Sample records for ha hydrokinetic axial

  1. Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

  2. Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ClimateECEnergyInvestigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural Health Monitoring Presented at GMREC METS Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil Structural...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hydrokinetic Sandia Funded to Model Power Pods for Utility-Scale Wave-Energy Converter On September 16, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  5. Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities.

  6. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University Consortium Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development University...

  7. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  8. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United...

  9. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmenta...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental Impacts on Fish August...

  10. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on...

  11. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at the Navy's Wave Energy Test Site (WETS) Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)...

  12. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  13. Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities.

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: marine hydrokinetic reference models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    marine hydrokinetic (MHK) reference models (RMs) for wave energy converters and tidal, ocean, and river current energy converters. The RMP team includes a partnership between...

  15. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  16. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  17. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

  18. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river...

  19. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    techenviroworkshop More Documents & Publications Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments Before the House Science and...

  20. Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

  1. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment and Mapping...

  2. Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

  3. Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

  4. Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Spain

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

  5. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies, Compiled Presentations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document represents a collection of all presentations given during the EERE Wind and Water Power Program's 2014 Marine and Hydrokinetic Peer Review. The purpose of the meeting was to evaluate DOE-funded hydropower and marine and hydrokinetic R&D projects for their contribution to the mission and goals of the Water Power Program and to assess progress made against stated objectives.

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez PuebloManteca,Marana,MariesWave) Jump to:Axial

  7. JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  8. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,ForkedAdd a Marine and Hydrokinetic

  9. Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketcham, Jerod W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

  10. Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnetEffective safety ...

  11. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Research and Development University Consortium

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 24, 2014 from 1:00 - 2:30 PM EDT, the Water Power Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Research and...

  12. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

  13. Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

  14. THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

  16. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 10, 6 March 2012 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    convert the kinetic energy of waves and water currents into power to generate electricity. Although of harnessing the natural power of water for renewable energy at a competitive cost and without harmingEos, Vol. 93, No. 10, 6 March 2012 Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy harvesting technologies

  17. Wave and Hydrokinetics Interest Group 1st Meeting of 2009/2010 Year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wave and Hydrokinetics Interest Group 1st Meeting of 2009/2010 Year: With a Focus on wave Energy, Inc. All rights reserved. Marine Wave Energy Interest Group · Bill Toman, PG&E WaveConnect Project Manager is Chairman · Agenda 8:30-9:00 USA Project Status: PG&E WaveConnect, OPT Reedsport and Coos Bay

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

  19. Live Webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test Site Funding Opportunity Announcement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On Wednesday, May 7, 2014 from 3:00 PM - 4:30 PM EDT the Water Power Program will hold an informational webinar on the Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Demonstrations at The Navy's Wave Energy Test...

  20. US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component)- The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    US Synthetic Corp (TRL 4 Component) - The Development of Open, Water Lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond Thrust Bearings for use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

  1. Evaluating Effects of Stressors from Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.; Brandt, Charles A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Gill, Gary A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Elster, Jennifer L.; Jones, Mark E.; Watson, Bruce E.; Jepsen, Richard A.; Metzinger, Kurt

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. During FY 2012, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) continued to follow project developments on the two marine and hydrokinetic projects reviewed for Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES) screening analysis in FY 2011: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. The ERES project in FY 2012 also examined two stressor–receptor interactions previously identified through the screening process as being of high importance: 1) the toxicity effects of antifouling coatings on MHK devices on aquatic resources and 2) the risk of a physical strike encounter between an adult killer whale and an OpenHydro turbine blade. The screening-level assessment of antifouling paints and coatings was conducted for two case studies: the Snohomish County Public Utility District No. 1 (SnoPUD) tidal turbine energy project in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, and the Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) wave buoy project in Reedsport, Oregon. Results suggest minimal risk to aquatic biota from antifouling coatings used on MHK devices deployed in large estuaries or open ocean environments. For the strike assessment of a Southern Resident Killer Whale (SRKW) encountering an OpenHydro tidal turbine blade, PNNL teamed with colleagues from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to carry out an analysis of the mechanics and biological consequences of different blade strike scenarios. Results of these analyses found the following: 1) a SRKW is not likely to experience significant tissue injury from impact by an OpenHydro turbine blade; and 2) if whale skin behaves similarly to the materials considered as surrogates for the upper dermal layers of whale skin, it would not be torn by an OpenHydro blade strike. The PNNL/SNL analyses could not provide insight into the potential for more subtle changes to SRKWs from an encounter with a turbine, such as changes in behavior, or inform turbine interactions for other whales or other turbines. These analyses were limited by the available time frame in which results were needed and focused on the mechanical response of whale tissues and bone to blade strike. PNNL proposes that analyses of additional turbine designs and interactions with other marine mammals that differ in size, body conformation, and mass be performed.

