Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

GRR/Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation Plan (HCP) The Developer meets with the DOFAW and the United States Fish and Wildlife Services to discuss the Habitat Conservation Plan. 12-HI-a.2 -...

2

Habitat Conservation Plans: Protecting Species, Enhancing Democratic Legitimacy and Promoting Stewardship are Not Mutually Exclusive Goals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE HCP HANDBOOK .. I.HABITAT CONSERVATION PLANNING HANDBOOK, http://www.fws.gov/bounda- ries. " 46 The HCP handbook does provide that the

Hulick, Anne B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

GRR/Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 2-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 12-HI-a - Habitat Conservation Plan and Incidental Take License 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 195D-21 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf 12HIAHabitatConservationPlanAndIncidentalTakeLicense (3).pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

4

On the road to conservation: state conservation strategies and applications for transportation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Resource Conservation PlanningNatural Resources Conservation Service. 2000. NaturalEndangered Species Habitat Conservation Planning. http://

White, Patricia A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Integrating transportation conservation with regional conservation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple Species Conservation Program (MSCP). 1998.Final Multiple Species Conservation Program: MSCP Plan. Sanand Resource Conservation Planning Conservation Banking I

DiGregoria, John; Luciani, Emilie; Wynn, Susan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Multispecies Conservation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 3 Multispecies Conservation Planning on U.S. Federal Lands Barry R. Noon, Kevin S. McKelvey, and Brett G. Dickson Numerous laws directly, or indirectly, mandate the conservation of all species that govern the use of these same lands that are in conflict with a goal of maximizing the conservation

7

MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MIDDLE PARK Conservation Action Plan 2011 Update Plant Species of Focus: Kremmling milkvetch Conservation Initiative Workshop dates: June 26, 2008 and July 6, 2010 Report date: August 25, 2011 Middle Park................................................................................................................... 6 A. Conservation Targets

8

Energy Management and Conservation Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Management and Conservation Plan December 2005 #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan Page 2 of 24 Table of Contents Section One: Executive: Reporting Progress #12;Texas Transportation Institute December 2005 Energy Management and Conservation Plan

9

Integrating transportation conservation with regional conservation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Wildlife Biologist/Transportation Liaison, U.S. Fish andChapter Integrating Transportation and Resource Conservationon the integration of transportation conservation with the

DiGregoria, John; Luciani, Emilie; Wynn, Susan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Conservation Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Plans Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Headquarters Program and Staff Office Energy Conservation Plans As part of the Department's Energy Efficiency campaign, each Headquarters Program and Staff Office participated in a contest early in 2010 to develop the best Energy Conservation Plan. These plans involved simple changes that employees could implement as part of their daily routines to help conserve energy. Plans were then divided into categories and reviewed by a panel to determine the best plan in each category. Employee Participation Category: Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Lighting Category: Office of Management (MA) Copier, Scanner, Fax Category: Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EE) Best Overall Plan: Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)

11

Energy Conservation Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Energy Conservation Plans Headquarters Program and Staff Office Energy Conservation Plans As part of the Department's Energy Efficiency campaign, each Headquarters Program and Staff Office participated in a contest early in 2010 to develop the best Energy Conservation Plan. These plans involved simple changes that employees could implement as part of their daily routines to help conserve energy. Plans were then divided into categories and reviewed by a panel to determine the best plan in each category. Employee Participation Category: Office of Fossil Energy (FE) Lighting Category: Office of Management (MA) Copier, Scanner, Fax Category: Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EE) Best Overall Plan: Office of Nuclear Energy (NE)

12

Energy emergency conservation and allocation plan  

SciTech Connect

In 1974 the Minnesota State Legislature directed that an Energy Emergency Conservation and Allocation Plan be prepared for use in the event of an energy supply emergency. The plan is intended to establish priorities of energy usage and to provide conservation actions for reducing energy usage. This report discusses details of the plan.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

EE - Energy Efficiency - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Richard Kidd, Program Manager Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) Richard.kidd@ee.doe.gov; 202-586-5772 EERE Energy Conservation Plan...

14

MA - Office of Management - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MA Energy Conservation Plan MA Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 1 Office of Management Office-Level Energy Conservation Plan January 2010 I. BACKGROUND This energy conservation plan represents an effort to reduce energy consumption within Office of Management (MA) office spaces and to increase employee awareness of and participation in energy conservation measures. II. SCOPE The plan and procedures in this document apply to all Office of Management (MA) office suites in the Forrestal and Germantown Facilities as well as the 950 L'Enfant Plaza Building. The actions and procedures set forth in this plan apply to each separate MA office suite as follows: MA-1: 4A-107 MA-43: 1F-039 MA-70: 7E-074 MA-1.1: 7E-028 MA-43: 1F-037 MA-70: 7E-054 MA-30: GH-081 MA-43:

15

Conservation Plan for Red Squirrels in Wales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Conservation Plan for Red Squirrels in Wales Meeting the challenge to keep reds in Wales to enable effective red squir- rel conservation and grey squirrel management in Wales. The Wales Squirrel squirrel conservation and grey squirrel management in Wales. The Forum and Partnership are currently

16

Yakima Habitat Improvement Project Master Plan, Technical Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Urban Growth Area (UGA) is a developing and growing urban area in south-central Washington. Despite increased development, the Yakima River and its tributaries within the UGA continue to support threatened populations of summer steelhead and bull trout as well as a variety of non-listed salmonid species. In order to provide for the maintenance and recovery of these species, while successfully planning for the continued growth and development within the UGA, the City of Yakima has undertaken the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. The overall goal of the project is to maintain, preserve, and restore functioning fish and wildlife habitat within and immediately surrounding the Yakima UGA over the long term. Acquisition and protection of the fish and wildlife habitat associated with key properties in the UGA will prevent future subdivision along riparian corridors, reduce further degradation or removal of riparian habitat, and maintain or enhance the long term condition of aquatic habitat. By placing these properties in long-term protection, the threat of development from continued growth in the urban area will be removed. To most effectively implement the multi-year habitat acquisition and protection effort, the City has developed this Master Plan. The Master Plan provides the structure and guidance for future habitat acquisition and restoration activities to be performed within the Yakima Urban Area. The development of this Master Plan also supports several Reasonable and Prudent Alternatives (RPAs) of the NOAA Fisheries 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), as well as the Water Investment Action Agenda for the Yakima Basin, local planning efforts, and the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority's 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program. This Master Plan also provides the framework for coordination of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project with other fish and wildlife habitat acquisition and protection activities currently being implemented in the area. As a result of the planning effort leading to this Master Plan, a Technical Working Group (TWG) was established that represents most, if not all, fish and wildlife agencies/interests in the subbasin. This TWG met regularly throughout the planning process to provide input and review and was instrumental in the development of this plan. Preparation of this plan included the development of a quantitative prioritization process to rank 40,000 parcels within the Urban Growth Area based on the value of fish and wildlife habitat each parcel provided. Biological and physical criteria were developed and applied to all parcels through a GIS-based prioritization model. In the second-phase of the prioritization process, the TWG provided local expert knowledge and review of the properties. In selecting the most critical areas within the Urban Growth Area for protection, this project assessed the value of fish and wildlife habitat on the Yakima River. Well-developed habitat acquisition efforts (e.g., Yakima River Basin Water Enhancement Project by the Bureau of Reclamation and Yakama Nation acquisition projects) are already underway on the Yakima River mainstem. These efforts, however, face several limitations in protection of floodplain function that could be addressed through the support of the Yakima Habitat Improvement Project. This Master Plan integrates tributary habitat acquisition efforts with those ongoing on the Yakima River to best benefit fish and wildlife in the Urban Growth Area. The parcel ranking process identified 25 properties with the highest fish and wildlife value for habitat acquisition in the Yakima Urban Area. These parcels contain important fish and wildlife corridors on Ahtanum and Wide Hollow Creeks and the Naches River. The fifteen highest-ranking parcels of the 25 parcels identified were considered very high priority for protection of fish and wildlife habitat. These 15 parcels were subsequently grouped into four priority acquisition areas. This Master Plan outlines a four-year schedule for acquisition, protection, and restoration of the 25 highest ranked prop

Golder Associates, Inc.

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

17

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1999 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a summary of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. Up until last year, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and was the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices are the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. However, the watershed stream evaluation team used in the watershed analysis determined that there were problems along the Pataha Creek that needed to be addressed that would add further protection to the banks and therefore a further reduction of sedimentation into the stream. 1999 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. In stream work was not addressed this year because of the costs associated with these projects and the low impact of the sediment issue concerning Pataha Creeks impact on Chinook Salmon in the Tucannon River.

Bartels, Duane G.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

FE - Fossil Energy - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(1) (1) Office of Fossil Energy Energy Conservation Plan The Office of Fossil Energy (FE) strongly supports the implementation of strategies to reduce energy consumption in the Headquarters buildings. FE engaged its employees by sending an office-wide email soliciting input for this plan; the ideas were then compiled into this document. The focus of this plan is on how FE employees can change their behavior to reduce energy consumption. This plan purposefully excludes measures that would require any significant capital investment. The measures outlined below in each category can be implemented without much effort and with minimal cost and will reduce the energy used by Fossil Energy employees in the Forrestal and Germantown buildings. FE recognizes that transparency is a key element of a successful energy conservation

19

RW - Radioactive Waste - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconsciously Unconsciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Negative Behaviors Consciously Positive Behaviors Unconsciously Positive Behaviors Education Motivation Repetition Permanent Change Figure 1 - The Phases of Behavior Change Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Energy Conservation Plan Summary: Development and implementation of this plan is being treated as a project. This serves two purposes. First, it increases familiarity with the precepts of project management and DOE Order 413. Secondly, project management provides a great structure for organizing and implementing the activities that will facilitate energy savings through behavioral changes. A project structure also helps define how the effort will begin and what constitutes success at the

20

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : January 2000-December 2002 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports were implemented from calendar year 2000 through 2002 in the Pataha Creek Watershed. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by NPPC. In previous years, demonstration sites using riparian fencing, off site watering facilities, tree and shrub plantings and upland conservation practices were used for information and education and were the main focus of the implementation phase of the watershed plan. These practices were the main focus of the watershed plan to reduce the majority of the sediment entering the stream. Prior to 2000, several bank stabilization projects were installed but the installation costs became prohibitive and these types of projects were reduced in numbers over the following years. The years 2000 through 2002 were years where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek. Over 95% of the sediment entering the stream can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek has steelhead in the upper reaches and native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow and shiners inhabit the lower portion because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat will improve habitat for the desired fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek could eventually develop into spawning and rearing habitat for chinook salmon if some migration barriers are removed and habitat is restored. The upland projects completed during 2000 through 2002 were practices that reduce erosion from the cropland. Three-year continuous no-till projects were finishing up and the monitoring of this particular practice is ongoing. Its direct impact on soil erosion along with the economical aspects is being studied. Other practices such as terrace, waterway, sediment basin construction and the installation of strip systems are also taking place. The years 2000 through 2002 were productive years for the Pataha Creek Model Watershed but due to the fact that most of the cooperators in the watershed have reached their limitation allowed for no-till and direct seed/ two pass of 3 years with each practice, the cost share for these practices is lower than the years of the late 90's. All the upland practices that were implemented have helped to further reduce erosion from the cropland. This has resulted in a reduction of sedimentation into the spawning and rearing area of the fall chinook salmon located in the lower portion of the Tucannon River. The tree planting projects have helped in reducing sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone of desired locations inside the Pataha Creek Watershed. The CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) along with the CCRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) are becoming more prevalent in the watershed and are protecting the riparian areas along the Pataha Creek at an increasing level every year. Currently roughly 197 acres of riparian has been enrolled along the Pataha Creek in the CREP program.

Bartels, Duane G.

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NE - Nuclear Energy - Energy Conservation Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) NUCLEAR ENERGY (NE) ENERGY CONSERVATION PLAN NE has heavily emphasized the use of flexiplace, both regular and situational. Since approximately 56 percent of NE staff use flexiplace, our plan is based on the Forrestal/Germantown (FORS/GTN) office spaces, and flexiplace office space. There are other common sense actions and policies that will be used to improve energy efficiency in the offices at both FORS and GTN. In the FORS/GTN office space: 1. Use flexiplace to the maximum extent possible. Saving an average of 1.5 gallons of gasoline per day per person (e.g., 13 miles per work x 2 = 26 miles, an average of 17 mpg), on a normal workday, NE employees save (56 percent of 145 = 71 times 1.2 days per pay period = 85.2 workdays x 1.5 gals = 127.8 gallons/pay

22

Conservation Resource Advisory Role in Council Plan DevelopmentRole in Council Plan Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Resource Advisory Committee Role in Council Plan DevelopmentRole in Council Plan on conservation resource potential and deployment § Work Plan Focused in Policy Issues slide 2 ­ Not a decision Work Plan Elements § Conservation Resource Assessment ­ Cost-Effectiveness Methodology ­ Achievable

23

Pataha Creek Model Watershed : 1998 Habitat Conservation Projects.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The projects outlined in detail on the attached project reports are a few of the many projects implemented in the Pataha Creek Model Watershed since it was selected as a model in 1993. 1998 was a year where a focused effort was made to work on the upland conservation practices to reduce the sedimentation into Pataha Creek.

Bartels, Duane G.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oxbow Conservation Area, 2002-2005 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the Oxbow Conservation Area in Grant County, Oregon. The evaluation is a required part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) relating to the acquisition and management of the Oxbow Conservation Area. The HEP team was comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. The survey was conducted using the following HEP evaluation models for key species: black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types used in this survey were conifer forest, irrigated meadow, riparian meadow, upland meadow, riparian shrub, upland shrub, and mine tailings. The project generated 701.3 habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. Results for each HEP species are: (1) Black-capped chickadee habitat was good, with only isolated areas lacking snags or having low tree canopy cover. (2) Mallard habitat was poor in upland meadows and marginal elsewhere due to a lack of herbaceous/shrub cover and low herbaceous height. (3) Mink habitat was good, limited only by the lack of the shrub component. (4) Western meadowlark habitat was marginal in upland meadow and mine tailing cover types and good in irrigated meadow. Percent cover of grass and height of herbaceous variables were limiting factors. (5) White-tailed deer habitat was marginal due to relatively low tree canopy cover, reduced shrub cover, and limited browse diversity. (6) Yellow Warbler habitat was marginal due to less than optimum shrub height and the lack of hydrophytic shrubs. General ratings (poor, marginal, etc.) are described in the introduction section.

Cochran, Brian

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program : Action Plan Final Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers activities conducted by the Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) grant project No. 2002-025-00 for fiscal year 2002. The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP, Program) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and improve habitat in areas where access is restored. Specifically, this program is designed to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). Achievements of YTAHP with BPA Action Plan funding during FY 2002 were to: (1) Establish contracts with RC&D and YTAHP participants. (2) Determine contract mechanism for MWH engineering services. (3) Provide engineering designs and services for 11 early action projects, including inverted siphons, pump and gravity diversion screening, diversion metering, rock weirs for improved fish passage, headgates and fishways. These designs were used to submit for project implementation funding through the WA Salmon Recovery Funding Board. (4) Complete 6 early action projects on Ahtanum Creek--One gravity diversion was replaced with a pump and pump end screen and 5 pump end screens were installed. (5) Conduct two topographic surveys--For the City of Yakima on the Fruitvale diversion for the North Yakima Conservation District to support the installation of a pumping plant which would eliminate the need to divert directly from the Naches River and build the gravel berm each year during low flows. For the Taylor Ditch system for the North Yakima Conservation District to support as feasibility of opening the ditch for habitat and at the same time maintaining irrigation deliveries. (6) Procure materials for use in future YTAHP projects, including siphon pipe, delivery pipe, rock, screens, and water meters. These materials will act as match and support the completion of these subsequent YTAHP projects. Overall, with broad agency support and Action Plan funding through BPA, the YTAHP has achieved substantial enhancements that support aquatic species and which will leverage subsequent work through engineering designs and materials. The program was also able to establish the personnel and equipment support for beginning the stream assessment process on tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas Counties. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat.

Myra, David (South Central Washington Resource Conservation and Development Council, Ellensburg, WA); Ready, Carol A. (Kittitas County Water Purveyors, Ellensburg, WA)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative- Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Guadalupe Valley Electric Cooperative offers an incentive for members to increase the energy efficiency of existing homes and facilities through the Conservation Plan 7 Loan Program. The loan...

27

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 7: Transmission Summary of Key..................................................................................................................................... 1 Northwest Transmission Planning), there was concern that there had been little progress on addressing the developing transmission issues in the region

28

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Thompson Falls Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents a preliminary mitigation and enhancement plan for the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. It discusses options available to provide wildlife protection, mitigation and enhancement in accordance with the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501). The options focus on mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat losses attributable to the construction of the hydroelectric project. These losses were previously estimated from the best available information concerning the degree of negative and positive impacts to target wildlife species (Wood and Olsen 1984). Criteria by which the mitigation alternatives were evaluated were the same as those used to assess the impacts identified in the Phase I document (Wood and Olsen 1984). They were also evaluated according to feasibility and cost effectiveness. This document specifically focuses on mitigation for target species which were identified during Phase I (Wood and Olsen 1984). It was assumed mitigation and enhancement for the many other target wildlife species impacted by the hydroelectric developments will occur as secondary benefits. The recommended mitigation plan includes two recommended mitigation projects: (1) development of wildlife protection and enhancement plans for MPC lands and (2) strategies to protect several large islands upstream of the Thompson Falls reservoir. If implemented, these projects would provide satisfactory mitigation for wildlife losses associated with the Thompson Falls hydroelectric project. The intent of the mitigation plan is to recommend wildlife management objectives and guidelines. The specific techniques, plans, methods and agreements would be developed is part of the implementation phase.

Bissell, Gael; Wood, Marilyn

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dependent upon maintenance of a healthy and functioning riparian system and associated uplands. AlterationsCONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE'S MEADOW JUMPING MOUSE ON THE U.S. AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Suite 40 USAF Academy, CO 80840-2400 October 26, 1999 #12;CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR PREBLE

30

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Forrest Conservation Area, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was performed to determine baseline habitat units on the 4,232-acre Forrest Conservation Area managed by the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribe) in Grant County, Oregon. The habitat evaluation is required as part of the Memorandum of Agreement between the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs and Bonneville Power Administration. Representatives from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Tribes conducted the field surveys for the HEP. The survey collected data for habitat variables contained in habitat suitability index (HIS) models for wildlife species; the key species were black-capped chickadee (Poecile atricapilla), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), mink (Mustela vison), western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), California Quail (Callipepla californica), and yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Cover types surveyed were grassland, meadow grassland, conifer forest, riparian tree shrub, shrub steppe, juniper forest, and juniper steppe. Other cover types mapped, but not used in the models were open water, roads, gravel pits, corrals, and residential.

Smith, Brent

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Facility Investigation Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication ``Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites`` has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan.

Not Available

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Hospital laundry standards and energy conservation: a program plan  

SciTech Connect

A program plan describing required research and experimental plans for establishing a proposed revision of hospital laundry standards is presented. An extension of the literature search done by Hittman and Associates was done to see whether the quality of the finished laundry could be maintained under revised standards. Consideration was given to stain removal, whiteness, and sanitation. An extensive review of published literature on standards is included. There is room for energy conservation measures in the hospital laundry, but it is noted that energy conservation measures must be accompanied by care and practicality in their implementation.

Battles, D.R.; Vesley, D.; Banks, R.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Preserving Beijing's Old City : the vision and reality of historic conservation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2000, the Beijing Municipal Planning Commission drew up a conservation plan for the 25 historic areas in Beijing's Old City. The main principles for the conservation plan were as follows: 1) To preserve the traditional ...

Chen, Beatrice B. (Beatrice Bee Fang), 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Kootenai River Wildlife Habitat Enhancement Project : Long-term Bighorn Sheep/Mule Deer Winter and Spring Habitat Improvement Project : Wildlife Mitigation Project, Libby Dam, Montana : Management Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Libby hydroelectric project, located on the Kootenai River in northwestern Montana, resulted in several impacts to the wildlife communities which occupied the habitats inundated by Lake Koocanusa. Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, in cooperation with the other management agencies, developed an impact assessment and a wildlife and wildlife habitat mitigation plan for the Libby hydroelectric facility. In response to the mitigation plan, Bonneville Power Administration funded a cooperative project between the Kootenai National Forest and Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks to develop a long-term habitat enhancement plan for the bighorn sheep and mule deer winter and spring ranges adjacent to Lake Koocanusa. The project goal is to rehabilitate 3372 acres of bighorn sheep and 16,321 acres of mule deer winter and spring ranges on Kootenai National Forest lands adjacent to Lake Koocanusa and to monitor and evaluate the effects of implementing this habitat enhancement work. 2 refs.

Yde, Chis

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix C: Demand Forecast Energy Demand................................................................................................................................. 1 Demand Forecast Methodology.................................................................................................. 3 New Demand Forecasting Model for the Sixth Plan

36

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 3: Electricity Demand Forecast Summary............................................................................................................ 2 Sixth Power Plan Demand Forecast................................................................................................ 4 Demand Forecast Range

37

Northwest Montana Wildlife Habitat Enhancement: Hungry Horse Elk Mitigation Project: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of two important elk (Cervus elaphus) winter ranges totalling 8749 acres were lost due to the construction of the Hungry Horse Dam hydroelectric facility. This habitat loss decreased the carrying capacity of the both the elk and the mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus). In 1985, using funds from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as authorized by the Northwest Power Act, the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (FWP) completed a wildlife mitigation plan for Hungry Horse Reservoir. This plan identified habitat enhancement of currently-occupied winter range as the most cost-efficient, easily implemented mitigation alternative available to address these large-scale losses of winter range. The Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, as amended in 1987, authorized BPA to fund winter range enhancement to meet an adjusted goal of 133 additional elk. A 28-month advance design phase of the BPA-funded project was initiated in September 1987. Primary goals of this phase of the project included detailed literature review, identification of enhancement areas, baseline (elk population and habitat) data collection, and preparation of 3-year and 10-year implementation plans. This document will serve as a site-specific habitat and population monitoring plan which outlines our recommendations for evaluating the results of enhancement efforts against mitigation goals. 25 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Casey, Daniel; Malta, Patrick

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Wanaket Wildlife Area Management Plan : Five-Year Plan for Protecting, Enhancing, and Mitigating Wildlife Habitat Losses for the McNary Hydroelectric Facility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to continue to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat at the Wanaket Wildlife Area. The Wanaket Wildlife Area was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1993. This management plan will provide an update of the original management plan approved by BPA in 1995. Wanaket will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the McNary Hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Wanaket Wildlife Area, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Wanaket Wildlife Area management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Wanaket Wildlife Area will be managed over the next five years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management. Specific project objectives are related to protection and enhancement of wildlife habitats and are expressed in terms of habitat units (HU's). Habitat units were developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service's Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP), and are designed to track habitat gains and/or losses associated with mitigation and/or development projects. Habitat Units for a given species are a product of habitat quantity (expressed in acres) and habitat quality estimates. Habitat quality estimates are developed using Habitat Suitability Indices (HSI). These indices are based on quantifiable habitat features such as vegetation height, shrub cover, or other parameters, which are known to provide life history requisites for mitigation species. Habitat Suitability Indices range from 0 to 1, with an HSI of 1 providing optimum habitat conditions for the selected species. One acre of optimum habitat provides one Habitat Unit. The objective of continued management of the Wanaket Wildlife Mitigation Area, including protection and enhancement of upland and wetland/wetland associated cover types, is to provide and maintain 2,334 HU's of protection credit and generate 2,495 HU's of enhancement credit by the year 2004.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Population modeling in conservation planning of the Lower Keys marsh rabbit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid development and urbanization of the Lower Florida Keys in the last 30 years has fragmented the habitat of the Lower Keys marsh rabbit (Sylvilagus palustris hefneri) and threatened it with extinction. Current threats exist at multiple spatiotemporal scales and include threats due to development, invasive species, and global climate change. On Boca Chica Key, the Lower Keys marsh rabbit (LKMR) exists as a metapopulation on Naval Air Station-Key West (NASKW). I conducted a population viability analysis to determine the metapopulation's risk of extinction under multiple management scenarios by developing a spatially-explicit, stage-structured, stochastic matrix model using the programs RAMAS Metapop and ArcGIS. These management scenarios include clearance of airfield vegetation, habitat conversion, and control of feral cats as an invasive species. Model results provided the Navy with relative risk estimates under these different scenarios. Airfield clearance with habitat conversion increased extinction risk, but when coupled with feral cat control, risk was decreased. Because of the potential of sea-level rise due to human-induced global climate change, and its projected impact on the biodiversity of the Florida Keys, I estimated the impacts of rising sea levels on LKMR across its geographic distribution under scenarios of no, low (0.3m), medium (0.6m), and high (0.9m) sea-level rise. I also investigated impacts due to 2 treatments (allowing vegetation to migrate upslope and not allowing migration), and 2 land-use planning decisions (protection and abandonment of humandominated areas). Not surprisingly, under both treatments and both land-use planning decisions, I found a general trend of decreasing total potential LKMR habitat with increasing sea-level rise. Not allowing migration and protecting human-dominated areas both tended to decrease potential LKMR habitat as compared with allowing migration and abandoning human-dominated areas. In conclusion, conservation strategies at multiple scales need to be implemented in order to reduce threats to LKMR, such as development, invasive species, and global climate change.

LaFever, David Howard

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modeling sage grouse: progressive computational methods for linking a complex set of local, digital biodiversity and habitat data towards global conservation statements and decision-making systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern conservation management needs to link biological questions with computational approaches. As a global template, here we present such an approach from a local study on sage grouse breeding habitat, leks, in North Natrona County, Wyoming, using ...

Anthonia Onyeahialam; Falk Huettmann; Stefania Bertazzon

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

On the road to conservation: state conservation strategies and applications for transportation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source emissions. Land & Water Conservation Fund of 1964.The Land and Water Conservation Fund declared afrom the Land and Water Conservation Fund. Efforts that

White, Patricia A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix A: Fuel Price Forecast Introduction................................................................................................................................. 3 Price Forecasts............................................................................................................................... 12 Oil Price Forecast Range

43

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix B: Economic Forecast Role of the Economic Forecast.................................................................................. 19 Forecasting Commercial Floor Space Requirements

44

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Jump to: navigation, search Name China-Medium and Long Term Energy Conservation Plan Agency/Company /Organization Government of China Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy Topics Implementation, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.beconchina.org/ener Country China UN Region Eastern Asia References China EE[1] Overview "Energy conservation is a long-term strategic guideline in China's economic and social development, and an extremely urgent matter at present. The NDRC has therefore formulated the Plan of Energy Conservation, which aims to push the whole society towards energy conservation and energy intensity reduction, to remove energy bottlenecks, to build an energy

46

Energy Conservation and Development Plan. Southern Tier Central Region, New York  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary is presented of the work of 40 volunteers working with regional planners to imagine, assess, and prescribe for the development of local energy resources (wind, solar, biomass, and water) and for conservation of all forms of energy. The plan contains a brief summary of the process the citizens followed in formulating the plan, the plans themselves, and appendices which contain more detailed comments by citizens on the possible consequences of the development of each resource. The areas (Chemung, Steuben, and Schuyler counties) experienced severe natural gas curtailments during the winter of 1976-1977. The formulation of an emergency energy conservation plan is also presented.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Transitions between town and metropolis : planning strategies for development and conservation of colonial Zacatecas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the planning strategies critical for the conservation and development of cities full of historic, traditional and cultural value. The colonial city of Zacatecas in central Mexico, was chosen for this ...

Lee Chibli, Jose Arturo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Nature Bulletin No. 18 June 9, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation CONSERVATION That...

49

Book Review Conserving biodiversity in agricultural landscapes: Model-based planning tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Conserving biodiversity in agricultural landscapes: Model-based planning tools Robert K of conservation within agricultural landscapes. The book's authors and case studies are predominantly from developed United States and European countries, and as such, the book's application in some ways is lim

Moore, Jeffrey E.

50

Multi-criteria assessment for linking regional conservation planning and farm-scale actions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regional-scale ecological restoration priorities such as increasing the extent and quality of native vegetation are generally planned at catchment scales, while on-ground restoration actions are generally implemented at paddock or farm scales. This paper ... Keywords: Conservation planning, GIS, MCA, Precision agriculture

A. Zerger; G. Warren; P. Hill; D. Robertson; A. Weidemann; K. Lawton

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 8: Direct Use of Natural Gas....................................................................... 1 Analysis of the Direct Use of Natural Gas for the Sixth Power Plan electricity to natural gas for residential space and water heating a lower-cost and lower-risk alternative

52

TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Overview of Ecosystem Management and Broad-Scale Conservation Planning.. 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This reference list represents books, articles, websites, and experts that resource professionals might find helpful in developing comprehensive wildlife conservation strategies. The list was initially compiled by Defenders of Wildlife to assist states in developing large-scale biodiversity conservation plans. It was expanded and enhanced by members of a committee appointed by the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies to assist states in developing comprehensive fish and wildlife conservation plans. Many experts have offered assistance in improving the list. Staff support was provided by Lisa Anderson, Arizona Game and Fish Department. The list contains information on conservation planning in general, building partnerships, involving the public, and information on how to maximize political support. Whenever possible the references are annotated. Book prices are for new editions as found on

unknown authors

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Iskuulpa Watershed Management Plan : A Five-Year Plan for Protecting and Enhancing Fish and Wildlife Habitats in the Iskuulpa Watershed.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) propose to protect, enhance, and mitigate wildlife and wildlife habitat and watershed resources in the Iskuulpa Watershed. The Iskuulpa Watershed Project was approved as a Columbia River Basin Wildlife Fish and Mitigation Project by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) in 1998. Iskuulpa will contribute towards meeting BPA's obligation to compensate for wildlife habitat losses resulting from the construction of the John Day and McNary Hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. By funding the enhancement and operation and maintenance of the Iskuulpa Watershed, BPA will receive credit towards their mitigation debt. The purpose of the Iskuulpa Watershed management plan update is to provide programmatic and site-specific standards and guidelines on how the Iskuulpa Watershed will be managed over the next three years. This plan provides overall guidance on both short and long term activities that will move the area towards the goals, objectives, and desired future conditions for the planning area. The plan will incorporate managed and protected wildlife and wildlife habitat, including operations and maintenance, enhancements, and access and travel management.

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation Wildlife Program

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Resource Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation: Volume 21, Water Conservation Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect

This Water Conservation Plan covers facilities within the ORR including the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), the Industrial Park, the Scarboro Facility, Rust Engineering, and the Clark Center Recreation Area. The water balance for the ORR is summarized and plans for optimizing water usage and protecting water quality are included. Temporary measures to curtail water usage in the event of a drought are also summarized.

Kasten, J.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Burlington Bottoms Wildlife Mitigation Site : Five-Year Habitat Management Plan, 2001-2005, 2000-2001 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Historically the lower Columbia and Willamette River Basins were ecologically rich in both the habitat types and the species diversity they supported. This was due in part to the pattern of floods and periodic inundation of bottomlands that occurred, which was an important factor in creating and maintaining a complex system of wetland, meadow, and riparian habitats. This landscape has been greatly altered in the past 150 years, primarily due to human development and agricultural activities including cattle grazing, logging and the building of hydroelectric facilities for hydropower, navigation, flood control and irrigation in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. The Burlington Bottoms (BB) wetlands contains some of the last remaining bottomlands in the area, supporting a diverse array of native plant and wildlife species. Located approximately twelve miles northwest of Portland and situated between the Tualatin Mountains to the west and Multnomah Channel and Sauvie Island to the east, the current habitats are remnant of what was once common throughout the region. In order to preserve and enhance this important site, a five-year habitat management plan has been written that proposes a set of actions that will carry out the goals and objectives developed for the site, which includes protecting, maintaining and enhancing wildlife habitat for perpetuity.

