : Proceedings.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Energy Conservation Management Conference (8th : 1981); United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The five-year energy conservation program at Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is described at the conference. An overview of the program is presented. Topics covered in panel discussions include: how utilities can work effectively with weatherization contractors, homebuilders, energy auditors, and weatherization material suppliers; mechanisms for implementing conservation programs in the commercial sector; experiences gained in existing residential weatherization programs; and streamlining relationships between consumers, utilities, and BPA in providing services and getting feedback. The planning, programming, technical assistance, and engineering thrusts of BPA's conservation programs are discussed. Indoor air quality, renewable energy, and the regulator's role in relationships to energy conservation are discussed. Passive solar programs, DOE initiatives in solar and conservation for buildings, conservation potential in the commercial and industrial sectors, and current conservation research and development are also discussed. (MCW)

  2. Scanning the Conservation Horizon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scanning the Conservation Horizon A Guide to Climate Change Vulnerability Assessment #12;Scanning.A. Stein, and N.A. Edelson, editors. 2011. Scanning the Conservation Horizon: A Guide to Climate Change.S. Geological Survey Fundamental Science Practices. Scanning the Conservation Horizon is available online at

  3. NonIntrusive Conservative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Läufer, Konstantin

    A Look at Non­Intrusive Conservative Garbage Collection Purdue University Page 1 of 16 A Look at Non­Intrusive Conservative Garbage Collection Gustavo Rodriguez­Rivera Vincent Russo Purdue University {grr,russo@cs.purdue.edu} #12; A Look at Non­Intrusive Conservative Garbage Collection Purdue

  4. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hair, Don

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

  5. Biotype 23 Page 1 The Biodiversity & Conservation Newsletter of Woodland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plans. Woodland Ecology Branch have started work on a project to develop a computer-based decision support system which will be used to identify threats and opportunities from forest management biodiversity officer is actively preparing data sets of SAP (Species Action Plan) species by conservancy

  6. Conserving Waterlogged Rope: A Review of Traditional Methods and Experimental Research with Polyethylene Glycol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCaskill, Jennifer R.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , and that continued study and experimentation are needed so that the conservator has the tools to develop an appropriate conservation plan for each artifact. The majority of La Belle's cordage was conserved using the passivation polymers method developed by Dr. C...

  7. Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to alter the bed, bank or boundary of any water...

  8. Classification of Seafloor Habitats using Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    habitats. The initial motivation to use GP for this task came from a work on diesel engine diagnosis [11 are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full

  9. Guam Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes various energy strategies available to Guam to meet the territory's goal of diversifying fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020.The information presented in this strategic energy plan will be used by the Guam Energy Task Force to develop an energy action plan. Available energy strategies include policy changes, education and outreach, reducing energy consumption at federal facilities, and expanding the use of a range of energy technologies, including buildings energy efficiency and conservation, renewable electricity production, and alternative transportation. The strategies are categorized based on the time required to implement them.

  10. Master Plan For Improving Energy Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, W. H.

    Presidential Executive Order 12003, dated July 1977, directed all government owned or leased facilities to develop and execute a 10-year Energy Conservation Plan. With facilities in seven states totaling 15 million square feet, the Albuquerque...

  11. Facilities Operations, Planning, and Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McLaughlin, Richard M.

    Facilities Operations, Planning, and Design Engineering Services Energy Management & Water and In- house Engineering Mechanical Electrical Engineering Data Analysis Construction Services In Conservation Capital Project-Bldg Systems Review Commissioning BSL3/DLAM Engineer Building Systems Engineering

  12. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1989 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The annual report contains three individual subproject papers detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1989. Subproject 1 contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject 2 contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. This report has been sub-divided into two parts: Part 1; stream evaluation and Part 2; pond series evaluation. Subproject 3 concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho. This report summarizes the evaluation of the project to date including the 1989 pre-construction evaluation conducted within the East Fork drainage. Dredge mining has degraded spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River and in Bear Valley Creek. Mining, agricultural, and grazing practices degraded habitat in the East Fork of the Salmon River. Biological monitoring of the success of habitat enhancement for Bear Valley Creek and Yankee Fork are presented in this report. Physical and biological inventories prior to habitat enhancement in East Fork were also conducted. Four series of off-channel ponds of the Yankee Fork are shown to provide effective rearing habitat for chinook salmon. 45 refs., 49 figs., 24 tabs.

  13. Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkman, Jed (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2002 and 2003, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts on private properties in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of this effort is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. The CTUIR has currently enrolled nine properties into this program: two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and four properties on the mainstem Walla Walla River. Major accomplishments during the reporting period include the following: (1) Secured approximately $229,000 in project cost share; (2) Purchase of 46 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River to be protected perpetually for native fish and wildlife; (3) Developed three new 15 year conservation easements with private landowners; (4) Installed 3000 feet of weed barrier tarp with new plantings within project area on the mainstem Walla Walla River; (5) Expanded easement area on Couse Creek to include an additional 0.5 miles of stream corridor and 32 acres of upland habitat; (6) Restored 12 acres on the mainstem Walla Walla River and 32 acres on Couse Creek to native perennial grasses; and (7) Installed 50,000+ new native plants/cuttings within project areas.

  14. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A.; Steven J. Wagner.

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Gauthreaux, Sidney, A., and Steven J. Wagner. 2005. Breeding bird populations and habitat associations within the Savannah River Site (SRS). Final Report. USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, Aiken, SC. 48 pp. Abstract: During the 1970's and 1980's a dramatic decline occurred in the populations of Neotropical migratory birds, species that breed in North America and winter south of the border in Central and South America and in the Caribbean. In 1991 an international initiative was mounted by U. S. governmental land management agencies, nongovernmental conservation agencies, and the academic and lay ornithological communities to understand the decline of Neotropical migratory birds in the Americas. In cooperation with the USDA Forest Service - Savannah River (FS - SR) we began 1992 a project directed to monitoring population densities of breeding birds using the Breeding Bird Census (BBC) methodology in selected habitats within the Savannah River Site SRS. In addition we related point count data on the occurrence of breeding Neotropical migrants and other bird species to the habitat data gathered by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the USDA Forest Service and data on habitat treatments within forest stands.

  15. Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress August 2014 United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Conservation Standards Activities Report to Congress | Page i Message from the...

  16. Wetland Conservation Act (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter of the Minnesota Administrative Rules implements the Wetland Conservation Act of 1991, setting standards for water preservation, withdrawal, and replacement.

  17. A discussion of best management practices for the South Esk Catchment: mitigation of a diminished aquatic habitat 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Shiloh

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    agriculture in order to be placed into conservation programmes. These relationships can be vital to the success of a management plan. The establishment of buffer zones was established an appropriate mitigation measure for the improvement of the aquatic...

  18. Nowzari et al. Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubenstein, Daniel I.

    25 Nowzari et al. · Habitat Associations of Persian Wild Ass in Iran HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS OF PERSIAN WILD ASS (EQUUS HEMIONUS ONAGER) IN QA- TROUYEH NATIONAL PARK, IRAN HANIYEH NOWZARI, Department of the IVth International Wildlife Management Congress: 25-30, 2013 Horses, zebras and asses, members

  19. Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

  20. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS or upper division) 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  1. Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

  2. MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    programs, the standard for all new commercial buildings, the standard for utility commercial conservation RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS The region should acquire all electric energy conservation measure savings from new residential and new commercial buildings that have a benefit-to-cost ratio greater than

  3. I-SAVE conservation program. Implementing title II of NECPA residential conservation service. Final draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The I-SAVE (Iowa Saves America's Vital Energy) conservation plan provides comprehensive energy-conservation information and services to residential consumers served by large investor-owned electric and gas utilities and participating home-heating suppliers. The overall objective of the I-SAVE plan is to conserve energy by facilitating cost-effective retrofit of existing housing and promoting more-efficient energy use. The ultimate benefit available to the customer under the I-SAVE plan - reduction in energy use - is dependent upon the action he or she takes as a result of the program audit. Benefits to the utility and the ratepayers as a whole, however, will accrue only upon widespread customer acceptance and utilization of program services. This degree of program acceptance and the resulting benefits to ratepayers can be attained only through an aggressive educational and promotional effort by the covered utilities. All electric and gas utilities which have sales, other than resale, exceeding 750 million kWh of electricity or 10 billion cubic feet of gas and participating home-heating suppliers, shall provide a program announcement and shall offer conservation services to their customers who occupy a residential building containing at least one, but not more than four units, in a manner as provided by the rules. The text of the rules is presented. (MCW)

  4. Draft Columbia River Basin Research Plan NOTE: This DRAFT document has not been reviewed or endorsed by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Conservation Council April 2005 #12;ii Table of Contents I. Planning for the Future, Taking Stock Program 98 #12;1 I. Planning for the Future, Taking Stock of the Present Introduction This Research Plan

  5. Climate Change Action Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    Climate Change Action Plan Report Intermountain Region 2013 National Park Service Resource Stewardship and Science Landscape Conservation and Climate Change Division #12;About this Report Each National Park Service is responding to the challenge of climate change; and (2) raise awareness among NPS

  6. 2014-10-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps, Request for Information. centralairconditionersrfi.pdf...

  7. Area C borrow Site Habitat Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat quality assessment was performed within selected portions of the proposed Area C Borrow Source. The previously identified Bitterbrush / Indian ricegrass stabilized dune element occurrence was determined to be better described as a sagebrush /needle-and-thread grass element occurrence of fair to good quality. A new habitat polygon is suggested adjacent to this element occurrence, which would also be sagebrush/needle-and-thread grass, but of poor quality. The proposed site of initial borrow site development was found to be a very low quality community dominated by cheatgrass.

  8. Wild Resource Conservation Program (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Established by The Wild Resource Conservation Act of 1982, the Wild Resource Conservation Program is a part of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. The program works closely with...

  9. Soil and Water Conservation (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and...

  10. Draft Management Plan Upper Snake Province

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................4-5 Consistency with Idaho's Water Quality Management Plan...........................4-5 303(dDraft Management Plan Upper Snake Province Submitted To The Northwest Power and Conservation Quality Anti-Degradation Policy (39-3603) ............................................4-8 ESA and CWA

  11. Supplement Analysis for the Watershed Management Program EIS --Idaho Model Watershed Habitat Projects - Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2004-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the installation of a fenced stream crossing over the Pahsimeroi River to enhance a livestock riparian enclosure. This structure would include up to four wood fence posts and two deadman anchors buried in the ground. The goal of this project is to enhance salmon and steelhead rearing and migration habitat by preventing livestock from entering the riparian area via the river. The NEPA compliance checklist for this project was completed by Carl Rudeen with the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (August 4, 2004) and meets the standards and guidelines for the Watershed Management Program Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The Endangered Species Act (ESA) listed species that may occur in the general vicinity of the project area are gray wolf, Canada lynx, bald eagle, Ute ladies'Tresses, Snake River chinook salmon, Snake River steelhead trout, and Columbia River Basin bull trout. It was determined that the proposed fence crossing construction project would have no effect on these species. Bald eagle, gray wolf and Canada lynx are not known to occur in the immediate project vicinity. Since the site is used primarily as livestock pasture it does not lend itself to the presence of Ute ladies'Tresses. ESA listed fish may be present in the project vicinity but will not be affected because the project does not involve instream work. Soil disturbance will be limited to the livestock pasture and to two holes that will be used to bury anchors for the suspended portion of the fence. Required river crossings will be made on foot. Requirements associated with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act were handled by the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), in cooperation with staff from the U.S. Forest Service (Boise National Forest), under their existing Programmatic Agreement with the Idaho State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO). A description of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project and site information was reviewed by a qualified archaeologist and it was determined that an archaeological survey was needed. Bruce Blackmere with NRCS conducted an intensive-complete survey of the project site and cultural resources were not identified (July 30, 2004). Based on these findings, it was recommended that the project proceed as planned. All survey findings were provided to the Idaho SHPO. In the unlikely event that archaeological material is discovered during project implementation, an archaeologist should be notified immediately and work halted in the vicinity of the finds until they can be inspected and assessed. Standard water quality protection procedures and Best Management Practices should be followed during the implementation of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. No construction is authorized to begin until the proponent has obtained all applicable local, state, and federal permits and approvals. Public involvement has occurred as part of the Pahsimeroi Fence Crossing project. This project was coordinated through the Upper Salmon Basin Technical Team and Advisory Committee composed of representatives from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA Fisheries, Shoshone Bannock Tribe, and Idaho Department of Fish and Game. In addition, the Custer Soil and Water Conservation District holds monthly meetings that are open to the public in which this project was discussed.