  2. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, B.P.; Becse, I.

    1988-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices. 1 fig.

  3. Measuring axial pump thrust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Suchoza, Bernard P. (McMurray, PA); Becse, Imre (Washington, PA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the hydraulic axial thrust of a pump under operation conditions is disclosed. The axial thrust is determined by forcing the rotating impeller off of an associated thrust bearing by use of an elongate rod extending coaxially with the pump shaft. The elongate rod contacts an impeller retainer bolt where a bearing is provided. Suitable measuring devices measure when the rod moves to force the impeller off of the associated thrust bearing and the axial force exerted on the rod at that time. The elongate rod is preferably provided in a housing with a heat dissipation mechanism whereby the hot fluid does not affect the measuring devices.

  4. Axial static mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandrock, H.E.

    1982-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Static axial mixing apparatus includes a plurality of channels, forming flow paths of different dimensions. The axial mixer includes a flow adjusting device for adjustable selective control of flow resistance of various flow paths in order to provide substantially identical flows through the various channels, thereby reducing nonuniform coating of interior surfaces of the channels. The flow adjusting device may include diaphragm valves, and may further include a pressure regulating system therefor.

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez PuebloManteca,Marana,MariesWave) Jump to:Axial Flow

  6. Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

  7. 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

  8. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower Conference, 10 June 2010, rev 1.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand RetrievalsFinalModule8.ppt MicrosoftDOE'sR.G.Hydrokinetic Projects

  10. International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

    2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

  11. Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.L. Rovey

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

  12. Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

  13. Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

  14. Effect of n-HA content on the isothermal crystallization, morphology and mechanical property of n-HA/PLGA composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liuyun, Jiang, E-mail: jlytxg@163.com [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chengdong, Xiong [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Lixin, Jiang [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China); Graduated School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Dongliang, Chen; Qing, Li [Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Effect of n-HA content on the isothermal crystallization, morphology and mechanical property of n-HA/PLGA composites was studied in details. The results showed that the addition of higher content of g-n-HA was favorable to promote the crystallization better in g-n-HA/PLGA composites, but it could also cause more agglomeration in PLGA matrix, as a result of worse mechanical properties, and the addition content of 3 wt% g-n-HA to PLGA matrix was an appropriate proportion, which had the highest bending strength among these g-n-HA/PLGA composites, and it might be potential to be used in biomedical fields in future. Highlights: ? The effect of n-HA content on the n-HA/PLGA composites was studied in detail. ? Isothermal crystallization, microstructure and mechanical property were studied. ? The relation between n-HA content and properties of n-HA/PLGA composite was found. ? An appropriate proportion of n-HA in n-HA/PLGA composite was obtained. - Abstract: A serials of g-n-HA/PLGA composites with surface-modified g-n-HA of 1%, 3%, 6%, 10% and 15% in weight were prepared by solution mixing. The isothermal crystallization, morphology and mechanical property of g-n-HA/PLGA composites were investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and electromechanical universal tester. The results showed that Avrami equation was suitable for describing the isothermal crystallization process in this system, and the crystallization rate of g-n-HA/PLGA composites containing more than 3 wt% g-n-HA was basically accord with the relational expression of T{sub 110} {sub °C} > T{sub 105°C} > T{sub 115°C} > T{sub 120°C}. Moreover, at the same Tc, crystallization rate was greatly enhanced with the increasing of g-n-HA acting as nucleate. However, the addition of higher content of g-n-HA would cause more agglomeration in PLGA matrix, so that the mechanical properties of g-n-HA/PLGA composites would gradually decrease. In conclusion, the addition of higher content of g-n-HA was favorable to promote the crystallization better in g-n-HA/PLGA composites, but it could also cause more agglomeration in PLGA matrix, result in worse mechanical properties, and the addition content of 3 wt% g-n-HA to PLGA matrix was an appropriate proportion, which had the highest bending strength among these g-n-HA/PLGA composites, and it might be potential to be used in biomedical fields in future.