Beilke, Susan G.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Energy conservation and management plan for plant facilities at the Livermore site  

SciTech Connect

An energy conservation and management plan for the Livermore site of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory is presented. The plan defines the energy-conservation goals for the next 10 years and proposes the ways and means of attaining them. The main features contained in this plan are as follows: development of the criteria and underlying assumptions required for long range planning, including energy growth rates and the case for using the concept of the technical-fix energy growth rate, LLL energy outlook and fuel cost projections, and life-cycle-cost criteria; targets of the long-range plan include between 1975 and 1985, an annual energy usage growth equal to 5.8 percent of the 1975 energy consumption, 1985 and thereafter, zero energy growth, a change from the current dependence on natural gas to the use of other fuels for heating, and a doubling of the 30-day strategic oil storage capacity; and cost schedule for the next 10 years.

Ng, W.; Szybalski, S.; Kerr, W. H.; Meyer, H. J.

1976-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, with Index (Public Law 96-501).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act was enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America. It was enacted to assist the electrical consumers of the Pacific Northwest through use of the Federal columbia River Power System to achieve cost-effective energy conservation, to encourage the development of renewable energy resources, to establish a representative regional power planning process, to assure the region of an efficient and adequate power supply, and for other purposes. Contents of the Act are: short title and table of contents; purposes; definitions; regional planning and participation; sale of power; conservation and resource acquisition; rates; amendments to existing law; administrative provisions; savings provisions; effective date; and severability.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Branch Chief HABITAT CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employees, contractors, and subcontractors make no warrant, express or implied, and assume no legal liability for the information in this report; nor does any party represent that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy Commission or California Department of Fish and Game nor has the Energy Commission or the California Department of Fish and Game passed

Richard L. Anderson; Susan D. Sanders; N. Misa Ward; Rick York; Paul Richins; B. B. Blevins; Scott A. Flint; David Sterner; Joseph A. Vincenty; Kevin Hunting; Sonke Mastrup; Ryan Broddrick

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

The Role of Social Capital and Collaborative Negotiations in Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997-2020, California Department of Housing and Community1997-2020, California Department of Housing and CommunityCalifornia Housing Projections and Constraints, 1997-2020.

Jimeno, Nancy A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

CCB 2005: Towards developing a monitoring framework for Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plans. Part I.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few source layers were created by CCB staff (Rock OutcropSource hydrarca California, Statewide coverage of CaSIL Hydrolines and Polygons, 1992 rock_

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge Hydroelectric Projects, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mitigation projects for wildlife species impacted by the Noxon Rapids and Cabinet Gorge hydroelectric projects are recommended. First priority projects encompass the development of long-term wildlife management plans for WWP lands adjacent to the two reservoirs. General objectives for all WWP lands include alternatives designed to protect or enhance existing wildlife habitat. It is also suggested that WWP evaluate the current status of beaver and river otter populations occupying the reservoirs and implement indicated management. Second priority projects include the protection/enhancement of wildlife habitat on state owned or privately owned lands. Long-term wildlife management agreements would be developed with Montana School Trust lands and may involve reimbursement of revenues lost to the state. Third priority projects include the enhancement of big game winter ranges located on Kootenai National Forest lands. 1 ref., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Coeur d'Alene Tribe Fish and Wildlife Program Habitat Protection Plan; Implementation of Fisheries Enhancement Opportunities on the Coeur d'Alene Reservation, 1997-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Throughout the last century, the cumulative effects of anthropogenic disturbances have caused drastic watershed level landscape changes throughout the Reservation and surrounding areas (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Changes include stream channelization, wetland draining, forest and palouse prairie conversion for agricultural use, high road density, elimination of old growth timber stands, and denuding riparian communities. The significance of these changes is manifested in the degradation of habitats supporting native flora and fauna. Consequently, populations of native fish, wildlife, and plants, which the Tribe relies on as subsistence resources, have declined or in some instances been extirpated (Apperson et al. 1988; Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998; Lillengreen et al. 1996; Lillengreen et al. 1993; Gerry Green Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife Biologist, personal communication 2002). For example, bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) are not present at detectable levels in Reservation tributaries, westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) are not present in numbers commensurate with maintaining harvestable fisheries (Lillengreen et al. 1993, 1996), and the Sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus) are not present at detectable levels on the Reservation (Gerry Green, Coeur d'Alene Tribe wildlife biologist, personal communication). The Coeur d'Alene Tribe added Fisheries and Wildlife Programs to their Natural Resources Department to address these losses and protect important cultural, and subsistence resources for future generations. The Tribal Council adopted by Resolution 89(94), the following mission statement for the Fisheries Program: 'restore, protect, expand and re-establish fish populations to sustainable levels to provide harvest opportunities'. This mission statement, focused on fisheries restoration and rehabilitation, is a response to native fish population declines throughout the Tribe's aboriginal territory, including the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Coeur d'Alene Tribe 1998). Implicit in this statement is a commitment to provide native subsistence resources in the present and near future as well as the long-term by employing all the mitigation and conservation measures available to them. The development of this Habitat Protection Plan is intended to provide additional planning level guidance as the implementation of conservation measures moves forward. The purpose of this plan is to develop a systematic approach to habitat restoration that will ultimately lead to self-perpetuating, harvestable populations of native fish, wildlife and botanical species. Specifically, it is our intention to apply the principles and analyses presented in this plan to prioritize future restoration efforts that receive funding under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Resident Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Programs. Using an ecosystem restoration approach based on landscape ecology concepts (Primack 1993), the basic premise of the plan is to (1) protect functioning habitat conditions and (2) restore degraded habitat conditions. This plan focuses on habitat conditions at the watershed scale (macrohabitat) rather than on the needs of single species and/or species guilds. By focusing restoration efforts at a macrohabitat level, restoration efforts target all native species inhabiting that area. This approach marks a paradigm shift that emphasizes ecological based restoration rather than species-specific restoration. Traditionally, fish managers and wildlife managers have approached restoration independently, often dedicating resources to a single species by focusing on specific habitat types on a small spatial scale (microhabitat) (Robinson and Bolen 1989, Marcot et al. 2002). This management technique has done little to curb declines despite large budgets (Pianka 1994). Restoration on a landscape level has shown promising results (Holling 1992) and many riparian and wetland restoration projects throughout the northwest have inadvertently improved habitats for non-targeted species. Landscape level restoration addresses

Vitale, Angelo; Roberts, Frank; Peters, Ronald

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

SciTech Connect

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma/Trimble Area Management Plan, Technical Report 2001-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2000 and 2001, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to mitigate the wildlife habitat losses as part of the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project. Utilizing Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds, the Kalispel Tribe of Indians (Tribe) purchased three projects totaling nearly 1,200 acres. The Tacoma/Trimble Wildlife Management Area is a conglomeration of properties now estimated at 1,700 acres. It is the Tribe's intent to manage these properties in cooperation and collaboration with the Pend Oreille County Public Utility District (PUD) No. 1 and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to benefit wildlife habitats and associated species, populations, and guilds.

Entz, Ray; Lockwood, Jr., Neil; Holmes, Darren

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Analysis of the methodology used to incorporate price-induced conservation into BPA's planning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is charged with the responsibility of planning how the electricity requirements of the BPA region may be met at a minimal cost. As part of this effort, electricity demand is forecast for the region over a twenty-year time horizon and the most efficient mix of resources that may be utilized to meet the forecasted electricity demand is determined by use of BPA's Least Cost Mix Model (LCMM). BPA considers conservation as a resource that may be utilized to meet future energy demand, and estimates supply curves for conservation which are sent to the LCMM.

Dinan, T.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

NOAA Essential Fish Habitat Research Implementation Plan for Alaska for FY 2007 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, proposals must meet the EFH research priorities listed above and involve habitat for species managed under deadline By November 30 Proposal review By December 15 Prioritized list of proposals released When amount feeding area for proposed-endangered beluga whales. Possible site for LNG facility. Lower Cook Inlet

67

Conservation Regional Conservation SavingsRegional Conservation Savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Regional Conservation SavingsRegional Conservation the Plan''s Targets?s Targets? March 14, 2008 slide 2 Northwest Power and Conservation Council 55thth Plan Conservation ResourcePlan Conservation Resource Acquisition TargetsAcquisition Targets 20052005 ­­ 2009 = 700 a

68

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution systems, consumer electronics, and street, parking, and exterior building lighting. In addition, but the region cannot neglect longer-term needs. The plan encourages research in advanced technologies potential, but the region can facilitate progress through research, development, and demonstration

69

Integrating Habitat Fragmentation Analysis into Transportation Planning Using the Effective Mesh Size Landscape Metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to planned future transportation projects (Thorne et al.impact of these future transportation projects on habitatthe effects of transportation infrastructure. In the future,

Girvetz, Evan H; Thorne, James H.; Berry, Alison M; Jaeger, Jochen A.G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Use of Calibrated Simulation for the Evaluation of Residential Energy Conservation Options of Two Habitat for Humanity Houses in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a project where selected energy conservation measures in two Habitat for Humanity houses in Houston, Texas were measured using side-by- side measurements of identical houses and calibrated simulation. The measures include shell tightening, improved A/C efficiency, modifications to the DHW heater, and solar screens. To perform the analysis both houses were instrumented with hourly data loggers for more than one year to record energy use and environmental conditions and the data analyzed using several methods including an inverse fourier series method and calibrated DOE-2 simulations. The results indicate that several of the energy conservation measures performed as estimated when all confounding factors were removed using simulation. The confounding factors that needed to be normalized with the simulation included: the weather conditions, Merences in the life styles of the two houses, and omissions in the construction of the houses (Bou-Saada, et al. 1998). This paper discusses the instrumentation installed in the houses and the efforts that were undertaken to calibrate the DOE-2 simulation to the energy efficient house. The paper by Haberl et al. (1998) discusses the results of simulating the ECRMs.

Soebarto, V.; Reddy, A.; Bou-Saada, T. E.; Haberl, J. S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Woodlands is a HUD Title VII New Town located near Houston, including 22,000 acres; the plan for the new town consists of 6 residential villages, a town center (Metro), and a Trade Center for larger-scale industrial use. Included within the program for each village are schools and commercial activities, as well as employment activities. The Woodlands is planned to be developed over a 26-year period (commenced in 1972) with an ultimate population of 150,000. Following a summary chapter, Chapter II presents background material on The Woodlands and results of the study are summarized. Chapter III describes the project team and its organizational structure. Chapter IV outlines and documents the methodology that was employed in developing, analyzing, and evaluating the case study. The next chapter describes and analyzes the conventional plan, documents the process by which energy-conserving methods were selected, and evaluates the application of these methods to the Metro Center Study area. Chapter VI discusses constraints to implementation and is followed by a final chapter that presents the general conclusions from the case study and suggests directions for further investigation.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Industrial Sites quality assurance project plan: Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This quality assurance project plan (QAPjP) describes the measures that shall be taken to ensure that the environmental data collected during characterization and closure activities of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are meaningful, valid, defensible, and can be used to achieve project objectives. These activities are conducted by the US Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Nevada Environmental Restoration (ER) Project. The Nevada ER Project consists of environmental restoration activities on the NTS, Tonopah Test Range, Nellis Air Force Range, and eight sites in five other states. The RCRA Industrial Sites subproject constitutes a component of the Nevada ER Project. Currently, this QAPjP is limited to the seven RCRA Industrial Sites identified within this document that are to be closed under an interim status and pertains to all field-investigation, analytical-laboratory, and data-review activities in support of these closures. The information presented here supplements the RCRA Industrial Sites Project Management Plan and is to be used in conjunction with the site-specific subproject sampling and analysis plans.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Demonstration of the Environmental Data Corporation Spectral Fuel Conservation System program plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this program is to demonstrate and quantify the amount of fuel that can be saved if the Spectral Fuel Conservation System (SFCS) developed by the Environmental Data Corporation (EDC) is installed in coal-fired industrial boilers. Of central importance to the program are the selection of an appropriate test site and the preparation and methodical application of a comprehensive test strategy. Consequently, the sections dealing with these topics in the proposal have been considerably expanded in this program plan to include as much preparatory thinking as is possible at this early stage. The remainder of this document is essentially an update version of the technical portion of the proposal. No change in the schedule is anticipated.

1979-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

Standby Conservation Plan No. 1: emergency weekend gasoline sales restrictions. Economic analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Emergency Weekend Sales Restrictions Plan has been designed to conserve gasoline and diesel fuel normally used for social and recreational purposes. The plan would authorize the Secretary of Energy to impose restrictions on the retail sale of motor fuels during weekend hours, defined as Friday noon to Sunday midnight. Only certain types of commercial vehicles and emergency vehicles could purchase fuel during these hours. The implementation of the measure is examined relative to a baseline economy characterized by a 15% petroleum shortfall. It is estimated that the measure would save 246,000 barrels per day of motor fuels, principally gasoline. Because the saved fuel can be made available to other sectors of the economy that are less petroleum intensive, it is projected that GNP would rise by approximately $7 billion as a result of the measure. The impact of the measure would vary sharply from one sector of the economy to another, however, with some industries experiencing losses in revenue. The cost of imposing the measure is preliminarily estimated at $5.2 million for nine months.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

What difference does local participation make? : contexts of engagement in regional conservation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are less so? 8. How well does the conservation communitythese in? 9. How well does the media cover land conservationSAN DIEGO What Difference Does Local Participation Make?

Lee, Caroline Worthen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Conceptual Spawning Habitat Model to Aid in ESA Recovery Plans for Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a spawning habitat model that can be used to determine the physical habitat factors that are necessary to define the production potential for fall chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Columbia River's Hanford Reach and Snake River. This project addresses RPA 155 in the NMFS 2000 Biological Opinion: Action 155: BPA, working with BOR, the Corps, EPA, and USGS, shall develop a program to: (1) Identify mainstem habitat sampling reaches, survey conditions, describe cause-and-effect relationships, and identify research needs; (2) Develop improvement plans for all mainstem reaches; and (3) Initiate improvements in three mainstem reaches. During FY 2003 we continued to collect and analyze information on fall chinook salmon spawning habitat characteristics in the Hanford Reach that will be used to address RPA 155, i.e., items 1-3 above. For example, in FY 2003: (1) We continued to survey spawning habitat in the Hanford Reach and develop a 2-dimensional hydraulic and habitat model that will be capable of predicting suitability of fall chinook salmon habitat in the Hanford Reach; (2) Monitor how hydro operations altered the physical and chemical characteristics of the river and the hyporheic zone within fall chinook salmon spawning areas in the Hanford Reach; (3) Published a paper on the impacts of the Columbia River hydroelectric system on main-stem habitats of fall chinook salmon (Dauble et al. 2003). This paper was made possible with data collected on this project; (4) Continued to analyze data collected in previous years that will ultimately be used to identify cause-and-effect relationships and identify research needs that will assist managers in the improvement of fall chinook habitat quality in main-stem reaches. During FY 2004 we plan to: (1) Complete preliminary reporting and submit papers based on the results of the project through FY 2004. Although we have proposed additional analysis of data be conducted in FY 2005, we anticipate a significant number of key papers being prepared and submitted in FY 2004 which will go toward identifying the data gaps this RPA is intended to address; (2) Make available data from this project for use on Project 2003-038-00 ('Evaluate restoration potential of Snake River fall chinook salmon') which is a BPA-funded project that will start in FY 2004; and (3) Present results of our work at regional and national meetings in order to facilitate technology transfer and information sharing. The objective of this project is to define the production potential of fall chinook salmon that spawn in the Hanford Reach. We will provide fisheries and resource managers with the information they need to determine if the Hanford Reach fall chinook salmon population is indeed healthy, and whether this population will be capable of seeding other satellite populations in the future. We will accomplish this purpose by continuing our on-going research at determining the carrying capacity of the Hanford Reach for producing fall chinook salmon under current operational scenarios, and then begin an assessment of whether the Reach is functioning as a model of a normative river as is widely believed. The product of our research will be a better understanding of the key habitat features for mainstem populations of anadromous salmonids, as well as a better understanding of the measures that must be taken to ensure long-term protection of the Hanford Reach fall chinook population. Although the project was originally funded in FY 1994, it was significantly redefined in FY 2000. At that time five tasks were proposed to accomplish the project objective. The purpose of this progress report is to briefly describe the activities that have been completed on each of the five tasks from FY 2000 through FY 2003.

Geist, David (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Woodlands Metro Center energy study. Case studies of project planning and design for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Appendix II of The Woodlands Metro Center Energy Study near Houston consists of the following: Metro Center Program, Conventional Plan Building Prototypes and Detail Parcel Analysis, Energy Plan Building Prototypes, and Energy Plan Detail Parcel Analysis.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

December 18, 2008 Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 December 18, 2008 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Wind Resource Assessment Jeff King Northwest Power and Conservation Council Generating Resources Advisory Committee Portland, OR December 18, 2008

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

December 18, 2008 Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 December 18, 2008 Northwest Power and Conservation Council Northwest Power and Conservation Council Sixth Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Resource Assessment Status and Remaining Work Jeff King Northwest Power and Conservation Council Generating Resources Advisory Committee Portland

82

Conservation Accomplishments Conservation Resource Advisory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% Wind 4% Biomass 1% Petroleum & Pet Coke Savings(GWH/Year) #12;Sixth Plan Conservation § Accelerated Acquisition of Cost-Effective Conservation Reduces System Cost & Risk § Plan & Budget for 1200 MWa (Next 5 Years) ­ Expect 1100 to 1400 MWa ­ Depending­ Expect

83

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon``. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity. The watershed coordinator for the Asotin County Conservation District led a locally based process that combined local concerns and knowledge with technology from several agencies to produce the Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan.

Browne, D.; Holzmiller, J.; Koch, F.; Polumsky, S.; Schlee, D.; Thiessen, G.; Johnson, C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 6: Generating Resources and Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

......................................................................................................................... 26 Solar Thermal Power Plants) or polygeneration. A cogeneration power plant simultaneously produces electricity and thermal energy for industrial Storage Technologies Sixth Power Plan 6-3 Conventional coal plants are unlikely to be developed

85

Industrial sector energy conservation programs in the People`s Republic of China during the seventh five-year plan (1986--1990)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus at the national level to invest in energy conservation is quite strong and has long been reflected not only in official pronouncements, but also in the investments and organizational activities of the Chinese government. In the early 1980s the central government began a program of direct investments in industrial energy conservation that continues to the present. In addition, concurrently established governmental and quasi-governmental agencies have pursued conservation through administrative and educational measures. In Section 2 of this paper the authors outline the policies and institutions that supported China`s program of energy conservation investments in the Sixth and Seventh Five-Year Plans (FYPs) (1981--1985 and 1986--1990). In Section 3 they describe examples of the types of conservation projects pursued in four industrial subsectors: ferrous metals manufacturing; non-ferrous metals mining and manufacturing; chemicals manufacturing; and building materials manufacturing. Section 4 presents a simple methodology for comparing the costs of energy conservation to those of energy supply. Further discussion points out the applicability and limitations of this methodology to State Planning Commission published statistical material on the overall results of energy conservation investments. Though problematic, such analysis indicates that energy conservation investments were probably substantially cheaper than investments in equivalent energy supply would have been. They end with a discussion of some of the difficulties encountered in carrying out the conservation investment programs.

Liu Zhiping [State Planning Commission, Beijing (China). Energy Research Inst.; Sinton, J.E.; Yang Fuqiang; Levine, M.D.; Ting, M.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation Spring Extended: May 26-June 2, 2014 Understand Marine Ecology and Conservation. Explain Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Terms as they Relate to the Tropics of Belize. Compare and Contrast Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Principles and Practices

Florida, University of

87

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix M: Integrating Fish & Wildlife and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

below Libby Dam. The reservoir operation in spring largely works toward project refill while otherwise operations in the mid-Columbia River to support fall Chinook spawning and rearing in the Hanford Reach to fish. Action item F&W-2 (see the Action Plan) calls for the Council to work with fish and wildlife

88

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 11: Climate Change Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Plan 11-5 conventional coal-fired power plants, 56 400-megawatt gas-fired combined-cycle plants consumption of Northwest power plants as reported to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Because fuel displaced thermal plant operation. Conversely, hydro production in 2005 was about 13,800 average megawatts

89

Secure & Restore Critical Fisheries Habitat, Flathead Subbasin, FY2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Hungry Horse Dam inundated 125 km of adfluvial trout habitat in the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries, impacting natural fish reproduction and rearing. Rapid residential and commercial growth in the Flathead Watershed now threaten the best remaining habitats and restrict our opportunities to offset natural resource losses. Hydropower development and other land disturbances caused severe declines in the range and abundance of our focal resident fish species, bull trout and westslope cutthroat trout. Bull trout were listed as threatened in 1998 under the Endangered Species Act and westslope cutthroat were petitioned for listing under ESA. Westslope cutthroat are a species of special concern in Montana and a species of special consideration by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes. The Secure & Protect Fisheries Habitat project follows the logical progression towards habitat restoration outlined in the Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan approved by the NWPPC in 1993. This project is also consistent with the 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program and the Flathead River Subbasin Plan that identifies the protection of habitats for these populations as one of the most critical needs in the subbasin and directs actions to offset habitat losses. The Flathead basin is one of the fastest growing human population centers in Montana. Riparian habitats are being rapidly developed and subdivided, causing habitat degradation and altering ecosystem functions. Remaining critical habitats in the Flathead Watershed need to be purchased or protected with conservation easements if westslope cutthroat and bull trout are to persist and expand within the subbasin. In addition, habitats degraded by past land uses need to be restored to maximize the value of remaining habitats and offset losses caused by the construction of Hungry Horse Dam. Securing and restoring remaining riparian habitat will benefit fish by shading and moderating water temperatures, stabilizing banks and protecting the integrity of channel dimension, improving woody debris recruitment for in-channel habitat features, producing terrestrial insects and leaf litter for recruitment to the stream, and helping to accommodate and attenuate flood flows. The purpose of this project is to work with willing landowners to protect the best remaining habitats in the Flathead subbasin as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan. The target areas for land protection activities follow the priorities established in the Flathead subbasin plan and include: (1) Class 1 waters as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; (2) Class 2 watersheds as identified in the Flathead River Subbasin Plan; and (3) 'Offsite mitigation' defined as those Class 1 and Class 2 watersheds that lack connectivity to the mainstem Flathead River or Flathead Lake. This program focuses on conserving the highest quality or most important riparian or fisheries habitat areas consistent with program criteria. The success of our efforts is subject to a property's actual availability and individual landowner negotiations. The program is guided using biological and project-based criteria that reflect not only the priority needs established in the Flathead subbasin plan, but also such factors as cost, credits, threats, and partners. The implementation of this project requires both an expense and a capital budget to allow work to be completed. This report addresses accomplishments under both budgets during FY08 as the two budgets are interrelated. The expense budget provided pre-acquisition funding to conduct activities such as surveys, appraisals, staff support, etc. The capital budget was used to purchase the interest in each parcel including closing costs. Both the pre-acquisition contract funds and the capital funds used to purchase fee title or conservation easements were spent in accordance with the terms negotiated within the FY08 through FY09 MOA between the Tribes, State, and BPA. In FY08, the focus of this project was to pursue all possible properties

DuCharme, Lynn [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes; Tohtz, Joel [Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy management action plan: Developing a strategy for overcoming institutional barriers to municipal energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Energy offices working to improve efficiency of local government facilities face not only technical tasks, but institutional barriers, such as budget structures that do not reward efficiency, a low awareness of energy issues, and purchasing procedures based only on minimizing initial cost. The bureau, in working to remove such barriers in San Francisco, has identified 37 institutional barriers in areas such as operations & maintenance, purchasing, and facility design; these barriers were then reorganized into three groupings-- policy & attitudes, budget & incentives, and awareness & information-- and mapped. This map shows that the barriers mutually reinforce each other, and that a holistic approach is required for permanent change. The city`s recreation & parks department was used as a model department, and information about facility energy use was compiled into a departmental energy review. Staff interviews showed how barriers affect conservation. The bureau then generated ideas for projects to remove specific barriers and rated them according to potential impact and the resources required to implement them. Four of the six projects selected focused on maintenance staff: a cost- sharing lighting retrofit program, a boiler efficiency program, a departmental energy tracking system, and a budgetary incentive program for conservation. The other two projects are city-wide: promotion of a new term contract supplying energy-efficient light materials, and publication/distribution of ENERGY NEWS newsletter. A general methodology, the EMAP Strategy Guide, has been created to assist other energy offices in developing EMAPs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

CTUIR Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2008 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2008-January 31, 2009) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight primary fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, McKay Creek, West Fork Spring Hollow, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying one fish passage barrier on West Birch Creek; (2) participating in six projects planting 10,000 trees and seeding 3225 pounds of native grasses; (3) donating 1000 ft of fencing and 1208 fence posts and associated hardware for 3.6 miles of livestock exclusion fencing projects in riparian areas of West Birch and Meacham Creek, and for tree screens to protect against beaver damage on West Fork Spring Hollow Creek; (4) using biological control (insects) to reduce noxious weeds on three treatment areas covering five acres on Meacham Creek; (5) planning activities for a levee setback project on Meacham Creek. We participated in additional secondary projects as opportunities arose. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at additional easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success. An Aquatic Habitat Inventory was conducted from river mile 0-8 on Isquulktpe Creek and the data collected was compared with data collected in 1994. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the duration of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance in accordance with the Umatilla River Subbasin Salmon and Steelhead Production Plan (NPPC 1990) and the Final Umatilla Willow Subbasin Plan (Umatilla/Willow Subbasin Planning Team 2005).

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Energy planning with solar and conservation: individual values and community choice  

SciTech Connect

Conflict among the priorities of individuals, private sector businesses, and government entities makes the transition to a renewable energy-resource base a difficult one. These conflicts are intensified by the overwhelming number of externalities created by the actions of each of these decision making groups. This paper explores the nature of some of these conflicts and externalities and gives an illustrative example of the benefits to be derived from community energy planning. Community energy programs have the potential to stimulate household and community income, create job opportunities, develop a more resilient energy economy, and help mitigate environmental deterioration.

Noll, S.A.; Roach, F.; Palmiter, L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Impact evaluation of energy conservation measures installed at Mayr Brothers Logging Company under the Energy Savings Plan  

SciTech Connect

This impact evaluation of adjustable speed drives (ASDs), programmble logic controllers (PLCs), and high efficiency motors (HEMs) that were recently installed at Mayr Brothers Logging Co., Inc. (Mayr Bros.) was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) as part of an evaluation of its Energy $avings Plan (E$P) Program. The project consists of ASDs, PLCs, and HEMs that were installed at the Mayr Bros. new small log nill at their facility in Hoquiam, Washington. Energy savings directly accrue through improved motor efficiency and indirectly accrue via an increase in production rate. This latter effect reduces energy consumption per unit of production by spreading fixed energy requirements over a greater number of units. The objective of this impact evaluation was to assess how much electricity is being saved at Mayr Bros. as a result of the E$P and to determine how much the savings cost Bonneville and the region. The impact of the project was evaluated with a combination of engineering analysis, financial analysis, interviews, and submittal reviews (Mayr Bros. proposal and completion report). The energy conservation measures were incorporated into the small log mill while the mill was constructed in 1992 and 1993. Financing the new mill had stretched Mayr Bros. cash and credit resources to the limit. Without the acquisition payment, Mayr Bros. would not have been able to afford the additional investment in the energy conservation measures. Therefore, all of the project`s impact can be attributed to the E$P. The key recommendation resulting from this impact evaluation is to avoid the direct comparison of energy consumption estimates derived via engineering calculations and metering. If ``before and after`` metering is not possible, engineering calculations should be calibrated against metered data to enhance comparability.

Brown, D.R.; Spanner, G.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Burlington Bottoms, Technical Report 1993-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Burlington Bottoms, consisting of approximately 417 acres of riparian and wetland habitat, was purchased by the Bonneville Power Administration in November 1991. The site is located approximately 1/2 mile north of the Sauvie Island Bridge (T2N R1W Sections 20, 21), and is bound on the east side by Multnomah Channel and on the west side by the Burlington Northern Railroad right-of-way and U.S. Highway 30 (Figures 1 and 2). Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Columbia and Willamette River Basin's Fish and Wildlife Program and Amendments. Under this Program, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Columbia and Willamette River Basins. In 1993, an interdisciplinary team was formed to develop and implement quantitative Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) to document the value of various habitats at Burlington Bottoms. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. HEP participants included; Charlie Craig, BPA; Pat Wright, Larry Rasmussen, and Ron Garst, U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service; John Christy, The Nature Conservancy; and Doug Cottam, Sue Beilke, and Brad Rawls, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Beilke, Susan

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in Big Canyon Creek Watershed, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Big Canyon Creek Watershed'' is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Big Canyon Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District. Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period September 1, 2004 through October 31, 2005 include; 2.7 riparian miles treated, 3.0 wetland acres treated, 5,263.3 upland acres treated, 106.5 riparian acres treated, 76,285 general public reached, 3,000 students reached, 40 teachers reached, 18 maintenance plans completed, temperature data collected at 6 sites, 8 landowner applications received and processed, 14 land inventories completed, 58 habitat improvement project designs completed, 5 newsletters published, 6 habitat plans completed, 34 projects installed, 2 educational workshops, 6 displays, 1 television segment, 2 public service announcements, a noxious weed GIS coverage, and completion of NEPA, ESA, and cultural resources requirements.

Rasmussen, Lynn (Nez Perce Soil and Conservation District, Lewiston, ID)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Bird Habitats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bird Habitats Bird Habitats Bird Habitats The avian nest box monitoring network is located in northern New Mexico to investigate the health and condition of bird populations that nest in bird houses on the Pajarito plateau. April 12, 2012 Avian nest box on LANL land Boxes are placed in the open ponderosa pine forest of the canyons and piñon-juniper woodland on the Pajarito plateau mesas. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The monitoring data are used in a population viability analysis that can determine the status of the population and potential impacts of contaminants. Who nests in our network? More than two dozen North American bird species prefer to nest in bird houses. At LANL, we provide nestboxes for the following native bird

97

Model Watershed Plan; Lemhi, Pahsimeroi, and East Fork of the Salmon River Management Plan, 1995 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho`s Model Watershed Project was established as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council`s plan for salmon recovery in the Columbia River Basin. The Council`s charge was simply stated and came without strings. The tasks were to identify actions within the watershed that are planned or needed for salmon habitat, and establish a procedure for implementing habitat-improvement measures. The Council gave the responsibility of developing this project to the Idaho Soil Conservation Commission. This Model Watershed Plan is intended to be a dynamic plan that helps address these two tasks. It is not intended to be the final say on either. It is also not meant to establish laws, policies, or regulations for the agencies, groups, or individuals who participated in the plan development.