  12. hurricane plan UNO HURRICANE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    hurricane plan #12;UNO HURRICANE PLAN TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION....................................................................................................................................................... 1 I. HURRICANE EMERGENCY TEAMS Hurricane Emergency Implementation Team (HEIT)......................................... 2 PPoosstt

  13. USDA Agricultural Conservation Easement Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) Agricultural Conservation Easement Program (ACEP) provides financial and technical assistance to help conserve agricultural lands, wetlands, and their related benefits.

  14. Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

  15. Nonprice incentives and energy conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asensio, OI; Delmas, MA; Delmas, MA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    individual choices about energy efficiency. Proc. Natl.4. Costa DL, Kahn ME (2013) Energy conservation “nudges” andInformation strategies and energy conservation behavior: a

  16. Soil Conservation Districts Law (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a soil and water conservation division within the Iowa Department of Agriculture, as well as local soil and water conservation districts. The regulations accompanying...

  17. Use of social information for habitat selection in songbirds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Shannon Leigh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that may result in improved fitness, resulting in positive behavioral responses to conspecifics as a habitat selection strategy. I conducted 3 replicated, manipulative experiments to investigate use of conspecific cues in habitat selection for the golden...

  18. Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Marilyn A.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

  19. Seasonal structure of fish communities at three barrier island habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitts, Donald Eugene

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    habitats with previously reported values from similar habitats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page Map of Galveston Island showing sampling stations (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SM = saltmarsh). Water... abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month (JB = jettied beachfront, OB = open beachfront and SN = saltmarsh) . 46 1B Cluster analysis dendrogram of mean species abundance in beach seine collections grouped by habitat and month...

  20. Indiana Conservancy Act (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Landowners in a given locality may petition for the establishment of a Conservancy District. Such districts may be created for the purpose of managing and regulating flood prevention and control,...

  1. Forest Conservation Act (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The main purpose of Maryland's Forest Conservation Act is to minimize the loss of Maryland's forest resources during land development by making the identification and protection of forests and...

  2. Estuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    stream restoration activities. Recommend NOOA fund. 11. Scaling-Up Native Oyster Will restore 4 acresEstuary Restoration Act Estuary Habitat Restoration Council Ranked Proposal Recommendation May 13, 2011 Project Name Description 1. Riverside Ranch Restoration Will restore 356 acres of estuarine

  3. LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    7 LAKE MICHIGAN'S TRIBUTARY AND NEARSHORE FISH HABITATS Edward S. Rutherford1 Background, the Lake Michigan LaMP was developed to comply with provisions in the GLWQA and to guide management-ranging, cooperative effort to design and implement a strategy for the 1 E.S. Rutherford. University of Michigan School

  4. Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Historical_Habitats File Geodatabase Feature Class Tags Historical ecology, Ventura, Oxnard View, Meiners Oaks, Camarillo, Somis, Ventura River, Santa Clara River, Calleguas Creek, Santa Paula Springs, Ormond Beach, Mandalay Beach, Pierpont Bay, McGrath Lake, Ventura County, Los Angeles County

  5. The Habitats Directive, Coastal Habitats and Climate Change -Case Studies from the South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    and mudflat areas, which decline under all the sea-level rise scenarios considered. Compensation locations ­ `managed realignment' ­ is a response to the loss of saltmarsh and mudflat habitats (ENVIRONMENT

  6. Doyle Conservation Center (DCC)

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Leominster, MA Built on a 50-acre reservation in Leominster, the Doyle Conservation Center (DCC) houses core Trustees staff and serves as a central training facility that showcases the organization's conservation activities. The DCC's LEED Gold rating reflects the mission of the Trustees of Reservations, which is "To preserve, for public use and enjoyment, properties of exceptional scenic, historic, and ecological value in Massachusetts." The DCC is accessible to the public and is often rented out by various groups and organizations.

  7. Habitat destruction and extinction in competitive and mutualistic metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    habitat loss is a leading cause of extinction, it is important to identify what kind of species is most competitive metapopulations. Metacommunities of mutualists can suffer the abrupt extinction of both species species coexist to predict their response to habitat loss. Keywords Habitat destruction, extinction

  8. Influence of grazing management on population attributes, habitats, and habitat selection of bobwhites in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, Robert Neal

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accounting for the comparatively poorer quail survival and reproduction on the 2PDG. Discriminant analysis procedures were used to delineate differences between quail selected and available habitats. fusil on both areas selected sites which were best... RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Grazing Pressures Population Attributes Habitat Characteristics Discriminant Analysis CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS LITERATURE CITED 19 23 23 25 32 58 69 74 APPENDIX A APPENDIX B VITA 77 78 79 LIST OF TABLES...

  9. Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Biology ­Conservation Biology Bachelor of Science [AS Geology Elective 3-4 See note 2 on page 2 General Elective 4 #12;Roadmap: Environmental and Conservation Summary on page 2 Conservation Biology Concentration Elective 2 See note 3 on page 2 Semester Five: [15

  10. Comparing strategies: State funding of capital projects versus water conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Dr. Calvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    10 tx H2O Winter 2013 Column by Dr. Calvin Finch, Water Conservation and Technology Center director COMPARING STRATEGIES State funding of capital projects versus water conservation The Texas Legislature seems intent on helping local water... purveyors #30;nance a portion of the water supply projects described in the #18;#25;#28;#18; state water plan (Water for Texas #31;#28;#29;#31;). #31;e plan says that #17;#18;#24;.#27; billion is needed from the state to meet our water needs...

  11. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

  12. A compendium of energy conservation success stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

  13. Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGowan, Vance

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

  14. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of particular habitats, contiguity to other protected habitat, role of the parcel in the lifecycle of a species

  15. Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1990 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rowe, Mike

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual report contains three individual subproject sections detailing tribal fisheries work completed during the summer and fall of 1990. Subproject I contains summaries of evaluation/monitoring efforts associated with the Bear Valley Creek, Idaho enhancement project. Subproject II contains an evaluation of the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River habitat enhancement project. Subproject III concerns the East Fork of the Salmon River, Idaho.

  16. Guam Energy Action Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

  17. SAVEnergy Action Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, K.; Westby, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); deMonsabert, S. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States)] [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States); Ginsberg, M. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)] [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) is charged with carrying out key sections of EPACT and Executive Order 12903, to make the Federal government operate more efficiently. A congressionally mandated energy and water conservation audit program is one component of this growing DOE program. This paper traces the SAVEnergy Action Plan program throughout its development from (1) identifying projects and Agency champions, (2) establishing a protocol and fitting auditors into the program, (3) developing a data base to track the audits and measure their success, and (4) evaluating the process, learning from mistakes, and charting and transferring successes. A major tenet of the SAVEnergy program is to proactively prescreen all audit activities to ensure that -- where audits are done and Action Plans completed -- projects will be done.

  18. Conservation and drought management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finch, Calvin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    management are related, but they are not the same. Water conservation is a long-term e#27;ort to reduce the amount of water it takes to manufacture goods, manage households and care for landscapes. Drought management is water-use rules initiated to deal... using less water comes only if people caring for the landscape choose to use the right amount of water at the right time to take advantage of the plants? capabilities. Water purveyors can conserve water with good maintenance and leak repair...

  19. Energy-conserving development regulations: current practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost every aspect of land development has an effect on energy use, from minute architectural details to broad considerations of urban density. Energy-efficiency depends in part on how development is planned and carried out. Conventional development regulations, such as zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, can be adapted in many ways to promote energy conservation at the community level. This report is about energy-efficient site and neighborhood design. It examines recent experiences of local governments that have adopted new development regulations or amended existing ones to promote energy conservation, more efficient generation and distribution, or a switch to alternative, renewable sources. Although much has been written in recent years about saving energy through community design, actual experience in applying these new ideas is still limited. To date, most communities have focused their efforts on studying the problem, documenting consumption patterns, and writing reports and plans. Only a handful have amended their land-use controls for the express purpose of saving energy. This study identifies 13 of these pioneering communities, after undertaking a survey of over 1400 local, regional, and state planning agencies. It takes a look at their experiences, to learn what has been done, how well it has worked, and what problems have been encountered.

  20. Linear Program to Select Energy Conservation Projects in an Existing Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mak, J. Y.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and petrJchemical industries for scheduling, product planning and utility system optimization. In an energy audit of a refinery or chemical plant, linear programming is a very useful technique in the screening of potential energy conservation projects...

  1. Understanding the Participation of Marginal Groups in Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahal, Smriti

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    community involvement in planning, implementation and monitoring of programs has been broadly encouraged, especially in developing countries. Although considered a more effective alternative to top down decision making, participatory conservation initiatives...

  2. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  3. The Conservation Alternative 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allaire, W. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Of all of the issues involved in our national energy dilemma, the matter of conservation of energy has, without a doubt, received major attention. Much has been said on the subject and certainly a great deal has been written on the many facets...

  4. Conservation of waterlogged linoleum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coke, BobbyeJo Evon

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    . In agreement with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, a study was commissioned to seek the best means to conserve linoleum from a canal boat excavated in the summer of 2002 in Lake Champlain. The Sloop Island Canal Boat is part of an excavation project...

  5. Foundry energy conservation workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses methods for promoting energy conservation in foundries. Use of electric power, natural gas, and coke are evaluated. Waste heat recovery systems are considered. Energy consumption in the specific processes of electric melting, natural gas melting, heat treatments, ladle melting, and coke fuel melting is described. An example energy analysis is included. (GHH)

  6. The vacuum conservation theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Minguzzi

    2015-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A version of the vacuum conservation theorem is proved which does not assume the existence of a time function nor demands stronger properties than the dominant energy condition. However, it is shown that a stronger stable version plays a role in the study of compact Cauchy horizons.

  7. Renewables for Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Rangan

    available ­wood, rice husk,coconut stalks,shells , sugarcane leaves, bagasse 20%CO, 15%H2,4%CH4 , 11%CO2 REFINED OIL, ELECTRICITY RAILWAYS, TRUCKS, PIPELINES WHAT CONSUMERS BUY DELIVERED ENERGY AUTOMOBILE, LAMP Fossil fuel reserves finite Motivation for energy conservation ­ Cost Reduction, Emission reduction

  8. Conservation and solar guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines are given for selecting R-values and infiltration levels, and determining the size of the solar collection area for passive solar buildings. The guidelines are based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of conservation and passive solar strategies. Tables are given for 90 cities in the US and the results are also displayed on maps. An example is included.

  9. Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaivoda, Alexis

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

  10. Modeling the choice to switch from fuelwood to electricity Implications for giant panda habitat conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Li

    , 1992). Asia, owing to its large population and the critical role that fuel- wood plays in the local (especially the determi- nants of rural household fuel substitution) is believed to be essential in relieving Dependence on fuelwood as the major energy source in rural areas of many developing countries has caused

  11. Land use changes and raptor conservation in steppe habitats of Eastern Kazakhstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrete, Martina

    Hidrologi´a, Universidad de Murcia, 30100 Espinardo, Murcia, Spain c Institute of Zoology, Akademgorodok

  12. Behavioral ecology and conservation of large mammals: historical distribution, reintroduction and the effects of fragmented habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad, Oranit

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , including effects of migration corridors; (2) identification of possible predators of the reintroduced species; and (3) a post-reintroduction assessment including an evaluation of the species' population dynamics. In this study I examine the suitability...