  15. Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Zhang

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

  16. Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

  17. Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

  19. A note on axial symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Beetle; Shawn Wilder

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This note describes a local scheme to characterize and normalize an axial Killing field on a general Riemannian geometry. No global assumptions are necessary, such as that the orbits of the Killing field all have period $2 \\pi$. Rather, any Killing field that vanishes at at least one point necessarily has the expected global properties.

  20. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

  1. HA133F10SE1558 Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HA133F10SE1558 Final Report Trainable Video Analytic Software (HA133F10SE1558) October 20, 2010.4 Machine / Human Concepts 9 4.0 SeaUrchin Data 10 4.1 Halibut Detection Performance 12 4.1.1 Understanding) investigated the use of machine vision technology applied to electronic monitoring of the Rockfish fishery

  2. Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Possible global warming futures Minh Ha-Duong Minh.Ha.Duong@cmu.edu CNRS, France HDGC, Carnegie Mellon Possible global warming futures ­ p.1/36 #12;SRES: Forecasts or scenarios? +5.5 C in 2100 the controversy using imprecise probabilities, a more general information theory. . . Possible global warming

  3. DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADE–STRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

  4. Digital Documentation of the China Mongghul Ha Clan Oral History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mingzong, Ha

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will describe the author’s project documenting the Mongghul Ha clan oral history tradition in Qinghai and Gansu provinces, China, by focusing on the purposes, methods and approaches to documentation. Reactions and attitudes towards...

  5. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

  6. Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

  7. Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

  8. Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

  9. FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driscoll, F.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

  10. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

  11. Axial interaction free-electron laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, B.E.

    1997-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies. 5 figs.

  12. Computer Science at Kent Transformation in HaRe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    - strates the facilities HaRe provides for program transformation by implementing a deforestation to autonomously optimise a program. One of them is deforestation, a transformation that eliminates intermediate data structures. In this paper, we present a partial implementation of the warm fusion deforestation

  13. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walrath, David E. (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY); Burgess, Robert K. (Sheridan, WY); LaBelle, James (Murrieta, CA)

    2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  14. Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, David Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

  15. Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walrath, David E. (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY); Burgess, Robert K. (Sheridan, WY)

    2000-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane.

  16. Yozmot HaEmek Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch, NewYanceyYokayoYorktown Heights,Yozmot HaEmek

  17. Nucleon Axial Form Factor from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, K F; Draper, T; Wu, J M; Wilcox, W

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the isovector axial form factors of the proton from a lattice QCD calculation are presented for both point-split and local currents. They are obtained on a quenched $16^{3} \\times 24$ lattice at $\\beta= 6.0$ with Wilson fermions for a range of quark masses from strange to charm. We determine the finite lattice renormalization for both the local and point-split currents of heavy quarks. Results extrapolated to the chiral limit show that the $q^2$ dependence of the axial form factor agrees reasonably well with experiment. The axial coupling constant $g_A$ calculated for the local and the point-split currents is about 6\\% and 12\\% smaller than the experimental value respectively.