Swift, Ralph

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Los Angeles River Urban Wildlife Refuge: A vision for Parks, Habitat, and Urban Runoff by Community Development by Design [EDRA/Places Awards 2007 -- Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refuge 2007 EDRA/Places Awards Planning The BeginningRefuge 2007 EDRA/Places Awards Planning LEDERER RANCH ANDRefuge 2007 EDRA/Places Awards Planning 4000 ft Second, the

Hayter, Jason Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Policy Documents (Central Government),Energy Conservation Policy Documents (Central Government),Energy Conservation Policy Documents (Central Government),

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Observing SQL queries in their natural habitat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe Habitat, a declarative observational debugger for SQL. Habitat facilitates true language-level (not: plan-level) debugging of, probably flawed, SQL queries that yield unexpected results. Users mark SQL subexpressions ... Keywords: Declarative debugging, SQL, query languages, relational databases

Torsten Grust; Jan Rittinger

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase I, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under direction of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, and the subsequent Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, impacts to wildlife due to the development and operation of the US Army Corps of Engineers Dworshak Project have been examined. Using existing information, it has been determined that the project has resulted in the loss of 15,316 acres of elk habitat, 15,286 acres of white-tailed deer habitat, 16,986 acres of black bear habitat, 14,776 acres of ruffed grouse habitat, 13,616 acres of pileated woodpecker habitat, and 66 acres of yellow warbler habitat (scrub-shrub/red alder). Acreages of mallard, Canada goose, river otter, and beaver habitat could not be determined from existing information. The interagency work group has recommended that a HEP (Habitat Evaluation Procedure) be used to determine changes in the quantity and quality of target species habitat in the study area, due to the development and operation of Dworshak Reservoir. 60 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

105

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conservation Renewable Energy The Future at Rutgers University Facilities & Capital Planning Operations & Services Utilities Operations 6 Berrue Circle Piscataway, NJ 08854 #12;Energy Conservation Wh C ti ? R bl EWhy Conservation? Renewable Energy · Climate control reduces green house gases · Reduces

Delgado, Mauricio

106

Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methane Hydrate Multi-Year R&D Program Plan NATIONAL METHANE HYDRATE MULTI-YEAR R&D PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Federal Energy Technology Center...

107

Draft Fourth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan, Appendix B HYDROPOWER AVAILABILITY IN RESPONSE TO SALMON RECOVERY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STATE OF CALIFORNIA ENERGY RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 2001 NET SYSTEM POWER CALCULATION (2001 CALIFORNIA POWER MIX) Adopted by the Commission at the April 3, 2002 Business Meeting Ronald COMMISSION April 3, 2002 #12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This report results from a collaborative effort by Energy

108

Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

Gontier, Mikael, E-mail: gontier@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Moertberg, Ulla, E-mail: mortberg@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Balfors, Berit, E-mail: balfors@kth.s [Department of Land and Water Resources Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Confederated Tribes Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project : A Columbia River Basin Fish Habitat Project : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Anadromous Fisheries Habitat Project (UAFHP) is an ongoing effort to protect, enhance, and restore riparian and instream habitat for the natural production of anadromous salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin, Northeast Oregon. Flow quantity, water temperature, passage, and lack of in-stream channel complexity have been identified as the key limiting factors in the basin. During the 2007 Fiscal Year (FY) reporting period (February 1, 2007-January 31, 2008) primary project activities focused on improving instream and riparian habitat complexity, migrational passage, and restoring natural channel morphology and floodplain function. Eight fisheries habitat enhancement projects were implemented on Meacham Creek, Camp Creek, Greasewood Creek, Birch Creek, West Birch Creek, and the Umatilla River. Specific restoration actions included: (1) rectifying five fish passage barriers on four creeks, (2) planting 1,275 saplings and seeding 130 pounds of native grasses, (3) constructing two miles of riparian fencing for livestock exclusion, (4) coordinating activities related to the installation of two off-channel, solar-powered watering areas for livestock, and (5) developing eight water gap access sites to reduce impacts from livestock. Baseline and ongoing monitoring and evaluation activities were also completed on major project areas such as conducting photo point monitoring strategies activities at the Meacham Creek Large Wood Implementation Project site (FY2006) and at all existing easements and planned project sites. Fish surveys and aquatic habitat inventories were conducted at project sites prior to implementation. Monitoring plans will continue throughout the life of each project to oversee progression and inspire timely managerial actions. Twenty-seven conservation easements were maintained with 23 landowners. Permitting applications for planned project activities and biological opinions were written and approved. Project activities were based on a variety of fisheries monitoring techniques and habitat assessments used to determine existing conditions and identify factors limiting anadromous salmonid abundance. Proper selection and implementation of the most effective site-specific habitat restoration plan, taking into consideration the unique characteristics of each project site, and conducted in cooperation with landowners and project partners, was of paramount importance to ensure each project's success.

Hoverson, Eric D.; Amonette, Alexandra

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Conservation Farming in New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Farming in New Mexico NEW M EX ICO S TAE U N I V E R SI T YT Cooperative Extension conservation farming methods for many years. However, soil conservation also is mandated by the 1985 Food erodible cropland to initiate an approved conservation plan by 1990 if they were to remain eli- gible

Castillo, Steven P.

111

Forrest Conservation Area : Management & Implementation FY 2004 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes) acquired the Forrest Conservation Area during July of 2002. The property is located in the Upper John Day subbasin within the Columbia basin. The property consists of two parcels comprising 4,232 acres. The Mainstem parcel consists of 3,445 acres and is located 1/2 mile to the east of Prairie City, Oregon on the mainstem John Day River. The Middle Fork parcel consists of 786 acres and is located one mile to the west of the town of Austin, OR on the Middle Fork John Day River. The Forrest Conservation Area is under a memorandum of agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to provide an annual written report generally describing the real property interests of the project and management activities undertaken or in progress. Acquisition of the Forrest Conservation Area was funded by BPA as part of their program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife habitat affected by hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The intent of the Conservation Area is to partially mitigate fish and wildlife impacts for the John Day Dam on the Columbia River as outlined in the Northwest Power Planning Council's Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994, {section}11.1, {section}7.6). While the Tribes hold fee-title to the property, the BPA has assured a level of management funding for the protection and restoration of fish and wildlife habitat through a memorandum of agreement.

Smith, Brent

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

An Ecosystem-Based Approach to Habitat Restoration Projects with Emphasis on Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary, 2003 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat restoration in the Columbia River estuary (CRE) is an important off-site mitigation action in the 2000 Biological Opinion (BiOp), an operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The CRE, defined as the tidally influenced stretch of river from the mouth to Bonneville Dam 146 miles upstream, is part of the migration pathway for anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin, including salmon listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Salmon in various stages of life, from fry to adults, use tidal channels and wetlands in the CRE to feed, find refuge from predators, and transition physiologically from freshwater to saltwater. Over the last 100 years, however, the area of some wetland habitats has decreased by as much as 70% because of dike and levee building, flow regulation, and other activities. In response to the decline in available habitat, the BiOp's Reasonable and Prudent Alternative (RPA) included mandates to 'develop a plan addressing the habitat needs of juvenile salmon and steelhead in the estuary' (RPA Action 159) and 'develop and implement an estuary restoration program with a goal of protecting and enhancing 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats' (RPA Action 160). To meet Action 159 and support Action 160, this document develops a science-based approach designed to improve ecosystem functions through habitat restoration activities in the CRE. The CRE habitat restoration program's goal and principles focus on habitat restoration projects in an ecosystem context. Since restoration of an entire ecosystem is not generally practical, individual habitat restoration projects have the greatest likelihood of success when they are implemented with an ecosystem perspective. The program's goal is: Implementation of well-coordinated, scientifically sound projects designed to enhance, protect, conserve, restore, and create 10,000 acres of tidal wetlands and other key habitats to aid rebuilding of ESA-listed salmon populations and native species using the CRE. The program's underlying principles are: (1) projects are founded on the best available ecological restoration science, implemented in an ecosystem context, and developed with the intent to restore relevant ecological processes; (2) projects incorporate adaptive management practices with testable hypotheses to track ecological responses to a given restoration effort; and (3) projects are implemented in a coordinated, open process and scientific results from monitoring and evaluation are communicated widely and readily accessible. With this goal and these principles in mind, we developed an approach for CRE habitat restoration. The intent of this document is to provide a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. The stepwise approach to CRE habitat restoration outlined is somewhat general and broad because the available scientific information is incomplete, e.g., juvenile salmon usage of various CRE wetland habitats. As new data become available, a more specific, detailed plan than was possible here can be produced as an outgrowth of this document. In conclusion, this document provides a scientific basis and implementation guidelines for a habitat restoration program designed to improve ecosystem functions and enhance juvenile salmonid survival in the CRE. As more experience is gained with CRE habitat restoration and scientific uncertainties are resolved, this document should be used as a basis for a detailed habitat restoration plan that specifically addresses (1) which habitat types offer the greatest ecological benefit to salmon, (2) the location of potential sites that if restored would likely provide these habitat types, and (3) how and when the restoration work should be done. This document supports the use of adaptive management so that all elements of salmonid habitat restoration actions in the CRE are under continual evaluation and revision at both the project and program levels. Lessons learned from curre

Johnson, G.; Thom, R.; Whiting, A. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix D, Conservation, Load Management and Fuel Switching Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect

Various conservation, load management, and fuel switching programs were considered as ways to reduce or shift system peak load. These programs operate at the end-use level, such as residential water heat. Figure D-1a shows what electricity consumption for water heat looks like on normal and extreme peak days. Load management programs, such as water heat control, are designed to reduce electricity consumption at the time of system peak. On the coldest day in average winter, system load peaks near 8:00 a.m. In a winter with extremely cold weather, electricity consumption increases fr all hours, and the system peak shifts to later in the morning. System load shapes in the Puget Sound area are shown in Figure D-1b for a normal winter peak day (February 2, 1988) and extreme peak day (February 3, 1989). Peak savings from any program are calculated to be the reduction in loads on the entire system at the hour of system peak. Peak savings for all programs are measured at 8:00 a.m. on a normal peak day and 9:00 a.m. on an extreme peak day. On extremely cold day, some water heat load shifts to much later in the morning, with less load available for shedding at the time of system peak. Models of hourly end-use consumption were constructed to simulate the impact of conservation, land management, and fuel switching programs on electricity consumption. Javelin, a time-series simulating package for personal computers, was chosen for the hourly analysis. Both a base case and a program case were simulated. 15 figs., 7 tabs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Reconstructing Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review: Reconstructing Conservation By Ben Minteer andEds. ). Reconstructing Conservation. Washington, DC: Islandabout the nature of conservation, and for U.S. scholars in

Hamilton-Smith, Elery

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil equivalent. In this paper energy units are converted toWenji (Collected Energy Conservation Papers from the 1991Wenji (Collected Energy Conservation Papers from the 1991

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has four volumes: a Tribal project annual report (Part 1) and three reports (Parts 2, 3, and 4) prepared for the Tribes by their engineering subcontractor. The Tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved habitat and fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Valley County, Idaho that will be used to evaluate responses to ongoing habitat enhancement. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur within the traditional Treaty (Fort Bridger Treaty of 1868) fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, Fort Hall Reservation, Idaho. Subproject III involved habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) and habitat problem identification on the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River (including Jordan Creek). Subproject IV during 1985 involved habitat problem identification in the East Fork of the Salmon River and habitat and fish inventories (pretreatment) in Herd Creek, a tributary to the East Fork.

Konopacky, Richard C.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Willow Creek, Technical Report 1993-1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Willow Creek site is one of the most significant remaining areas of typical native Willamette Valley habitats, with a variety of wetlands, grasslands, and woodlands. A diverse array of native flora and fauna, with significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Wildlife diversity is high, and includes species of mammals, songbirds, raptors, reptiles, amphibians, and one rare invertebrate. Over 200 species of native plants have been identified (including populations of six rare, threatened, or endangered species), along with significant remnants of native plant communities. Willow Creek is located in Lane County, Oregon, on the western edge of the City of Eugene (see Figure 1). The city limit of Eugene passes through the site, and the site is entirely within the Eugene Urban Growth Boundary (UGB). At present, only lands to the east and northeast of the site are developed to full urban densities. Low density rural residential and agricultural land uses predominate on lands to the northwest and south. A partially completed light industrial/research office park is located to the northwest. Several informal trails lead south from West 18th at various points into the site. The area encompasses a total of approximately 349 acres under several ownerships, in sections 3 and 4 of Township 18 South, Range 4 West. wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the development and operation of Federal hydro-electric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the HEP will be used to: (1) determine the current status and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area. The BPA is considering exercising their option to purchase the Bailey Hill property, acquiring additional properties now owned by The Nature Conservancy, and/or funding enhancement activities for the entire site in order to receive credit under the Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin.

Beilke, Susan

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

conservation laws  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Laws Conservation Laws Conservation Laws - Data Analysis Using Graphs - Histograms - Units or Vectors in Particle Physics In all of physics there are only six conservation laws. Each describes a quantity that is conserved, that is, the total amount is the same before and after something occurs. These laws have the restriction that the system is closed, that is, the system is not affected by anything outside it. Conservation of charge Conservation of momentum Conservation of mass/energy Conservation of angular momentum Conservation of baryons Conservation of leptons Let's review the conservation laws that you know from classical physics. Then, we will describe two particle physics conservation laws. Conservation of Charge This is used all the time in chemistry. The total charge in the system is

119

Habitat Evaluation: Guidance for the Review of Environmental Impact Assessment Documents  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HABITAT EVALUATION: HABITAT EVALUATION: GUIDANCE FOR THE REVIEW OF ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT DOCUMENTS EPA Contract No. 68-C0-0070 work Assignments B-21, 1-12 January 1993 Submitted to: Jim Serfis U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Federal Activities 401 M Street, SW Washington, DC 20460 Submitted by: Mark Southerland Dynamac Corporation The Dynamac Building 2275 Research Boulevard Rockville, MD 20850 CONTENTS Page INTRODUCTION ... ...... .... ... ................................................. 1 Habitat Conservation .......................................... 2 Habitat Evaluation Methodology ................................... 2 Habitats of Concern ........................................... 3 Definition of Habitat ..................................... 4

120

Couse/Tenmile Creeks Watershed Project Implementation : 2007 Conservtion Projects. [2007 Habitat Projects Completed].  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Asotin County Conservation District (ACCD) is the primary entity coordinating habitat projects on private lands within Asotin County watersheds. The Tenmile Creek watershed is a 42 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Asotin Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Couse Creek watershed is a 24 square mile tributary to the Snake River, located between Tenmile Creek and the Grande Ronde River. Both watersheds are almost exclusively under private ownership. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife has documented wild steelhead and rainbow/redband trout spawning and rearing in Tenmile Creek and Couse Creek. The project also provides Best Management Practice (BMP) implementation throughout Asotin County, but the primary focus is for the Couse and Tenmile Creek watersheds. The ACCD has been working with landowners, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Washington State Conservation Commission (WCC), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), Farm Service Agency (FSA), Salmon Recovery Funding Board (SRFB), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), U.S. Forest Service, Pomeroy Ranger District (USFS), Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), Washington Department of Ecology (DOE), National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) to address habitat projects in Asotin County. The Asotin Subbasin Plan identified priority areas and actions for ESA listed streams within Asotin County. Couse Creek and Tenmile Creek are identified as protection areas in the plan. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) has been successful in working with landowners to protect riparian areas throughout Asotin County. Funding from BPA and other agencies has also been instrumental in protecting streams throughout Asotin County by utilizing the ridge top to ridge top approach.

Asotin County Conservation District

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Conservation Practices for Conserving  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conservation Catalog Practices for Conserving Pennsylvania's Natural Resources #12;#12;A Conservation Catalog 1 Introduction P ennsylvania is a land of great natural resources and Pennsylvania. The Pennsylvania Conservation Catalog is a cooperative effort of the Pennsylvania Conservation Partnership which

Kaye, Jason P.

122

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams completely and irrevocably blocked anadromous fish migrations to the Upper Columbia River. Historically this area hosted vast numbers of salmon returning to their natal waters to reproduce and die. For the native peoples of the region, salmon and steelhead were a principle food source, providing physical nourishment and spiritual sustenance, and contributing to the religious practices and the cultural basis of tribal communities. The decaying remains of spawned-out salmon carcasses contributed untold amounts of nutrients into the aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial ecosystems of tributary habitats in the upper basin. Near the present site of Kettle Falls, Washington, the second largest Indian fishery in the state existed for thousands of years. Returning salmon were caught in nets and baskets or speared on their migration to the headwater of the Columbia River in British Columbia. Catch estimates at Kettle Falls range from 600,000 in 1940 to two (2) million around the turn of the century (UCUT, Report No.2). The loss of anadromous fish limited the opportunities for fisheries management and enhancement exclusively to those actions addressed to resident fish. The Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project is a mitigation project intended to enhance resident fish populations and to partially mitigate for anadromous fish losses caused by hydropower system impacts. This substitution of resident fish for anadromous fish losses is considered in-place and out-of-kind mitigation. Upstream migration and passage barriers limit the amount of spawning and rearing habitat that might otherwise be utilized by rainbow trout. The results of even limited stream surveys and habitat inventories indicated that a potential for increased natural production exists. However, the lack of any comprehensive enhancement measures prompted the Upper Columbia United Tribes Fisheries Center (UCUT), Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STI) and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) to develop and propose a comprehensive fishery management plan for Lake Roosevelt. The Rainbow Trout Habitat/Passage Improvement Project (LRHIP) was designed with goals directed towards increasing natural production while maintaining genetic integrity among current tributary stocks. The initial phase of the Lake Roosevelt Habitat Improvement Project (Phase I, baseline data collection: 1990-91) was focused on the assessment of limiting factors, including the quality and quantity of available spawning gravel, identification of passage barriers, and assessment of other constraints. After the initial assessment of stream parameters, five streams meeting specific criteria were selected for habitat/passage improvement projects (Phase II, implementation -1992-1995). Four of these projects were on the Colville Indian Reservation South Nanamkin, North Nanamkin, Louie and Iron Creeks and one Blue Creek was on the Spokane Indian Reservation. At the completion of project habitat improvements, the final phase (Phase III, monitoring-1996-2000) began. This phase assessed the changes and determined the success achieved through the improvements. Data analysis showed that passage improvements are successful for increasing habitat availability and use. The results of in-stream habitat improvements were inconclusive. Project streams, to the last monitoring date, have shown increases in fish density following implementation of the improvements. In 2000 Bridge Creek, on the Colville Reservation was selected for the next phase of improvements. Data collection, including baseline stream survey and population data collection, was carried out during 2001 in preparation for the design and implementation of stream habitat/passage improvements. Agencies cooperating on the project include the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS, Ferry County District), Ferry County Conservation District, and Ferry County. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provided

Sears, Sheryl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

PICEANCE BASIN Conservation Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sites Lead Notes Energy development, associated roads and infrastructure Dudley Bluffs BLM Continue revision. Low BLM 2013 Energy development, associated roads and infrastructure Dudley Bluffs private that is conducted with federal funds would be responsible for the plants under the ESA. County WAS pre- consulting

125

Industrial Sector Energy Conservation Programs in the People's Republic of China during the Seventh Five-Year Plan (1986-1990)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Plant Renovation Fuel-Gas Recovery District.Heating Honeycomb Briquettes Coal Processing Raw Material Conservation (b) Technology Updating Waste Heat &

Zhiping, L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed, Technical Report 2003-2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Restoring Anadromous Fish Habitat in the Lapwai Creek Watershed is a multi-phase project to enhance steelhead trout in the Lapwai Creek watershed by improving salmonid spawning and rearing habitat. Habitat is limited by extreme high runoff events, low summer flows, high water temperatures, poor instream cover, spawning gravel siltation, and sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. Funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Program, the project assists in mitigating damage to steelhead runs caused by the Columbia River hydroelectric dams. The project is sponsored by the Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District). Target fish species include steelhead trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Steelhead trout within the Snake River Basin were listed in 1997 as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accomplishments for the contract period December 1, 2003 through February 28, 2004 include; seven grade stabilization structures, 0.67 acres of wetland plantings, ten acres tree planting, 500 linear feet streambank erosion control, two acres grass seeding, and 120 acres weed control.

Rasmussen, Lynn

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.  

SciTech Connect

The construction of Albeni Falls Dam was completed in 1955. Prior to construction, the dam was expected to alter approximately 6,300 acres. However, the loss assessment addressed the losses in terms of Habitat Units (HUs) (Martin et al. 1988). HUs are derived by multiplying the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) by the number of acres in question. The HSI, in turn, is an index to the habitat carrying capacity for a specific species or guild of species based on a set of habitat performance measures and can be used to assess changes, both positive and negative, in habitat quantity and quality (USFWS 1980, 1980a). The HSI is derived though a HEP that is completed according to species or guild specific models. Variables defined in the models are measured on the landscape; and those measured values are rated according to the model to produce an index to the habitat's suitability. The HSI index ranges from 0.0 to 1.0. An HSI of 0.3 indicates that habitat quality/carrying capacity is marginal while an HSI of 0.7 suggests that habitat quality/carrying capacity is relatively good. Thus an acre of optimum habitat (HSI = 1.0) results in 1 HU. The construction and inundation of Albeni Falls Dam resulted in a loss of 28,587 HUs. This HU ledger was the sum of the losses for each of the chosen target species, which were 5,985 mallard HUs, 4,699 Canada goose HUs, 3,379 redhead HUs, 4,508 breeding bald eagle HUs, 4,365 wintering bald eagle HUs, 2,286 black-capped chickadee HUs, 1,680 white tailed deer HUs, and 1,756 muskrat HUs. The PACIFIC NORTHWEST ELECTRIC POWER PLANNING AND CONSERVATION ACT (1980) made mitigating against the HU ledger associated with the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS), of which Albeni Falls is a part, the responsibility of BPA. The Act also established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), which is responsible for, among other things, establishing the Fish and Wildlife Program to direct the mitigation process. The Bonneville Power Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation. The Bonneville Power Administration was guaranteed a minimum of 364 protection HUs for th

Green, Gerald I.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Conservation Blueprint for Neotropical Migratory Birds in Western Colorado Michelle Fink, David opportunities for conservation of Neotropical migratory birds in coniferous and aspen forest habitats in Western, and SPOT, a conservation portfolio optimization software, to analyze information about bird distribution

129

Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Tributary Access and Habitat Program (YTAHP) was organized to restore salmonid passage to Yakima tributaries that historically supported salmonids and to improve habitat in areas where access is restored. This program intends to (a) screen unscreened diversion structures to prevent fish entrainment into artificial waterways; (b) provide for fish passage at man-made barriers, such as diversion dams, culverts, siphons and bridges; and (c) provide information and assistance to landowners interested in to contributing to the improvement of water quality, water reliability and stream habitat. The YTAHP developed from a number of groups actively engaged in watershed management, and/or habitat restoration within the Yakima River Basin. These groups include the Washington State Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Kittitas County Conservation District (KCCD), North Yakima Conservation District (NYCD), Kittitas County Water Purveyors (KCWP), and Ahtanum Irrigation District (AID). The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and Yakama Nation (YN) both participated in the development of the objectives of YTAHP. Other entities that will be involved during permitting or project review may include the YN, the federal Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE). The objectives of YTAHP are listed below and also include subtasks detailed in the report: (1) Conduct Early Action Projects; (2) Review Strategic Plan; (3) Restore Access, including stream inventory, prioritization, implementation; and (4) Provide opportunities to improve habitat and conserve resources. The BPA YTAHP funding supported activities of the program which are described in this report. These activities are primarily related to objective 1 (conduct early action projects) and parts of objectives 2-4. The work supported by YTAHP funding will support a series of scheduled projects and be made larger by complementary funding through NRSC EQIP, Irrigation Efficiencies, WA State Salmon Recovery Funding Board and other local, state and federal programs. Projects completed FY-03: The Cooke Creek siphon and screen/bypass was completed on time and within budget. The Rosbach Farms project was completed in cooperation with the NRCS Environmental Quality Incentives Program and the KCCD's Irrigation Efficiencies Program. Tributary survey teams were trained and surveys of tributaries in Yakima and Kittitas counties commenced in December of 2002. By the end of September 2003 Cowiche Creek in Yakima County was completed as well as Coleman, Reecer, Currier, Dry, Cabin, Indian, and Jack Creeks in Kittitas County. A screen was installed on the Hernandez/Ringer diversion in cooperation with the NRCS office in Kittitas County. YTAHP submitted six applications to the Salmon Recovery Funding Board and three were selected and funded. Another Salmon Recovery Funding Board project awarded in 2000 to the Yakama Nation was transferred to the KCCD. Two miles of fencing of riparian zones on the north fork Ahtanum was completed by the North Yakima Conservation District in cooperation with the Department of Natural Resources and the Ahtanum Irrigation District and funded by US fish and Wildlife as part of YTAHP's outreach partnering. Completion of this year's effort has provided significant inroads to working on the private lands in two counties which will be vital to future efforts by YTAHP and others to protect and enhance Yakima River Basin habitat. 2003 saw the migration of the WEB site from MWH to the Kittitas County Conservation District and can be accessed at www.kccd.net.

Myra, D.; Ready, C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers, Final Rule Title Energy Conservation Program: Energy...

131

Conservation on the edge : landscape scale conservation at Colorado's urban-rural interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Landscape scale conservation is an emerging framework that refers to the ability to conceive, plan, finance and manage projects with significant natural conservation value while incorporating the cultural and economic ...

Ericson, Peter, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) General Contingency Plan for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Units at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant  

SciTech Connect

This contingency plan provides a description of the Y-12 plant and its waste units and prescribes control procedures and emergency response procedures. It lists emergency and spill response equipment, provides information on coordination agreements with local agencies, and describes the evacuation plan and reporting requirements.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Salmon Basin Habitat Site Visits May 20-23, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

meeting at the Idaho Council Office Detailed Itinerary TBD #12;13 Projects included in this tour: 2007-268-00 Idaho Watershed Habitat Restoration-Custer District Custer Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) 1994-015-00 Idaho Fish Screening Improvement Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) 2007-399-00 Upper

135

Umatilla River Basin Anadromus Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Section 7.6-7.8 and targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The project focused on implementing cooperative instream and riparian habitat improvements on private lands on the Umatilla Indian Reservation (hereafter referred to as Reservation) from April 1, 1988 to March 31, 1992. These efforts resulted in enhancement of the lower l/4 mile of Boston Canyon Creek, the lower 4 river miles of Meacham Creek and 3.2 river miles of the Umatilla River in the vicinity of Gibbon, Oregon. In 1993, the project shifted emphasis to a comprehensive watershed approach, consistent with other basin efforts, and began to identify upland and riparian watershed-wide causative factors impacting fisheries habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities throughout the Umatilla River Watershed. During the 1994-95 project period, a one river mile demonstration project was implemented on two privately owned properties on Wildhorse Creek. This was the first watershed improvement project to be implemented by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) off of the Reservation. Four 15 year riparian easements and two right-of-way agreements were secured for enhancement of one river mile on Wildhorse Creek and l/2 river mile on Meacham Creek. Enhancements implemented between river mile (RM) 9.5 and RM 10.5 Wildhorse Creek included: (1) installation of 1.43 miles of smooth wire high tensile fence line and placement of 0.43 miles of fence posts and structures to restrict livestock from the riparian corridor, (2) construction of eighteen sediment retention structures in the stream channel to speed riparian recovery by elevating the stream grade, slowing water velocities and depositing sediments onto streambanks to provide substrate for revegetation, and (3) revegetation of the stream corridor, terraces and adjacent pasture areas with 644 pounds of native grass seed (when commercially available) or close species equivalents and 4,000 native riparian shrub/tree species to assist in floodplain recovery, stream channel stability and filtering of sediments during high flow periods. Three hundred pounds of native grass/legume seed (including other grasses/legumes exhibiting native species characteristics) were broadcast in existing Boston Canyon Creek, Meacham Creek and Umatilla River project areas. The addition of two properties into the project area between RM 4.25 and RM 4.75 Meacham Creek during the 1995-96 work period will provide nearly complete project coverage of lower Meacham Creek corridor areas on the Reservation. Water quality monitoring continued for temperature and turbidity throughout the upper Umatilla River Watershed. Survey of cross sections and photo documentation of riparian recovery within the project areas provided additional baseline data. Physical habitat surveys continued to be conducted to characterize habitat quality and to quantify various habitat types by area. This information will be utilized to assist in identification of habitat deficient areas within the watershed in which to focus habitat restoration efforts. These efforts were coordinated with the CTUIR Umatilla Basin Natural Production Monitoring and Evaluation (UBNPME) Project. Poor land use practices, which have altered natural floodplain dynamics and significantly reduced or eliminated fisheries habitat, continued to be identified in the Mission Creek Subbasin. Complied data is currently being incorporated into a data layer for a Geographic Information System (GIS) data base. This effort is being coordinated with the Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS). Community outreach efforts and public education opportunities continued during the reporting period. CTUIR cooperatively sponsored a bioengineering workshop on February 23, 1995 with the Oregon De

Shaw, R. Todd

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Conservation and Wetland Banking Opportunities Within Transmission Rights-of-Way.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric transmission line rights-of-way (ROWs) encompass millions of acres. Some of these lands include aquatic resources and land suitable for threatened or endangered species habitat. Wetland mitigation banking and habitat conservation banking provide legally recognized ways to offset permitted impacts to aquatic resources and wildlife by providing compensatory mitigation "credits" generated by conservation activities. Because ROW corridor lands traverse a variety of aquatic resources and habitats, an...

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Conservation Program Update New conservation program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Program Update New conservation program > Conservation Stewardship Program (CSTP) The new Conservation Stewardship Program is available for all landowners. CSTP rules are still being developed. However, the program could pay farmers who are improving conservation treatment on their working

Netoff, Theoden

138

Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act : Legislative History of the Act to Assist the Electrical Consumers of the Pacific Northwest through use of the Federal Columbia River Power System to Achieve Cost-Effective Energy Conservation : P.L. 96-501, 94 Stat. 2697.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act became effective when it was signed into law by President Carter on December 5, 1980. This ended a four-year debate over legislation designed to plan and coordinate the region's energy future. This legislative history is an abbreviated version taken from the larger historical file maintained by the BPA Law Library. It is intended to assist BPA personnel and others who are studying the Northwest Power Act and working on its implementation. The documents included were selected for their value in determining what Congress meant in enacting the statute and to provide the researcher with a starting point for further investigation. These documents include: a history of the Act, a chronology of the legislative action leading to passage of the law; a section-by-section analysis of the Act; the Congressional Records of Senate and House debates on the bill and its amendments, and a list of Congressional committee hearings.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Energy State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Energy Efficiency and Conservation Plans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

140

Energy Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Goal 1: Energy Conservation LANL strives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to meet and surpass Department of Energy goals. The Lab's goal is to reduce emissions from energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

International Conservation Emphasis Resource Conservation Degree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conservation Emphasis Resource Conservation Degree Faculty Advisors Steve Siebert) 243-6062, Office: CHCB 467 Goals The International Conservation emphasis is an interdisciplinary course of study that addresses opportunities and constraints to the use, management and conservation

Crone, Elizabeth

142

A Multiple Watershed Approach to Assessing the Effects of Habitat Restoration Actions on Anadromous and Resident Fish Populations, Technical Report 2003-2004.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Habitat protection and restoration is a cornerstone of current strategies to restore ecosystems, recover endangered fish species, and rebuild fish stocks within the Columbia River Basin. Strategies featuring habitat restoration include the 2000 Biological Opinion on operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS BiOp) developed by the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the 2000 Biological Opinion on Bull Trout developed by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and Sub-Basin Plans developed under the Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NWPCC). There is however little quantitative information about the effectiveness of different habitat restoration techniques. Such information is crucial for helping scientists and program managers allocate limited funds towards the greatest benefits for fish populations. Therefore, it is critical to systematically test the hypotheses underlying habitat restoration actions for both anadromous and resident fish populations. This pilot project was developed through a proposal to the Innovative Projects fund of the NWPCC (ESSA 2002). It was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) following reviews by the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP 2002), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA 2002), the NWPCC and BPA. The study was designed to respond directly to the above described needs for information on the effectiveness of habitat restoration actions, including legal measures specified in the 2000 FCRPS BiOp (RPA 183, pg. 9-133, NMFS 2000). Due to the urgency of addressing these measures, the timeline of the project was accelerated from a duration of 18 months to 14 months. The purpose of this pilot project was to explore methods for evaluating past habitat restoration actions and their effects on fish populations. By doing so, the project will provide a foundation of retrospective analyses, on which to build prospective, multi-watershed designs for future habitat restoration actions. Such designs are being developed concurrently with this project by several other groups in the Columbia Basin (RME Workgroup 2003, NMFS 2003, Hillman and Paulsen 2002, Hillman 2003). By addressing questions about habitat restoration and monitoring (in coordination with other related efforts), we hope that this project will catalyze a shift in the Basin's paradigm of habitat restoration, moving from implementation of individual watershed projects towards rigorously designed and monitored, multiwatershed, adaptive management experiments. The project involved three phases of work, which were closely integrated with various related and ongoing efforts in the region: (1) Scoping - We met with a Core Group of habitat experts and managers to scope out a set of testable habitat restoration hypotheses, identify candidate watersheds and recommend participants for a data evaluation workshop. (2) Data Assembly - We contacted over 80 scientists and managers to help evaluate the suitability of each candidate watershed's historical data for assessing the effectiveness of past restoration actions. We eventually settled on the Yakima, Wenatchee, Clearwater, and Salmon subbasins, and began gathering relevant data for these watersheds at a workshop with habitat experts and managers. Data assembly continued for several months after the workshop. (3) Data Analysis and Synthesis - We explored statistical approaches towards retrospectively analyzing the effects of restoration 'treatments' at nested spatial scales across multiple watersheds (Chapters 2-5 of this report). These analyses provided a foundation for identifying existing constraints to testing restoration hypotheses, and opportunities to overcome these constraints through improved experimental designs, monitoring protocols and project selection strategies (Chapters 6 and 7 of this report). Finally, we developed a set of recommendations to improve the design, implementation, and monitoring of prospective habitat restoration programs in the Columbia River Basin (Chapter 8).