  13. Energy-conserving site design: case study, The Woodlands, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, M

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located north of Houston. It includes 22,000 acres and the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center called the Metro Center and several additional tracts, such as the Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Each village is to be structured around one large and several supporting neighborhood centers. Ultimate population is planned to be 150,000. Included in this report are sections on background, team structure and organization, methodological considerations, the conventional and energy-conserving plan, constraints to implementation, and general conclusions and next phases.

  14. Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Browne, Dave

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

  15. Conservation Practice and Policy Taking the Conservation Biology Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    to transform the topics of conservation biology research into environmental-issue and ecology topics, the major (environmental issues). Many studies published in Conservation Biology are related in some way to the ecological of their effect on the world. Keywords: conservation biology, ecology education, education, environmental

  16. Staff summary of Issues and Recommendations Long Term O&M Contingency Plans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues and Recommendations Long Term O&M Contingency Plans *Preliminary draft. Overview The majority the recommendations received by the Council regarding long term O&M/contingency plans)to ensure long-term funding of O&M (35) 3. Fish Screens and Fishways a. The habitat based Program relies

  17. Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand for water is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected. The Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas are carrying out a number of successful programs in the areas of education and public awareness, technical assistance...

  18. Proactive Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 20 Landowners and agricultural producers in the Cedar Creek watershed are working with agency representatives and gov- ernment leaders on a proactive plan to help reduce pollution flowing into Cedar Creek Reservoir. The 34...-county watershed have an opportunity to voice their opinions and help draft the watershed protection plan for the reservoir. The plan, which will outline ways to reduce pollution and improve water quality, is an outgrowth of years of water quality monitoring...

  19. BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollander, Jack M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposures: The Impact of Energy Conservation in Buildings,"1. "Another Look at Energy Conservation," Papers and79. Griffin, J. 1979. Energy Conservation in OECD Countries.

  20. BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, C.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Institutional Barriers to Energy Conservation C. M. York, C.P.R. , 1973. "Energy Conservation in Buildings: ItsS. (eds. ), 1973. Energy Conservation: Implica­ tions for

  1. MEASURING ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH UTILITY BILLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deckel, Walter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Program of Energy Conservation for the Community CollegeLBL-7836, May 1978, Energy Conservation on Campus", FEA/D-Journal MEASURING ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH UTILITY BILLS

  2. Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    these limited resources is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected for the benefit of the state?s economy, our natural ecosystems, and our quality of life. The Texas Water Code, Chapter 36, calls for the creation of Groundwater Conservation... groundwater reservoirs or their subdivisions.? In Texas, local deci- sion making through Groundwater Conservation Districts has been the rule and not the exception. In fact, Groundwater Conservation Districts are the state?s preferred method of groundwater...

  3. Strategic Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a single BPA data repository * Data quality improvements * Improve model alignment with WECC planning data * Improve WECC base case coordination * Align the BPA data model with...

  4. Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

  5. LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

  6. aegypti larval habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    patterns in modeled particle transport to estuarine habitat with comparisons to larval fish Geosciences Websites Summary: settlement patterns of red drum larvae (Sciaenops...

  7. anopheline breeding habitats: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strategies (e.g., maintaining engineered wetlands with an appropriate hydroperiod length) employed in cases of direct habitat loss. The timing of emigration away from natal...

  8. Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

  9. Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fredlund, Corps, 503-808-4510 (EDITORS: Click for maps, photos and video.) Major habitat purchase in Columbia estuary benefits salmon The Columbia Land Trust, Bonneville Power...

  10. Environmental Management System Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

  11. Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open Energy Sector:ErgenicsHabitat

  12. Managing the Transition State for Energy Strategic Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koehler, T. A.

    MANAGING THE TRANSITION STATE FOR ENERGY STRATEGIC PLANNING a Thomas A. Koehler Eastman Kodak Company Rochester, New York ABSTRACT Corporate energy conservation programs have made substantial gains in reducing energy consumption during... the last decade. The responses to survive the mid-1970's global energy uncertainties were made in a crisis environment. Now, there is a transition from energy conservation to energy strategic planning. Energy engineers and managers need to im prove...

  13. Conservation and solar guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines are given for selecting R-values and infiltration levels, and determining the size of the solar collection area for passive solar buildings. The guidelines are based on balancing the incremental cost/benefit of conservation and passive solar strategies. Tables are given for 90 cities in the United States and the results are also displayed on maps. The procedures are developed in an appendix, which gives the cost assumptions used and explains how to develop different guidelines for different costs.

  14. Environmental Studies and Planning Page 147Sonoma State University 2008-2010 Catalog Department Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Dministrative cOOrDinatOr Jo-Ann Smith Faculty Caroline Christian / Environmental Conservation and Restoration / Energy Management and Design Laura Watt / Environmental Conservation and Restoration, Planning *Faculty and the environment energy management and Design environmental conservation and restoration Outdoor Leadership

  15. Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Boilers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Boilers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  16. Amarillo Metropolitan Transportation Plan 2010-2035

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amarillo Metropolitan Planning Organization

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , natural resources, environmental protection, conservation, and historic preservation concerning the development of long- and short- range transportation plans. MPO maintains a website www.amarillompo.org that includes this Metropolitan Transportation... Commissioner City of Amarillo Alan M. Taylor City Manager City of Amarillo Howard Holland, P.E. District Engineer TxDOT Kenneth Petr, P.E. Dir. of Transportation Planning & Development TxDOT Judge Arthur Ware County Judge Potter County H.R. Kelly County...

  17. Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services Coordinating Energy Efficiency With Water Conservation Services Better Buildings Residential Network Program...

  18. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merenlender, Adina

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review Paper Maintaining and restoring hydrologic habitat connectivity in mediterranean streams: an integrated modeling framework Adina M. Merenlender · Mary K. Matella of hydrologic habitat connectivity and benefits of habitat restoration alternatives we provide: (1) a review

  19. Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes (Tripterygiidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shima, Jeff

    Habitat configuration and availability influences the settlement of temperate reef fishes 29 September 2013 Available online 23 October 2013 Keywords: Attraction vs. production Fragmentation Habitat availability Habitat configuration Settlement Tripterygiidae To survive, most benthic marine

  20. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 percent. Habitat selection ratios showed a preference for ridge as well as grassland habitat and avoidance of bare ground and flatland habitats. The location data from west Texas was further analyzed to build a predictive logistic regression model...

  1. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  2. anadronous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadronous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  3. anadromus fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromus fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Essential Fish Habitat and...

  4. Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Sze-Bi

    Global Dynamics of Zooplankton and Harmful Algae in Flowing Habitats Sze-Bi Hsu Feng-Bin Wang Xiao from the dynamics of harmful algae and zooplankton in flowing- water habitats where a main channel. For the system modeling the dynamics of algae and their toxin that contains little limiting nutrient, we

  5. RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    RESTORING AND MAINTAINING RIPARIAN HABITAT ON PRIVATE PASTURELAND1 Nancy Reichard2 1 Presented Resources. Redwood Community Action Agency. Eureka, Calif. Abstract: Protecting riparian habitat from livestock grazing on private land is a complex task that requires paying attention to sociological

  6. Influence of Habitat Modifications on Habitat Composition and Anadromous Salmonid Populations in Fish Creek, Oregon, 1983-1988 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Gordon H.; Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Hohler, David B. (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR)

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of degraded habitats to increase populations of anadromous salmonids is a major focus of management agencies throughout the Pacific Northwest. Millions of dollars are spent annually on such efforts. Inherent in implementing habitat improvements is the need for quantitative evaluation of the biological and physical effects of such work. Reeves et al. (in press), however, noted that such evaluations are rare, making it difficult to assess the true results of habitat work. While it is not economically possible to thoroughly evaluate every habitat project, it is essential that intensive evaluations be done on selected representative projects. One such evaluation program has been underway since 1982 on Fish Creek, a tributary of the Clackamas River near Estacada, OR. Habitat modification has been done by the USDA Forest Service, Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest with funding provided in part by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The USDA Forest Service, Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit, Pacific Northwest Research Station (PNW), Corvallis, OR is charged with: (1) evaluating the biological and physical responses to habitat modifications on a basin scale; and (2) developing a cost-benefit analysis of the program. Preliminary results have been reported in a series of annual publications, Everest and Sedell 1983, 1984 and Everest et al. 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988. The objectives of this paper are to: (1) report 1988 observations of biological and physical changes in habitat, salmonid populations, and smolt production in Fish Creek, and (2) examine preliminary trends in fish habitat and populations related to habitat improvement over the period 1983-1988. We have prefaced the trends in the latter objective as preliminary because we believe it could take a minimum of 10 years before the full biological and physical responses to habitat work are realized. We therefore urge caution in interpreting these preliminary results.

  7. Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

  8. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the public and private sectors in providing a supply of high quality urban water? Best management practices in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operation

  9. Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's loads · Bonneville sells wholesale power to over 120 publicly-owned utilities · Variability in hydro generation led to development of the nation's first major spot market for wholesale power · Bonneville built and wholesale power are low · Retirement of coal-fired plants have been announced; will require development

  10. October 2014 Seventh Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of complying with regulations on air and water pollution control, disposal of waste products, fuel extraction costs o new regulations? e.g., Mercury and Air Toxics Standard Residual effects? residual effects after for regulating carbon emissions under Clean Air Act: - 111(b) -- applies to new power plants: use? how

  11. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    electricity can provide, such as heat for homes, lights for commercial buildings, or motors for industrial

  12. Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Flexibility Adequacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    load - curtail wind until loads build up Unforecasted downramp during peak load - dispatch reserve uncertainties Extrapolating from BA-scale integration assessments to regional scale Wind development for flexibility is unevenly allocated among BAs Bonneville, NWE · Bonneville pressed because: Scale of penetration

  13. 2009 RARE PLANT CONSERVATION INITIATIVE IMPLEMENTATION PLAN (May 4, 2009)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Section 6 fund for listed species-late summer RFP · GOCO · NFWF-acres for America · Economic stimulus

  14. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and procedures to its employees and continues to improve its in-house preventive maintenance program. TTI contributes in keeping vehicles at their peak efficiency, TTI maintains an in-house preventive maintenance program for all fleet vehicles. Preventive maintenance procedures as recommended by the SFVMP as well

  15. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -house preventive maintenance program. TTI is committed to minimizing fuel use in its fleet vehicles while adhering maintains an in-house preventive maintenance program for all fleet vehicles. Preventive maintenance its preventive maintenance program · Consideration of fuel efficiency rating when purchasing fleet

  16. Texas Transportation Institute Energy Management and Conservation Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and continues to improve its in-house preventive maintenance program. #12;Texas Transportation Institute Energy efficiency, TTI maintains an in-house preventive maintenance program for all fleet vehicles. Preventive methods to improve its preventive maintenance program · Consideration of fuel efficiency rating when

  17. California Natural Community Conservation Plan Act | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:EzfeedflagBiomassSustainableCSL Gas Recovery Biomass16 2013Management86Use

  18. Information, Planning, and Conservation (IPAC) online screening tool | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWPIndiantown, Florida:Inerjy JumpInformationEnergy

  19. Nevada Department of Wildlife Energy Planning and Conservation Fund Website

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall, Pennsylvania: EnergyEnergyPPCR) JumpAir QualityBureau of101Highway| Open

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

  1. ACQUISITION PLANNING

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition...