  18. Regulatory Assistance, Stakeholder Outreach, and Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning Activities in Support of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geerlofs, Simon H.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.; Blake, Kara M.; Hanna, Luke A.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2011 progress report summarizes activities carried out under DOE Water Power Task 2.1.7, Permitting and Planning. Activities under Task 2.1.7 address the concerns of a wide range of stakeholders with an interest in the development of the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry, including regulatory and resource management agencies, tribes, nongovernmental organizations, and industry. Objectives for Task 2.1.7 are the following: • to work with stakeholders to streamline the MHK regulatory permitting process • to work with stakeholders to gather information on needs and priorities for environmental assessment of MHK development • to communicate research findings and directions to the MHK industry and stakeholders • to engage in spatial planning processes in order to further the development of the MHK industry. These objectives are met through three subtasks, each of which is described in this report: • 2.1.7.1—Regulatory Assistance • 2.1.7.2—Stakeholder Outreach • 2.1.7.3—Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning. As MHK industry partners work with the regulatory community and stakeholders to plan, site, permit, and license MHK technologies, they have an interest in a predictable, efficient, and transparent process. Stakeholders and regulators have an interest in processes that result in sustainable use of ocean space with minimal effects to existing ocean users. Both stakeholders and regulators have an interest in avoiding legal challenges by meeting the intent of federal, state, and local laws that govern siting and operation of MHK technologies. The intention of work under Task 2.1.7 is to understand and work to address these varied interests, reduce conflict, identify efficiencies, and ultimately reduce the regulatory costs, time, and potential environmental impacts associated with developing, siting, permitting, and deploying MHK systems.

  19. Performance of An Axial Gas Ionization Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Adhikari; C. Basu; C. Samanta; S. S. Brahmachari; B. P. Das; P. Basu

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An axial gas ionization chamber has been fabricated for use as a $\\Delta E$ detector in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. Different operating parameters such as gas type, pressure, anode voltage and anode structures have been optimized. The transparency of the anode structure is observed to play an important role in improving the energy resolution of the detector.

  20. Co-axial, high energy gamma generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reijonen, Jani Petteri (Princeton, NJ); Gicquel, Frederic (Pennington, NJ)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma ray generator includes an ion source in a first chamber. A second chamber is configured co-axially around the first chamber at a lower second pressure. Co-axially arranged plasma apertures separate the two chambers and provide for restricted passage of ions and gas from the first to the second chamber. The second chamber is formed by a puller electrode having at least one long channel aperture to draw ions from the first chamber when the puller electrode is subject to an appropriate applied potential. A plurality of electrodes rings in the third chamber in third pressure co-axially surround the puller electrode and have at least one channel corresponding to the at least one puller electrode aperture and plasma aperture. The electrode rings increase the energy of the ions to a selected energy in stages in passing between successive pairs of the electrodes by application of an accelerating voltage to the successive pairs of accelerator electrodes. A target disposed co-axially around the plurality of electrodes receives the beam of accelerated ions, producing gamma rays.