Marmorek, David

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Clinch River: an alternate financing plan. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy Conservation and Power, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, first session, 20 Sep 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Representatives of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) project, the nuclear industry, taxpayers, the financial community, and legislators testified at a hearing held to review administration plans for completing the CRBR by attaching its financing to a continuing resolution and avoiding the legislative process. A Congressional Budget Office report noted that the administration's financing proposal will generate up to 37% return on investment from tax relief alone, which is more appropriate for high-risk than government-backed investment. The Congressional Research Service challenged that the plant's power production capacity was overstated and its price overvalued. Of concern to the committee was the fairness of asking taxpayers to share in the $2.5 billion needed to complete the project. Additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 20 witnesses.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1 of 2, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tribal project annual report contains reports for four subprojects within Project 83-359. Subproject I involved fish inventories in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, that will be used in conjunction with 1984 and 1985 fish and habitat pre-treatment (baseline) data to evaluate effects of habitat enhancement on the habitat and fish community in Bear Valley Creek overtime. Subproject II is the coordination/planning activities of the Project Leader in relation to other BPA-funded habitat enhancement projects that have or will occur in the upper-Salmon River basin. Subproject III involved fish inventories (pre-treatment) in the Yankee Fork drainage of the Salmon River, and habitat problem identification on Fivemile and Ramey Creek. Subproject IV involved baseline habitat and fish inventories on the East Fork of the Salmon River, Herd Creek and Big-Boulder Creek. Individual abstracts have been prepared for the four subproject reports. 20 refs., 37 figs., 22 tabs.

Richards, Carl

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title HI-County-Maui Location: County Maui HI American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Energy efficiency and conservation strategy planning activities including hiring program manager; 2)

146

Columbia River Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report / Scotch Creek Wildlife Area, Berg Brothers, and Douglas County Pygmy Rabbit Projects.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Habitat Evaluation Procedure study was conducted to determine baseline habitat units (HUs) on the Scotch Creek, Mineral Hill, Pogue Mountain, Chesaw and Tunk Valley Habitat Areas (collectively known as the Scotch Creek Wildlife Area) in Okanogan County, Sagebrush Flat and the Dormaler property in Douglas County, and the Berg Brothers ranch located in Okanogan County within the Colville Reservation. A HEP team comprised of individuals from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, and the Natural Resources Conservation Service (Appendix A) conducted baseline habitat surveys using the following HEP evaluation species: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus), pygmy rabbit (Brachylagus idahoensis), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginiana), mink (Mustela vison), Canada goose (Branta canadensis), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), Lewis woodpecker (Melanerpes lewis), and Yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia). Results of the HEP analysis are listed below. General ratings (poor, marginal, fair, etc.,) are described in Appendix B. Mule deer habitat was marginal lacking diversity and quantify of suitable browse species. Sharp-tailed grouse habitat was marginal lacking residual nesting cover and suitable winter habitat Pygmy rabbit habitat was in fair condition except for the Dormaier property which was rated marginal due to excessive shrub canopy closure at some sites. This report is an analysis of baseline habitat conditions on mitigation project lands and provides estimated habitat units for mitigation crediting purposes. In addition, information from this document could be used by wildlife habitat managers to develop management strategies for specific project sites.

Ashley, Paul R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Many voices, one wilderness : collaborative conservation in the greater Chicago region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been a growing recognition in the conservation community that landscape-scale networks of preserves and habitat corridors are needed to adequately protect native biodiversity. While most of the efforts to protect ...

Bates, Justin (Justin Timothy)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Energy Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Energy Goal 1: Energy Conservation LANL strives to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to meet and surpass Department of Energy goals. The Lab's goal is to reduce emissions from energy use in our facilities and driving vehicles in our fleet by 28 percent. Energy Conservation» Efficient Water Use & Management» High Performance Sustainable Buildings» Greening Transportation» Green Purchasing & Green Technology» Pollution Prevention» Science Serving Sustainability» ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Renewable energy goals: With the newly installed low flow turbine, LANL will be able to meet nearly half of its renewable energy goals for 2013. LANL was one of the original investors in renewable energy through the high flow turbines at Abiquiu Dam. Engineer Campbell of the Abiquiu Dam Facility demonstrates the use of the low flow turbine for electricity generation. The Abiquiu Dam power station's water flow and electrical output is controlled from monitors in Los Alamos. Inside the TA-03 Steam Plant: Replacement or reconfiguration of the 50 year old steam plant and piping system could provide significant energy savings for LANL.

149

Optimum Reservoir Operation for Flood Control and Conservation Purposes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid population and economic growth in Texas is accompanied by increased needs for water supply and flood control. Depleting groundwater reserves are resulting in an increased reliance on surface water. The rising cost of fossil fuel during the 1970's has focused attention on increasing hydroelectric power generation. Instream flow needs for fish and wildlife habitat and maintenance of fresh water inflows to bays and estuaries have received increased attention in recent years. The climate of the state is characterized by extremes of floods and droughts. Reservoirs are necessary to control and utilize the highly variable streamflow. Due to a number of economic, environmental, institutional, and political factors, construction of additional new reservoir projects is much more difficult now than in the past. Consequently, optimizing the beneficial use of existing reservoirs is becoming increasingly more important. In addition to ever increasing water related needs, other factors affecting reservoir operation change over time as well. Watershed and flood plain conditions are dynamic. Construction of numerous small flood retarding dams by the Soil Conservation Service and other entities in the watersheds of major reservoirs have reduced flood inflows to the reservoirs. Construction of numerous small ponds for recreation or watering livestock have also decreased reservoir inflows and yields. Increased runoff caused by watershed urbanization is significantly contributing to flooding problems in certain locations. The existing flood control reservoirs were planned and designed based on the expectation of ever increasing intensification of flood plain land use. However, the National Flood Insurance Program has resulted in zoning and regulation of 100-year flood plains. With stringent flood plain management, susceptibility to flooding could actually decrease over time as existing activities choose to leave the flood plain and regulation prevents other activities from moving into the flood plain. Reservoir sedimentation reduces available storage capacity. Construction of additional reservoirs, as well as other related types of projects such as conveyance facilities, flood control levees and channel improvements, and electric power plants, affect the operation of existing reservoirs. Technological advancements in hydrologic data collection, streamflow forecasting, system modeling and analysis, and computer technology provide opportunities for refining operating policies. Reservoir storage capacities and operating policies are generally established prior to construction and tend to remain constant thereafter. However, public needs and objectives and numerous factors affecting reservoir effectiveness significantly change over time. The increasing necessity to use limited storage capacity as effectively as possible warrants periodic reevaluations of operating policies. Operating procedures should be responsive to changing needs and conditions. Reallocation of storage capacity between flood control and conservation purposes represents one general strategy for modifying operating policies in response to changing needs and conditions. Reservoir operation is based upon the conflicting objectives of maximizing the amount of water available for conservation purposes and maximizing the amount of empty space available for storing flood waters. Conservation purposes include municipal, industrial, and agricultural water supply, hydroelectric power, recreation, and instream flow maintenance. Common practice is to operate a reservoir only for conservation purposes or only for flood control or to designate a certain reservoir volume, or pool, for conservation purposes and a separate pool for flood control. The conservation and flood control pools in a multiple purpose reservoir are fixed by a designated top of conservation (bottom of flood control) pool elevation. Planning, design, and operating problems associated with flood control are handled separately from those associated with conservation. Institutional arra

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Cabezas, L. Morris; Tibbets, Michael N.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Landscaping Water Conservation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landscaping Water Conservation Landscaping Water Conservation Landscaping Water Conservation April 13, 2012 - 6:39pm Addthis This colorful water-conserving landscape requires only one-quarter the water a bluegrass lawn would use. | Photo courtesy of Jim Knopf. This colorful water-conserving landscape requires only one-quarter the water a bluegrass lawn would use. | Photo courtesy of Jim Knopf. What does this mean for me? A waterwise landscape can be colorful and interesting if you follow xeriscape principles. How does it work? Xeriscaping requires planning and careful plant selection, but often requires less attention and maintenance than traditional landscapes. You can design a landscape that conserves water as well as energy. Here is a brief overview of some water-conserving landscaping strategies.

151

Geopressured habitat: A literature review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A literature review of the geopressured-geothermal habitat is summarized. Findings are presented and discussed with respect to the principal topics: Casual agents are both geological and geochemical; they include disequilibrium compaction of sediments, clay diagenesis, aquathermal pressuring, hydrocarbon generation, and lateral tectonic compression. The overall physical and chemical characteristics of the habitats are dictated by varying combinations of sedimentation rates, alteration mineralogy, permeability, porosity and pressure, temperature, fluid content and chemistry, and hydrodynamic flow. Habitat pressure seals are considered in terms of their formation processes, geologic characteristics, and physical behavior, including pressure release and reservoir pressure recharge on a geologic time scale. World-wide occurrence of geopressured-geothermal habitats is noted. The main thrust of this topic concerns the U.S.A. and Canada; in addition, reference is made to occurrences in China and indications from deep-sea vents, as well as the contribution of paleo-overpressure to habitat initiation and maintenance. Identification and assessment of the habitat is addressed in relation to use of hydrogeologic, geophysical, geochemical, and geothermic techniques, as well as well-logging and drill-stem-test data. Conclusions concerning the adequacy of the current state of knowledge and its applicability to resource exploration and development are set forth, together with recommendations for the thrust of future work.

Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Estuarine and Tidal Freshwater Habitat Cover Types Along the Lower Columbia River Estuary Determined from Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) Imagery, Technical Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing an understanding of the distribution and changes in estuarine and tidal floodplain ecosystems is critical to the management of biological resources in the lower Columbia River. Columbia River plants, fish, and wildlife require specific physicochemical and ecological conditions to sustain their populations. As habitats are degraded or lost, this capability is altered, often irretrievably; those species that cannot adapt are lost from the ecosystem. The Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (Estuary Partnership) completed a comprehensive ecosystem protection and enhancement plan for the lower Columbia River and estuary in 1999 (Jerrick, 1999). The plan identified habitat loss and modification as a critical threat to the integrity of the lower Columbia River ecosystem and called for a habitat inventory as a key first step in its long term restoration efforts. In 2000, the Estuary Partnership initiated a multiphase project to produce a spatial data set describing the current location and distribution of estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover types along the lower Columbia River from the river mouth to the Bonneville Dam using a consistent methodology and data sources (Fig. 1). The first phase of the project was the development of a broadbrush description of the estuarine and tidal freshwater habitat cover classes for the entire study area ({approx}146 river miles) using Landsat 7 ETM+ satellite imagery. Phase II of the project entailed analysis of the classified satellite imagery from Phase I. Analysis of change in landcover and a summary of the spatial relationships between cover types are part of Phase II. Phase III of the project included the classification of the high resolution hyperspectral imagery collected in 2000 and 2001 for key focal areas within the larger study area. Finally, Phase IV consists of this final report that presents results from refining the Landsat ETM+ classification and provides recommendations for future actions. Previous studies (Thomas, 1980; Thomas, 1983; Graves et al., 1995; NOAA, 1997; Allen, 1999) produced similar landcover data sets; however, most of these studies used multiple and varied data sources and differed from one another in methodologies. Currently, no single data set has been produced using a consistent methodology and uniform scale data, which describes current estuarine and tidal freshwater floodplain cover types from the Columbia's mouth to the Bonneville Dam (Fig. 1). Results from this study will be used by the Estuary Partnership and its cooperators to: (1) develop indicators of 'habitat health' for target species and populations, and biological integrity at the community and ecosystem scales; (2) develop definitions of 'important salmonid habitat'; (3) identify and evaluate potential wetland conservation and restoration sites; (4) track non-indigenous and invasive species; and (5) develop an understanding of how estuarine and floodplain habitats have changed over the past 200 years. This study focused on estuarine and tidal freshwater floodplain habitat cover types, which are important to native species, particularly juvenile salmonids. Results from this study are meant to provide support for the multiple efforts currently underway to recover 12 species of Columbia River salmonids identified as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Spatial scale was an important consideration in this study. Our goal was to create a geographic information system (GIS) coverage depicting habitat cover types for the entire 146 river miles of the study area and the associated floodplain, at a spatial resolution sufficient to resolve important estuarine and floodplain features, wherever possible. Thus, in addition to the small scale (30 m pixel size) satellite imagery covering the study area described in this report, we also acquired high spatial resolution imagery ({approx}1.5 m pixel size) for key portions of the study area using a Compact Airborne Spectrographic Imager (CASI). Compared to the rather coarse, low spectral resolution of the satellite ima

Garono, Ralph; Robinson, Rob

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

green, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in significant changes to this plan warranting the delay. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL in a sustainable manner. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B, respectively), and lists of actions in tabular format - including completed items as well as ongoing and new action items (Appendices C and D, respectively).

green, T.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Energy-conserving site design  

SciTech Connect

Information useful to landscape architects, architects, planners, engineers, students, and homeowners is presented. The concepts and examples needed to create more energy-efficient landscapes are described. The book is organized into five sections, including: an overview and history of energy-efficient design research; detailed information and new strategies on site analysis and planning; energy-efficient landscape design of clustered and single residences; alternative energy-conserving scenarios for the future; and appendices. The appendices contain such technical information as: lists of energy-conserving design options, formulas to calculate solar radiation and soil temperatures, tools for climatic analysis, and techniques for precision planting for solar control and access.

McPherson, E.G. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NE-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe NE-TRIBE-PONCA TRIBE OF NEBRASKA NE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Ponca Tribe of Nebraska proposes to 1) employ and train one full-time employee to oversee the energy efficiency and conservation plan development, establish the Ponca Energy Office, and implement activities proposes in the energy efficiency and conservation plan; 2) maintain an Energy Team that will provide advice and guidance to the energy planner and develop programming to educate the community about energy efficiency, conservation, and renewable energy; the planner will research renewable energy by attending training and pursuing funding to obtain renewable energy; and 3) create a recycling plan at

157

GIS-Based estimation of wetland conservation potentials in europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the EU socio-economic considerations and economic activities play an important part in land use management and conservation planning. However, conservation studies that offer high-accuracy landscape information at the European level are often recommended ... Keywords: land use planning, restoration ecology, spatial analysis

Christine Schleupner

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Afrotherian Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

w members: I do not think Professor Jonathan Kingdon needs any introduction! Dr. Thomas Lehmann from the Transvaal Museum joined us as an authority on aardvarks and Dr. Andrew Baker of the Philadelphia Zoo agreed to give us his expertise on captive afrotheres, especially sengis and aardvarks (see issue No. 3 of our newsletter). WELCOME to these new members! The complete membership list is attached at the end of the newsletter. As this issue of Afrotherian Conservation goes to press, we are waiting for news as to whether Jon Benstead, Link Olson, Daniel Rakotondravony, and Erika Ranoarivony will be successful in obtaining a Chicago Board of Trade grant, through the Chicago Zoological Society, for their proposal on the web-footed tenrec in Madagascar. With the GMA, Red List update, and new quadrennial behind us we have two main activities that need our focus. First, our web site needs attention, including finishing the golden mole and tenrec pages, and updating the taxonomy, Red List s

Newsletter Of The; Galen Rathbun; R. W. Yarnell; D. M. Scott; Moles G. B. Rathbun; L. Rathbun; F. Kachel; U. Zeller; V Besnard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Characterization of Habitat for Hawksbill Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) in Los Roques Archipelago National Park, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information on the locations for feeding, reproductions, and resting, are essential to effectively protect sea turtle populations and implement conservation efforts. This type of ecological information is critically important for hawksbill turtle conservation in Los Roques Archipelago National Park (LRANP) where turtles have been declining in spite of habitat protection efforts. The goal of this research was to produce a benthic habitat map of LRANP employing in situ visual surveys, remote sensing and geographic information system techniques, and to spatially characterize sea turtle occupancy and patterns of usage by habitat type. Between June and August of 2008, turtle behavior and habitat use were recorded during 159 h of observation, comprising 46 sighting events (n = 20 juveniles, n = 26 female adults). Observed activities were grouped into 4 categories: foraging, resting, swimming, and reproductive behavior. The benthic habitat at each turtle sighting was recorded as one of three categories: coral reef, sand or marine vegetation. Results suggest that the population of turtles within LRANP is comprised primarily of female adults and juvenile individuals and that coral reef is the most important habitat for this species. The most important foraging area in the atoll is a coral patch reef that connects Dos Mosquises Sur and Dos Mosquises Norte. The data in this thesis have been made available in digital and map form to the managers of LRANP for management purposes.

Hunt, Luciana E.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes such as the up- turning of topsoil and plant populations to retrieve oil shale. The goal in the world that boasts an abundance of oil shale. CSU scientists at the time believed that the extraction methods used to retrieve the oil shale - a sedimen- tary rock that contains ma- terials that, when heated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Rare Plant Conservation Planning Workshop Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and potentially by future oil and gas development. To abate these and other threats, participants of the Summer Conduct research on impacts of cattle grazing; natural history; and how to best monitor the phacelia. High RPI/Grad student TBD. Re natural history: See report from Kathy Darrow - 1990 study. Need

162

Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

Buehler, D.A. [Univ., of Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation It Takes a Village: Students as a Catalyst for Conservation Speaker(s): Julie Osborn Date: January 23, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Successful conservation projects must address human influences on species and their habitat by integrating local residents into the conservation solution. Involving local students in research can serve as a catalyst to gain community participation in protection efforts; educate those who have the most immediate connection to the issues; and empower individuals with tangible ways they can contribute to conservation. Effective community response requires the collaboration of educational institutions, NGOs, landowners, government agencies, and individual community members. Ecology Project International (EPI) has integrated local students in conservation

165

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &share some of the water-conservation techniques used at theWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Water Conservation Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gardener Water Conservation Tips fo r t h e UCSC Farm &we share some of the water-conservation techniques used atWinter Squash Water Conservation Mulches will save water,

Brown, Martha

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating...

168

EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp...

169

Building America Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Habitat for Humanity Palm Beach County, West Palm Beach, Florida  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm 2011, Building America assisted Habitat for Humanity of Palm Beach County (HabitatPBC) in completing three high-performance prototype houses that achieved HERS index scores of less than 60, which is about 30% better than typical HabitatPBC construction, at a payback of less than 4 years. The HabitatPBC is planning to implement these strategies in future homes they build. This has the potential for significant and affordable energy savings as HabitatPBC has built more than 111 affordable houses and served an additional 125 families worldwide through their affiliation with HFH International (today serving >20 families a year). Building America (through the Florida Solar Energy Center, a member of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory team) achieved

170

Guidance Concerning Applicable Sampling Plan for Certification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sampling Plan for Certification of Consumer Product The Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended, authorizes the Department of Energy to enforce compliance...

171

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-IGIUGIG TRIBAL VILLAGE COUNCIL AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Igiugig Village Council plans to work toward implementing the energy efficiency and conservation strategic plan for the Igiugig Village by planning for new community development such as tribal housing, infrastructure, and facilities to include energy-efficient features that contribute to lower energy demand. A subcontractor will be contracted to provide planning and design assistance (planning/design only) for new tribal buildings and infrastructure and 2) the Igiugig Village Council proposes to purchase, install, and

172

Conservation and Outdoor Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CONSERVATION AND OUTDOOR EDUCATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVE DISTRIC. The Forest...

173

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1987.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead (Salmo gairdneri) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages over the last four years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production at full seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded attainment of full benefit of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration. According to the BPA Work Plan, project implementors have the primary responsibility for measuring physical habitat and estimating habitat change. To date, Idaho habitat projects have been implemented primarily by the US Forest Service (USFS). The Shoshone-Bannock Tribes (SBT) have sponsored three projects (Bear Valley Mine, Yankee Fork, and the proposed East Fork Salmon River projects). IDFG implemented two barrier-removal projects (Johnson Creek and Boulder Creek) that the USFS was unable to sponsor at that time. The role of IDFG in physical habitat monitoring is primarily to link habitat quality and habitat change to changes in actual, or potential, fish production. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B. (Idaho Dept. of Fish and Game, Boise, ID (USA)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Marketing energy conservation options to Northwest manufactured home buyers  

SciTech Connect

This study relies on extensive, existing survey data and new analyses to develop information that would help design a marketing plan to achieve energy conservation in new manufactured homes. Existing surveys present comprehensive information about regional manufactured home occupants and their homes that are relevant to a potential conservation marketing plan. An independent analysis of the cost-effectiveness of various efficiency improvements provides background information for designing a marketing plan. This analysis focuses on the economic impacts of alternative energy conservation options as perceived by the home owner. Identifying impediments to conservation investments is also very important in designing a marketing plan. A recent report suggests that financial constraints and the need for better information and knowledge about conservation pose the major conservation investment barriers. Since loan interest rates for new manufactured homes typically exceed site-built rates by a considerable amount and the buyers tend to have lower incomes, the economics of manufactured home conservation investments are likely to significantly influence their viability. Conservation information and its presentation directly influences the manufactured home buyer's decision. A marketing plan should address these impediments and their implications very clearly. Dealers express a belief that consumer satisfaction is the major advantage to selling energy efficient manufactured homes. This suggests that targeting dealers in a marketing plan and providing them direct information on consumers' indicated attitudes may be important. 74 refs.

Hendrickson, P.L.; Mohler, B.L.; Taylor, Z.T.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Facility Investigation Program Plan has been developed to provide a framework for the completion of RCRA Facility Investigations (RFI) at identified units on the Savannah Rive Site (SRS) facility. As such, the RFI Program Plan provides: technical guidance for all work to be performed, managerial control, a practical, scientific approach. The purpose of this Overview is to demonstrate how the basic RFI Program Plan elements (technical, management, and approach) are interwoven to provide a practical and workable plan. The goal of the RFI Program Plan is to provide a systematic, uniform approach for performance and reporting. In addition, the RFI Program Plan has been developed to be specific to the SRS facility and to adhere to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) RFI guidance received as part of the SRS. The US EPA publication Characterization of Hazardous Waste Sites'' has been liberally adapted for use in this RFI Program Plan.

Not Available

1989-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Durability of Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Durability of Conservation Easements in Georgia Meghan Ryan & Michelle Godfrey November 3, 2008-0612 jroskie@uga.edu #12;1The Durability of Conservation Easements in Georgia The Durability of Conservation Easements in Georgia Meghan Ryan & Michelle Godfrey Fall 2008 I. Introduction Conservation easements

Radcliffe, David

177

Energy Conservation Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Circuitry Optimization. National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP) Efficiency of Electric Motors. >> see all Energy Conservation ...

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sharp-tailed Grouse Restoration; Colville Tribes Restore Habitat for Sharp-tailed Grouse, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus) (CSTG) are an important traditional and cultural species to the Colville Confederated Tribes (CCT), Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI), and other Tribes in the Region. They were once the most abundant upland bird in the Region. Currently, the largest remaining population in Washington State occurs on the CCT Reservation in Okanogan County. Increasing agricultural practices and other land uses has contributed to the decline of sharp-tail habitat and populations putting this species at risk. The decline of this species is not new (Yokum, 1952, Buss and Dziedzic, 1955, Zeigler, 1979, Meints 1991, and Crawford and Snyder 1994). The Tribes (CCT and STOI) are determined to protect, enhance and restore habitat for this species continued existence. When Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Hydro-projects were constructed, inundated habitat used by this species was lost forever adding to overall decline. To compensate and prevent further habitat loss, the CCT proposed a project with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funding to address this species and their habitat requirements. The projects main focus is to address habitat utilized by the current CSTG population and determine ways to protect, restore, and enhance habitats for the conservation of this species over time. The project went through the NPPC Review Process and was funded through FY03 by BPA. This report addresses part of the current CCT effort to address the conservation of this species on the Colville Reservation.

Whitney, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy conserving site design case study: Shenandoah, Georgia. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The case study examines the means by which energy conservation can be achieved at an aggregate community level by using proper planning and analytical techniques for a new town, Shenandoah, Georgia, located twenty-five miles southwest of Atlanta's Hartsfield International Airport. A potentially implementable energy conservation community plan is achieved by a study team examining the land use options, siting characteristics of each building type, alternate infrastructure plans, possible decentralized energy options, and central utility schemes to determine how community energy conservation can be achieved by use of pre-construction planning. The concept for the development of mixed land uses as a passively sited, energy conserving community is based on a plan (Level 1 Plan) that uses the natural site characteristics, maximizes on passive energy siting requirement, and allows flexibility for the changing needs of the developers. The Level 2 Plan is identical with Level 1 plan plus a series of decentraized systems that have been added to the residential units: the single-family detached, the apartments, and the townhouses. Level 3 Plan is similar to the Level 1 Plan except that higher density dwellings have been moved to areas adjacent to central site. The total energy savings for each plan relative to the conventional plan are indicated. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Rainwater Wildlife Area Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland cover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglecta). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2}2 plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Childs, Allen B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PREVENTIVE CONSERVATION: A CONCEPT SUITED TO THE CONSERVATION OF EARTHEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PREVENTIVE CONSERVATION: A CONCEPT SUITED TO THE CONSERVATION OF EARTHEN ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE and Construction Key words: Preventive conservation, traditional conservation practices, risk reduction, heritage management Abstract The concept of "preventive conservation" is relatively old as it has already been

Recanati, Catherine

182

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of Engineers and the Washington Department of fish and Wildlife subsequently purchased numerous properties to mitigate for the identified Snake River losses. These projects, however, were not sufficient to mitigate for all the HU's lost. The Northwest Power Planning Council amended the remaining 26,774 HU's into their 1994-1995 Fish and Wildlife Program as being unmitigated (NPPC 2000), which allowed the Nez Perce Tribe to contract with BPA to provide HU's through the Precious Lands Project. The Precious Lands project contains a different composition of cover types than those assessed during the lower Snake loss assessment. For example, no mallard or Canada goose habitat exists on Precious Lands but the area does contain conifer forest, which was not present on the area inundated by dam construction. These cover type differences have resulted in a slightly different suite of species for the current HEP assessment. Target species for Precious Lands are downy woodpecker, yellow warbler, song sparrow, California Quail, mule deer, sharp-tailed grouse (brood rearing), west em meadowlark, beaver, and black-capped chickadee. This list is a reflection of the available cover types and the management objectives of the Nez Perce Tribe. For example, chukar was not used in the present assessment because it is an introduced Eurasian game bird that does not provide an accurate representation of the ecological health of the native grasslands it was supposed to represent. Initial model runs using the chukar confirmed this suspicion so the brood-rearing section of the sharp-tailed grouse model was used instead. Additionally, the beaver model was used in place of the river otter model because the otter model used in the loss assessment was not a published model, was overly simplistic, and did not provide an accurate assessment of riparian condition. The beaver model, however, provides a detailed evaluation of overstory class structure that the NPT felt was a good compliment to the yellow warbler and song sparrow models that evaluated understory shrub layers. Overall, such substituti

Kozusko, Shana

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Big Island - The McKenzie River, Technical Report 1998-2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Big Island site is located in the McKenzie River flood plain, containing remnant habitats of what was once more common in this area. A diverse array of flora and fauna, representing significant wildlife habitats, is present on the site. Stands of undisturbed forested wetlands, along with riparian shrub habitats and numerous streams and ponds, support a diversity of wildlife species, including neotropical migratory songbirds, raptors, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians (including two State-listed Sensitive Critical species). The project is located in eastern Springfield, Oregon (Figure 1). The project area encompasses 187 acres under several ownerships in Section 27 of Township 17S, Range 2W. Despite some invasion of non-native species, the site contains large areas of relatively undisturbed wildlife habitat. Over several site visits, a variety of wildlife and signs of wildlife were observed, including an active great blue heron rookery, red-Legged frog egg masses, signs of beaver, and a bald eagle, Wildlife habitat values resulting from the purchase of this site will contribute toward the goal of mitigating for habitat lost as outlined in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Mitigation and Enhancement Plan for the Willamette River Basin. Under this Plan, mitigation goals and objectives were developed as a result of the loss of wildlife habitat due to the construction of Federal hydroelectric facilities in the Willamette River Basin. Results of the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) will be used to: (1) determine the current habitat status of the study area and habitat enhancement potential of the site consistent with wildlife mitigation goals and objectives; and (2) develop a management plan for the area.

Sieglitz, Greg

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian enclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2000 included: (1) Implementing 2 new projects in the Grande Ronde drainage, and retrofitting one old project that will protect an additional 1.3 miles of stream and 298.3 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Improving fish passage in Bear Creek to restore tributary and mainstem access; (4) Planting and seeding 6.7 stream miles with 7,100 plants and 365 lbs. of seed; (5) Establishing 18 new photopoints and retaking 229 existing photopoint pictures; (6) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (7) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 98.7 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 62 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,910 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.; Stennfeld, Scott P.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Strategic Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Strategic Plan Print ALS Strategic Plan Update: March 2013 The Advanced Light Source Strategic Plan, originally published in 2009, has been revised to reflect completed...

186

Habitat for Humanity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habitat for Humanity Habitat for Humanity Jump to: navigation, search Name Habitat for Humanity Place Americus, GA Website http://www.habitat.org/ References NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home[1] Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home[2] Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration Partnership Year 2005 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! Habitat for Humanity is a company located in Americus, GA. References ↑ "NREL Technical Report: Zero Energy Home" ↑ "Fact Sheet: Zero Energy Demonstration Home" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Habitat_for_Humanity&oldid=38172

187

Energy Conservation in Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Energy Conservation in Metals. Sponsorship, The Minerals, Metals and...

188

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Project Title MN-County-Ramsey Location: County Ramsey MN American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Comprehensive energy plan and energy/sustainability coordinator to administer energy efficiency and

189

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aID5044&FilenameAquatic+Habitat+Protection+Permit+Application.pdf&lEnglish Summary The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of...