  2. Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue memorandum, the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) requested that the ISRP conduct additional review in which TPL would purchase the property from the developer, convey the conservation easement to WDFW

  3. Energy Conservation & Behavior Modification Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodin, E.; Hanner, S.; Mitchel, R.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information Technology O&M Savings A balanced approach maximizes savings Managing the Human Element of Energy Consumption Those of us who call ourselves energy analyst have made a mistake?we have analyzed energy. We should have... of District Admin was key to moving our conservation efforts to the next level. 14 Conserve My Planet ? Allen ISD ?First Energy Conservation Week Contest - SUCCESS! ?Winning School received Energy All Star Trophy ?District Wide Savings...

  4. Clark County- Energy Conservation Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In September 2010, Clark County adopted Ordinance 3897, implementing the Southern Nevada version of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for both residential and commercial buildings...

  5. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OAQDA) administers the Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECB) program in Ohio. QECBs have been used by local governments and public universities to...

  6. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 4: Conservation Supply Assumptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that ensure that new and existing residential buildings, household appliances, new and existing commercial buildings, commercial-sector appliances, commercial infrastructure such as street lighting and sewage....................................................................................................................... 8 Commercial Sector

  7. Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix E: Conservation Supply Curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................... 11 Value of Energy Saved ......................................................................................................................... 17 Residential Sector Definition and Coverage........................................................................................................................ 22 Commercial Sector Definition and Coverage

  8. Urban/Suburban Landscape & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    of groundwater 5) Increased production of CO2 #12;3 Ground water pollution due to "storm run-off" - Construction.S. was fairly distinctly split into localized urban- industrial landscapes and widespread rural landscapes to development pressure in terms of housing, infrastructure and industry Impacting habitat cont. 1) Fragmentation

  9. 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals or desired future conditions for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    175 6. Hood River Subbasin Management Plan This Chapter presents a vision that describes goals for this Management Plan is 10-15 years. The Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) model was used in the Hood River and August-October streamflow records; and 2) a habitat-population modeling effort recently completed

  10. Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiser, Dudley W.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

  11. Company shelves dam to avoid agency's conservation edict

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Northern Paper Co. is shelving plans to build a hydroelectric dam because of two stipulations by the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC) requiring the company to fund a comprehensive energy audit of several mills in the area and submit a plan for modernizing outdated paper producing machines. Critics of the dam contend that in-plant conservation would free up more power than the dam would produce. The basis for this was an internal memo citing possible large amounts of wasted energy from motors that need rewinding. Although the company is retaining the option to build, the future of the Big A dam is uncertain.

  12. A new mechanism for energy conservation technology services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Feng

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the ninth-five year plan of China, the socialist market economy model will be developed. In the stage of transferring from planning economy to market economy, the energy conservation technology services industry in China has met new challenges. Over the past ten to fifteen years, there has developed a new mechanism for financing energy efficiency investments in market economies. The process is simple. After inspecting an enterprise or an entity for energy saving opportunities, an Energy Service Company (ESCO) which business aimed at making money will review the recommended energy conservation opportunities with the enterprise or the entity (user) and implement those measures acceptable to the user at no front end cost to the user. The ESCO then guarantees that the energy savings will cover the cost of the capital renovations using the Performance Contracting.

  13. Relativistic dynamics without conservation laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Rothenstein; Stefan Popescu

    2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that relativistic dynamics can be approached without using conservation laws (conservation of momentum, of energy and of the centre of mass). Our approach avoids collisions that are not easy to teach without mnemonic aids. The derivations are based on the principle of relativity and on its direct consequence, the addition law of relativistic velocities.

  14. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Environmental Pre-Law provides a solid undergraduate-use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Specialization: Environmental Pre-Law Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest Resources

  15. Conservation Stand! Reducing My Commute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    . + Diverts plastic waste for food production. + Placed beside window, replaces light input with solarConservation Stand! Reducing My Commute 72.6 mi to 5.1 mi #12;#12;Conserving Water and Energy or contribution to sedimentation. + Food produced on site without transportation costs. - Depends on energy input

  16. Fresh Water Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huffman, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water for Future Generations ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 The demand for water in Texas will soon outstrip our supply. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Worst yearlong drought... in Texas history. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 Record-breaking wildfires across the state. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas, Texas, Nov. 7 ? 9, 2011 We must plan for the future. ESL-KT-11-11-06 CATEE 2011, Dallas...

  17. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  18. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  19. MSc Conservation The leading degree for aspiring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    benefits from the participation of staff from a variety of external conservation and environmental,000wordswiththesupportofanacademicsupervisor. 1st term (60 credits) Core module: Conservation and environmental management This moduleMSc Conservation The leading degree for aspiring nature conservation professionals www.geog.ucl.ac.uk/conservation

  20. area habitat evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or test results. Please return this form to: Gray Squirrel; Wildlife Service; U. S. Fish; Wildlife Service 1987-01-01 2 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Group CiteSeer Summary:...

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    executive director for the Habitat affiliate. "We started doing ENERGY STAR about 5 years ago, and DOE Builders Challenge 3 years ago, and then DOE Zero Energy Ready Home...

  2. Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Lowland Habitat Networks in Scotland: Phase 2 Jonathan Humphrey1 , Mike Smith1 reproduced from Ordnance Survey material with the permission of Ordnance Survey on behalf of the Controller...............................................................................11 3.5 Construction of landuse change scenarios

  3. Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    appliances, and ceiling fans, a solar water heater, an ERV, and a high-efficiency heat pump. To keep the ducts in conditioned space, the Habitat affiliate installed a rigid...

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. Manatee County Habitat for Humanity - Ellenton, FL More Documents & Publications...

  6. Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

  7. Habitat associations of fish assemblages in the Sulphur River, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morgan, Michael Neal

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of an instream flow study, information on summer distribution of fishes and habitat variables was collected from six sites at each of three flows in the Sulphur River, Texas. I evaluated (1) spatiotemporal relationships between instream...

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  10. Habitat Appraisal Guide for Rio Grande Wild Turkey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Ransom, Dean; DeMaso, Stephen; Schwertner, T. Wayne; Collier, Bret

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    and structure of the roost 5 Glennon and Porter (1999) found that townships in southwest New York with greater interspersion of forests and open areas supported larger turkey populations. Further- more, habitat suitability increased by provid- ing smaller...

  11. Essential Fish Habitat (EFH) 5-year Review for 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ...............................................................................................................................9 4 ENVIRONMENTAL AND MANAGEMENT CHANGES SINCE 2005 EFH EIS ANALYSIS.................................................................................................................... 10 4.1 Environmental and habitat changes since 2005 EFH EIS ..............................................................................10 4.2 Research since the EFH EIS

  12. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  13. assess soil degradation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitats, soil animals, land use and soil conservation. Includes teacher-tested lesson plans, assessment methods and suggestions for further study. Integrates science with...

  14. agroforestry soil fertility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    habitats, soil animals, land use and soil conservation. Includes teacher-tested lesson plans, assessment methods and suggestions for further study. Integrates science with...

  15. PROGRESS IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY PERSPECTIVE -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conference, "New Energy Conservation Technologies", Berlin,IN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRYIN RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSERVATION - A MULTI COUNTRY

  16. Residential Energy Conservation: Standards, Subsidies, and Public Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quigley, John M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information for energy conservation tax credits. Qualifyinglations Establishing Energy Conservation Standards for Newof the Residential Energy Conservation Tax Credits: Concepts

  17. Waterfowl food and habitat utilization on a southern reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouchley, James Kelby

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Twenty ? one waterfowl surveys were conducted during the first season 12 and data from 13 of these were used in the habitat utilization analysis. Eight surveys were in the second seasons analysis. These surveys were chosen on the basis of thoroughness...WATERFOWL FOOD AND HABITAT UTILIZATION ON A SOUTHERN RESERVOIR A Thesis by JAMES KELBY OUCHLEY 1 Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May...

  18. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  19. Habitat selection of the Wood Thrush nesting in east Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrie, Neil Ross

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1995 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences HABITAT SELECTION OF THE WOOD THRUSH NESTING IN EAST TEXAS A Thesis by NEIL ROSS CARRIE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  20. POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AMHERST related to environmental conservation, policy and management. Candidates should have strong quantitative of Environmental Conservation hosts a multi-disciplinary group of faculty with nationally ranked programs

  1. Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silander Jr., John A.

    Stakeholder analysis a b s t r a c t Conservation justice, a concept analogous to environmental justiceConservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area J xxxx Keywords: Conservation justice Community-based conservation South Africa Urban conservation

  2. Project Based Energy Conservation vs. Management Based Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judy, K.; O'Brien, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic American Foods (BAF) is the largest potato dehydrator worldwide. This paper will trace the shift from a Project Based to Management Based energy conservation program. Second only to raw material, energy is one of the highest expenses at BAF...

  3. Project Based Energy Conservation vs. Management Based Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judy, K.; O'Brien, S.

    Basic American Foods (BAF) is the largest potato dehydrator worldwide. This paper will trace the shift from a Project Based to Management Based energy conservation program. Second only to raw material, energy is one of the highest expenses at BAF...

  4. Energy planning and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

  5. Plan Your School Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plan Your School Visit For Teachers Teachers Visit the Museum We Visit You Teacher Resources Home Schoolers Plan Your School Visit invisible utility element Plan Your School Visit...

  6. February 25, 2005 NUMERICAL ENERGY CONSERVATION FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tübingen, Universität

    February 25, 2005 NUMERICAL ENERGY CONSERVATION FOR MULTI­FREQUENCY OSCILLATORY DIFFERENTIAL systems, modulated Fourier expansion, energy conservation, oscillatory solutions. 1 Introduction

  7. February 6, 2004 NUMERICAL ENERGY CONSERVATION FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hairer, Ernst

    February 6, 2004 NUMERICAL ENERGY CONSERVATION FOR MULTI­FREQUENCY OSCILLATORY DIFFERENTIAL, Hamiltonian systems, modulated Fourier expansion, energy conservation, oscillatory solutions. 1 Introduction

  8. Final Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement Background...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 17, 2014 Page 1 Final Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement Background and Need: This Conservation Billing Credit Policy Supplement describes how Bonneville Power...

  9. Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and...

  10. Water Conservation and Water Use Efficiency (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin has several statutes that promote water conservation and controlled water use, and this legislation establishes mandatory and voluntary programs in water conservation and water use...

  11. Cooling Towers, Energy Conservation Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooling towers, in all too many industrial plants, are often the neglected units of the process chain which are hidden bonanzas for energy conservation and dollar savings. By lowering the entire systems temperature by the use of colder water...

  12. Oil and Gas Conservation (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Parts 1 and 2 of this chapter contain a broad range of regulations pertaining to oil and gas conservation, including requirements for the regulation of oil and gas exploration and extraction by the...

  13. Cooling Tower Energy Conservation Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, R.

    Energy conservation strategies involve more than examination of fan horsepower. Colder water and pumping head provide vast savings potentials. What is dollar value of 1°F in your process? What is dollar cost of pumping water to distribution system...

  14. California's Energy Policy: Conservation Works

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greene, D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conservation is the foundation of California's energy policy and the largest single source of the state's 'new energy supply'. Our goal is to use economic market forces and government programs to direct energy Investments away from our current...

  15. Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ''Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008'', enacted in October 2008, authorized the issuance of Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) that may be used by state, local and tribal...

  16. Electric Utility Industrial Conservation Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norland, D. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy conducted a study, funded by the John A. Hartford Foundation, of industrial and commercial electricity conservation opportunities in the service territory of Arkansas Power and Light Company (AP&L). The study determined...

  17. Soil and Water Conservation (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida’s 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in 1937 under Chapter 582 Florida Statutes. The law was based on federal model legislation to establish Soil and Water...