  1. Description of Axial Detail for ROK Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trellue, Holly R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Galloway, Jack D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of NDA simulations of the ROK fuel assemblies, we have developed an axial burnup distribution to represent the pins themselves based on gamma scans of rods in the G23 assembly. For the purpose of modeling the G23 assembly (both at ORNL and LANL), the pin-by-pin burnup map as simulated by ROK is being assumed to represent the radial burnup distribution. However, both DA and NDA results indicate that this simulated estimate is not 100% correct. In particular, the burnup obtained from the axial gamma scan of 7 pins does not represent exactly the same 'average' pin burnup as the ROK simulation. Correction for this discrepancy is a goal of the well-characterized assembly task but will take time. For now, I have come up with a correlation for 26 axial points of the burnup as obtained by gamma scans of 7 different rods (C13, G01, G02, J11, K10, L02, and M04, neglecting K02 at this time) to the average burnup given by the simulation for each of the rods individually. The resulting fraction in each axial zone is then averaged for the 7 different rods so that it can represent every fuel pin in the assembly. The burnup in each of the 26 axial zones of rods in all ROK assemblies will then be directly adjusted using this fraction, which is given in Table 1. Note that the gamma scan data given by ROK for assembly G23 included a length of {approx}3686 mm, so the first 12 mm and the last 14 mm were ignored to give an actual rod length of {approx}366 cm. To represent assembly F02 in which no pin-by-pin burnup distribution is given by ROK, we must model it using infinitely-reflected geometry but can look at the effects of measuring in different axial zones by using intermediate burnup files (i.e. smaller burnups than 28 GWd/MTU) and determining which axial zone(s) each burnup represents. Details for assembly F02 are then given in Tables 2 and 3, which is given in Table 1 and has 44 total axial zones to represent the top meter in explicit detail in addition to the other 26 zones. Note that the MCNP files for F02 were created using the Monte Carlo burnup linkage code Monteburns, which saves MCNP input files with detailed compositions as a function of burnup. The 'intermediate burnup files' produced for F02 include a cooling time of 27 years. The axial location of 5 spacers was also included in the ROK F02 assembly in which each spacer contained a length of 3.81 cm. Note that due to the nature of Monteburns, which was run in a special fashion for this problem, the step number increments after the 27 year decay, so the second column of Table 2 refers to the step number that should be used in the Monteburns files.

  2. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  3. Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Field Examples of Axial Cracked Bearings in Wind Turbine Gearboxes Presented by Paul John Baker of FrontierPro Services at the Wind Turbine Tribology Seminar 2014. 141030 Axial...

  4. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

  5. Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

  6. The Molecular Gas Environment around Two Herbig Ae/Be Stars: Resolving the Outflows of LkHa 198 and LkHa 225S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenda C. Matthews; James R. Graham; Marshall D. Perrin; Paul Kalas

    2007-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of outflows associated with pre-main-sequence stars reveal details about morphology, binarity and evolutionary states of young stellar objects. We present molecular line data from the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association array and Five Colleges Radio Astronomical Observatory toward the regions containing the Herbig Ae/Be stars LkHa 198 and LkHa 225S. Single dish observations of 12CO 1-0, 13CO 1-0, N2H+ 1-0 and CS 2-1 were made over a field of 4.3' x 4.3' for each species. 12CO data from FCRAO were combined with high resolution BIMA array data to achieve a naturally-weighted synthesized beam of 6.75'' x 5.5'' toward LkHa 198 and 5.7'' x 3.95'' toward LkHa 225S, representing resolution improvements of factors of approximately 10 and 5 over existing data. By using uniform weighting, we achieved another factor of two improvement. The outflow around LkHa 198 resolves into at least four outflows, none of which are centered on LkHa 198-IR, but even at our resolution, we cannot exclude the possibility of an outflow associated with this source. In the LkHa 225S region, we find evidence for two outflows associated with LkHa 225S itself and a third outflow is likely driven by this source. Identification of the driving sources is still resolution-limited and is also complicated by the presence of three clouds along the line of sight toward the Cygnus molecular cloud. 13CO is present in the environments of both stars along with cold, dense gas as traced by CS and (in LkHa 225S) N2H+. No 2.6 mm continuum is detected in either region in relatively shallow maps compared to existing continuum observations.

  7. Study of casing treatment effects in axial flow compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schiller, Robert Neil

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to in- creased tip leakage between shroud and blade tip. Figure (I) shows a typical performance curve for an axial flow compressor. Note that as pressure ratio increases, the operating 'range between surge and stall is decreased, there by reducing... the surge to stall margin of the axial flow compressor. REFERENCES I 1 ~ 4 Koch, C. C. , "Experimental Evaluation of Outer Case Blowing or Bleeding of Single Stage Axial Flow Compressor". , Part IV. Rep. R 69AEG256, General Electric Co. , (NASA CR...