190

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring : Annual Report 1989.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northwest Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) habitat improvement projects, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject (Part 1) are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density data from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) management and research activities. Primary objectives of the intensive monitoring subproject (Part 2) are to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and to develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Field work began in 1987 in the upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). 22 refs., 10 figs., 17 tabs.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ANOTHER LOOK AT ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab. Report of Demand and Conservation Panel, Committee onin 3 Conaes Demand/Conservation Panel Futures. Average30 r- RESIDENTIAL GAS CONSERVATION 1400 SQ. FT. UNINSULATED

Schipper, Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards 81: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download October 20, 2011 EA-1881: Finding of No Significant Impact Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts (October 2011) October 5, 2011 EA-1881: Final Environmental Assessment Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent

193

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Wireless sensor networks for habitat monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide an in-depth study of applying wireless sensor networks to real-world habitat monitoring. A set of system design requirements are developed that cover the hardware design of the nodes, the design of the sensor network, and the capabilities ... Keywords: environmental monitoring, habitat monitoring, low power systems, sensor network architecture, wireless sensor networks

Alan Mainwaring; David Culler; Joseph Polastre; Robert Szewczyk; John Anderson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1991 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets the improvement of water quality and restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning,and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. This report covers work accomplished by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation from April 1991 through May 1992. This program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Measure 704 (d)(1) 34.02) as partial mitigation for construction of hydroelectric dams and the subsequent losses of anadromous fish throughout the Columbia River system.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards 774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment EA-1774: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the adoption of amended energy conservation standards as required by The Energy Policy and Conservation Act, as amended) for direct heating equipment, as contained in the final rule titled, "Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating quipment," would not be a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the NEPA. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 22, 2010

197

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Appendix 2). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for protection of habitats within the project area. The HSI models used were identical to those modified for use in 1991 (Attachment A). The objective of using HEP as an assessment tool is two-fold. First, it provides an unbiased and measured assessment of wildlife habitats within the mitigation parcel. This data is used to offset the Albeni Falls Dam HU loss ledger. That ledger accounts for the loss of wildlife habitat that resulted from the construction and inundation of Albeni Falls hydroelectric project and the extent to which those losses have been mitigated. Additionally, the baseline HEP evaluation describes existing habitat conditions on the property and will be used, along with other tools, to determine initial management, restoration, and enhancement activities. HEP analyses will be completed every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional HU crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Holmes, Darren

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Iskuulpa Wildlife Mitigation and Watershed Project, Technical Report 1998-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to evaluate lands acquired and leased in Eskuulpa Watershed, a Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation watershed and wildlife mitigation project. The project is designed to partially credit habitat losses incurred by BPA for the construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grasslands cover types were included in the evaluation. Indicator species included downy woodpecker (Picuides puhescens), black-capped chickadee (Pams atricopillus), blue grouse (Beadragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petschia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnello neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 55,500 feet of transects, 678 m2 plots, and 243 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 123.9 and f 0,794.4 acres were evaluated for each indicator species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total habitat units credited to BPA for the Iskuulpa Watershed Project and its seven indicator species is 4,567.8 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest, which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing or implementation of restoration grazing schemes, road de-commissioning, reforestation, large woody debris additions to floodplains, control of competing and unwanted vegetation, reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, and the allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence. Implementation of these alternatives could generate an estimated minimum of 393 enhancement credits in 10 years. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and structural complexity in all cover types. While such benefits are not readily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they also provide dual benefits for fisheries resources. Implementation of the alternatives will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program.

Quaempts, Eric

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources are the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No.199202601). Work undertaken during 2007 included: (1) Starting 1 new fencing project in the NFJD subbasin that will protect an additional 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat; (2) Constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa River to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) Planting 22,100 plants along 3 streams totaling 3.6 stream miles; (4) Establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; (7) Initiated writing of a comprehensive project summary report that will present a summary of conclusions of the benefits to focal species and management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 56 individual projects have been implemented, monitored and maintained along 84.8 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams that protect and enhance 3,501 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H.

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Spawning Habitat Studies of Hanford Reach Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted this study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) with funding provided through the Northwest Power and Conservation Council(a) and the BPA Fish and Wildlife Program. The study was conducted in the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River. The goal of study was to determine the physical habitat factors necessary to define the redd capacity of fall Chinook salmon that spawn in large mainstem rivers like the Hanford Reach and Snake River. The study was originally commissioned in FY 1994 and then recommissioned in FY 2000 through the Fish and Wildlife Program rolling review of the Columbia River Basin projects. The work described in this report covers the period from 1994 through 2004; however, the majority of the information comes from the last four years of the study (2000 through 2004). Results from the work conducted from 1994 to 2000 were covered in an earlier report. More than any other stock of Pacific salmon, fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) have suffered severe impacts from the hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. Fall Chinook salmon rely heavily on mainstem habitats for all phases of their life cycle, and mainstem hydroelectric dams have inundated or blocked areas that were historically used for spawning and rearing. The natural flow pattern that existed in the historic period has been altered by the dams, which in turn have affected the physical and biological template upon which fall Chinook salmon depend upon for successful reproduction. Operation of the dams to produce power to meet short-term needs in electricity (termed power peaking) produces unnatural fluctuations in flow over a 24-hour cycle. These flow fluctuations alter the physical habitat and disrupt the cues that salmon use to select spawning sites, as well as strand fish in near-shore habitat that becomes dewatered. The quality of spawning gravels has been affected by dam construction, flood protection, and agricultural and industrial development. In some cases, the riverbed is armored such that it is more difficult for spawners to move, while in other cases the intrusion of fine sediment into spawning gravels has reduced water flow to sensitive eggs and young fry. Recovery of fall Chinook salmon populations may involve habitat restoration through such actions as dam removal and reservoir drawdown. In addition, habitat protection will be accomplished through set-asides of existing high-quality habitat. A key component to evaluating these actions is quantifying the salmon spawning habitat potential of a given river reach so that realistic recovery goals for salmon abundance can be developed. Quantifying salmon spawning habitat potential requires an understanding of the spawning behavior of Chinook salmon, as well as an understanding of the physical habitat where these fish spawn. Increasingly, fish biologists are recognizing that assessing the physical habitat of riverine systems where salmon spawn goes beyond measuring microhabitat like water depth, velocity, and substrate size. Geomorphic features of the river measured over a range of spatial scales set up the physical template upon which the microhabitat develops, and successful assessments of spawning habitat potential incorporate these geomorphic features. We had three primary objectives for this study. The first objective was to determine the relationship between physical habitats at different spatial scales and fall Chinook salmon spawning locations. The second objective was to estimate the fall Chinook salmon redd capacity for the Reach. The third objective was to suggest a protocol for determining preferable spawning reaches of fall Chinook salmon. To ensure that we collected physical data within habitat that was representative of the full range of potential spawning habitat, the study area was stratified based on geomorphic features of the river using a two-dimensional river channel index that classified the river cross section into one of four shapes based on channel symmetry, depth, and width. We found t

Geist, David R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Chien, Yi-Ju (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

202

Conservation in transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nationwide examination was made of grassroots energy conservation programs related to transportation. Information compiled from civic groups, trade associations, and corporations is included on driver awareness/mass transit; travel; and ride sharing. It is concluded that a willingness by the public to cooperate in transportation energy conservation exists and should be exploited. (LCL)

None

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Energy conservation program  

SciTech Connect

The energy conservation program undertaken by ARHCO to reduce energy consumption in the operation of the fuels reprocessing and waste management facilities on the Hanford reservation is described. This program includes fuel conservation for transportation equipment at the facilities, minimizing power requirements for lighting and air conditioning buildings, and reducing the energy demands of the processes used. (LCL)

Curren, E.F.

1976-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native vegetation species, allowance of normative processes such as fire occurrence, and facilitating development of natural stable stream channels and associated floodplains. Implementation of habitat enhancement and restoration activities could generate an additional 1,850 habitat units in 10 years. Baseline and estimated future habitat units total 7,035.3 for the Rainwater Wildlife Area. Habitat protection, enhancement and restoration will require long-term commitments from managers to increase probabilities of success and meet the goals and objectives of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Fish and Wildlife Mitigation Program. Longer-term benefits of protection and enhancement activities include increases in native species diversity and plant community resiliency in all cover types. Watershed conditions, including floodplain/riparian, and instream habitat quality should improve as well providing multiple benefits for terrestrial and aquatic resources. While such benefits are not necessarily recognized by HEP models and reflected in the number of habitat units generated, they are consistent with the NPPC Fish and Wildlife Program.

Childs, Allen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2000, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Fisheries Habitat Program implemented stream habitat restoration and protection efforts in the Walla Walla River Basin with funding from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The objective of these efforts is to protect and restore habitat critical to the recovery of weak or reintroduced populations of salmonid fish. Six projects, two on Couse Creek, two adjacent properties on Blue Creek, one on Patit Creek, and one property on the mainstem Walla Walla River were part of the exercise. Several thousand native plants as bare-root stock and cuttings were reintroduced to the sites and 18 acres of floodplain corridor was seeded with native grass seed. Pre and post-project monitoring efforts were included for all projects, incorporating methodologies from CTUIR's Draft Monitoring Plan.

Volkman, Jed; Sexton, Amy D. (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Pendleton, OR)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Individual energy conservation behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One important basis for sound energy policy is an understanding of how American consumers view and practice energy conservation. This volume reports the results of Project Monitor, a study of consumers' energy attitudes and behaviour. More than 1000 household consumers were interviewed to determine individual attributes, situational factors, attitudes, and perceptions that influence (or fail to influence) energy conservation. Using these data, the authors related specific types of energy conservation-general, winterization, heating, cooling, appliance, transportation, and electricity reductions-to twenty-four demographic, situational, attitudinal, and perceptual variables in the household sample. To determine the characteristics that differentiate conservers from nonconservers, simple correlations are made between each of the ''independent'' variables and the ''dependent'' measures of conservation and the results of multivariate regression analyses are used to estimate the effects of the independent variables simultaneously.

Beck, P.; Doctors, S.I.; Hammond, P.Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Supplementary Table 2 Conservation of helicase motifs. Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplementary Table 2 Conservation of helicase motifs. Motif Lobe1 Structural Conservation between SF1/SF2 Function Structural conservation in Rad54 Comment I Conserved in SF1 and SF2 Nucleotide to the -phosphate of ATP. This sulfate group also interacts with motif VI. Ia Conserved in SF1 and SF2 DNA binding

Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.

208

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program OK-TRIBE-KIOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE-KIOWA TRIBE OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Kiowa Tribe of Oklahoma proposes to 1) conduct energy audits at tribal members housing, provide advice to tribal members, and develop plans for families to reduce energy wasted; attend training classes for conducting audits and providing training to tribal members; purchase equipment to sustain a viable energy audit program; and develop a plan for conducting tribal housing audits; and 2) install wind turbines (approximately 10 kW) at the Kiowa Tribal Headquarters Building (1978/79) and the Kiowa Head Start Classroom Building (1984). The wind turbines will feed wind-generated electrical power to the buildings

209

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MT-City-Missoula MT-City-Missoula Location: City Missoula MT American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Conservation strategy refinement (expand current Conservation Strategy into a foundation for a long- term Climate Action plan), 2) develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 3) City Parks and Recreation Exterior Lighting Project and City Shops Building exterior lighting retrofits, 4) development of revolving fund for energy efficiency projects, 5) development of sub-grant program for energy audits, and 6) fleet vehicle electric conversion. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

210

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement, Volume 2, Idaho, 1984 Final and Annual Reports.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1984, and under the auspices of the Northwest Power Planning Council, the Clear-water National Forest and the Bonneville Power Administration entered into a contractual agreement to improve anadromous fish habitat in Lolo Creek. This was to be the second and final year of instream enhancement work in Lolo Creek, a major tributary to the Clearwater River. The project was again entitled Lolo Creek Habitat Improvement (No.84-6) which was scheduled from April 1, 1984, through March 31, 1985. Project costs were not to exceed $39,109. The following report is a description of the project objectives, methodology, results, and conclusions of this year's work, based on the knowledge and experience gained through 2 years of enhancement work. The primary objective was to partially mitigate the juvenile and adult anadromous fish losses accrued through hydroelectric development in the Columbia and Snake River systems by enhancing the spawning and rearing habitats of selected Clearwater River tributaries for spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead trout. The enhancement was designed to ameliorate the ''limiting production factors'' by the in-stream placement of habitat structures that would positively alter the pool-riffle structure and increase the quality of over-winter habitat.

Hair, Don

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Guam Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

Describes various energy strategies available to Guam to meet the territory's goal of diversifying fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020.The information presented in this strategic energy plan will be used by the Guam Energy Task Force to develop an energy action plan. Available energy strategies include policy changes, education and outreach, reducing energy consumption at federal facilities, and expanding the use of a range of energy technologies, including buildings energy efficiency and conservation, renewable electricity production, and alternative transportation. The strategies are categorized based on the time required to implement them.

Conrad, M. D.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fisheries Habitat Evaluation in Tributaries of the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation : Annual Report 1992.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1987 the Northwest Power Planning Council amended the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, directing the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to fund, ``a baseline stream survey of tributaries located on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation to compile information on improving spawning habitat, rearing habitat, and access to spawning tributaries for bull trout, cutthroat trout, and to evaluate the existing fish stocks. ff justified by the results of the survey, fund the design, construction and operation of a cutthroat and bull trout hatchery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation; necessary habitat improvement projects; and a three year monitoring program to evaluate the effectiveness of the hatchery and habitat improvement projects. If the baseline survey indicates a better alternative than construction of a fish hatchery, the Coeur d`Alene Tribe will submit an alternative plan for consideration in program amendment proceeding.`` This report contains the results of the third year of the study and the Coeur d`Alene Indian Tribes` preliminary recommendations for enhancing the cutthroat and bull trout fishery on the Coeur d`Alene Indian Reservation. These recommendations are based on study results from year three data and information obtained in the first two years of the study.

Woodward-Lillengreen, Kelly L.; Skillingstad, Tami; Scholz, Allan T.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Commitment and energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

The authors discuss the process of becoming committed to energy conservation research, then describe practical issues of field research and several data sets on household energy conservation. Their results show that taking a stand affected behavior in reducing the levels of natural gas and electricity usage, with the effect continuing even after the study ended. Although based on the assumption that homeowners were initially favorable toward energy conservation, the studies suggest that energy-related behavior is malleable and amenable to approaches familiar to psychologists. The study indicates that feedback on energy use during peak seasons could help to avoid power shortages. 16 references, 6 tables.

Pallak, M.S.; Cook, D.A.; Sullivan, J.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

An Analysis of Potential Stream Fish and Fish Habitat Monitoring Procedures for the Inland Northwest: Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

Recent concerns over the rapid declines of native stream-fish populations in the inland Northwest have prompted the USDA Forest Service to institute interim land management practices intended to stop further declines in fish habitat quality and protect existing high quality habitat. Natural resource managers in the Inland Northwest need tools for assessing the success or failure of conservation policies and the impacts of management actions on fish and fish habitats. Effectiveness monitoring is one such potential tool, but there are currently no established monitoring protocols. Since 1991, US Forest Service biologists have used the standardized R1/R4 inventory procedures to measure fish and fish habitats on agency lands throughout the Intermountain West. The widespread use and acceptance of these standardized procedures and the large amount of data collected suggest that the R1/R4 procedures might provide the basis for an effectiveness monitoring protocol. Using fish and fish habitat data collected by Forest Service biologists, the authors assessed the efficiency of the R1/R4 procedures for monitoring stream fish and fish habitats.

Peterson, James T.; Wollrab, Sherry P.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

NEWS AND COMMENTARY Conservation genetics...............................................................  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEWS AND COMMENTARY Conservation genetics doubt in the minds of conservation geneticists, first raised in the 1980s, that genetic considerations might be irrelevant to the conservation of species on the brink. What happens when a species goes

DeSalle, Rob

216

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus On.... Biodiversity and Conservation This resource guide aims to provide useful, detailed, high quality sources of information on biodiversity and conservation for students in Higher and Further and Conservation Introduction.....................................................................................3

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

217

Potential Conservation Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove that potential conservation laws have characteristics depending only on local variables if and only if they are induced by local conservation laws. Therefore, characteristics of pure potential conservation laws have to essentially depend on potential variables. This statement provides a significant generalization of results of the recent paper by Bluman, Cheviakov and Ivanova [J. Math. Phys., 2006, V.47, 113505]. Moreover, we present extensions to gauged potential systems, Abelian and general coverings and general foliated systems of differential equations. An example illustrating possible applications of proved statements is considered. A special version of the Hadamard lemma for fiber bundles and the notions of weighted jet spaces are proposed as new tools for the investigation of potential conservation laws.

Michael Kunzinger; Roman O. Popovych

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Indiana Conservancy Act (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Landowners in a given locality may petition for the establishment of a Conservancy District. Such districts may be created for the purpose of managing and regulating flood prevention and control,...

219

Conservative-Bayesian Mechanisms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We put forward a new class of mechanisms. In this extended abstract, we exemplify our approach only for single-good auctions in what we call a conservative-Bayesian setting. (Essentially, no common-knowledge about the ...

Azar, Pablo

2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Conservation of waterlogged linoleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linoleum has been around for over a hundred years. With its invention by Frederick Walton in the 1860?s a new means of durable floor covering was introduced to the world. This new invention was promoted as durable, hygienic, and easy to maintain. In agreement with the Lake Champlain Maritime Museum, a study was commissioned to seek the best means to conserve linoleum from a canal boat excavated in the summer of 2002 in Lake Champlain. The Sloop Island Canal Boat is part of an excavation project that is studying the ways of life on the lake. Conserving waterlogged linoleum is a new area of study in conservation, and there is very little information dealing with the topic. This study will provide a baseline for the conservation of linoleum.

Coke, BobbyeJo Evon

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1985 consumer segmentation: Assessment of the market for conservation in the Northwest: Phase 2  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information on consumer attitudes toward conservation, past and intended conservation behaviors, and utility-sponsored conservation program participation levels. The information was collected by means of random telephone surveys of households in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Western Montana. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted analyses of the survey results for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to obtain a better understanding of consumer attitudes and behaviors and to facilitate conservation program planning, design, and marketing.

Bailey, B.M.; Hattrup, M.P.; Nordi, R.T.; Shankle, S.A.; Ivey, D.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

I-SAVE conservation program. Implementing title II of NECPA residential conservation service. Final draft  

SciTech Connect

The I-SAVE (Iowa Saves America's Vital Energy) conservation plan provides comprehensive energy-conservation information and services to residential consumers served by large investor-owned electric and gas utilities and participating home-heating suppliers. The overall objective of the I-SAVE plan is to conserve energy by facilitating cost-effective retrofit of existing housing and promoting more-efficient energy use. The ultimate benefit available to the customer under the I-SAVE plan - reduction in energy use - is dependent upon the action he or she takes as a result of the program audit. Benefits to the utility and the ratepayers as a whole, however, will accrue only upon widespread customer acceptance and utilization of program services. This degree of program acceptance and the resulting benefits to ratepayers can be attained only through an aggressive educational and promotional effort by the covered utilities. All electric and gas utilities which have sales, other than resale, exceeding 750 million kWh of electricity or 10 billion cubic feet of gas and participating home-heating suppliers, shall provide a program announcement and shall offer conservation services to their customers who occupy a residential building containing at least one, but not more than four units, in a manner as provided by the rules. The text of the rules is presented. (MCW)

Not Available

1980-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

223

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

224

Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

Ashley, Paul R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Lesson Plans!  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you from other teachers, educators, and professionals. These lesson plans are provided free of charge, to help you planning a challenging curriculum that will instill a love of...

226

Medical Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Plans Retiree Medical Insurance Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of medical benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Medical plan options...

227

Transmission Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning Transmission Planning We accept requests from electric utilities, firm-power customers, private power developers, and independent power generators to interconnect...

228

Hyperbolic Conservation Laws The 1D conservation law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyperbolic Conservation Laws The 1D conservation law wt + f(w)x = 0 (where w and f have m of linearly independent eigenvectors). Then solutions to the conservation law can be viewed in terms of propagating waves. Finite Volume Methods Finite volume methods are conservative by construction. Define

Gardner, Carl

229

Coho Salmon Master Plan, Clearwater River Basin.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Nez Perce Tribe has a desire and a goal to reintroduce and restore coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin at levels of abundance and productivity sufficient to support sustainable runs and annual harvest. Consistent with the Clearwater Subbasin Plan (EcoVista 2003), the Nez Perce Tribe envisions developing an annual escapement of 14,000 coho salmon to the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1994, the Nez Perce Tribe began coho reintroduction by securing eggs through U.S. v. Oregon; by 1998 this agreement provided an annual transfer of 550,000 coho salmon smolts from lower Columbia River hatchery facilities for release in the Clearwater River Subbasin. In 1998, the Northwest Power and Conservation Council authorized the Bonneville Power Administration to fund the development of a Master Plan to guide this reintroduction effort. This Master Plan describes the results of experimental releases of coho salmon in the Clearwater River Subbasin, which have been ongoing since 1995. These data are combined with results of recent coho reintroduction efforts by the Yakama Nation, general coho life history information, and historical information regarding the distribution and life history of Snake River coho salmon. This information is used to assess a number of alternative strategies aimed at restoring coho salmon to historical habitats in the Clearwater River subbasin. These data suggest that there is a high probability that coho salmon can be restored to the Clearwater River subbasin. In addition, the data also suggest that the re-establishment of coho salmon could be substantially aided by: (1) the construction of low-tech acclimation facilities; (2) the establishment of a 'localized' stock of coho salmon; and (3) the construction of hatchery facilities to provide a source of juvenile coho salmon for future supplementation activities. The Nez Perce Tribe recognizes that there are factors which may limit the success of coho reintroduction. As a result of these uncertainties, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize a phased approach for coho reintroductions. This Master Plan seeks authorization and funding to move forward to Step 2 in the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 3-Step review process to further evaluate Phase I of the coho reintroduction program, which would focus on the establishment of a localized coho salmon stock capable of enduring the migration to the Clearwater River subbasin. To achieve this goal, the Nez Perce Tribe proposes to utilize space at existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities in concert with the construction of two low-tech acclimation facilities, to capitalize on the higher survival observed for acclimated versus direct stream released coho. In addition, Phase I would document the natural productivity of localized coho salmon released in two targeted tributaries within the Clearwater River subbasin. If Phase I is successful at establishing a localized coho salmon stock in an abundance capable of filling existing hatchery space, the rates of natural productivity are promising, and the interspecific interactions between coho and sympatric resident and anadromous salmonids are deemed acceptable, then Phase II would be triggered. Phase II of the coho reintroduction plan would focus on establishing natural production in a number of Clearwater River subbasin tributaries. To accomplish this goal, Phase II would utilize existing Clearwater River subbasin hatchery facilities, and expand facilities at the Nez Perce Tribal Hatchery Site 1705 facility to rear approximately 687,700 smolts annually for use in a rotating supplementation schedule. In short, this document identifies a proposed alternative (Phase I), complete with estimates of capital, operations and maintenance, monitoring and evaluation, and permitting that is anticipated to raise average smolt replacement rates from 0.73 (current) to 1.14 using primarily existing facilities, with a limited capital investment for low-tech acclimation facilities. This increase in survival is expected to provide the opportunity for the establishm

Nez Perce Tribe; FishPro

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Microsoft Word - CX_West Chewuch Conservation Easement_FINAL.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2010 8, 2010 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Jay Marcotte Project Manager - KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) would provide funds to the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation (Yakama Nation) for the acquisition of a conservation easement for fish habitat mitigation in Okanogan County, Washington. The conservation easement would preserve anadromous fish habitat through the Columbia Basin Fish Accords and would be held and managed by the Methow Conservancy. Budget Information: Work Order # 00266311 Fish and Wildlife Project No.: 2009-003-00, CR#42460 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): A7. Transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal property...if property use is to remain unchanged;

231

Assess Current and Potential Salmonid Production in Rattlesnake Creek Associated with Restoration Efforts; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The White Salmon River Watershed Enhancement Project (WSRWEP) began in 1993 through efforts of the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), local stakeholders and various agencies. Early accomplishments of the project included the formation of a multi-stakeholder watershed management committee (WMC) and technical advisory committee (TAC), completion of several baseline assessments, drafting of a watershed management plan, and beginning implementation of the plan. Since inception, the effort has utilized the support of various government/private grants, and local in-kind contributions to accomplish project goals. The WMC and its partners utilize a four-pronged approach for achieving watershed enhancement: on-ground restoration, extension of technical and financial assistance to cooperators, community and environmental education, and assessment/monitoring to develop strategies and track the success of ongoing work. Project activities are generally targeted to sub-basins and stream reaches within the White Salmon watershed that exhibit important water quality and fish/wildlife habitat problems. Such project prioritization is being conducted with the active input of both the White Salmon WMC and TAC. An important current phase of the WSRWEP targets detailed monitoring and assessment of the Rattlesnake Creek sub-basin, and is the focus of this report. The 'Assessment of Rattlesnake Creek in Relation to Restoration Efforts' project (BPA Project ID Number 21009) was identified and prioritized for accomplishment by the White Salmon River TAC in January of 2000. Rationale for the project stemmed from the group's realization that Condit Dam on the lower White Salmon is scheduled for removal, or fish passage retrofitting, within the near future. Given this eventuality, the TAC identified the current lack of understanding regarding both potential anadromous habitat and existing native fish and habitat conditions above Condit Dam (RM 3.2) as an important need. In response to the TAC's determination, the US Geological Survey (USGS), Yakama Nation (YN) and UCD began work to develop the current project that is intended to address the above. The overall goal of the Rattlesnake Creek assessment is to document existing riparian habitat and water quality conditions, native fish populations, and future restoration sites before future return of anadromous fish to the basin above RM 3.2. Since the project is jointly enacted by the USGS, YN and UCD, a high degree of shared planning and joint implementation is applied during completion of tasks. In general, the USGS and YN are cooperatively working to monitor and assess fish populations and riparian habitat conditions within the drainage and adjacent sections of the White Salmon. The UCD is generally responsible for assessing water quality, mapping stream channel geomorphology to enable future restoration planning, and measuring the ratios of carbon and nitrogen isotopes at various trophic levels The remainder of this report provides a summary of significant activities achieved by the UCD under BPA Project 21009 during the first project year. The report follows the FY 2001 UCD/BPA contract Statement of Work (SOW) format. Discussion of major problems encountered, changes in the work plan and schedule deviations are noted in italics after the description of accomplishments for each task.

Stampfli, Steve

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Conservation Strategy for Sable Island  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towards a Conservation Strategy for Sable Island Environment Canada, Canadian Wildlife Service, Atlantic Region #12;SABLE ISLAND CONSERVATION STRATEGY page - i March, 1998 A CONSERVATION STRATEGY FOR SABLE ISLAND PREPARED BY This Conservation Strategy for Sable Island was prepared for Environment Canada

Jones, Ian L.

233

Noise and Hearing Conservation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hearing Conservation Hearing Conservation Mary L. Doyle NOISE & HEARING CONSERVATION Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 16, 2002 1.0.1.~ CAUSES OF HEARING LOSS * Congenital * Environmental Exposures * Hereditary * Illness *Injury * Noise * Occupational * Non-Occupational * Sociacusis S.O.S. eon.ua.nt. OTOTOXIC DRUGS Can Affect Cochlea or Vestibular System * Aminoglycoside Antibiotics * Diuretics * Cancer Chemotherapy * Aspirin * Quinines * Usually Permanent * Consider Benefit-Risk Ratio S.O.S. eon.ua.nts HEARING * Modification of Acoustic Wave by Outer Ear * Conversion of Modified Acoustic Wave to Vibration of Eardrum * Middle Ear * Inner Ear * Transformation of Mechanical Movement to Nerve Impulses S.O.S. CoMubRis OTOTOXIC INDUSTRIAL

234

Planning Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Planning Workshop on Renewable Energy and Climate Science for the Americas: Metrology and Technology Challenges. ...

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Conservation Alternative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of all of the issues involved in our national energy dilemma, the matter of conservation of energy has, without a doubt, received major attention. Much has been said on the subject and certainly a great deal has been written on the many facets of this alternative going all the way back to before the oil embargo. Most vivid, perhaps, in our memories is an early major study of our national energy problem; the Ford Foundation's "A Time To Choose" and its controversial proposal of zero energy growth as a purported solution to the energy problem. And, of course, who can ever forget "Project Independence." Since those days, increasingly more rational views have been published on the impact of conservation on energy demand in our country and the contribution that the more efficient use of energy can make to the ultimate solution of the problem. Perhaps, most rational of all is the assessment in a recently published study on energy futures entitled "Energy - Global Prospects; 1985-2000." This study, in which I am proud to have participated, was sponsored by M.I.T. and released last year. The study involved over 75 people - bankers, economists, academicians, and business leaders from 15 countries - for two and a half years in an analysis of various national and global energy relationships and problems. One of the conclusions of this study was, and I quote - "Energy conservation is essential. Conservation may be our best, cheapest, and most accessible alternative energy source. It, unquestionably, must play a central role in global and national energy strategies. However, demand for energy will continue to grow even if governments adopt vigorous policies to conserve energy. "-- unquote. This, I believe, clearly sums up the important role that conservation can and must play in the solution of our national energy problem; but, hopefully, it also puts to rest the notion that this alternative is the total answer to the worsening energy difficulties of our nation.

Allaire, W. F.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Sixth Power Plan Action Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to meeting carbon emissions reduction targets, and what are those targets most likely to be? · What generation needs has been met by other sources, such as coal, nuclear, natural gas, biofuels, and most

237

Energy Conservation and BP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The reduction of energy consumption in the BP Group has a high priority and substantial savings have been achieved from improvements in operational efficiency and as a result of capital expenditure on energy efficient equipment. In order to provide the right impetus a BP Energy Conservation Committee was established and the role of this Committee is described. In addition to an overall view of energy conservation activities this paper considers the importance and ways of providing the necessary staff motivation. Details are also given of a burner test rig installed at BP's Research Centre and a supervisory computer system which has been in operation for two years at one of BP's German refineries.

Partridge, R. W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Financing residential energy conservation investment in the Northwest, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has analyzed how households in the Pacific Northwest financed their investments in energy conservation measures during the 1983-85 period, how they would finance their likely future investments, and related topics regarding conservation investments and financing. The information was collected through a stratified random telephone survey of householders conducted in October/November 1985 in the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) service area in Idaho, Oregon, Washington and Western Montana. This information will be used by BPA to facilitate the planning, design, and implementation of relevant conservation programs such as the Residential Weatherization Program, and potential programs of bank and utility loans.