  18. Nancy Leonard Northwest Power & Conservation Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and suggestions. Many of the HLI pertain to anadromous fish species and their habitat and, because Montana has no anadromous fish, we focused on resident fish and their habitat in Montana. Adding indicators for resident fish will increase the potential to effectively communicate the Program's progress to stakeholders

  19. California's Russian River: A Conservation Partnership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Improve weather and river flow forecasting to maximize water captured for reservoirs and fisheries support forecast-based reservoir operations and allow for improved water management. It may also provide's Russian River Habitat Blueprint #12;Restore floodplain habitat through reclamation of abandoned gravel

  20. Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stewardship Environmental Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Documents Individual Permit: Plans, Updates, Regulatory Documents1335769200000Plans...

  1. Annual Training Plan Template

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Annual Training Plan Template is used by an organization's training POC to draft their organization's annual training plan.

  2. Underground storage tank management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

  3. Disability Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirectionsDirectorateDisability Plans

  4. Vision Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilize AvailableMedia1.1 The History of theVision Plan

  5. Plans, Procedures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding accessPeptoidLabPhysics Physics Oursources |VisitPlans,

  6. Strategic Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSiteSeparationsRelevantStrategic Plan

  7. Medical Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDispositionMechanical R&DMakingMedical Plans

  8. Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume I, Oregon, Supplement A: Habitat Enhancement Evaluation of Fish and Wash Creeks, 1983 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everest, Fred

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat improvements for anadromous salmonids on Fish Creek in the upper Clackamas Basin were evaluated. The primary objectives of the evaluation effort include: (1) evaluate and quantify the changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat improvements; (2) evaluate and quantify the changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements; and (3) evaluate the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and KV funds on Fish Creek. This report integrates data for the evaluation efforts collected in the Fish Creek Basin in 1982 and 1983. 3 references, 34 figures, 23 tables.

  9. Locally Led Conservation The Local Work Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grants ­ Conservation Stewardship Program ­ Environmental Quality Incentive Program ­ Farm & Ranch Lands1 Locally Led Conservation & The Local Work Group Mark Habiger NRCS #12;2 What Is "Locally Led Conservation"? · Community Stakeholders ­ 1. Assessing their natural resource conservation needs ­ 2. Setting

  10. NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    FACT SHEET For NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION Draft New York State Conservation Law #12;New York State Department of Environmental Conservation Draft New York State Pollutant-0-09-001) FACT SHEET Introduction The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation ("the

  11. Conservation Resource Advisory Role in Council Plan DevelopmentRole in Council Plan Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -effectiveness & "economic feasibility" for buildings, appliances & equipment (Residential & Commercial) § Review need

  12. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  13. Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashley, Paul

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

  14. Landscape and Urban Planning 92 (2009) 19 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An, Li

    and Urban Planning journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/landurbplan Spatial and temporal patterns higher in elevation, more remote, and closer to highly suitable panda habitat from the 1970s to the 1990s the needs of local communities. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Approximately 3

  15. A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimberly Carlo

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

  16. Groundwater planning in Texas: paradigm shifts and implications for the future 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Vanessa Christine

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    . Then in 2005, HB 1763 gave groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) the authority to determine groundwater availability instead of regions. The purpose of this research is to explore the overall impact of the regional planning process and how the change...

  17. Groundwater planning in Texas: paradigm shifts and implications for the future 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Vanessa Christine

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    . Then in 2005, HB 1763 gave groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) the authority to determine groundwater availability instead of regions. The purpose of this research is to explore the overall impact of the regional planning process and how the change...

  18. Open Subsystems of Conservative Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Figotin; Stephen P. Shipman

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject under study is an open subsystem of a larger linear and conservative system and the way in which it is coupled to the rest of system. Examples are a model of crystalline solid as a lattice of coupled oscillators with a finite piece constituting the subsystem, and an open system such as the Helmholtz resonator as a subsystem of a larger conservative oscillatory system. Taking the view of an observer accessing only the open subsystem we ask, in particular, what information about the entire system can be reconstructed having such limited access. Based on the unique minimal conservative extension of an open subsystem, we construct a canonical decomposition of the conservative system describing, in particular, its parts coupled to and completely decoupled from the open subsystem. The coupled one together with the open system constitute the unique minimal conservative extension. Combining this with an analysis of the spectral multiplicity, we show, for the lattice model in particular, that only a very small part of all possible oscillatory motion of the entire crystal, described canonically by the minimal extension, is coupled to the finite subsystem.

  19. MINOR for Natural Resources Conservation Conserving Earth's biological diversity and safeguarding the benefits or "ecosystem services"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    . Environmental Resources NRC 390E Evolution and Conservation (3cr-sprg) NRC 575 Case Studies in Conservation NRC for Natural Resources Conservation Conserving Earth's biological diversity and safeguarding the benefits resources conservation. In this minor, students learn about the ecology of terrestrial and aquatic

  20. ISSUANCE 2015-06-09: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Room Air Conditioners; Request for Information

  1. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  2. ISSUANCE 2014-12-11: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  3. ISSUANCE 2015-05-14: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dehumidifiers Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  4. ISSUANCE 2015-06-25: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Light Kits, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Light Kits, Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

  5. The International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Ransom A.

    the original FAO guidelines. For comprehensiveness, additional management and conservation measures for sharksThe International Plan of Action for Sharks: How does national implementation measure up? Brendal a greater need for effective conservation measures. In 1999 the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO

  6. Lorentz conserving noncommutative standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettefaghi, M. M.; Haghighat, M. [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider Lorentz-conserving noncommutative field theory to construct the Lorentz-conserving noncommutative standard model based on the gauge group SU(3)xSU(2)xU(1). We obtain the enveloping algebra-valued of Higgs field up to the second order of the noncommutativity parameter {theta}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}. We derive the action at the leading order and find new vertices which are absent in the ordinary standard model as well as the minimal noncommutative standard model. We briefly study the phenomenological aspects of the model.

  7. On the economic optimality of marine reserves when fishing damages habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moeller, Holly Villacorta

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I expand a spatially-explicit bioeconomic fishery model to include the negative effects of fishing effort on habitat quality. I consider two forms of effort driven habitat damage: First, fishing effort may ...

  8. Will a Forest Habitat Network in the Scottish Highlands be both feasible and truly sustainable? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Vanessa

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Forest Habitat Network (FHN) concept has emerged in recent years as a strategy to reverse processes of deforestation and ecosystem degradation by connecting existing woodland habitat and increasing forest area. This thesis presents a wide...

  9. The impacts of mining on the habitat ecology of raccoons in east-central Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beucler, Michele

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Habitat alterations associated with strip-mining and reclamation may reduce the suitability of an area for wildlife by redistributing requirements for survival and reproduction. I evaluated several predictions regarding the impacts of habitat...

  10. Wildlife Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giffen, Neil R [ORNL; Evans, James W. [TWRA; Parr, Patricia Dreyer [ORNL

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document outlines a plan for management of the wildlife resources on the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oak Ridge Reservation. Management includes wildlife population control through hunting, trapping, removal, and habitat manipulation; wildlife damage control; restoration of wildlife species; preservation, management, and enhancement of wildlife habitats; coordination of wildlife studies and characterization of areas; and law enforcement. Wildlife resources are divided into several categories, each with a specific set of objectives and procedures for attaining them. These objectives are management of (1) wildlife habitats to ensure that all resident wildlife species exist on the Reservation in viable numbers; (2) featured species to produce selected species in desired numbers on designated land units; (3) game species for research, education, recreation, and public safety; (4) the Three Bend Scenic and Wildlife Management Refuge Area; (5) nuisance wildlife, including nonnative species, to achieve adequate population control for the maintenance of health and safety on the Reservation; (6) sensitive species (i.e., state or federally listed as endangered, threatened, of special concern, or in need of management) through preservation and protection of both the species and habitats critical to the survival of those species; and (7) wildlife disease. Achievement of the objectives is a joint effort between the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency (TWRA) and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory through agreements between TWRA and DOE and between DOE and UT-Battelle, LLC.

  11. Performance Demonstration Program Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To demonstrate compliance with the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste characterization program, each testing and analytical facility performing waste characterization activities participates in the Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). The PDP serves as a quality control check against expected results and provides information about the quality of data generated in the characterization of waste destined for WIPP. Single blind audit samples are prepared and distributed by an independent organization to each of the facilities participating in the PDP. There are three elements within the PDP: analysis of simulated headspace gases, analysis of solids for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) constituents, and analysis for transuranic (TRU) radionuclides using nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Because the analysis for TRU radionuclides using NDA techniques involves both the counting of drums and standard waste boxes, four PDP plans are required to describe the activities of the three PDP elements. In accordance with these PDP plans, the reviewing and approving authority for PDP results and for the overall program is the CBFO PDP Appointee. The CBFO PDP Appointee is responsible for ensuring the implementation of each of these plans by concurring with the designation of the Program Coordinator and by providing technical oversight and coordination for the program. The Program Coordinator will designate the PDP Manager, who will coordinate the three elements of the PDP. The purpose of this management plan is to identify how the requirements applicable to the PDP are implemented during the management and coordination of PDP activities. The other participants in the program (organizations that perform site implementation and activities under CBFO contracts or interoffice work orders) are not covered under this management plan. Those activities are governed by the organization’s quality assurance (QA) program and procedures or as otherwise directed by CBFO.

  12. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  13. 2030 OCARTS Plan Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Association of Central Oklahoma Governments

    ......................................Director of Planning & Program Development Pearlie Tiggs................................................................... Community Planner 2030 OCARTS Plan Report Table of Contents PART 1 INTRODUCTION........................................................................ 1 Federal Legislation.......................................................................... 1 Purpose of the Plan Report and Relationship to other Plan Documents............. 3 Organization of the Transportation Planning Process...

  14. Distribution, habitat preference, competitive interactions and predation of French Polynesian Bryozoa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Connor D

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT PREFERENCE, COMPETITIVE INTERACTIONSfronds, I quantified the distribution of bryozoans in aorea, French Polynesia; distribution I NTRODUCTION Fouling

  15. Ontogenetic shift in habitat by early juvenile queen conch,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    using suction dredges (Iversen et a!., 1987; Stoner, unpub1. data) but few early juveniles have been populations IAppeldoorn, 1984), mass rearing of large juveniles (1- and 2-years-old) is costly (Siddall, 1983 with the identification of suitable habitats (Iversen et a!., 1986; Stoner and Sandt. 1991; Stoner, unpub1. data). Despite

  16. anadromous fish habitat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromous fish habitat First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Working paper on restoration...

  17. Habitat Abstracting Logic Melissa Bingham, Eric Cummings, Vincenzo Buttari, Sherryll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Jennifer S.

    habitat, navigates towards can, secures can, and abstracts it by locating recycle bin and then disposes World Applications ·Detection and removal of objects in an environment unsafe for humans. ·Recycling faster when battery is fully charged. Advisor: Dr. Jennifer Kay of Rowan University Computer Science

  18. Extinction rates under nonrandom patterns of habitat loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conversion on species extinctions assume that habitat conversion occurs at ran- dom. This assumption allows predictions about extinction rates based on the species­area relationship. We show that the spatially compositional gradients, or species richness, also alter pre- dicted species extinction rates. We illustrate

  19. THE BIOLOGY OF RARE AND DECLINING SPECIES AND HABITATS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities on declining species and habitats. Rarity, declining populations, and extinctions are natural may underiie llaturalpopulation declines of species leading to extirpationsand extinctions (Allendorf: additional factors push species towards extinction Ziswiler (1967) noted that 53 of the 77 species of birds

  20. Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    CIR 912 Creating Wildlife Habitat with Native Florida Freshwater Wetland Plants1 Martin B. Main by establishing and managing desirable native plants. Native wetland plants play important ecological roles many more species than non-native plants because native wildlife evolved with native plant communities

  1. Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Michael T.