  8. SN 2008ha: AN EXTREMELY LOW LUMINOSITY AND EXCEPTIONALLY LOW ENERGY SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Ryan J.; Kirshner, Robert P.; Challis, Peter J.; Friedman, Andrew S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Modjaz, Maryam; Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Wood-Vasey, W. Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: rfoley@cfa.harvard.edu

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared photometry as well as optical spectra of the peculiar supernova (SN) 2008ha. SN 2008ha had a very low peak luminosity, reaching only M{sub V} = -14.2 mag, and low line velocities of only {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} near maximum brightness, indicating a very small kinetic energy per unit mass of ejecta. Spectroscopically, SN 2008ha is a member of the SN 2002cx-like class of SNe, a peculiar subclass of SNe Ia; however, SN 2008ha is the most extreme member, being significantly fainter and having lower line velocities than the typical member, which is already {approx}2 mag fainter and has line velocities {approx}5000 km s{sup -1} smaller (near maximum brightness) than a normal SN Ia. SN 2008ha had a remarkably short rise time of only {approx}10 days, significantly shorter than either SN 2002cx-like objects ({approx}15 days) or normal SNe Ia ({approx}19.5 days). The bolometric light curve of SN 2008ha indicates that SN 2008ha peaked at L {sub peak} = (9.5 {+-} 1.4) x 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, making SN 2008ha perhaps the least luminous SN ever observed. From its peak luminosity and rise time, we infer that SN 2008ha generated (3.0 {+-} 0.9) x 10{sup -3} M {sub sun} of {sup 56}Ni, had a kinetic energy of {approx}2 x 10{sup 48} erg, and ejected 0.15 M {sub sun} of material. The host galaxy of SN 2008ha has a luminosity, star formation rate, and metallicity similar to those of the Large magellanic Cloud. We classify three new (and one potential) members of the SN 2002cx-like class, expanding the sample to 14 (and one potential) members. The host-galaxy morphology distribution of the class is consistent with that of SNe Ia, Ib, Ic, and II. Several models for generating low-luminosity SNe can explain the observations of SN 2008ha; however, if a single model is to describe all SN 2002cx-like objects, deflagration of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs, with SN 2008ha being a partial deflagration and not unbinding the progenitor star, is preferred. The rate of SN 2008ha-like events is {approx}10% of the SN Ia rate, and in the upcoming era of transient surveys, several thousand similar objects may be discovered, suggesting that SN 2008ha may be the tip of a low-luminosity transient iceberg.

  9. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartmentShawn WangSioux Students2009 Siting

  10. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECSEnergy Plans andWorkerandPROGRAM C L

  11. A Transonic Axial Compressor Facility for Fundamental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Scott C.

    A Transonic Axial Compressor Facility for Fundamental Research and Flow Control Development Joshua, IN, 46556, USA A single-stage transonic axial compressor facility has been constructed in the the current generation of aero-gas turbine engines. The compressor stage and facility were designed

  12. The Shaft Torque of a Tandem Axial-Piston Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manring, Noah D.

    The Shaft Torque of a Tandem Axial- Piston Pump Noah D. Manring Viral S. Mehta Mechanical of this study is to identify the best indexed position of two rotating groups within a tandem axial-piston pump characteristics of the pump, other vibration aspects of the machine are also expected to be reduced. In particular

  13. VEE-0074- In the Matter of H.A. Mapes, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On May 30, 2000, H.A. Mapes, Inc., (Mapes) of Springvale, Maine, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its...

  14. axial blanket experiments: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ideas. We concentrate on the explanation and illustration of the key concept of bucket: its definition, formation and how it is used in generating the axial map. Keywords:...

  15. axial flux machine: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ideas. We concentrate on the explanation and illustration of the key concept of bucket: its definition, formation and how it is used in generating the axial map. Keywords:...

  16. axial turbine cascade: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and ideas. We concentrate on the explanation and illustration of the key concept of bucket: its definition, formation and how it is used in generating the axial map. Keywords:...

  17. Secondary air interaction with main flow in axial turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zlatinov, Metodi B. (Metodi Blagoev)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary air, known as purge air, is injected through seals in the hub and shroud of axial turbines to prevent hot gas ingestion into the endwall cavities. An investigation into the interaction of purge ow with turbine ...