Fang, J.M.; Hattrup, M.P.; Nordi,, R.T.; Ivey, D.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

2010 Climate Action Plan Environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by utilizing the energy conservation loan fund and Sustainable Campus Initiative Fund for exceeding typical occupants and facilities' staff to monitor and improve the energy usage of buildings. · Utilizingsub2010 Climate Action Plan Energy and Environmental Stewardship Initiative: Prepared by: The Office

Feschotte, Cedric

240

Effects of Hydroelectric Dam Operations on the Restoration Potential of Snake River Fall Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) Spawning Habitat Final Report, October 2005 - September 2007.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as part of the Fish and Wildlife Program directed by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council. The study evaluated the restoration potential of Snake River fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat within the impounded lower Snake River. The objective of the research was to determine if hydroelectric dam operations could be modified, within existing system constraints (e.g., minimum to normal pool levels; without partial removal of a dam structure), to increase the amount of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the lower Snake River. Empirical and modeled physical habitat data were used to compare potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Snake River, under current and modified dam operations, with the analogous physical characteristics of an existing fall Chinook salmon spawning area in the Columbia River. The two Snake River study areas included the Ice Harbor Dam tailrace downstream to the Highway 12 bridge and the Lower Granite Dam tailrace downstream approximately 12 river kilometers. These areas represent tailwater habitat (i.e., riverine segments extending from a dam downstream to the backwater influence from the next dam downstream). We used a reference site, indicative of current fall Chinook salmon spawning areas in tailwater habitat, against which to compare the physical characteristics of each study site. The reference site for tailwater habitats was the section extending downstream from the Wanapum Dam tailrace on the Columbia River. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat use data, including water depth, velocity, substrate size and channelbed slope, from the Wanapum reference area were used to define spawning habitat suitability based on these variables. Fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat suitability of the Snake River study areas was estimated by applying the Wanapum reference reach habitat suitability criteria to measured and modeled habitat data from the Snake River study areas. Channel morphology data from the Wanapum reference reach and the Snake River study areas were evaluated to identify geomorphically suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat. The results of this study indicate that a majority of the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas contain suitable fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat under existing hydrosystem operations. However, a large majority of the currently available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas is of low quality. The potential for increasing, through modifications to hydrosystem operations (i.e., minimum pool elevation of the next downstream dam), the quantity or quality of fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat appears to be limited. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor study area decreased as the McNary Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation. Estimates of the amount of potential fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Lower Granite study area increased as the Little Goose Dam forebay elevation was lowered from normal to minimum pool elevation; however, 97% of the available habitat was categorized within the range of lowest quality. In both the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study areas, water velocity appears to be more of a limiting factor than water depth for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with both study areas dominated by low-magnitude water velocity. The geomorphic suitability of both study areas appears to be compromised for fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat, with the Ice Harbor study area lacking significant bedforms along the longitudinal thalweg profile and the Lower Granite study area lacking cross-sectional topographic diversity. To increase the quantity of available fall Chinook salmon spawning habitat in the Ice Harbor and Lower Granite study area, modifications to hydroelectric dam operations beyond those evaluated in this study likely would be necessary. M

Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Arntzen, Evan V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Garfield County Habitat for Fall Chinook and Steelhead, Annual Report 2006.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives and tasks outlined in detail in this project report were implemented during calendar year 2006 in all the watersheds of Garfield County. The Pataha Creek Watershed was selected in 1993, along with the Tucannon and Asotin Creeks, as model watersheds by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC). In the years since 1993, other watersheds in Garfield County have been designated as salmon bearing streams and have received numerous practices formerly just designated for the Pataha Creek Watershed. The following sections show the individual practices, quantity of practices implemented, total costs, BPA costs and tons of soil saved for all the BPA funds used to protect and enhance the natural resources in the salmon bearing watersheds of Garfield County. In the year 2006, 55% of the funding received from BPA went into cost share practices. Of all the cost share received in the county, 22% came from BPA. This is largely due to other funding programs becoming available to address livestock influenced water quality problems and riparian health improvement. Over 95% of the sediment entering the streams can be tied directly to the upland and riparian areas of the watershed. The Pataha Creek, Deadman Creek, and Alpowa Creek have had steelhead runs in the past. The Pataha Creek has native and planted rainbow trout in the mid to upper portion. Suckers, pikeminow, and shiners inhabit the lower portion of Pataha Creek because of the higher water temperatures and lack of vegetation. The improvement of riparian habitat through the CREP, CCRP, and DOE grants has improved habitat for all the fish species. The lower portion of the Pataha Creek is slowly developing into spawning and rearing habitat for Chinook salmon. With the future removal of some migration barriers on the lower portion of the Deadman and Pataha, more stream miles will become useful spawning and rearing habitat. The upland projects completed during 2006 were practices that significantly reduce the erosion and resulting sedimentation from these croplands. Runoff studies conducted by WSU have shown a direct impact on reducing soil erosion by the implementation of these practices. The tree planting projects conducted under the CREP (Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program) and CRP (Continuous Conservation Reserve Program) programs have helped reduce sedimentation and have also improved the riparian zone in desired locations inside the Pataha, Deadman, and Alpowa Creek watersheds. The CREP and the CCRP programs continue with enrollment in the watersheds and are protecting the riparian areas along these three streams at an increasing level every year. Currently, over 1,100 acres of riparian habitat have been enrolled in the CREP program within these three watersheds.

Bartels, Duane

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A multi-scale qualitative approach to assess the impact of urbanization on natural habitats and their connectivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Habitat loss and fragmentation are often concurrent to land conversion and urbanization. Simple application of GIS-based landscape pattern indicators may be not sufficient to support meaningful biodiversity impact assessment. A review of the literature reveals that habitat definition and habitat fragmentation are frequently inadequately considered in environmental assessment, notwithstanding the increasing number of tools and approaches reported in the landscape ecology literature. This paper presents an approach for assessing impacts on habitats on a local scale, where availability of species data is often limited, developed for an alpine valley in northern Italy. The perspective of the methodology is multiple scale and species-oriented, and provides both qualitative and quantitative definitions of impact significance. A qualitative decision model is used to assess ecological values in order to support land-use decisions at the local level. Building on recent studies in the same region, the methodology integrates various approaches, such as landscape graphs, object-oriented rule-based habitat assessment and expert knowledge. The results provide insights into future habitat loss and fragmentation caused by land-use changes, and aim at supporting decision-making in planning and suggesting possible ecological compensation. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Many environmental assessments inadequately consider habitat loss and fragmentation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-perspective for defining habitat quality and connectivity is claimed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species-based tools are difficult to be applied with limited availability of data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose a species-oriented and multiple scale-based qualitative approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Advantages include being species-oriented and providing value-based information.

Scolozzi, Rocco, E-mail: rocco.scolozzi@fmach.it [Sustainable Agro-ecosystems and Bioresources Department, IASMA Research and Innovation Centre, Fondazione Edmund Mach, Via E. Mach 1, 38010 San Michele all& #x27; Adige, (Italy); Geneletti, Davide, E-mail: geneletti@ing.unitn.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Trento, Trento (Italy)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Willamette River Habitat Protection and Restoration Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.............................................................................6 a. The Challenge of Restoration in a Large River/Flood Plain System.............6 b. The Need Goals: Anchor Habitats as Stepping Stones....................20 f. Measuring Results-purpose dams and reservoirs as part of the Federal Columbia River Power System, as well as 42 miles of bank

244

December 9, 2008 Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive Gasification Integrated coal gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) - Very early commercial IGCC w and Conservation Council Capital cost estimate: Supercritical PC coal plant (no CSS) $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2 of Estimate OvernightCapitalCost(2006$/kW) Generic Supercritical w/o CSS Rankine Projects Supercritical 6th

245

Renewables for Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Massflowrate(kg/h) Hot Water Usage Patterns Selected #12;Monthly variation in energy requirement for electricalRenewables for Energy Conservation Rangan Banerjee Energy Systems Engineering IIT Bombay National Conference on "Energy Efficiency", Pune , 28th June2005 #12;ENERGY FLOW DIAGRAM PRIMARY ENERGY ENERGY

Banerjee, Rangan

246

MODEL CONSERVATION STANDARD INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

standards and surcharge methodology. 2 The term "system cost" means an estimate of all direct costs and transmission to the consumer and, among other factors, waste disposal costs, end-of-cycle costs, and fuel costs. SURCHARGE RECOMMENDATION The Council does not recommend that the model conservation standards be subject

247

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2001 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Projects continued to be maintained on 49 private properties, one 25-year Non-Exclusive Bureau of Indian Affairs' Easement was secured, six new projects implemented and two existing project areas improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River, upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek, Cottonwood Creek and Buckaroo Creek. New enhancements included: (1) construction of 11,264 feet of fencing between River Mile 43.0 and 46.5 on the Umatilla River, (2) a stream bank stabilization project implemented at approximately River Mile 63.5 Umatilla River to stabilize 330 feet of eroding stream bank and improve instream habitat diversity, included construction of eight root wad revetments and three boulder J-vanes, (3) drilling a 358-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 46.0 Umatilla River, (4) installing a 50-foot bottomless arch replacement culvert at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek, (5) installing a Geoweb stream ford crossing on Mission Creek (6) installing a 22-foot bottomless arch culvert at approximately River Mile 0.5 Cottonwood Creek, and (7) providing fence materials for construction of 21,300 feet of livestock exclusion fencing in the Buckaroo Creek Drainage. An approximate total of 3,800 native willow cuttings and 350 pounds of native grass seed was planted at new upper Umatilla River, Mission Creek and Cottonwood Creek project sites. Habitat improvements implemented at existing project sites included development of a 105-foot well for off-stream livestock watering at approximately River Mile 12.0 Wildhorse Creek and construction of an engineered stream ford at approximately River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek. A total of $277,848 in financial cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, U.S. Workforce Investment Act, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, Umatilla County and Pheasants Forever for planning efforts and habitat enhancements. Monitoring continued to quantify baseline conditions and the effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 96 existing and three newly established photo points to document habitat recovery and pre-project conditions. Transects were measured at three stream channel cross sections to assist with engineering and design and to obtain baseline data regarding channel morphology. Biological inventories were conducted at River Mile 3.0 Mission Creek to determine pre-project fish utilization above and below the passage barrier. Post-project inventories were also conducted at River Mile 85.0 of the Umatilla River at a project site completed in 1999. Umatilla Subbasin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Eco-Pacific. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist project personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs. Water Works Consulting, Duck Creek Associates and Ed Salminen Consulting were subcontracted for watershed assessment and restoration planning in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed. A document detailing current conditions in the Meacham Creek Subwatershed and necessary restoration actions will be availa

Shaw, R. Todd; Sexton, Amy D.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program: Daniel Howard, Ph.D., department head, Biology of Science in Conservation Ecology MAJOR: Conservation Ecology MINOR: Conservation Ecology New Mexico State University offers a new interdisciplinary, undergraduate program in Conservation Ecology. The goal

Castillo, Steven P.

250

Idaho Habitat Evaluation for Off-Site Mitigation Record : Annual Report 1988.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for steelhead and chinook in the Clearwater and Salmon subbasins since 1984. Projects included in the monitoring are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. This monitoring project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use actual and potential increases in smolt production as the best measures of benefit from a habitat improvement project. This project is divided into two subprojects: general and intensive monitoring. Primary objectives of the general monitoring subproject are to determine natural production increases due to habitat improvement projects in terms of parr production and to determine natural production status and trends in Idaho. The second objective is accomplished by combining parr density from monitoring and evaluation of BPA habitat projects and from other IDFG management and research activities. The primary objective of the intensive monitoring subproject is to determine the relationships between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production in two Idaho streams; the upper Salmon River and Crooked River. Results of the intensive monitoring will be used to estimate mitigation benefits in terms of smolt production and to interpret natural production monitoring in Idaho. 30 refs., 19 figs., 34 tabs.

Idaho. Dept. of Fish and Game.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A compendium of energy conservation success stories  

SciTech Connect

Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office/endash/Energy Utilization Research/endash/sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Compendium of Energy Conservation Success Stories  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Three-quarters of DOE's Conservation R and D funds have been devoted to technology research and development: basic and applied research, exploratory R and D, engineering feasibility studies, pilot-scale prototype R and D, and technology demonstration. Non R and D projects have involved technology assessment program planning and analysis, model development, technology transfer and consumer information, health effects and safety research, and technical support for rule making. The success stories summarized in this compendium fall into three general categories: Completed Technology Success Stories, projects that have resulted in new energy-saving technologies that are presently being used in the private sector; Technical Success Stories, projects that have produced or disseminated important scientific/technical information likely to result in future energy savings; Program Success Stories, non-R and D activities that have resulted in nationally significant energy benefits. The Energy Conservation research and development program at DOE is managed by the Office of Conservation under the direction of the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Conservation. Three subordinate Program Offices correspond to the buildings, transportation, and industrial end-use sectors. A fourth subordinate Program Office{endash}Energy Utilization Research{endash}sponsors research and technical inventions for all end-use sectors.

1988-09-00T23:59:59.000Z

253

Salmon River Habitat Enhancement, Part 1, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains reports on subprojects involving the determining of alternatives to enhance salmonid habitat on patented land in Bear Valley Creek, Idaho, coordination activities for habitat projects occurring on streams within fishing areas of the Shoshone-Bannock Indian Tribes, and habitat and fish inventories in the Salmon River. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

Konopacky, Richard C.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE AK-TRIBE-YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- YAKUTAT TLINGIT TRIBE AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Yakutat Tlingit Tribe of Alaska proposes to 1) hire a technical consultant to assist the Tribe in developing a strategic energy plan, 2) prepare a comprehensive energy efficiency and conservation strategy for the Tribe, and 3) hire a technical consultant to conduct energy audits of select Tribal-owned buildings and facilities. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

255

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ID-TRIBE-NEZ PERCE TRIBE ID-TRIBE-NEZ PERCE TRIBE Location: Tribe ID-TRIBE-NEZ ID PERCE TRIBE American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Nez Perce Tribe of Idaho proposes to 1) hire staff to develop, submit, and administer the energy efficiency and conservation strategy document; 2) develop a comprehensive strategic energy plan, 3) provide educational materials at various community events regarding energy efficiency and conservation measures, rebates, etc.; 3) conduct energy efficiency retrofits at the Water Resources Building (1978) to include replacing ballasts and lighting, determine the feasibility of installing dimming sensors in the building, and replacing windows; and installing motion sensors in the Boys and Girls Club.

256

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF MEKORYUK Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF MEKORYUK AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Mekoryuk proposes to implement energy efficiency upgrades to Indian Reorganization Act buildings. These planned upgrades includes installing approximately ten energy efficient Toyostove heating units, approximately six energy efficient heat saving windows, and approximately two energy efficient doors. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

257

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF SAINT MICHAEL Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE-NATIVE VILLAGE OF SAINT MICHAEL AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Native Village of Saint Michael of Alaska proposes to 1) develop a comprehensive energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire a technical consultant to assist in developing a strategic energy plan, and 3) hire a technical consultant to conduct energy audits of Village-owned facilities and housing. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

258

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NJ-City-Edison, Township of NJ-City-Edison, Township of Location: City Edison, Township of NJ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Hire a Project Administrator to oversee energy efficiency and conservation grant and administrative costs associated with application, 2) develop an energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a comprehensive plan to provide long-term guidance for energy efficiency improvements, and 3) install a roof-mounted, approximately 165 kW, photovoltaic solar energy system with UPS battery backup on Edison Municipal Complex. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

259

Watershed Evaluation and Habitat Response to Recent Storms : Annual Report for 1999.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large and powerful storm systems moved through the Pacific Northwest during the wet season of 1995--96, triggering flooding, mass erosion, and, alteration of salmon habitats in affected watersheds. This project study was initiated to assess whether watershed conditions are causing damage, triggered by storm events, to salmon habitat on public lands in the Snake River basin. The storms and flooding in 1995--96 provide a prime opportunity to examine whether habitat conditions are improving, because the effects of land management activities on streams and salmon habitat are often not fully expressed until triggered by storms and floods. To address these issues, they are studying the recent storm responses of watersheds and salmon habitat in systematically selected subbasins and watersheds within the Snake River system. The study watersheds include several in the Wenaha and Tucannon subbasins in Washington and Oregon, and the watersheds of Squaw Creek (roaded) and Weir Creek (unroaded) in the Lochsa River subbasin, Idaho. The study was designed to examine possible differences in the effects of the storms in broadly comparable watersheds with differing magnitudes or types of disturbance. Watershed response is examined by comparing storm response mechanisms, such as rates of mass failure, among watersheds with similar attributes, but different levels of land management. The response of salmon habitat conditions is being examined by comparing habitat conditions before and after the storms in a stream and among streams in watersheds with similar attributes but different levels of land management. If appropriate to the results, the study will identify priority measures for reducing the severity of storm responses in watersheds within the Snake River Basin with habitat for at-risk salmon. This annual report describes the attributes of the study watersheds and the criteria and methods used to select them. The report also describes the watershed and fish habitat attributes evaluated and the methods used to evaluate them. Watershed responses and attributes evaluated include mass failures, historic soil loss, the integration of roads with the drainage network, estimated flood recurrence intervals, and headwater channel morphology. Habitat attributes evaluated include large woody debris, pool frequency and depth, substrate conditions, and bank stability. Multiple analyses of habitat data in the Tucannon and Wenaha subbasins remain to be completed due to difficulties stemming from data characteristics that indicated that some of the pre-existing data may have be of questionable accuracy. Diagnostic attributes of the questionable data included a change in monitoring protocols during the pre- to post-flood analysis period, physically implausible temporal trends in some habitat attributes at some sites, and conflicting results for the same attribute at the same locations from different data sources. Since unreliable data can lead to spurious results, criteria were developed to screen the data for analysis, as described in this report. It is anticipated that while the data screening will prevent spurious results, it will also truncate some of the planned analysis in the Tucannon and Wenaha systems.

Rhodes, Jonathan J.; Huntington, Charles W.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru-Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages for the past 7 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council [NPPC]). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Schrader, William C.; Petrosky, Charles E. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Pt. I: General Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, hereafter called steelhead, and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha, hereafter called chinook, in the Clearwater and Salmon River drainages for the past seven years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority (Fish and Wildlife Program, Northwest Power Planning Council). A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Scully, Richard J.; Petrosky, Charles Edward

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Conserving the Connections: A Nationwide Inventory of State-Based Habitat Connectivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Transportation. Montpelier, VT. Personal Communicationin Vermont. Montpelier, VT. http://repositories.cdlib.org/Transportation, Montpelier, VT. http://www.aot.state.vt.us/

Feinberg, Jesse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The National Marine Fisheries Service Habitat Conservation Efforts in Louisiana, 1980 Through 1990  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

% of all remaining coastal wetlands in the United States. Louisiana waters contributed about 15 tively estimated to exceed $600 mil lion (Bertrand, 1984). Louisiana coastal wetlands converted to open). Wetland losses in Louisiana are caused by a variety of factors. In a com prehensive evaluation, Turner

265

Conserving the Connections: A Nationwide Inventory of State-Based Habitat Connectivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the time that this inventory was conducted and written.for the sake of this inventory, both terms may refer to theto be implemented. This inventory examines eleven statewide

Feinberg, Jesse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Conserving the Connections: A Nationwide Inventory of State-Based Habitat Connectivity Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NC Gringas, Glen. 2007. Vermont Agency of Transportation.Morse and J. Austin. 2003. Vermont Agency of Transportationecological connectivity in Vermont. Montpelier, VT. http://

Feinberg, Jesse

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Project Conserve in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Project Conserve computer audit is one of seven program elements in the Homeowners's Energy Extension Program funded by the ECPA of 1975. It provides homeowners with information on what they can do to save energy and money. Data supplied by the homeowner on a questionnaire is processed by computer to produce a report containing the cost and savings of do-it-yourself or contractor-installed energy conservation actions: storm windows and doors, ceiling insulation, weather stripping/caulking, or thermostat setback. It is estimated that this program could save over 18 trillion Btu's per year in heating and cooling. This report summarizes how the project will be carried out in Illinois. (MCW)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Security Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Appendix A Glossary - A glossary of security terms used within the security planning document. ... F, Glossary. None applicable.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

A conserved Parity Operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry of Nature under a Space Inversion is described by a Parity operator. Contrary to popular belief, the Parity operator is not unique. The choice of the Parity operator requires several arbitrary decisions to be made. It is shown that alternative, equally plausible, choices leads to the definition of a Parity operator that is conserved by the Weak Interactions. The operator commonly known as CP is a more appropriate choice for a Parity operator.

Mark J Hadley

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Potential For Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The largest single area for industrial energy conservation is in the improvement of combustion efficiencies for heaters and boilers. A number of methods can be employed to recover heat. The most common are by use of recuperative air preheaters, regenerative air preheaters and economizers. Relative advantages and applicability of the three methods are discussed. Analytical methods and correlations are presented which enable determination of size of unit, capital cost and operating cost for each of the three methods of heat recovery.

Kumar, A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Another look at energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

The need for energy conservation in US buildings, industry and the transportation sector, the effects of the amount and cost of energy supplies on energy conservation, and goals of a national energy policy are discussed. (LCL)

Schipper, L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ME-County-Kennebec ME-County-Kennebec Location: County ME American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and conduct energy audit to improve energy efficiency in county facilities; 2) technical consultant services to conduct energy audits and develop a plan for implementation of retrofit projects; 3) building retrofits to historic facilities including replacing siding, installing insulation board, replacing HVAC chiller, and upgrading lighting and installing motion sensors at the County Government Center (1900); replacing pumps, upgrading lighting and installing motion sensors, installing direct digital control systems, and replacing windows at the County Correction Facility (1860); and

273

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GA-County-Cherokee GA-County-Cherokee Location: County Cherokee GA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) hire technical consultant, 3) energy efficiency retrofits to include: replace chiller and cooling tower in the Justice Center (1994); replace heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) controls in the Justice Center; installation of occupancy sensors in the Detention Center (1992); 4) installation of cool roofs on the Justice Center, Historic Courthouse (SHPO approval received), and the TAG Office (approximately 1988); 5) develop an overall energy plan for energy management including audits and for replacement of older inefficient roof-top packaged HVAC equipment

274

Status and Conservation of the American Crocodile in Florida: Recovering an Endangered Species While Restoring an Endangered Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Turkey Point Power Plant site. All crocodile habitat can be characterized by low wind and wave action Company's Turkey Point Power Plant site. Only recently have surveys systematically extended beyond and Fresh Water Fish Commission (now Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission), and Florida Power and Light

Mazzotti, Frank

275

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program targets improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, holding, spawning and rearing habitats of steelhead, spring and fall Chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the U.S.D.A. Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Enhancements included the construction of nine boulder deflectors, two boulder weirs with pools, and 4 instream boulder placements. Instream cover was improved through the placement of 38 instream cover trees that were cabled to anchor boulders and four rootwads placed and anchored in pools. High tensile fence was constructed along 1.2 miles of stream bank to exclude livestock from riparian areas.

Scheeler, Carl A.; Shaw, R.Todd

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part II, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages for the past 7 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. The objectives of this project are: (1) to determine the mathematical relationship between spawning escapement, parr production, and smolt production; (2) estimate carrying capacity and optimal smolt production; and (3) determine habitat factors relating to substrate, riparian, and channel quality that limit natural smolt production.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Lockhart, Jerald N. (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Business Management gives students a sound Management Summer B FOR3200C Foundations in Natural Resources and Conservation 3 credits FOR3434C Forest

Watson, Craig A.

278

LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

Minnesota, University of

279

Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page 1 Archipelagos Institute of Marine Conservation www.archipelago.gr VOLUNTEER RESEARCHER GUIDE of Marine Conservation. As an Archipelagos volunteer researcher, you are expected to abide by these policies. Introduction Archipelagos, Institute of Marine Conservation is a Greek, non-profit, non- governmental

280

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Majoring in Forest Resources & Conservation University of Florida/IFAS School of Forest Resources & Conservation www.sfrc.ufl.edu ~ 352-846-0847 ~ khaselier@ufl.edu Protected Areas Management is for students interested in managing lands for conservation and restoration purposes, usually on lands owned

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Genetic conservation of native trees  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic conservation of native trees Scott McG. Wilson1 and C. J. A. Samuel Over recent years, the genetic conservation of British native tree populations has become an increasingly important part policy-makers in the genetic basis of forest biodiversity conservation, both at the UK and, more

282

Conservation Biology Navjot S. Sodhi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Biology for All EDITED BY: Navjot S. Sodhi Department of Biological Sciences, National­0­19­955424­9 (Pbk.) 3 5 7 9 10 8 6 4 2 Sodhi and Ehrlich: Conservation Biology for All. http Introduction Navjot S. Sodhi and Paul R. Ehrlich 1 Introduction Box 1: Human population and conservation (Paul

Miami, University of

283

Lower Klickitat Riparian and In-channel Habitat Restoration Project, Annual Report 2001-2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focuses on the lower Klickitat River and its tributaries that provide or affect salmonid habitat. The overall goal is to restore watershed health to aid recovery of salmonid stocks in the Klickitat subbasin. An emphasis is placed on restoration and protection of watersheds supporting anadromous fish production, particularly steelhead (Oncorhyncus mykiss) which are listed as 'Threatened' within the Mid-Columbia ESU. Restoration activities are aimed at restoring stream processes by removing or mitigating watershed perturbances and improving habitat conditions and water quality. In addition to steelhead, habitat improvements benefit Chinook (O. tshawytscha) and coho (O. kisutch) salmon, resident rainbow trout, and enhance habitat for many terrestrial and amphibian wildlife species. Protection activities compliment restoration efforts within the subbasin by securing refugia and preventing degradation. Since 90% of the project area is in private ownership, maximum effectiveness will be accomplished via cooperation with state, federal, tribal, and private entities. The project addresses goals and objectives presented in the Klickitat Subbasin Summary and the 1994 NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program. Feedback from the 2000 Provincial Review process indicated a need for better information management to aid development of geographic priorities. Thus, an emphasis has been placed on database development and a review of existing information prior to pursuing more extensive implementation. Planning and design was initiated on several restoration projects. These priorities will be refined in future reports as the additional data is collected and analyzed. Tasks listed are for the April 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 contract cycle, for which work was delayed during the summer of 2001 because the contract was not finalized until mid-August 2001. Accomplishments are provided for the September 1, 2001 to August 31, 2002 reporting period. During this reporting period, significant progress was made on acquisition and development of spatial data, monitoring of steelhead spawning, riparian revegetation, streamflow monitoring, completion of maintenance and repair work, completion of a working version of a habitat database, and completion of the Swale Creek assessment.

Conley, Will

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Guam Energy Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

Describes the four near-term strategies selected by the Guam Energy Task Force during action planning workshops conducted in March 2013, and outlines the steps being taken to implement those strategies. Each strategy addresses one of the energy sectors identified in the earlier Guam strategic energy plan as being an essential component of diversifying Guam's fuel sources and reducing fossil energy consumption 20% by 2020. The four energy strategies selected are: (1) expanding public outreach on energy efficiency and conservation, (2) establishing a demand-side management revolving loan program, (3) exploring waste-to-energy options, and (4) influencing the transportation sector via anti-idling legislation, vehicle registration fees, and electric vehicles.

Conrad, M. D.; Ness, J. E.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Options for passive energy conservation in site design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At a time of concern for energy supplies and costs it is essential to examine the energy-conserving potential of once again using natural energy systems and patterns that exist on any site on which a building is to be or has been placed. This state-of-the-art study examines existing research and applications of land planning and design for energy-conservation purposes. It is organized around the basic principles of natural heating and cooling factors and the impact of site elements on human comfort, regional adaptation of these principles, steps in the site planning and design process, and energy-conservation options available in each of the steps. This is supplemented by an appendix and a bibliography of additional references. The principles of site planning and design for energy conservation deal with the impact of the sun and wind on natural elements and, conversely, ways in which landforms, water, and vegetation affect the impact of the sun and wind on limited sections of the earth. For instance, the sun is able to naturally warm certain slopes more than others, certain surface materials naturally accentuate the warmth of the sun, while certain naturally occurring elements, such as vegetation, block and control the sun. The wind moving over the earth's surface has certain natural directions, patterns, and characteristics. By recognizing these and by introducing or removing impediments it is possible to modify these patterns to provide natural ventilation and to conserve energy. Four commonly accepted regional divisions were utilized to illustrate the differing applications of these principles in the temperate, hot-humid, hot-arid, and cool regions of the continental U.S. The typical site planning or design process was superimposed over each region to illustrate the various energy conservation options possible, depending upon the precise decision made in each step in each region. 300 references.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

conservation biogeography forum: Neil D. Burgess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

profiles ISSN 1948-6596 conservation biogeography forum NeilD. Burgess Senior Conservation Scientist (Africa),WWF US Conservation Science Group, Department of Zoology,

Ahrends, Antje

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Conservation tillage achieves record acreage yields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

switching to no-tillage Conservation Agriculture Systems agelonger-term Sustainable Conservation counties (Fresno, Kern,Research news Conservation tillage achieves record acreage,

Warnert, Jeannette E; Editors, The

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Energy Demand and Conservation. 1979 (in press). Brooks.Look at Energy Conservation," Papers and Proceedings,Research Opportunities," in Conservation and Public Policy,

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Handbook of Water Use and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more of the myriad water conservation measures described inthe 21st century, water conservation is looking far moreup her claim that water conservation represents "The Great

Cohen, Russell A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an agreement to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In July of 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the intergovernmental contract, and on March 1, 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife is on private lands and therefore requires that considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance of, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. This project calls for passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing as the primary method to restore degraded streams to a normative condition. Active remediation techniques using plantings, off-site water developments, site-specific instream structures, or whole channel alterations are also utilized where applicable. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and local watershed councils. Work undertaken during 2002 included: (1) Implementing 1 new fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that will protect an additional 0.95 miles of stream and 22.9 acres of habitat; (2) Conducting instream work activities in 3 streams to enhance habitat and/or restore natural channel dimensions, patterns or profiles; (3) Planting 31,733 plants along 3.7 stream miles, (4) Establishing 71 new photopoints and retaking 254 existing photopoint pictures; (5) Monitoring stream temperatures at 12 locations on 6 streams; (6) Completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 100.5 miles of project fences. Since initiation of the project in 1984 over 68.7 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams and 1,933 acres of habitat have been protected, enhanced and maintained.

McGowan, Vance

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Focus Area: Crosscutting Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: eco3.org/wp-content/plugins/downloads-manager/upload/Report%20on%20Dem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/energy-conservation-and-commercializa Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance Regulations: Resource Integration Planning

292

Energy conservation system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conservation system is disclosed wherein power in a given area, such as in a hotel or other room, is controlled by means of an ultrasonic sound transmitter and a plurality of ultrasonic sound receivers, each receiver controlling power for a separate power outlet. Upon entering the room, a key is inserted into a key receptacle to activate the transmitter and thereby cause the receivers to couple power to the power outlets in the room. When the key is withdrawn from the key receptacle, the transmitter signals the receivers to decouple power from the power outlets.

Fichtner, R.L.

1977-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Biological Opinion and Conservation Review Consultation History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will be initiated. Pahrump poolfish We concur with BLM's determination that the remoteness of its habitat from

Argonne National Laboratory

294

Correlations Among Gender, Career Interests, Conservation Issues, And Curriculum Choice By Students In Wildlife And Fisheries Sciences At Texas A&M University From 2000 To 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to develop and assess student learning outcomes in order to determine whether academic department goals and standards are being reached. One aspect of this process involves alignment of learning outcomes with stakeholder criteria (expectations, beliefs) for assessment. The Department of Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences at Texas A&M University has not previously developed a program assessment of student learning outcomes. However, a survey has been administered to undergraduate students enrolled in a mandatory class, Conservation and Management (WFSC 201). Among other questions, the survey asked students to provide information about their curriculum choice, agreement with value statements about wildlife and conservation issues, career interests, graduate school plans, and importance of issues related to wildlife and fisheries management and conservation. To evaluate alignment of student choice of curriculum with expectations and beliefs related to their choice of career, I tested the student responses to curriculum choice for relationships to responses to survey questions about career interests, gender, and graduate school plans for surveys administered in 2000 and 2008. For these same surveys, I also tested responses to value statements for relationships to responses for importance of issues, in addition to career interests, gender, and graduate school plans. Similar percentages (24%) of the total variation in curriculum choice and in agreement with value statements were explained: Career interests explained 18% of the variation related to curriculum choice and 8% of variation related to value statements. Year and gender combined explained only 2% of the variation in either dependent variable. Responses to important issues explained 11% of the variation in responses to value statements. Choice of curriculum was most strongly related to career interests and graduate school plans. Students who chose the teaching curriculum option were interested in careers in public school education and planned on attending graduate school. Students who chose curriculum options in aquaculture and fish ecology and management were interested in careers in aquaculture and as government fisheries biologists and conservation officers and planned on attending graduate school. Students who chose the curriculum options in wildlife ecology and management and other options were interested in a broad range of careers and were undecided about graduate school. Although importance of issues and career interests explained 19% of the variation in student agreement with value statements, this relationship was not statistically significant. Issues of greatest importance to females were endangered species, habitat destruction, water availability, loss of biodiversity, and water pollution. Females in 2000 tended to choose careers in public school education and as government wildlife biologists, and in 2008 chose careers in nature center education and as urban wildlife biologists. Issues of greatest importance to males were landowner rights to resources, such as high fences to enclose wildlife, access to rivers, water availability, and hunting of wildlife. Males in 2000 tended to choose careers as conservation officers, and in 2008 chose careers in ranch management, private consulting, and as government fish biologists and urban wildlife biologists. This data provides the Wildlife and Fisheries Department at Texas A&M University with information about its students and how they responded to curriculum options, career interests, value statements, and important issues.