    Ambient habitat noise and vibration at the Georgia Aquarium P. M. Scheifele Department significant levels of background noise due to pumps and motors. This noise, together with pool architecture to quantify the ambient noise levels in the water from machine vibration and from in-air performance speaker

  2. Restoration of Soldier Spring: an isolated habitat for native

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the channel and restore aquatic habitat along 450 m of degraded stream. Following treatment, the bed refilled in the stream declined as the degradation worsened, but it rebounded following the restoration treatments. While the stream. New restoration efforts began in 1998 with support from a number of tribal, federal, and school

  3. An Analysis of a Large Scale Habitat Monitoring Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    of the Atlantic University of California, Berkeley 2150 Shattuck Avenue 105 Eden St. Berkeley, California 94720 Berkeley, California 94704 Bar Harbor, ME 04609 ABSTRACT Habitat and environmental monitoring is a driving underestimated the impact of multi- hop traffic overhearing and the nuances of power source selection. While

  4. adaptable habitat construction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    adaptable habitat construction First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Appendix J 2008...

  5. The Efficiency of Liquidity Management in Islamic Banks (Conservative vs. Profit)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Efficiency of Liquidity Management in Islamic Banks (Conservative vs. Profit) Professor Abdul-Iraq) ABSTRACT The aim of this paper is to explaim and examines the liquidity efficiency in Islamic Banks to measure liquidity efficiency, where measurement of liquidity management efficiency helps in the planning

  6. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    and management. The program emphasizes sustainable, multiple-use management and includes substantial field work work, etc.) Fall FNR 4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems 3 credits FNR 4660 NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Forest Resource Management Forest

  7. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    -use management and includes substantial field work and group projects. Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in NaturalMajoring in Forest Resources & Conservation Specialization: Watershed Science & Management Watershed Science & Management prepares students to address the many management issues associated with water

  8. Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    for Management of Ecosystems, SWS4233 Soil & Water Conservation, SWS4245 Water Resource Sustainability or AEB with water resources, including soils, policy and water quality. The program emphasizes sustainable Affairs, FNR4624C FNR4624C Field Operations for Management of Ecosystems, SWS4233 Soil & Water

  9. Conservation and Global Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landweber, Laura

    V.6 Conservation and Global Climate Change Diane M. Debinski and Molly S. Cross OUTLINE 1. Introduction 2. How climate is changing 3. Environmental responses to climate change 4. Consequences of climate the coming decades will be preserving biodiversity in the face of climate change. It has become increasingly

  10. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Describes various energy strategies available to CNMI to meet the territory's goal of diversifying fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption. The information presented in this strategic energy plan will be used by the CNMI Governor's Energy Task Force to develop an energy action plan. Available energy strategies include policy changes, education and outreach, and expanding the use of a range of energy technologies, including renewable electricity production and buildings energy efficiency and conservation.

  11. Environmental Conservation: page 1 of 9 C Foundation for Environmental Conservation 2013 doi:10.1017/S0376892913000015 Rethinking property rights: comparative analysis of conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rissman, Adena

    Environmental Conservation: page 1 of 9 C Foundation for Environmental Conservation 2013 doi:10 INTRODUCTION Property is central to environmental conservation (Naughton- Treves&Sanderson1995.1017/S0376892913000015 Rethinking property rights: comparative analysis of conservation easements

  12. Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Relating fish biomass to habitat and chemistry in headwater streams of the northeastern United influencing total fish biomass in streams, but few studies have evaluated the relative influence of habitat and pH together. We measured total fish biomass, stream habitat, and stream pH in sixteen sites from

  13. 2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    . Annu. Conf. Southeast. Assoc. Fish and Wild. Agencies 59:227­240 Habitat selection by largemouth bass2005 Proc. Annu. Conf. SEAFWA Movement and Habitat Selection of Largemouth Bass in a Florida Steep Street, Ruskin, FL 33570 Abstract: The movement and habitat selection of largemouth bass (Micropterus

  14. Quantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeley, Ernest R.

    for stream-dwelling salmonids: guidelines for habitat restoration. Province of British Columbia, MinistryQuantitative Measures of Rearing And Spawning Habitat Characteristics For Stream-Dwelling Salmonids: Guidelines For Habitat Restoration by E.R. Keeley and P.A. Slaney Watershed Restoration Project Report No. 4

  15. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  16. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power System Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (BPA, 1994). Steigenvald Lake NWR is located in southwest Washington (Clark County), within the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area. Historically part of the Columbia River flood plain, the refuge area was disconnected from the river by a series of dikes constructed by the COE for flood control in 1966. An aerial photograph from 1948 portrays this area as an exceedingly complex mosaic of open water, wetlands, sloughs, willow and cottonwood stands, wet meadows, upland pastures, and agricultural fields, which once supported a large assemblage of fish and wildlife populations. Eliminating the threat of periodic inundation by the Columbia River allowed landowners to more completely convert the area into upland pasture and farmland through channelization and removal of standing water. Native pastures were 'improved' for grazing by the introduction of non-native fescues, orchard grass, ryegrass, and numerous clovers. Although efforts to drain the lake were not entirely successful, wetland values were still significantly reduced.

  17. Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project; Klickitat Watershed Enhancement, Annual Report 2002-2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conley, Will

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the Klickitat Watershed Enhancement Project (KWEP) is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of stream reaches and watersheds supporting native anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss; ESA- listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU) and spring Chinook (O. tshawytscha). Habitat restoration activities in the Klickitat subbasin augment goals and objectives of the Yakima Klickitat Fisheries Project (YKFP), NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the NMFS Biological Opinion (All-H paper). Work is conducted to enhance instream and contributing upland habitat to facilitate increased natural production potential for native salmonid stocks. Efforts in the Klickitat Subbasin fall into two main categories: (1) identification and prioritization of sites for protection and restoration activities, (2) implementation of protection and restoration measures. KWEP personnel also assist monitoring efforts of the YKFP Monitoring & Evaluation Project. During the September 2002-August 2003 reporting period, KWEP personnel continued efforts to address feedback from the August 2000 Provincial Review that indicated a need for better information management and development of geographic priorities by: (1) Assisting development of the Strategic Habitat Plan for the Klickitat Lead Entity (Task A3.1) and Klickitat steelhead EDT model (Task A4.1); (2) Improving the functionality of reference point, habitat unit, and large woody debris modules of the habitat database as well as addition of a temperature module (Tasks A1.1-1.2); (3) Continuing development and acquisition of GIS data (Task A1.3); (4) Ongoing data collection efforts to fill information gaps including streamflow, habitat, and temperature (Objectives C1 and C2); and (5) Completion of planning, field work, and hydrologic modeling associated with roads assessment in the White Creek watershed (Task A4.2). Significant milestones associated with restoration projects during the reporting period included: (1) Completion of the Surveyors Fish Creek Passage Enhancement project (Task B2.3); (2) Completion of interagency agreements for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat Mill (Task B2.10) projects; (3) Completion of topographic surveys for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4), Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5), Trout Creek and Bear Creek culvert replacements (Task B2.7), and Snyder Swale II (Task B2.13) projects; (4) Completion of the Snyder Swale II - Phase 1 project (Task B2.13); (5) Completion of design, planning, and permitting for the Klickitat Mill project (Task B2.10) and initiation of construction; (6) Design for the Trout and Bear Creek culverts (B2.7) were brought to the 60% level; and (7) Completion of design work for the for the Klickitat Meadows (Task B2.4) and Klickitat River Meadows (Task B2.5) projects.

  18. Ecosystem responses to habitat restoration are being evaluated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    in the population abundance and angler catch rates of sport fish such as largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides Ecology and Conservation and Florida Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit), with funding from the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). The Situation Channelization and flood control

  19. Energy department does about-face: Will promote conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yates, M.

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the Department of Energy's changing policy toward its involvement in conservation and funding of development of renewable energy fuels. Topics include DOE proposals for relighting federal facilities and commercial buildings, promotion of integrated resource planning and demand-side programs, accelerated building guidelines and standards, boosting production efficiency and cutting costs in the manufacture of photovoltaics, cost-competitive ethanol fuels, speed the development of solar detoxification of hazardous wastes out of the laboratory in site-testing programs, improving technologies that convert municipal solid waste into energy, promote the full utilization of all hydropower resources, and fund federal building programs to support photovoltaic and materials sciences research.

  20. PLAN100%DIGITAL PLAN100%DIGITAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    en un conjunto d e servicios digitales. RAZONES DEL PLAN: Existe un nú mero importante de institu tos

  1. Xeriscape...Landscape Water Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welsh, Douglas F.; Welch, William C.; Duble, Richard L.

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    You can make your landscape both beautiful and water-efficient by xeriscaping. Topics covered include planning, soil preparation, plant selection, maintenance, watering, irrigation systems, mulching and mowing. There are lists of outstanding...

  2. Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Management Plan Supplement Yakima Subbasin Plan November 26, 2004 Prepared for the Presented's subbasin planning process is iterative and designed within an adaptive management framework. Management is comprised of elected officials from local governments throughout the subbasin, and meets regularly to work

  3. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Officer Biological (Accident Reports) 2204 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN (CHP) (4/2007) 1

  4. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Bioengineering 2965 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

  5. Golden-cheeked Warbler (Dendroica chrysoparia) habitat fragmentation in Travis County, Texas: a remote sensing and geographical information system analysis of habitat extent, pattern and condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moses, Michael Edwin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis procedures were assessed for their utility in characterizing fragmentation patterns. Benson (1990) attempted to calculate a fractal dimension of potential GCW habitat "patches" within larger GCW habitat 'sites' and then correlate this parameter... recreational recreational Study Site Size (ha) 3, 420 1, 655 1, 202 1, 069 1, 833 504 1, 393 517 93 BULL CREEK Bull Creek (1, 655 ha) is characterized by a large, nearly contiguous block of habitat (Table 1). The topography is dominated by three...

  6. A. La Rosa Lecture Notes ENERGY CONSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ________________________________________________________________________ ENERGY CONSERVATION The Fisrt Law of Thermodynamics and the Classical Work Kinetic-Energy (CWE) Theorem I on a system II.4.B2 Heat-transfer Q II.4.C Fundamental Energy Conservation Law Generalization of the classic

  7. AM Conservation: Proposed Penalty (2010-CW-1415)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that AM Conservation Group, Inc. failed to certify a variety of showerheads as compliant with the applicable water conservation standards.

  8. Evaluating Industrial Conservation Programs: An Interdisciplinary Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einhorn, M. A.

    Proponents have touted utility conservation programs in homes, businesses, and factories as powerful strategies for conserving our nation’s energy resources and reducing our long-term dependence on foreign oil. When installed in a factory...

  9. Soil and Water Conservation Districts (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil and Water Conservation Districts are local governmental subdivisions of the state of South Carolina, established to provide for land and water conservation and prevent erosion in the state....

  10. Cost Effectiveness Analysis for Conservation Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, M. W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alliance to Save Energy conducted case studies of conservation investment practices in five energy-intensive industries. A portion of the case studies focused on the economic evaluation of proposed conservation investments. The results suggested...

  11. Selling Energy Conservation Projects to Top Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonsson, K. A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A guide to presenting proposals on Energy Conservation Projects by plant engineers to their top level management, in order to get approval for Energy Conservation Projects. Through the author's past experience he ascertained that many Energy...

  12. Accidental Death & Dismemberment Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Death & Dismemberment Plan A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact...