Woldhagen, Ashley N.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Task Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Task Plans Task Plans This page contains links to a tentative listing of active and closed TEC Task Plans. Final status of these task plans will be determined after the July 2000 TEC meeting. Task Plan Number/Title DOE Lead Staff Last Update Comment Status/ New No. After 7/27/00 GP-1, Section 180(c) Coordination (begun 1/96) C. Macaluso 7/98 DOE published a Revised Proposed Policy and Procedures in April 1998; no final policy will be issued until a definitive date for NWPA shipments is determined, based on site suitability or other legislative direction. To the extent that any issues related to Section 180(c) arise in TEC meetings, they are being discussed in the context of the consolidated grant topic group which is covered by another task plan. Closed

296

Redshift and Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has always been considered a serious error to treat the cosmological redshift as a Doppler velocity effect rather than the result of space expansion. It is demonstrated here that in practical terms this is not the case, and that the apparent distance - redshift relation derived from a Doppler interpretation is reasonably consistent with supernova data (though not as good as the standard model with dark energy). The normal Doppler effect is examined in detail and shown to conserve energy as expected. Because of the equivalence between the general relativistic space expansion paradigm and the Doppler effect (as demonstrated) the long-standing problem of energy loss associated with the expansion of the Universe is treated in a similar manner to the normal well-behaved Doppler effect. The mechanism by which energy is conserved with the normal Doppler shift is applied to the cosmological redshift and the energy violation disappears. However, an additional luminosity-dependent recession factor is introduced. The effect on astronomical objects is examined and it is found to add only a small additional redshift to a body generating power by nuclear means but can be very large for objects powered by gravity. A possible connection to the claimed anomalous redshift of quasars is considered.

Alasdair Macleod

2004-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

297

Decommissioning Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this EPRI Technical Report is to provide a series of pre-planning guidance documents for the decommissioning of a nuclear power plant. This guidance is based in part upon Nuclear Decommissioning Plans (NDPs) developed by Commonwealth Edison (now Exelon) following the premature closure of Zion Station in 1998 as well as from other industry references and experience. These NDPs focus on the planning activities over the period from prior to final shutdown through the transition period into de...

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Plan (SSMP) to be submitted to Congress after the April 2010 release of the Nuclear Posture Review Report. It is aligned with the President's National Security Strategy...

299

Emergency Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Early Dismissal (Early Closing) Due to Inclement Weather - Snow/Ice or Emergency Situation. ... Emergency Situation - "Shelter-in-Place" Plan. ...

2013-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

300

EVALUATING CONSERVATION EFFECTIVENESS AND ADAPTATION IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATING CONSERVATION EFFECTIVENESS AND ADAPTATION IN DYNAMIC LANDSCAPES ADENA R. RISSMAN* I INTRODUCTION Despite the widespread use of conservation easements, their conservation outcomes are relatively unknown.1 Evaluating conservation easement effectiveness requires interdisciplinary research that reaches

Rissman, Adena

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Supply Curves of Conserved Energy  

SciTech Connect

Supply curves of conserved energy provide an accounting framework that expresses the potential for energy conservation. The economic worthiness of a conservation measure is expressed in terms of the cost of conserved energy, and a measure is considered economical when the cost of conserved energy is less than the price of the energy it replaces. A supply curve of conserved energy is independent of energy prices; however, the economical reserves of conserved energy will depend on energy prices. Double-counting of energy savings and error propagation are common problems when estimating conservation potentials, but supply curves minimize these difficulties and make their consequences predictable. The sensitivity of the cost of conserved energy is examined, as are variations in the optimal investment strategy in response to changes in inputs. Guidelines are presented for predicting the consequences of such changes. The conservation supply curve concept can be applied to peak power, water, pollution, and other markets where consumers demand a service rather than a particular good.

Meier, Alan Kevin

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hood River Fish Habitat Project; Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the project implementation and monitoring of all habitat activities in the Hood River basin that occurred over the October 1, 2002 to September 30, 2003 period (FY 03). Some of the objectives in the corresponding statement of work for this contract were not completed within FY 03. A description of the progress during FY 03 and reasoning for deviation from the original tasks and timeline are provided. OBJECTIVE 1 - Provide coordination of all activities, administrative oversight and assist in project implementation and monitoring activities. Administrative oversight and coordination of the habitat statement of work, budget, subcontracts, personnel, implementation, and monitoring was provided. OBJECTIVE 2 - Continue to coordinate, implement, and revise, as needed, the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan. The Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan was completed in 2000 (Coccoli et al., 2000). This document was utilized for many purposes including: drafting the Watershed Action Plan (Coccoli, 2002), ranking projects for funding, and prioritizing projects to target in the future. This document has been reviewed by many, including stakeholders, agencies, and interested parties. The Hood River Watershed Group Coordinator and author of the Hood River Fish Habitat Protection, Restoration, and Monitoring Plan, Holly Coccoli, has updated and revised the plan. Changes will be reflected in the Hood River Subbasin Plan, and after submission of the Subbasin Plan, a formally revised version of the Monitoring Plan will be put out for review. This will more specifically address changes in the Hood River subbasin since 2000, and reflect changes to fish habitat and needs in the Hood River subbasin regarding monitoring. OBJECTIVE 3 - Evaluate and monitor the habitat, accessibility, and presence of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout upstream of the Middle Fork Irrigation District water sources on Evans Creek. Through this project, BPA funded the Middle Fork Irrigation District (MFID) a total of $194,000 in FY 03 for the Glacier Ditch- Evans Creek project. BPA funds accounted for approximately 30% of the project while the remaining 70% was cost-shared by the MFID, the US Forest Service, and the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board. The MFID operated irrigation diversions on Evans Creek (Hutson pond RM 4.0 and the Evans Creek diversion RM 5.5), a tributary to the East Fork Hood River. Both diversions had inadequate upstream fish passage, and utilized Evans Creek to transport Eliot Branch water to distribute irrigation water lower in the basin. This project consisted of: piping a portion of the Glacier ditch to create a pressurized irrigation pipeline system, piping the Hutson extension, removing the culvert on Evans Creek near the Glacier ditch, removing the culvert above the Hutson pond, revegetating the disturbed areas, and providing adequate and approved fish passage on Evans Creek. Prior to any work, Brian Connors with MFID completed a NEPA checklist. Some of the key regulatory points of this project included wetland delineations, a cultural resources survey, and consultations with NOAA Fisheries, U.S. Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. This project will eliminate the overflow of silty water into Evans Creek and West Fork Evans Creek. Upon completion of this project, access to 2.5 miles of winter steelhead, coho salmon, and resident trout habitat will be restored. Elimination of the interbasin transfer of water will discontinue the conveyance of silty Eliot Branch water into clear East Fork tributaries. Additionally, less water taken from Coe Branch, Eliot Branch, and Laurance Lake which will benefit listed steelhead and bull trout. The Glacier Ditch provided irrigation water from the Eliot Branch to upper valley orchards and agriculture for more than 100 years. The Glacier Ditch served approximately 1,438 acres with 18 cfs of water. The Glacier Ditch portion of this project

Vaivoda, Alexis

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 1: Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation needs has been met by other sources, such as coal, nuclear, natural gas, biofuels, and most the first decade of the new millennium. In addition, fuel prices have become more volatile. The wholesale

304

Sixth Power Plan northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

anticipated economic and electricity demand growth and low market prices for natural gas and wholesale power topics: 1. Regional Economic Conditions 2. Electricity Demand 3. Natural Gas Markets and Prices 4 supplies or increasing demand. Increasingly, natural gas-fired generation is displacing coal

305

PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operation

306

Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Lakeland Electric - Commercial Conservation Rebate Program Eligibility Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Local Government Nonprofit State...

307

Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) Alternative Energy and Energy Conservation Patent Exemption (Personal) Eligibility General PublicConsumer Savings For Bioenergy...

308

State Facilities Energy Conservation Program (Oklahoma) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Facilities Energy Conservation Program (Oklahoma) State Facilities Energy Conservation Program (Oklahoma) Eligibility Schools State Government Savings For Other Program...

309

Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Barron Electric Cooperative - Residential Energy Resource Conservation Loan Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Home...

310

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

RCS program evaluation plan options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Residential Conservation Service (RCS) Program evaluation plan is designed to provide an ongoing evaluation during the RCS Program's active period as well as a measurement of the RCS Program's cumulative effect after the program's termination. The study options described include utility case studies, random survey sampling, directed survey sampling, and remote data collection. Survey techniques are described and appropriate questions are suggested. Several sample selection criteria are included as background for a DOE policy decision on this issue. Present and anticipated data sources are listed and discussed. Statistical data analysis plans include a preliminary determination of required sample sizes.

Stovall, T.K.; Bayne, C.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Yakama Nation Wildlife Management Areas, Technical Report 1999-2000.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of the Dalles, Bonneville, McNary, and John Day Dams on the Columbia River by the federal government resulted in a substantial loss of riparian bottomland along the Columbia River. Impacts associated with the Mid-Columbia Projects were assessed for several wildlife species using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USDI-FWS 1980). The studies documented the loss of riparian habitat and established a baseline against which mitigation measures could be developed (USDI-FWS 1990 and USDE-BPA 1990). The impact assessments established a mitigation goal, a portion of which would be satisfied by the creation, restoration, and enhancement of riparian lands on tributaries to the Columbia River, including the Yakima Valley. The Yakama Nation (YN), the Northwest Power Planning Council, and the Bonneville Power Administration have agreed that the Yakama Nation would be funded to implement habitat restoration on lands within and adjacent to their reservation. Some of the targeted lands are owned by the Yakama Nation, some are trust lands, and some lands have been in private ownership. Since the early 1990s, the Yakama Nation has been in the process of assembling riparian lands into Wildlife Management Areas, and restoring natural hydrology and natural cover-types on these lands. The Northwest Power Planning Council, through the Bonneville Power Administration, has supported the program. HEP studies were performed by the Yakama Nation in 1990 (Bich et al. 1991) to establish baseline conditions and inventory wildlife habitat at the initiation of the restoration project. The 1990 HEP used a simplified version of the HEP to quantify baseline conditions. The present assessment is designed to evaluate the progress of the mitigation plan in meeting its stated goals. The 1999 HEP assessment has two distinct tasks: (1) Evaluation of the mitigation plan as currently implemented using the simplified YN HEP methodologies for the Wildlife Management Areas; and (2) Evaluation of the simplified YN HEP methodologies as a means of measuring mitigation progress.

Raedeke, Kenneth; Raedeke, Dorothy

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Individual energy-conservation behaviors  

SciTech Connect

One important basis for sound energy policy is an understanding of how American consumers view and practice energy conservation. Project Monitor, a study of consumers' energy attitudes and behavior surveyed more than 1000 household consumers to determine individual attributes, situational factors, attitudes, and perceptions that influence (or fail to influence) energy conservation. Using these data, the authors related specific types of energy conservation - general, winterization, heating, cooling, appliance, transportation, and electricity reductions - to 24 demographic, situational, attitudinal, and perceptual variables in the household sample. To determine the characteristics that differentiate conservers from nonconservers, simple correlations are made between each of the independent variables and the dependent measures of conservation; the results of multivariate regression analyses are used to estimate the effects of the independent variables simultaneously. Also measured were the effects on households of two exogenous events during the period of the study. It concludes with recommendations for implementing and increasing energy conservation. 296 references, 42 tables.

Beck, P.; Doctors, S.I.; Hammond, P.Y.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Compare Activities by Energy Conservation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Compare Activities by ... Energy Conservation Inpatient health care buildings had the highest incidence of conservation features among all building types. For almost all building types, at least half of the buildings reported having a regularly scheduled maintenance program for the heating and/or cooling equipment. Reference: Definitions of Conservation Features Number of Buildings With Conservation Features by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) All Buildings Variable Air-Volume System Economizer Cycle HVAC Maintenance Energy Management and Control System (EMCS) Specular Reflector Electronic Ballasts All Buildings 4,657 550 567 2,786 460 843 2,167 Principal Building Activity Education 327 53 76 262 112 75 208 Food Sales 174

315

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan: Asotin County, Washington, 1995.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council completed its ``Strategy for Salmon'' in 1992. This is a plan, composed of four specific elements,designed to double the present production of 2.5 million salmon in the Columbia River watershed. These elements have been called the ``four H's'': (1) improve harvest management; (2) improve hatcheries and their production practices; (3) improve survival at hydroelectric dams; and (4) improve and protect fish habitat. The Asotin Creek Model Watershed Plan is the first to be developed in Washington State which is specifically concerned with habitat protection and restoration for salmon and trout. The plan is consistent with the habitat element of the ``Strategy for Salmon''. Asotin Creek is similar in many ways to other salmon-bearing streams in the Snake River system. Its watershed has been significantly impacted by human activities and catastrophic natural events, such as floods and droughts. It supports only remnant salmon and trout populations compared to earlier years. It will require protection and restoration of its fish habitat and riparian corridor in order to increase its salmonid productivity.

Browne, Dave

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Plans 1. Atlantic Red Drum 2. Shrimp 3. Stone Crab 4. Coral, Coral Reef, and Live/Hard Bottom Habitats (with SAFMC) Key Gulf of Mexico Commercial Species Commercially-important species and species groups in the Gulf of Mexico include: blue crab, stone crab

319

Environmental Management System Plan  

SciTech Connect

Executive Order 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management establishes the policy that Federal agencies conduct their environmental, transportation, and energy-related activities in a manner that is environmentally, economically and fiscally sound, integrated, continually improving, efficient, and sustainable. The Department of Energy (DOE) has approved DOE Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program and DOE Order 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management as the means of achieving the provisions of this Executive Order. DOE Order 450.1A mandates the development of Environmental Management Systems (EMS) to implement sustainable environmental stewardship practices that: (1) Protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources potentially impacted by facility operations; (2) Meet or exceed applicable environmental, public health, and resource protection laws and regulations; and (3) Implement cost-effective business practices. In addition, the DOE Order 450.1A mandates that the EMS must be integrated with a facility's Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) established pursuant to DOE P 450.4, 'Safety Management System Policy'. DOE Order 430.2B mandates an energy management program that considers energy use and renewable energy, water, new and renovated buildings, and vehicle fleet activities. The Order incorporates the provisions of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. The Order also includes the DOE's Transformational Energy Action Management initiative, which assures compliance is achieved through an Executable Plan that is prepared and updated annually by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL, Berkeley Lab, or the Laboratory) and then approved by the DOE Berkeley Site Office. At the time of this revision to the EMS plan, the 'FY2009 LBNL Sustainability Executable Plan' represented the most current Executable Plan. These DOE Orders and associated policies establish goals and sustainable stewardship practices that are protective of environmental, natural, and cultural resources, and take a life cycle approach that considers aspects such as: (1) Acquisition and use of environmentally preferable products; (2) Electronics stewardship; (3) Energy conservation, energy efficiency, and renewable energy; (4) Pollution prevention, with emphasis on toxic and hazardous chemical and material reduction; (5) Procurement of efficient energy and water consuming materials and equipment; (6) Recycling and reuse; (7) Sustainable and high-performance building design; (8) Transportation and fleet management; and (9) Water conservation. LBNL's approach to sustainable environmental stewardship required under Order 450.1A poses the challenge of implementing its EMS in a compliance-based, performance-based, and cost-effective manner. In other words, the EMS must deliver real and tangible business value at a minimal cost. The purpose of this plan is to describe Berkeley Lab's approach for achieving such an EMS, including an overview of the roles and responsibilities of key Laboratory parties. This approach begins with a broad-based environmental policy consistent with that stated in Chapter 11 of the LBNL Health and Safety Manual (PUB-3000). This policy states that Berkeley Lab is committed to the following: (1) Complying with applicable environmental, public health, and resource conservation laws and regulations. (2) Preventing pollution, minimizing waste, and conserving natural resources. (3) Correcting environmental hazards and cleaning up existing environmental problems, and (4) Continually improving the Laboratory's environmental performance while maintaining operational capability and sustaining the overall mission of the Laboratory. A continual cycle of planning, implementing, evaluating, and improving processes will be performed to achieve goals, objectives, and targets that will help LBNL carry out this policy. Each year, environmental aspects will be identified and their impacts to the environm

Fox, Robert; Thorson, Patrick; Horst, Blair; Speros, John; Rothermich, Nancy; Hatayama, Howard

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Relationship between juvenile steelhead survival and winter habitat availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ugedal. 2007. Shelter availability affects behaviour, size-and winter habitat availability Eric Huber, Sammy Kayed, andThe establishment and availability of interstitial spaces

Huber, Eric; Kayed, Sammy; Post, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Patterns of fish habitat use in Mediterranean streams-type.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this study is to contribute to the understanding of the Mediterranean freshwater fish ecology, emphasising the habitat use patterns. Extreme seasonal variations (more)

Ilhu, Maria

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Landscape Characteristics Of Upland Sandpiper Habitat In Michigan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Grassland bird populations have declined across North America due to habitat loss but at a disproportionately higher rate in the midwestern United States, where extensive (more)

Korte, Jacob Lawrence

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) Aquatic Habitat Protection Permit (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Rural Electric Cooperative Schools Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment The Environmental Management and Protection Act, 2002 (EMPA) provides for the protection of aquatic habitat and states that a permit is required: to

324

Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Change (PlanCC) Peru Change (PlanCC) Peru Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Name Planning for Climate Change (PlanCC) Peru Agency/Company /Organization HELVETAS Swiss Intercooperation, Libélula Consulting Company of Peru Partner Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN), The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF), Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), Ministry of Planning, Ministry of Finance, Ministry of Environment Sector Climate, Energy, Land, Water Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Economic Development, Forestry, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, People and Policy, Transportation, Water Conservation, Water Power Topics Adaptation, Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, - Macroeconomic, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

325

Habitat Quality and Anadromous Fish Production on the Warm Springs Reservation. Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The number of anadromous fish returning to the Columbia River and its tributaries has declined sharply in recent years. Changes in their freshwater, estuarine, and ocean environments and harvest have all contributed to declining runs of anadromous fish. Restoration of aquatic resources is of paramount importance to the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs (CTWS) Reservation of Oregon. Watersheds on the Warm Springs Reservation provide spawning and rearing habitat for several indigenous species of resident and anadromous fish. These streams are the only ones in the Deschutes River basin that still sustain runs of wild spring chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus, tshawytscha. Historically, reservation streams supplied over 169 km of anadromous fish habitat. Because of changes in flows, there are now only 128 km of habitat that can be used on the reservation. In 1981, the CTWS began a long-range, 3-phase study of existing and potential fish resources on the reservation. The project, consistent with the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program, was designed to increase the natural production of anadromous salmonids on the reservation.

Fritsch, Mark A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation and Monitoring of Idaho Habitat Enhancement and Anadromous Fish Natural Production : Annual Report 1986.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been conducting an evaluation of existing and proposed habitat improvement projects for anadromous fish in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages over the last 3 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by or proposed for funding by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. This evaluation project is also funded under the same authority. A mitigation record is being developed to use increased smolt production (i.e., yield) at full-seeding as the best measure of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed nature of upriver anadromous stocks have precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat enhancement project in Idaho. Partial benefit will be credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Petrosky, Charles E.; Holubetz, Terry B.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Anadronous Fish Habitat Enhancement for the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River, 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wild and natural salmon and steelhead populations in the Middle Fork and Upper Salmon River are at a critical low. Habitat enhancement through decreasing sediment loads, increasing vegetative cover, removing passage barriers, and providing habitat diversity is imperative to the survival of these specially adapted fish, until passage problems over the Columbia River dams are solved. Personnel from the Boise and Sawtooth National Forests completed all construction work planned for 1988. In Bear Valley, 1573 feet of juniper revetment was constructed at eleven sites, cattle were excluded from 1291 feet of streambanks to prevent bank breakdown, and a small ephemeral gully was filled with juniper trees. Work in the Upper Salmon Drainage consisted of constructing nine rock sills/weirs, two rock deflectors, placing riprap along forty feet of streambank, construction of 2.1 miles of fence on private lands, and opening up the original Valley Creek channel to provide spring chinook passage to the upper watershed. A detailed stream survey of anadromous fish habitat covering 72.0 miles of streams in the Middle Fork Sub-basin was completed.

Andrews, John ( US Forest Service, Intermountain Region, Boise, ID)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Idaho Habitat and Natural Production Monitoring Part I, 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG) has been monitoring and evaluating proposed and existing habitat improvement projects for rainbow-steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss and chinook salmon O. tshawytscha in the Clearwater River and Salmon River drainages on a large scale for the past 8 years. Projects included in the evaluation are funded by, or proposed for funding by, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Northwest Power Planning Act as off-site mitigation for downstream hydropower development on the Snake and Columbia rivers. A mitigation record is being developed using increased carrying capacity and/or survival as the best measures of benefit from a habitat enhancement project. Determination of full benefit from a project depends on completion or maturation of the project and presence of adequate numbers of fish to document actual increases in fish production. The depressed status of upriver anadromous stocks has precluded measuring full benefits of any habitat project in Idaho. Partial benefit is credited to the mitigation record in the interim period of run restoration.

Rich, Bruce A.; Petrosky, Charles E. (idaho Department of Fish and Game, Fisheries Research Section, Boise, ID)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

On the road to conservation: state conservation strategies and applications for transportation planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement Program (STIP): A short-term program for theimprovement program (STIP). At a glance, we can seeImprovement Projects (STIP). State transportation

White, Patricia A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix E: Conservation Supply Curve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy efficient clothes washers and dishwashers save significant amounts of water as well as electricity

331

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Appendix F: Model Conservation Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Connecticut Fuel Cell Programs - From Demonstration to Deployment September 12, 2007 Lise Dondy (CCEF) Legislation 1998 / Launch 2000 Administered by Connecticut Innovations (CI) Surcharge on electric CCEF Goals 6 #12;Clean Energy Technologies Fuel Cells Solar Biomass Hydro Landfill Gas Wave Wind 7 #12

332

Sixth Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan Chapter 4: Conservation Supply Assumptions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thirds of commercial savings are in lighting systems. New technologies like light-emitting diodes and improved lighting, recent advances in solid- state lighting--light-emitting diodes (LED) and organic light-emitting diodes. The availability of new lights such as light-emitting diodes (LED) and improved emerging technologies

333

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

334

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy Grants to Help N.H. Towns Conserve Energy March 19, 2010 - 4:17pm Addthis New Hampshire has a plan to lower expenses and create jobs, all while conserving energy. In all, the state has received $17.3 million in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funding. Of that, $9.6 million has been sent to the New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning (NHOEP) to launch several energy saving projects. NHOEP established a subgrant program to award $6.6 million of the EECBG grant funding to local municipalities and counties. New Hampshire municipalities and counties submitted over 270 applications, totaling over $21 million in grant requests. "Substantial energy efficiency improvements will be made throughout the

335

GRIPS Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The GRIPS (Geothermal Resources Impact Projection Study) Commission was established by a Joint Powers Agreement between the California Counties of Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma. The objectives of GRIPS are primarily to develop and use a cooperative environmental data collection and use system including natural, social, and economic considerations to facilitate their independent decisions and those of State and Federal agencies related to the environmental effects of geothermal development. This GRIPS Plan was prepared from a wide range of studies, workshops, and staff analyses. The plan is presented in four parts: summary and introduction; environmental data status report; planned programs; and budget. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Energy conserving site design case study-Radisson, New York. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A case study of project planning and design for energy conservation at Radisson New Community, Baldwinsville, New York is described. The new community includes a 95-acre residential site and a 51-acre town center. Energy-conserving plans developed for both sites have focused on passive measures to reduce energy use for space heating. Utility systems options have been identified for both sites. The case study overview contains data on location, climatology, local meteorology. Development plans for both the residential and town center areas are described. After a description of the team structure, methodological considerations, and impediments to implementation, the implementation program is given. (MCW)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Bonneville Power Administration`s Commercial Sector Conservation Market.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville has, as part of its resource plan, accepted targets for commercial conservation which are quite ambitious. To meet these targets, Bonneville will need to acquire as much cost-effective conservation as possible over the next twelve years. With this in mind, this document explores the relative importance of different commercial market segments and the types of assistance each market needs to install as many cost-effective conservation measures in as many buildings as possible. This document reviews Bonneville`s marketing environment and position, and suggests goals for commercial sector conservation marketing at Bonneville. Then it presents a broad market segmentation and series of additional demographic analyses. These analyses assess what groups of consumers Bonneville must reach to achieve most of the commercial conservation potential and what is needed to reach them. A final section reviews the success of Bonneville programs at reaching various markets. The market segmentation identifies different types of consumers and opportunities which would require distinct program approaches. Four large market segments are identified that have distinct program needs. Then four ``building life-cycle events`` are identified which provide important conservation opportunities and also require distinct program services. This creates a matrix of 16 cells which delineate distinct needs for program marketing. Each of the four key market segments manages at least 20% of the Region`s commercial floorspace.

Gordan, Frederick M. [Pacific Energy Associates, Inc. (United States)

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

338

Test plan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

3.0 TEST PLAN METHODOLOGY 8. 3.1 Assumptions 8. 3.2 Methodology 8. 4.0 COMMENTS ON INITIAL VIEW OF THE DATA 16 1.0 INTRODUCTION. EIA tasked Allied ...

339

Conserving Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Energy Assurance » Emergency Preparedness » Community Guidelines » Conserving Energy Conserving Energy Conserving Energy During an energy emergency, customers can reduce stress on infrastructure by conserving energy. This will help you and your community recover more quickly. Officials can ask the public to conserve energy, including: Cutting back on driving, using public transportation, and telecommuting when possible; Refraining from using non-essential lights and appliances, especially during peak hours (typically around 4:00-6:00 p.m.); and Lowering thermostat and water heating settings. Officials can ask transmission operators to activate demand-response programs in regions where those programs have been established. Under these programs, end-users are compensated to reduce their demand on the system

340

The Predators of Junnar: Local Peoples' Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes towards Leopards and Leopard Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conflicts between humans and leopards have intensified in the Junnar Forest Division (JFD), India due to a combination of factors: loss of natural habitats, increasing rural human densities, and increasing leopard populations. These rural and agrarian communities that have large sugarcane plantations are vulnerable to these conflicts in the form of livestock depredation and attacks on humans, which decrease the tolerance of locals towards leopards and may undermine local wildlife conservation activities. This study used structured interviews to explore local resident's views, knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and behavioral intentions towards leopards and their conservation. The mean attitudes and behavioral intentions of respondents (N = 154) was found to be positive towards leopards and their conservation. To understand behaviors towards leopards and their conservation, a socio-psychological theory, Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA), was used. Results indicate a stronger attitudinal influence on locals' behavioral intention towards leopards and leopard conservation. Although several socioeconomic and demographic variables were found to be statistically significant in relation to attitudes, this study revealed the existence of social, psychological, and cultural variables that shape the locals' perceptions of leopards and their conservation. The current study shows that local peoples' attitudes toward leopards are complex, with the view held by the same person often being characterized by both negative and positive aspects. This study does reveal positive dimensions to the local peoples' perceptions of leopards, which are relevant to conservation of this animal and serve as a foundation for recommendations regarding regulatory interventions and educational and management strategies for the future.

Shingote, Ramaa Jhamvar

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Conservation screening curves to compare efficiency investments to power plants: Applications to commercial sector conservation programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ashok K. Gadgil. 1989. Conservation Screening Curves forof Utility Experience with Conservation and Load ManagementSupport Document: Energy Conservation Standards for Consumer

Koomey, Jonathan; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.; Gadgil, Ashok J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Year Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

readers and funders of conservation organizations who seekReview: Conservation Refugees: The Hundred-Conflict Between Global Conservation and Native Peoples By

Jenkins, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Plans and Schedules | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Plans and Schedules Appliance & Equipment Standards » About » Plans and Schedules Plans and Schedules The Appliances and Equipment Standards program maintains a multi-year rulemaking schedule. The currently scheduled rulemaking activities are described in the program's semi-annual implementation report to Congress. The program will also issue other plans and schedules when needed. The most recent 5-year plan was released in October 2010 and outlines how the program planned to meet all the statutory requirements established in the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, as amended. Expedited Rulemakings In November 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) adopted new procedures that enable certain rulemakings to be expedited or improve the efficiency of the rulemaking process:

344

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

Entz, Ray

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CFN Ops Plan | Work Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Plan Operations Plan Work Planning & Control for Experiments and Operations All experimental work will be conducted in accordance with Work Planning and Control for Experiments and Operations, which ensures proper design and operation of all experiments prior to their commencement. CFN will use the SBMS provided standard form for the formal documentation. The Lead Experimenter/Responsible person will notify the Experimental Safety Review Committee of any new experiments or modifications to existing experiments. CFN will appoint an Experimental Safety Review Committee. This committee will consist of the Experiment Review Coordinator, CFN personnel, Facility Support Representative (FSR), Environmental Compliance Representative (ECR). Additional subject matter experts may be appointed on an ad-hoc

346

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NJ-City-Paterson NJ-City-Paterson Location: City Paterson NJ American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Conduct energy audits on city buildings; 2) develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy that will identify buildings eligible for free/reduced energy audits and where matching funds can be sought to maximize energy retrofits, prepare climate action plan, pre-feasibility studies, and conceptual design and develop a program for the Paterson Renewable Energy Education Center to be located in the historic district; and 3) energy efficiency retrofits to be defined after audits are completed (Activity 3 Excluded from NEPA Approval) Conditions: None-NEPA APPROVAL EXCLUDES RETROFITS IN ACTIVITY 3 Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1

347

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IA-City-Des Moines IA-City-Des Moines Location: City Des Moines IA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Reimbursement for the cost of preparing the energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) perform energy audits to benchmark the energy performance of municipal buildings and fund public education/outreach campaign, 3) revolving loan program for energy efficiency retrofits and incremental costs for purchasing hybrid vehicles, 4) energy efficiency window retrofits at City Hall and the Police Station, 5) fund program to increase cycling and walking opportunities in the city including safety training and bicycle rodeo, 6) technical consultant services to develop long-term energy plan, 7) technical services to assist with building energy audits, and 8) replace high pressure sodium lighting with light-emitting diode

348

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IL-City-Champaign IL-City-Champaign Location: City Champaign IL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) technical consultant to coordinate technical work on retrofit work in Activities 6 and 7, 3) technical consultant to assist in developing Sustainability Plan, 4) audit program for non-profit groups, 5) grants to non-profit groups for energy efficient upgrades (attic and ceiling insulation; replace cooling units and/or furnaces; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) maintenance and replacement; upgrade lighting; replace boiler; air sealing; replace/insulate water heaters; replace/install pneumatic controls), 6) energy efficient retrofits at

349

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY Location: Tribe CA-TRIBE-ALL MISSION INDIAN HOUSING AUTHORITY CA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The All Mission Indian Housing Authority (AMIHA), with input from the La Jolla Band of Luiseno Indians (DUNS 172879231), proposes to utilize the services of a technical consultant to assist the Tribe with developing a Tribal Energy Plan which will include a chapter on energy efficiency and conservation and also conduct as many residential and tribal building audits as funding would allow. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

350

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AK-TRIBE-NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA AK-TRIBE-NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA Location: Tribe AK-TRIBE- NINILCHIK VILLAGE OF ALASKA AK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Ninilchik Village of Alaska proposes to 1) develop a planning document and strategy to address the needs of the community; 2) conduct home energy audit assessment surveys; 3) disseminate information on energy conservation, weatherization, and alternative energy usage for the tribe and the community; 4) perform assessments and data collection to measure change and success of the programs from those attending the Home Energy Education training course and develop a GIS database; 5) perform community outreach to distribute information through local newsletters and training programs.

351

Conservation saves for Minnesota municipal utility  

SciTech Connect

Hibbing Public Utilities Commission operates a 19,500-kW coal-fired generating station. The utility was concerned about its peaking power capability for the cold winter forecast for 1977--1978. An infrared aerial survey was conducted over the community and homeowners were shown the results. Residents were instructed where additional insulation was needed in the homes and banks made special loans to the homeowners to add the insulation. As a result of the efforts of on-site in plant conservation as well as that of consumers, more than $88,000 annually was saved in the cost of purchased power at the utility. A turn-back thermostat campaign and use of other energy-saving devices are planned for the 1978--1979 season. (MCW)

Vumbaco, J.A.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Palm Bay Palm Bay Location: City Palm Bay FL American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description: 1) Technical consultant to develop energy efficiency and conservation strategy and a sustainability and energy master plan (completed); 2) energy efficiency audits at seven municipal facilities; 5) energy efficient retrofits at six municipal buildings; 3) community-wide greenhouse gas inventory; 4) review and upgrade existing building codes; 5) municipal building retrofits to include interior lighting retrofits, upgrade appliances, building management system design proposal and retrofits, solar water heaters, and parking lot LED conversions; 6) installation of electric car charging stations at strategic locations in city; 7) residential light bulb exchange program; and 8) technical consultant services for energy efficiency website

353

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook The Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook, published by the...

354

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An analysis of underwater habitats a development of the outline for aquatectural graphic standards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In addition to many forms of land-based architecture in this world, there are several instances of underwater habitats. These habitats have implications for space exploration (more)

Riggin, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Panther Creek, Idaho, Habitat Rehabilitation, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project was to achieve full chinook salmon and steelhead trout production in the Panther Creek, Idaho, basin. Plans were developed to eliminate the sources of toxic effluent entering Panther Creek. Operation of a cobalt-copper mine since the 1930's has resulted in acid, metal-bearing drainage entering the watershed from underground workings and tailings piles. The report discusses plans for eliminating and/or treating the effluent to rehabilitate the water quality of Panther Creek and allow the reestablishment of salmon and trout spawning runs. (ACR)

Reiser, Dudley W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise over half the total acreage and may be mowed or hayed to reduce exotic vegetation. Grasslands and wetlands may similarly be mowed or hayed, or left fallow. Wetlands would be subject to periodic flooding from the Tualatin River, but would drain quickly and promote undesirable vegetation. Riverine, forested wetland, and mixed forest habitats would likely change little from their current condition. Active restoration would include restoring wetlands with limited use of dikes and water control structures; planting and maintaining native grass, trees, and shrubs; and aggressive management of non-native invasive vegetation. Hydrology would be restored to emergent wetlands mimicking natural cycles thus promoting hydrophytic vegetation beneficial to fish and wildlife. Grassland and former crop areas would be planted with native grasses and trees to recreate prairie and savanna habitat types. Riverine riparian and forested wetland areas would be expanded by planting native trees and shrubs benefiting a multitude of species. Although a 'hands off' approach may provide habitat benefits after many decades, a more proactive approach would provide far more benefits to fish and wildlife, and thus would provide additional habitat credits more quickly.

Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) Chapter 7.1 (May 2012 second revision) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

359

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 2011) January 2011) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

360

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCTOBER 2010) OCTOBER 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) -Chapter 7.1 (May 2012) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR 17.5 Interagency Acquisitions 11. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 12. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs Guiding Principles  Sound acquisition planning ensures that the contracting process is

362

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PLANNING PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 6 Competition Requirements 4. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 5. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 6. FAR Part 9 Contractor Qualifications 7. FAR Part 10 Market Research 8. FAR Part 11 Describing Agency Needs 9. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 10. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 11. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 12. FAR 17 Special Contracting Methods 13. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 14. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 15. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy

363

Insect Conservation under the Endangered Species Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E. Carlton, Insect Conservation in America: Status andat 14 2006-2007] INSECT CONSERVATION UNDER THE ESA it isis "the most important conservation law in the his- tory of

Lugo, Ezequiel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EXTENSION WATER SUMMIT PRIORITY: WATER CONSERVATION Leadership Team Subcommittee: Joan Bradshaw Michael Dukes Pierce Jones Kati Migliaccio #12;Water Conservation - Situation · Florida water supplies;Water Conservation Initiative 2: Enhancing and protecting water quality, quantity, and supply Priority 1

Slatton, Clint

365

Water Conservation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Conservation Water Conservation Water Conservation Mission The team facilitates the reduction of water consumption intensity at LM sites in support of requirements of Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management, and (EO) 13514, Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance, and DOE Order 436.1, Departmental Sustainability, as approved by LM. The Water Conservation Team advocates natural resource sustainability by continually improving water use efficiencies. Scope LM and the contractor evaluate, make recommendations, and implement approved programs to maintain and operate its buildings and facilities in a manner that beneficially reduces water use, loss, and waste at LM sites. The team strives to reduce water use intensity annually. Water efficiency

366

Conservation in signal processing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation principles have played a key role in the development and analysis of many existing engineering systems and algorithms. In electrical network theory for example, many of the useful theorems regarding the ...

Baran, Thomas A. (Thomas Anthony)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ''Energy Improvement and Extension Act of 2008'', enacted in October 2008, authorized the issuance of Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds (QECBs) that may be used by state, local and tribal...

368

Prepared for: REGION C WATER PLANNING GROUP Prepared by:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This model water conservation plan was prepared by Freese and Nichols, Alan Plummer Associates, and Chiang, Patel, and Yerby for the Region C Water Planning Group. It is intended as a template for manufacturers within Region C as they develop their own water conservation plans. Manufacturers should customize the details to match their unique situation. The model plan was prepared pursuant to Texas Commission on Environmental Quality rules. The rules do not require a drought contingency plan for manufacturers. The other Region C model water conservation plans (for municipal, steam electric power, and irrigation users) include example text for a fictional water user that can be edited to match a real-life situation. However, there are a large number of manufacturers in Region C with widely varying processes and water uses, and it is difficult to generate example text that is applicable to most manufacturers. This template provides a plan structure and instructions for the type of content that belongs in each section. The water conservation plans for the City of Fort Worth 1, the City of Dallas 2, New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (Guide for Commercial, Institutional, and Industrial Users) 3 were used

Brian K. Mcdonald; Alan Plummer Associates; Thomas C. Gooch; Stephanie W. Griffin; Alan Plummer Associates

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Energy Conservation vs. Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy conservation is considered by some as synonymous with energy efficiency, but to others, it has a meaning of getting fewer or lower quality energy services. The degree of confusion between these meanings varies widely by individual, culture, historic period and language spoken. In the context of this document, energy conservation means to keep from being lost or wasted; saved, and energy efficiency means the ability to produce a desired effect or product with a minimum of effort, expense or waste.

Somasundaram, Sriram

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area J xxxx Keywords: Conservation justice Community-based conservation South Africa Urban conservation Stakeholder analysis a b s t r a c t Conservation justice, a concept analogous to environmental justice

Silander Jr., John A.

371

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) Grass Conservation Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Grass Conservation Act provides for the conservation, protection, restoration, and proper utilization of grass, forage, and range resource of the state of Montana. The Act establishes the Montana Grass Conservation Commission to coordinate between the Department and Conservation Districts

372

BIBLIOGRAPHY ON INSTITUTIONAL BARRIERS TO ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Innovative Financing: Banks and Energy Conserva tion (Finalexamines the role of banks in promoting energy conservation.to consumers; and 3) banks can't promote energy conservation

York, C.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Energy Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservation and Commercialization in Gujarat: Report On Demand Side Management (DSM) In Gujarat Jump to: navigation, search Name Energy Conservation and Commercialization in...

374

Reforms could boost conservation banking by landowners  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights of way Total http://californiaagriculture.ucanr.edu AprilJune 2013 93 conservation banking: (1) the enactment of state conservation banking standards

Bunn, David; Lubell, Mark; Johnson, Christine K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Federal Energy Management Program: National Energy Conservation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Energy Conservation Policy Act to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: National Energy Conservation Policy Act on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

376

Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) Conservation of Biomass Fuel, Firewood (Minnesota) Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned...

377

Valuing the Environmental Benefits of Urban Water Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bene?ts of Urban Water Conservation LBNL-61011 1 Katiethe California Urban Water Conservation Council, LNBL Awardwww.irwd.com/Conservation/water conservation research.php#=

Coughlin, Katie M.; Bolduc, Chris A.; Chan, Peter T.; Dunham-Whitehead, C.; Van Buskirk, R.D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Project Based Energy Conservation vs. Management Based Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic American Foods (BAF) is the largest potato dehydrator worldwide. This paper will trace the shift from a Project Based to Management Based energy conservation program. Second only to raw material, energy is one of the highest expenses at BAF. Due to this fact, BAF started a corporation wide energy reduction program in 1999. The program was one full time project engineer focused only on energy reduction projects. This approach, called project based energy conservation, worked well for about 3 years. Total savings from energy reduction projects were equivalent to over 10% of the corporate profit. At that point entropy started to take over and the initial successes were reversing themselves. BAF then re-energized its energy initiative by setting a 5% per year energy reduction goal. The project based program could not achieve this goal. Therefore, the focus switched from project based to a management based energy conservation program.

Judy, K.; O'Brien, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at Property Reuse » Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site Habitat Restoration at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site The 1,470-acre Salmon, Mississippi, Site is located in Lamar County, approximately 20 miles southwest of Hattiesburg, in southwestern Mississippi. It is roughly square in shape, and each side is approximately 1.52 miles long. The site was used by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Defense for underground nuclear testing in the 1960s. The site was decontaminated, remediated, and decommissioned in 1972, and all buildings and equipment were removed at that time. Two small, shallow pockets of contamination were left for remediation by natural attenuation. A subsequent remedial investigation was completed in 1999. Final site

380

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity Posted By Office of Public Affairs Guy painter Girl painter A number of Pantexans volunteered Friday, March 30, to help renovate two

382

Pantexans volunteer to help Habitat for Humanity | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 30, to help renovate two Habitat for Humanity homes in Amarillo, Texas. B&W Pantex provided breakfast and lunch for the volunteers, who were encouraged to bring family...

383

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Natural Propagation and Habitat Improvement Volume I -Oregon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 PROJECT COSTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 LITERATURE CITED Fork John Day River Habitat Improvement Annual Report Prepared by John Andrews, Project Leader and Earl Fishburn, Brent Frazier, and Rod Johnson, Project Coordinators Umatilla National Forest 2517 S. W. Hailey

385

Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver Zero Energy Demonstration Home  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure describes the 2005 demonstration home designed by NREL and the Habitat for Humanity of Metro Denver. The completed home produced 24% more energy than it consumed over 12 months.

Not Available

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Energy planning and management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains printed copies of 60FR 53181, October 12, 1995 and 60 FR 54151. This is a record of decision concerning the Western Area Power Administration`s final draft and environmental impact statement, and Energy Planning and Management Program.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7.1 (May 2010) 7.1 (May 2010) 1 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination 13. FAR 34.004 Acquisition Strategy Guiding Principles

391

ACQUISITION PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) --Chapter 7.1 (JUNE 2010) 2 ACQUISITION PLANNING REFERENCES 1. FAR 4.803(a)(1) Contents of Contract Files 2. FAR 5.405(a) Exchange of Acquisition Information 3. FAR Part 7 Acquisition Planning 4. FAR Part 8 Required Sources of Supply 5. FAR Part 10 Market Research 6. FAR 11.402 Factors to Consider in Establishing Schedules 7. FAR 15.201(c) Exchanges with Industry Before Receipt of Proposals 8. FAR Subpart 16.1 Selecting Contract Types 9. FAR 16.504(c) Indefinite-Quantity Contracts - Multiple Award Preference 10. FAR Subpart 17.6 Management and Operating Contracts 11. FAR Part 19 Small Business Programs 12. FAR 25.802(a)(2) Other International Agreements and Coordination Guiding Principles

392

Planning for Change: The Implications of a Changing Climate for Ecological Conservation Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plant Society. 55-57. McLaughlin, J. , J. Hellman, C. Boggs,term study conducted by McLaughlin et. al. (2002) found thatbest for the BCB survival (McLaughlin, 2002). Temperature is

Klausmeyer, Kirk

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Berkeley Lab Strategic Planning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Development (LDRD) BER Review Annual Lab Plan Notable Outcomes Division-Level Strategic Planning Related Links Strategic Planning Laboratory Directed Research and...

394

Plan Descriptions & Summaries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Descriptions & Summaries Retiree Insurance Plans Retiree health and welfare benefits are managed by AonHewitt and Associates. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Plan...

395

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation : Fish Passage and Habitat Improvement in the Upper Flathead River Basin, 1991-1996 Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past 50 years, dramatic changes have occurred in the Flathead Lake and River system. Degradation of fishery resources has been evident, in part due to deterioration of aquatic habitat and introduction of non-endemic fish and invertebrate species. Habitat loss has been attributed to many factors including the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam, unsound land use practices, urban development, and other anthropogenic and natural disturbances. Fish migration has also been limited by barriers such as dams and impassible culverts. Cumulatively, these factors have contributed to declines in the distribution and abundance of native fish populations. Recovery of fish populations requires that a watershed approach be developed that incorporates long-term aquatic habitat needs and promotes sound land use practices and cooperation among natural resource management agencies. In this document, the authors (1) describe completed and ongoing habitat improvement and fish passage activities under the Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program, (2) describe recently identified projects that are in the planning stage, and (3) develop a framework for identifying prioritizing, implementing, and evaluating future fish habitat improvement and passage projects.

Knotek, W.Ladd; Deleray, Mark; Marotz, Brian L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

BL4268 Conservation and Management of Biodiversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BL4268 ­ Conservation and Management of Biodiversity Conservation of biological diversity is one understanding of some of the current issues associated with conservation and biodiversity management. Emphasis decision makers and the general public. Why is biodiversity important? What should be conserved? Alfredo F

Brierley, Andrew

397

Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conservation Conservation Behavior: From Voluntary Restraint to a Voluntary Price Premium * By Matthew J. Kotchen y Department of Economics Williams College and Michael R. Moore School of Natural Resources & Environment University of Michigan October 19, 2004 We are grateful for helpful comments from Jim Andreoni, Jon Bakija, Bill Gentry, Joe Herriges, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, Steve Polasky, Steve Salant, Lucie Schmidt, Joel Slemrod, Klaas van ' t Veld, and seminar participants at the University of Minnesota, Williams College, Yale University, and the 2004 NBER Workshop on Public Policy and the Environment. This research was supported in part by a grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency. y Corresponding author: Department of Economics, Williams College, Williamstown, MA 01267; Email: mkotchen@williams.edu; Telephone (413) 597-2101; Fax (413) 597-4045. Conservation

398

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) In 1965 the Solid Waste Disposal Act [Public Law (Pub. L.) 89-72] was enacted to improve solid waste disposal methods. It was amended in 1970 by the Resource Recovery Act (Pub. L. 91-512), which provided the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) with funding for resource recovery programs. However, that Act had little impact on the management and ultimate disposal of hazardous waste. In 1976 Congress enacted the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA, Pub. L. 94-580). RCRA established a system for managing non-hazardous and hazardous solid wastes in an environmentally sound manner. Specifically, it provides for the management of hazardous wastes from the point of origin to the point of final disposal (i.e., "cradle to grave"). RCRA also promotes resource recovery and waste minimization.

399

Building Energy Conservation in China  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Conservation in China Building Energy Conservation in China Speaker(s): Zhang Fulin Date: January 29, 2013 - 11:15am Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Haley Gilbert Mr. Zhang Fulin is a Senior Engineer and Director of the Division of Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Department of Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Science &Technology of the Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development (MOHURD) in China. He is tasked with developing China building energy conservation policies and regulations and is responsible for the approval of major China building energy efficiency projects. Mr. Zhang has been working in the field of building energy efficiency for more than two decades. He will speak about current laws and regulations governing building energy efficiency practice in China,

400

Wind River Watershed Restoration Project; Underwood Conservation District, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Wind River project is to preserve, protect and restore Wind River steelhead. In March, 1998, the National Marine Fisheries Service listed the steelhead of the lower Columbia as 'threatened' under the Endangered Species Act. In 1997, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife rated the status of the Wind River summer run steelhead as critical. Due to the status of this stock, the Wind River summer steelhead have the highest priority for recovery and restoration in the state of Washington's Lower Columbia Steelhead Conservation Initiative. The Wind River Project includes four cooperating agencies. Those are the Underwood Conservation District (UCD), United States Geological Service (USGS), US Forest Service (USFS), and Washington State Department of Fish & Wildlife (WDFW). Tasks include monitoring steelhead populations (USGS and WDFW), Coordinating a Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Group (UCD), evaluating physical habitat conditions (USFS and UCD), assessing watershed health (all), reducing road sediments sources (USFS), rehabilitating riparian corridors, floodplains, and channel geometry (UCD, USFS), evaluate removal of Hemlock Dam (USFS), and promote local watershed stewardship (UCD, USFS). UCD's major efforts have included coordination of the Wind River Watershed Committee and Technical Advisory Committee (TAC), water temperature and water chemistry monitoring, riparian habitat improvement projects, and educational activities. Our coordination work enables the local Watershed Committee and TAC to function and provide essential input to Agencies, and our habitat improvement work focuses on riparian revegetation. Water chemistry and temperature data collection provide information for monitoring watershed conditions and fish habitat, and are comparable with data gathered in previous years. Water chemistry information collected on Trout Creek should, with 2 years data, determine whether pH levels make conditions favorable for a fish parasite, Heteropolaria lwoffi. Educational activities further the likelihood that future generations will continue to understand and enjoy the presence of native fish stocks in the Wind River basin.

White, Jim

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "habitat conservation plan" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Commitment and voluntary energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Homeowners were interviewed and expected to be either personally identified (public commitment) or not identified (private commitment) as having agreed to attempt energy conservation. The response measure of energy usage was provided by utility-meter readings for the month following the interview. Homeowners under public commitment showed a lower rate of increase in the use levels for both natural gas (Experiment I) and electricity (Experiment II) than under private commitment or in the control (no interview condition). Results from a set of self-monitoring conditions suggested that conservation may be related to increased attention to energy use levels. 8 references, 1 table.

Pallak, M.S.; Cummings, W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook A. Dane and L. Doris National Renewable Energy Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy | Office of Indian Energy 1000 Independence...

403

Evaluation, 1979: a look at conservation projects and activities at Seattle City Light  

SciTech Connect

The attempt at systematic evaluation of energy conservation activities and programs at Seattle City Light is reviewed. In 1979, 22 projects/activities were evaluated and categorized in-house, i.e., commercial/industrial; residential; outreach efforts;support activities; (not targeting the public); research, development, and demonstration; and in-house conservation activities. Details of each of these projects are presented. Four studies conducted by outside consultants are: Evaluation of the Seattle City Light Neighborhood Energy Conservation Program (Battelle Institute); Seattle City Light Conservation Office Evaluation Plan Review (Communication Design); Residential Customer Conservation Attitude and Awareness Study (Communication Design); and A Case Study of Seattle City Light's Utility/Bank/Contractor Insulation Program (Brown and Caldwell). Summaries of the reports are included as appendices.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) Municipal Energy Plan Program (Ontario, Canada) < Back Eligibility Municipal/Public Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Maximum Rebate 90,000 Program Info Expiration Date 11/29/2013 State Ontario Program Type Grant Program Rebate Amount 50 percent of eligible costs Ontario is supporting local energy planning by introducing the Municipal Energy Plan (MEP) program. The MEP program is designed to help municipalities better understand their local energy needs and conservation opportunities, set goals and develop implementation plans. A MEP takes an integrated approach to energy planning by aligning energy, infrastructure and land use planning. MEPs will help municipalities:

405

Review of Conservation Costs and Benefits: Five Years of Experience under the Northwest Power Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). In the Act, Congress mandated that conservation (i.e., improvements in energy efficiency that result in reduced consumptions) be treated as a resource and that all resources be evaluated against uniform criteria to determine the lowest cost mix of resources to meet the Northwests energy needs. Since the passage of the Act, the total regional expenditure on conservation by the federal Bonneville Power Administration, public utilities, and investor-owned utilities has been approximately $800 million to $900 million. This includes research and development elements of the program. This paper describes the costs and benefits of conservation programs implemented in the Pacific Northwest and some of the lessons learned to date. The analysis indicates that conservation programs that were run to acquire energy have achieved savings at levelized costs ranging between 1.9 and 2.9 cents per kilowatt hours. Research, development and pilot projects have produced savings at costs that range from less than .10 cents to 8.9 cents per kilowatt hour. Based on the results described in this paper, the Northwest Power Planning Council has concluded that conservation is indeed a resource that the Pacific Northwest can rely on to help meet future needs for electricity. The Council also concluded the region will be able secure conservation measure and resources at a cost lower than it would otherwise have to pay for additional generating resources.

Sheets, E.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Idaho Habitat/Natural Production Monitoring, Part II: Intensive Monitoring Subproject : Annual Progress Report 1990.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 83-7 was established under the Northeast Power Planning Council's 1982 Fish and Wildlife Program, Measure 704 (d) (1) to monitor natural production of anadromous fish, evaluate Bonneville Power Administration habitat improvement project, and develop a credit record for off-site mitigation projects in Idaho. Project 83-7 is divided into two sub-projects: general and intensive monitoring. Results of the intensive monitoring sub-project are reported here. Results from the general monitoring sub-project will be reported in a separate document. The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. Field work began in 1987 in upper Salmon River and Crooked River (South Fork Clearwater River tributary). Methods include using weirs to trap adults, conducting ground and aerial redd counts, snorkeling to estimate parr populations, PIT-tagging juveniles to determine parr-tosmolt survival, trapping fall and spring downstream emigrants with scoop traps, and outplanting adults to determine juvenile carrying capacity. PIT tags also provide a wide range of other information such as migration timing, effects of flow and passage conditions on smolt survival, other factors affecting smolt survival, and growth.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Forster, Katharine A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Step Towards Conservation for Interior Alaska Tribes  

SciTech Connect

This project includes a consortium of tribes. The tribes include Hughes (representing the consortium) Birch Creek, Huslia, and Allakaket. The project proposed by Interior Regional Housing Authority (IRHA) on behalf of the villages of Hughes, Birch Creek, Huslia and Allakaket is to develop an energy conservation program relevant to each specific community, educate tribe members and provide the tools to implement the conservation plan. The program seeks to achieve both energy savings and provide optimum energy requirements to support each tribe's mission. The energy management program will be a comprehensive program that considers all avenues for achieving energy savings, from replacing obsolete equipment, to the design and construction of energy conservation measures, the implementation of energy saving operation and maintenance procedures, the utilization of a community-wide building energy management system, and a commitment to educating the tribes on how to decrease energy consumption. With the implementation of this program and the development of an Energy Management Plan, these communities can then work to reduce the high cost of living in rural Alaska.

Kimberly Carlo

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

409

-1 -Conservation Activity Conceptual Models June 2008.doc CCF Measures of Conservation Success  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 -Conservation Activity Conceptual Models June 2008.doc CCF Measures of Conservation Success Conservation Activity Conceptual Models These models are flowchart-style representations of the generic processes by which different types of conservation activity can lead to conservation effects. The components

Foster, William A.

410

Conservation Genetics of California Abalone: Developing Tools for Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Genetics of California Abalone: Developingto develop effective conservation and recovery strategies

Burton, Ronald S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Progress and Outlook on China Industrial Energy Conservation Wang Wenyuan, Department of Energy Conservation and...

412

Measures and Investment Options for Community Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipalities and electric and gas utilities have for the past decade offered ratepayers incentives for conserving energy. The energy conservation strategies used have varied depending on the goals of the local utility. The cost-effectiveness of these strategies, however, has been debated because of the limited activity in producing quantifiable data and the lack of documentation of methodologies. Because the cost-effectiveness and the reach of current energy programs is often unknown, the return on investment to the utility, city, or the ratepayer is often without quantifiable documentation. The development of municipal or utility energy conservation programs centers principally on economic and social issues. Utilities look at energy efficiency and demand management as a cheaper option than the construction of a new power plant. Municipalities consider energy efficiency because it promotes awareness and therefore helps keep utility bills low for its citizens. The two viewpoints may combine as in the case of the City of San Antonio and its municipally owned utility, City Public Service. A dilemma, therefore, arises when a municipally owned utility has excess capacity. The municipality demands that its utility provide for growth and maintain rates, two goals which may conflict. In this project, the City of San Antonio's Office of Public Utilities assessed the potential for energy conservation and its relationship to meeting the community's economic growth objectives. The project evaluated the municipally owned utility's energy conservation goals and objectives, current and future programs, and its forecasting and generation plans. Emphasis was placed on evaluating and developing cost-effective residential energy conservation programs designed for the San Antonio area and determining a "best-set" of programs based on a detailed economic analysis.

Myers, M. S.; Korinchock, D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1987, Westinghouse Hanford Company has been a major contractor to the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and has served as co-operator of the 300 Area Process Trenches, the waste management unit addressed in this closure plan. For the purposes of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, Westinghouse Hanford Company is identified as ``co-operator.`` The 300 Area Process Trenches Closure Plan (Revision 0) consists of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Part A Dangerous Waste Permit Application, Form 3 and a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Closure Plan. An explanation of the Part A Permit Application, Form 3 submitted with this document is provided at the beginning of the Part A Section. The closure plan consists of nine chapters and six appendices. The 300 Area Process Trenches received dangerous waste discharges from research and development laboratories in the 300 Area and from fuels fabrication processes. This waste consisted of state-only toxic (WT02), corrosive (D002), chromium (D007), spent halogenated solvents (F001, F002, and F003), and spent nonhalogented solvent (F005). Accurate records are unavailable concerning the amount of dangerous waste discharged to the trenches. The estimated annual quantity of waste (item IV.B) reflects the total quantity of both regulated and nonregulated waste water that was discharged to the unit.

Luke, S.N.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Position Measurements Obeying Momentum Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a hitherto unknown fundamental limitation to a basic measurement: that of the position of a quantum object when the total momentum of the object and apparatus is conserved. This result extends the famous Wigner-Araki-Yanase (WAY) theorem, and shows that accurate position measurements are only practically feasible if there is a large momentum uncertainty in the apparatus.

Paul Busch; Leon Loveridge

2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

Good lighting with energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

The publicity and economic impact of the oil embargo of 1973-74 has frequently caused over-reactive, indiscriminate reductions in lighting without eliminating many of the truly energy-wasteful aspects of lighting system usage. With current technology and a clear knowledge of the lighting requirements significant contributions to energy conservation can be achieved without unnecessarily sacrificing the benefits of good lighting.

Clark, G.W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Conservation Laws in Weak Interactions  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Notes are presented on four lectures given at Harvard University in March 1957 on elementary particle physics, the theta-tau problem, validity of parity conservation, tests for invariance under P, C, and T, and the two-component theory of the neutrino. (W.D.M.)

Lee, T. D.

1957-03-00T23:59:59.000Z

417

Flight Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing broader linguistic capability and cultural understanding iscritical to prevail in the long war and meet 21 st Century challenges. The Department must dramatically increase the number of personnel proficient in key languagesand make these languages available at all levels of action and decision from the strategic to the tactical. 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review, p. 78 Due to the nature of immediate and likely future challenges, our Joint forces require Airmen capable of influencing the outcomes of US, allied, and coalition operations anywhere in the world. While we, the Air Force, have made considerable initial progress toward building the necessary cross-cultural skills, we recognize the existing processes for obtaining this forceenhancing capability (appropriate culture, region, language and negotiation skills) are not currently mature or robust enough to optimally meet immediate expectations or near-future requirements. Therefore, it is imperative that we tailor our cultural, regional, and language competency development to maximize our efforts and meet Air Force and Joint requirements informed by National guidance. To this end, the Air Force Culture, Region, and Language (CRL) Flight Plan represents our framework for implementing relevant National Security and National Defense strategies via Air Force programs. The dynamic global environment has made Cross-Cultural Competence a critical and necessary capability for the Total Force. The Air Force CRL Flight Plan supports the

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Exotic atoms and leptonic conservations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major 1989 efforts have been on two aspects of experiments at TRIUMF. One effort was production of muonic hydrogen and muonic deuterium into a vacuum. We study rates relevant to muonic catalyzed fusion, and if there are found an adequate number of muons in the 2s state then we plan to measure precision energies. The second effort was to develop plans for kaonic atoms at the kaon factory. We also completed analyses from the experiments with pionic atoms at LAMPF.

Kunselman, R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project: 1990 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Umatilla habitat improvement program is funded under the Northwest Power Planning Council`s Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program measure 704 (d) (1) 34.02, and targets the improvement of water quality and the restoration of riparian areas, spawning and rearing habitat of steelhead, spring and fall chinook and coho salmon. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation are responsible for enhancing stream reaches within the Reservation boundaries as guided by an implementation plan developed cooperatively with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and the USDA Forest Service, Umatilla National Forest. Treatment areas included the lower 4 miles of Meacham Creek, the lower {1/4} mile of Boston Canyon Creek, and the Umatilla River between RM 78.5 and 80. The upper {1/2} of the Meacham Creek project area including Boston Canyon Creek, which were initially enhanced during 1989, were reentered for maintenance and continued enhancements. Approximately 2400 cu. yds. of boulders and 1000 cu. yds. of riprap was used in the construction of in-stream, stream bank and flood plain structures and in the anchoring of large organic debris (LOD) placements. In-stream structures were designed to increase instream cover and channel stability and develop of a defined thalweg to focus low summer flows. Flood plain structures were designed to reduce sediment inputs and facilitate deposition on flood plains. Riparian recovery was enhanced through the planting of over 1000 willow cuttings and 400 lbs. of grass seed mix and through the exclusion of livestock from the riparian corridor with 4.5 miles of high tensile smooth wire fence. Photo documentation and elevational transects were used to monitor changes in channel morphology and riparian recovery at permanent standardized points throughout the projects. Water quality (temperature and turbidity) data was collected at locations within the project area and in tributaries programmed for future enhancements.

Scheeler, Carl A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Underground storage tank management plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Underground Storage Tank (UST) Management Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant was established to locate UST systems in operation at the facility, to ensure that all operating UST systems are free of leaks, and to establish a program for the removal of unnecessary UST systems and upgrade of UST systems that continue to be needed. The program implements an integrated approach to the management of UST systems, with each system evaluated against the same requirements and regulations. A common approach is employed, in accordance with Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) regulations and guidance, when corrective action is mandated. This Management Plan outlines the compliance issues that must be addressed by the UST Management Program, reviews the current UST inventory and compliance approach, and presents the status and planned activities associated with each UST system. The UST Management Plan provides guidance for implementing TDEC regulations and guidelines for petroleum UST systems. (There are no underground radioactive waste UST systems located at Y-12.) The plan is divided into four major sections: (1) regulatory requirements, (2) implementation requirements, (3) Y-12 Plant UST Program inventory sites, and (4) UST waste management practices. These sections describe in detail the applicable regulatory drivers, the UST sites addressed under the Management Program, and the procedures and guidance used for compliance with applicable regulations.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z