  13. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGY DECENTRALIZATION: ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Mark D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    increases in energy conservation investments will occurProceedings ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGY DECENTRALIZATION:Jan. 8, 1980 AAAS Symposium ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGY

  14. Geography-informed Energy Conservation for Ad Hoc Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Ya; Heidemann, John; Estrin, D

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geography-informed Energy Conservation for Ad Hoc Routingof network lifetime, energy conservation, and data deliverypowers node off for energy conservation while G A F - m a

  15. PRESSURIZATION TEST RESULTS: BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION ENERGY CONSERVATION STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krinkel, D.L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADMINISTRATION ENERGY CONSERVATION STUDY D. L. Krinkel, D.Administration Energy Conservation Study D.L. Krinke! , D.J.Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The purpose of

  16. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGY DECENTRALIZATION: ISSUES AND PROSPECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, M.D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CA, January 8, 1980 ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGYFrancisco, CA January 8, 1980 ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGYJan. 8, 1980 AAAS Symposium ENERGY CONSERVATION AND ENERGY

  17. PROMOTING ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE: A FEASIBILITY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilms, W.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interim Criteria for Energy Conservation in New Buildings",Robert and others, "Energy Conservation Program Guide forDivision Promoting Energy Conservation Through Occupational

  18. ENERGY CONSERVATION AND THE ENVIRONMENT: CONFLICT OR COMPLEMENT?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Logic of Energy Conservation. for Future Studies, 1977.1976. lEA, Energy Conservation in Member Countries, Paris:Division Energy Conservation and the Environment: Conflict

  19. Wildlife Monitoring and Conservation in a West African Protected Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Andrew Cole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    local communities. Environmental Conservation, 28, 135-149.Parks in Ghana. Environmental Conservation, 9, 293-304.northern Cameroon. Environmental Conservation, 30, 175-181.

  20. Biological Inventory Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Inventory of the Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area Prepared by: Joe Stevens .............................. 12 Identify Targeted Inventory Areas

  1. Mastermind Session: Wisconsin Energy Conservation Corporation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Corporation Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Peer Exchange Call: Program Sustainability Mastermind Session, featuring host Brian Driscoll, Wisconsin Energy Conservation...

  2. Water Conservation with Urban Landscape Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hip, B. W.; Giordano, C.; Simpson, B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shrubs and of the ones compared, Texas barberry appeared to have the most promise for use in water conserving landscapes....

  3. Natural regeneration in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geier-Hayes, K.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural regeneration of five conifer species was surveyed in two central Idaho grand fir habitat types. The habitat types range from warm, dry (grand fir/white spirea) to mesic (Grand fir/Mountain Maple). Four harvest-regeneration methods and four site preparation techniques were sampled. Recommendations for obtaining natural regeneration vary primarily by habitat type. Conifer seedlings in the warm, dry grand fir white spirea habitat type require site protection for establishment. In the mesic grand fir/mountain maple habitat type, tall shrub potential can reduce the opportunity to establish early seral conifer species.

  4. Development of a Habitat Suitability Index Model for the Sage Sparrow on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Simmons, Mary Ann; Sackschewsky, Michael R.; Becker, James M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigation threshold guidelines for the Hanford Site are based on habitat requirements of the sage sparrow (Amphispiza belli) and only apply to areas with a mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) overstory and a native understory. The sage sparrow habitat requirements are based on literature values and are not specific to the Hanford Site. To refine these guidelines for the Site, a multi-year study was undertaken to quantify habitat characteristics of sage sparrow territories. These characteristics were then used to develop a habitat suitability index (HSI) model which can be used to estimate the habitat value of specific locations on the Site.

  5. ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH NONSYMPLECTIC METHODS: EXAMPLES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hairer, Ernst

    ENERGY CONSERVATION WITH NON­SYMPLECTIC METHODS: EXAMPLES AND COUNTER­EXAMPLES ERWAN FAOU 1 , ERNST. email: Ernst.Hairer@math.unige.ch, Truong­Linh.Pham@math.unige.ch Abstract. Energy conservation into energy conservation with non­ symplectic methods. Su#cient conditions and counter­examples are presented

  6. ENERGY CONSERVATION BY ORMERTYPE NUMERICAL INTEGRATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tübingen, Universität

    ENERGY CONSERVATION BY ST ¨ ORMER­TYPE NUMERICAL INTEGRATORS ERNST HAIRER \\Lambda AND CHRISTIAN the long­time energy conservation by a class of methods which integrate the linear part of oscillatory. HAIRER AND CH. LUBICH 2. Energy conservation by symmetric methods used with small step size

  7. Northwest Power and Conservation Council Briefing Book

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Power and Conservation Council Briefing Book January 2007 Northwest Power Conservation conservation but has had a more difficult time gaining consensus on saving salmon. -- William Dietrich through measures that impose the least economic and environmental cost on the region, while taking

  8. FOR 6005 Conservation Behavior University of Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    FOR 6005 ­ Conservation Behavior University of Florida School of Forest Resources and Conservation, 846-0878, 347 NZ Hall, mcmonroe@ufl.edu Office Hours: Wednesday 9-12 and on request Conservation and resolving environmental challenges. This course will explore what we know about human behavior and apply

  9. Upper Columbia White Sturgeon Recovery Plan -2012 Revision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coulee Dam is close to the endangered status criteria of 2,500 identified by the World Conservation Union. This coupled with an almost complete failure of natural recruitment to the population since the early 1970s led of recruitment failure. This revised plan is the product of the UCWSRI Technical Working Group, composed

  10. The Thermodynamics of Energy Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, L. C.

    they relate to energy conser vation. Some simple examples of how they are used to analyze energy conservation systems will be presented. The use of device efficiencies will be ex plained. Turbine expansions and other com monly encountered calcul... through the control volume such as the tur bine shown in Figure Z. Steady state, steady flow systems Many energy systems contain devices that involve steady flow through them, such as compressors, turbines, pumps, heat exchan ger~, boilers...

  11. Conservation and solar: working together

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology is developed for optimally allocating resources between conservation and solar strategies in building design. Formulas are presented for a constrained optimum in which the initial investment is limited. A global optimum procedure is also described in which life-cycle cost is minimized. The procedure is amenable to hand analysis if tables are available which give the Solar Savings Fraction as a function of the Load Collector Ratio for the locality. A numerical example is given.

  12. Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

  13. Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

    1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

  14. The role of social aggregations and protected areas in killer whale conservation: The mixed blessing of critical habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decline. On 20 August 2007, a barge loaded with $10,000 L of diesel sank in the area, exposing 25, protected areas have been used to mitigate effects of human activities on mammals such as grizzly bears

  15. CONSERVATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor. ^

  16. CONSERVATION

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r kiVP-^"^^?CONCEPTUALor. ^10

  17. Plans, Implementation, and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    About the Weatherization and Intergovernmental Programs Office (WIPO) including information on plans, implementations, and results.

  18. Climate change action plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delivery Climate change action plan 2009-2011 #12;2 | Climate change action plan ©istockphoto.com #12;Climate Change Action Plan Climate change action plan | 3 Contents Overview 4 Preface and Introduction 5 Climate change predictions for Scotland 6 The role of forestry 7 Protecting and managing

  19. Evaluating stream habitat using a 2D hydraulic model Supervisor: Dr Rhian Thomas (Rhian.thomas@glasgow.ac.uk)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    including pearl fishing, industrial and agricultural pollution, siltation, physical riverbed habitat of habitat restorations, such as the construction of habitat enhancement measures and the removal of past in meters, depth and substrate data, and the construction of habitat suitability curves for Atlantic salmon

  20. Role of Tidal Saltwater Habitats for Juvenile Salmonids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Which Habitats are Used by Juvenile Salmon April 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90) ScrubShrub Forested Emergent #12;0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% CS WSI PAB PE UCC ETI LES composition varies through the year 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov From

  1. Wetland Conservation The Food Security Act was enacted on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    XII of this Act introduced 3 conservation provisions to address environmental concerns associatedWetland Conservation Compliance #12;The Food Security Act was enacted on December 23, 1985. Title) Conservation ­ "Sodbuster" provision ­ Wetland Conservation, or "Swampbuster" #12;The Swampbuster provision

  2. ISSUANCE 2015-05-29: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOralGovernment VehicleStandardsConservation Standards

  3. Demonstration Dock Designed to Benefit Eelgrass Habitat Restoration (Washington)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Sargeant, Susan L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.; Gayaldo, Perry F.; Curtis, Craig A.; Court, Brian L.; Pierce, David M.; Robison, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The derelict Thomas Oil Dock on state tidelands in Port Townsend, Washington, was redesigned for the Northwest Maritime Center by a committee including marine scientists, architects, engineers, educators, regulators, and user groups. The committee's objectives were to create a ''demonstration dock'' using the best-available technologies and design features to restore nearshore habitat functions, particularly for threatened fisheries resources, while accommodating the unique requirements of the educational facility to house vessels ranging from historic tall ships to sea kayaks. A key nearshore habitat restoration goal was to reduce fragmentation of eelgrass where shade from the existing dock inhibited growth, by improving conditions with a new dock design and transplanting eelgrass to connect existing patches. Ecological conditions were evaluated through diver surveys; mapping existing eelgrass, macroalgae, and substrates; and review of controlling factors. Data on the attenuation an d diffusion of photosynthetically-active radiation (PAR) was collected and evaluated relative to eelgrass light requirements. Potential shade impacts of existing and alternative dock designs and materials were modeled. Key design features to improve habitat functions included the installation of reflective material under the dock to increase the incidence of PAR at the substrate level, reduction in the number of piles and associated shade impacts through the use of steel piles instead of wood, increase in the length of the trestle to 286 to move the greatest area of overwater structure beyond the range of eelgrass, and the use of grating in strategic locations to reduce the potential of a light/dark barrier to fish passage.

  4. Bees in urban landscapes: An investigation of habitat utilization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojcik, Victoria A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University Press, Baltimore. Montenegro, G. , M. Schuck, A.City/sub-city USA NA City Montenegro et al. Chile SA City-Survey C D Conservation C Montenegro et al. Nates-Parra et

  5. Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manufactured, or HUD-Code, homes comprise a growing share of the housing stock in the Northwest, as well as nationally. Their relatively low cost has made them especially attractive to lower income families, first-time home-buyers, and retired persons. The characteristics of manufactured home (MH) buyers, the unique energy consumption characteristics of the homes, and their increasing market share make this market an especially critical one for energy consumption and conservation planning in the Northwest. This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that can potentially assist the design of a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. This study has the objective of assisting BPA in the development of a regional approach in which numerous organizations and parties would participate to achieve conservation in new manufactured homes. A previous survey and information collected for this study from regional dealers and manufacturers provide an indication of the energy conservation options being sold to manufactured home buyers in the PNW. Manufacturers in the Northwest appear to sell homes that usually exceed the HUD thermal requirements. Manufacturers typically offer efficiency improvements in packages that include fixed improvements in insulation levels, glazing, and infiltration control. Wholesale costs of these packages range from about $100 to $1500. Typical packages include significant upgrades in floor insulation values with modest upgrades in ceilings and walls. This study identifies trends and impacts that a marketing plan should consider to adequately address the financial concerns of manufactured home buyers.

  6. Uranium Mill Tailings remedial action project waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this plan is to establish a waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness (WM/PPA) program for the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The program satisfies DOE requirements mandated by DOE Order 5400.1. This plan establishes planning objectives and strategies for conserving resources and reducing the quantity and toxicity of wastes and other environmental releases.

  7. A Habitat-based Wind-Wildlife Collision Model with Application to the Upper Great Plains Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forcey, Greg, M.

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous studies on collision impacts at wind facilities have taken place at the site-specific level and have only examined small-scale influences on mortality. In this study, we examine landscape-level influences using a hierarchical spatial model combined with existing datasets and life history knowledge for: Horned Lark, Red-eyed Vireo, Mallard, American Avocet, Golden Eagle, Whooping Crane, red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat. These species were modeled in the central United States within Bird Conservation Regions 11, 17, 18, and 19. For the bird species, we modeled bird abundance from existing datasets as a function of habitat variables known to be preferred by each species to develop a relative abundance prediction for each species. For bats, there are no existing abundance datasets so we identified preferred habitat in the landscape for each species and assumed that greater amounts of preferred habitat would equate to greater abundance of bats. The abundance predictions for bird and bats were modeled with additional exposure factors known to influence collisions such as visibility, wind, temperature, precipitation, topography, and behavior to form a final mapped output of predicted collision risk within the study region. We reviewed published mortality studies from wind farms in our study region and collected data on reported mortality of our focal species to compare to our modeled predictions. We performed a sensitivity analysis evaluating model performance of 6 different scenarios where habitat and exposure factors were weighted differently. We compared the model performance in each scenario by evaluating observed data vs. our model predictions using spearmans rank correlations. Horned Lark collision risk was predicted to be highest in the northwestern and west-central portions of the study region with lower risk predicted elsewhere. Red-eyed Vireo collision risk was predicted to be the highest in the eastern portions of the study region and in the forested areas of the western portion; the lowest risk was predicted in the treeless portions of the northwest portion of the study area. Mallard collision risk was predicted to be highest in the eastern central portion of the prairie potholes and in Iowa which has a high density of pothole wetlands; lower risk was predicted in the more arid portions of the study area. Predicted collision risk for American Avocet was similar to Mallard and was highest in the prairie pothole region and lower elsewhere. Golden Eagle collision risk was predicted to be highest in the mountainous areas of the western portion of the study area and lowest in the eastern portion of the prairie potholes. Whooping Crane predicted collision risk was highest within the migration corridor that the birds follow through in the central portion of the study region; predicted collision risk was much lower elsewhere. Red bat collision risk was highly driven by large tracts of forest and river corridors which made up most of the areas of higher collision risk. Silver-haired bat and hoary bat predicted collision risk were nearly identical and driven largely by forest and river corridors as well as locations with warmer temperatures, and lower average wind speeds. Horned Lark collisions were mostly influenced by abundance and predictions showed a moderate correlation between observed and predicted mortality (r = 0.55). Red bat, silver-haired bat, and hoary bat predictions were much higher and shown a strong correlations with observed mortality with correlations of 0.85, 0.90, and 0.91 respectively. Red bat collisions were influenced primarily by habitat, while hoary bat and silver-haired bat collisions were influenced mainly by exposure variables. Stronger correlations between observed and predicted collision for bats than for Horned Larks can likely be attributed to stronger habitat associations and greater influences of weather on behavior for bats. Although the collision predictions cannot be compared among species, our model outputs provide a convenient and easy landscape-level tool to quick

  8. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers' short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners' (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  9. National conference on integrated resource planning: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, state regulators have focused most of their attention on the development of least-cost or integrated resource planning (IRP) processes for electric utilities. A number of commissions are beginning to scrutinize the planning processes of local gas distribution companies (LDCs) because of the increased control that LDCs have over their purchased gas costs (as well as the associated risks) and because of questions surrounding the role and potential of gas end-use efficiency options. Traditionally, resource planning (LDCs) has concentrated on options for purchasing and storing gas. Integrated resource planning involves the creation of a process in which supply-side and demand-side options are integrated to create a resource mix that reliably satisfies customers` short-term and long-term energy service needs at the lowest cost. As applied to gas utilities, an integrated resource plan seeks to balance cost and reliability, and should not be interpreted simply as the search for lowest commodity costs. The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners` (NARUC) Energy Conservation committee asked Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) to survey state PUCs to determine the extent to which they have undertaken least cost planning for gas utilities. The survey included the following topics: status of state PUC least-cost planning regulations and practices for gas utilities; type and scope of natural gas DSM programs in effect, including fuel substitution; economic tests and analysis methods used to evaluate DSM programs; relationship between prudency reviews of gas utility purchasing practices and integrated resource planning; key regulatory issued facing gas utilities during the next five years.

  10. Conservation Area Networks Sahotra Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    . Morton,2 and Sahotra Sarkar1 1 Section of Integrative Biology, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C0390, Austin, Texas 78712­1180, USA; tfuller@mail.utexas.edu, sarkar@mail.utexas.edu 2. Sarkar An effective way to formulate this planning problem is to represent it as a linear integer

  11. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

  12. Conservation International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| OpenCongress, Arizona:Connecticut:Conserval

  13. Recommendations on Implementing the Energy Conservation Building Code in Rajasthan, India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Sha; Makela, Eric J.; Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    India launched the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007 and Indian Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) recently indicated that it would move to mandatory implementation in the 12th Five-Year Plan. The State of Rajasthan adopted ECBC with minor modifications; the new regulation is known as the Energy Conservation Building Directives – Rajasthan 2011 (ECBD-R). It became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. This report provides recommendations on an ECBD-R enforcement roadmap for the State of Rajasthan.

  14. Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, G.L.; Holstein, K.A.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hazardous Waste Compliance Program Plan (HWCPP) describes how the Rocky Flats Plant institutes a more effective waste management program designed to achieve and maintain strict adherence to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements. Emphasis is given to improve integration of line operations with programmatic and functional support activities necessary to achieve physical compliance to RCRA regulated equipment, facilities and operations at the floor level. This program focuses on specific activities occurring or which need to occur within buildings containing RCRA regulated units and activities. The plan describes a new approach to achieving and maintaining compliance. This approach concentrates authority and accountability for compliance with the line operating personnel, with support provided from the programmatic functions. This approach requires a higher degree of integration and coordination between operating and program support organizations. The principal changes in emphases are; (1) increased line operations involvement, knowledge and accountability in compliance activities, (2) improved management systems to identify, correct and/or avoid deficiencies and (3) enhanced management attention and employee awareness of compliance related matters.

  15. Associate at the American Planning Association. Planning for Solar Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This Pas; Quicknotes Erin Musiol

    There is a growing desire among communities to become more sustainable. Energy conservation and renewable energy production (including solar energy) play a significant role in community sustainability goals. Public officials and engaged citizens have many opportunities throughout the planning process to help support and advance solar energy initiatives in their communities. LONG-RANGE COMMUNITY VISIONING AND GOAL SETTING Community visioning is often the first step in developing any type of community plan, for establishing new standards, policies, and incentives, for doing development work, and for making public investment decisions. Whether part of a planning process or on its own, visioning is an important first chance to identify new opportunities and priorities—including those related to solar energy. Planners often conduct visioning exercises that produce a community’s long-term goals and objectives. By expressing their views of renewable energy generation during these visioning exercises (including responding to surveys and participating in visioning meetings), citizens enable planners to gauge the level of awareness and importance of solar energy in the community. Planners use this information to develop policies and action items for the community. Once a community agrees upon its long-range goals and objectives, municipal officials should look to them when reviewing development proposals, making budget decisions, and performing other related tasks. Both citizens and public officials should use these visioning meetings to discuss how solar energy is connected to other community goals and values and how solar energy could help achieve other community goals. A PV System installed on a residence. (Photo credit:

  16. Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

  17. Y-12 Site Sustainability Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherry, T. D.; Kohlhorst, D. P.; Little, S. K.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accomplishments to date and the long-range planning of the Y-12 Energy Management and Sustainability and Stewardship programs support the DOE and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) vision for a commitment to energy efficiency and sustainability and to achievement of the Guiding Principles. Specifically, the Y-12 vision is to support the Environment, Safety and Health Policy and the DOE Strategic Sustainability Performance Plan (SSPP) while promoting overall sustainability and reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Table ES.2 gives a comprehensive overview of Y-12's performance status and planned actions. B&W Y-12's Energy Management mission is to incorporate renewable energy and energy efficient technologies site-wide and to position Y-12 to meet NNSA energy requirement needs through 2025 and beyond. During FY 2011, the site formed a sustainability team (Fig. ES.1). The sustainability team provides a coordinated approach to meeting the various sustainability requirements and serves as a forum for increased communication and consistent implementation of sustainability activities at Y-12. The sustainability team serves as an information exchange mechanism to promote general awareness of sustainability information, while providing a system to document progress and to identify resources. These resources are necessary to implement activities that support the overall goals of sustainability, including reducing the use of resources and conserving energy. Additionally, the team's objectives include: (1) Foster a Y-12-wide philosophy to conserve resources; (2) Reduce the impacts of production operations in a cost-effective manner; (3) Increase materials recycling; (4) Use a minimum amount of energy and fuel; (5) Create a minimum of waste and pollution in achieving Y-12-strategic objectives; (6) Develop and implement techniques, technologies, process modifications, and programs that support sustainable acquisition; (7) Minimize the impacts to resources, including energy/fuel, water, waste, pesticides, and pollution generation; (8) Incorporate sustainable design principles into the design and construction of facility upgrades, new facilities, and infrastructure; and (9) Comply with federal and state regulations, executive orders, and DOE requirements. Y-12 is working to communicate its sustainment vision through procedural, engineering, operational, and management practices. The site will make informed decisions based on the application of the five Guiding Principles for HPSBs to the maximum extent possible.

  18. 65 Contingency Planning Issues CONTINGENCY PLANNING ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The plan relies on a mixed strategy response to an energy shortage. The plan uses a free market approach to local jurisdic- tions, economic considerations, revisions to the California Energy Shortage Contingency multiple jurisdictions or agencies. LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM The purpose of the Energy

  19. CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Duck O.

    CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN AND HAZARD COMMUNICATION PLAN Occupational Exposures to Hazardous Chemicals and Safety Numbers Research Safety 2723 Environmental Health/Safety Chemical Hygiene Officer Radiation Safety Human Resources (Accident Reports) 4589 Clinical Engineering 2964 #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS CHEMICAL HYGIENE

  20. Abundance, Behavior, and Habitat Utilization by Coho Salmon and Steelhead Trout in Fish Creek, Oregon, as Influenced by Habitat Enhancement, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, John (Mount Hood National Forest, Clackamas River Ranger District, Estacada, OR); Everest, Fred H. (Oregon State University, Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station, Corvallis, OR); Heller, David A. (Mount Hood National Forest, Gresham, OR)

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction and evaluation of salmonid habitat improvements on Fish Creek, a tributary of the upper Clackamas River, was continued in fiscal year 1985 by the Estacada Ranger District, Mt. Hood National Forest, and the Anadromous Fish Habitat Research Unit of the Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station (PNW), USDA Forest Service. The study began in 1982 when PNW entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to evaluate fish habitat improvements in the Fish Creek basin on the Estacada Ranger District. The project was initially conceived as a 5-year effort (19824986) to be financed by Forest Service funds. Several factors limiting production of salmonids in the basin were identified during the first year of the study, and the scope of the habitat improvement effort was subsequently enlarged. The habitat improvement program and the evaluation of improvements were both expanded in mid-1983 when the Bonneville Power Administration entered into an agreement with the Mt. Hood National Forest to provide additional funding for work on Fish Creek. Habitat improvement work in the basin is designed to increase the annual number of chinook and coho salmon, and steelhead trout smolt outmigrants. The primary objectives of the evaluation include the: (1) Evaluation and quantification of changes in salmonid spawning and rearing habitat resulting from a variety of habitat Improvements. (2) Evaluation and quantification of changes in fish populations and biomass resulting from habitat improvements. (3) Evaluation of the cost-effectiveness of habitat improvements developed with BPA and Forest Service funds on Fish Creek. Several prototype enhancement projects were constructed and tested during the first three years of the study. The Intention was to identify successful techniques that could then be broadly applied within the bash. This stepwise procedure has been largely successful in identifying the most promising enhancement techniques for the Fish Creek basin. To date, 7-10 percent of the habitat area in the basin has been treated. When work on Fish Creek is completed, it is estimated that 50-60 percent of the total habitat area used by anadromous salmonids will have received some form of treatment. This annual progress report will focus on the projects completed in the basin In 1983, 1984, and 1985, and their evaluation. Winter habitat use and coho salmon and steelhead trout smolt production will also be emphasized.