  18. The axial behaviour of piled foundations in liquefiable soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringer, Mark

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the mechanisms by which any engineering structure resists load is an essential requirement for its consistent and reliable design. The axial resistance which can be mobilised by piled foundations in liquefiable soils when subjected...

  19. Applications of axial and radial compressor dynamic system modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spakovszky, Zoltán S. (Zoltán Sándor), 1972-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presented work is a compilation of four different projects related to axial and centrifugal compression systems. The projects are related by the underlying dynamic system modeling approach that is common in all of them. ...

  20. axial flow pump: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences Websites Summary: of a configuration that includes an axial pump and a bundle of tubes that mimics the cool source of a heat exchangerEXPERIMENTAL AND...

  1. Optimization of the axial power shape in pressurized water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melik, M. A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical and numerical methods have been applied to find the optimum axial power profile in a PWR with respect to uranium utilization. The preferred shape was found to have a large central region of uniform power density, ...

  2. Axial clad strain behavior of sphere-pac fuel pins 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, James Kelly

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    quantitative di f f er ences exist. 17 CHAPTER III STEADY STATE MODELING Introduction This section descr ibes the analytic model developed to predict the axial shear load bearing capacity of a packed particle bed. The goal of this model development... par ticle beds. 36 CHAPTER IV VIBRATIONAL EXPERIMENTS Introduction The model developed in the previous chapter provides a method to predict the axial shear load bearing capacity of a packed particle bed under negligible vibr ation conditions...

  3. A wave refraction analysis for an axially symmetrical island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forst, Ronald John

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE l966 Major Subject Oceanography A WAVE REFRACTION ANALYSIS FOR AN AXIALLY SYMMETRICAL ISLAND A Thesis By LIEUTENANT RONALD J FORST UNITED STATES NAVY Approved as to style and content by; ( airma Committee) Head of Dep rtme t...

  4. Design of high temperature high speed electromagnetic axial thrust bearing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad Waqar

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH SPEED ELECTROMAGNETIC AXIAL THRUST BEARING A Thesis by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN OF HIGH TEMPERATURE HIGH SPEED ELECTROMAGNETIC AXIAL THRUST BEARING A Thesis by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  5. Superfluid Phase Stability of 3 He in Axially Anisotropic Aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Pollanen; J. P. Davis; B. Reddy; K. R. Shirer; H. Choi

    Abstract. Measurements of superfluid 3 He in 98 % aerogel demonstrate the existence of a metastable A-like phase and a stable B-like phase. It has been suggested that the relative stability of these two phases is controlled by anisotropic quasiparticle scattering in the aerogel. Anisotropic scattering produced by axial compression of the aerogel has been predicted to stabilize the axial state of superfluid 3 He. To explore this possiblity, we used transverse acoustic impedance to map out the phase diagram of superfluid 3 He in a ? 98 % porous silica aerogel subjected to 17 % axial compression. We have previously shown that axial anisotropy in aerogel leads to optical birefringence and that optical cross-polarization studies can be used to characterize such anisotropy. Consequently, we have performed optical cross-polarization experiments to verify the presence and uniformity of the axial anisotropy in our aerogel sample. We find that uniform axial anisotropy introduced by 17 % compression does not stabilize the A-like phase. We also find an increase in the supercooling of the A-like phase at lower pressure, indicating a modification to B-like phase nucleation in globally anisotropic aerogels. 1.

  6. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

  7. Impact of axial diffusion on nitric oxide exchange in the lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    Impact of axial diffusion on nitric oxide exchange in the lungs HYE-WON SHIN1 AND STEVEN C. GEORGE1, Hye-Won, and Steven C. George. Impact of axial diffusion on nitric oxide exchange in the lungs. J Appl of the lungs, but neglects axial diffusion. We incorporated axial diffusion into a one-dimensional trumpet

  8. Van der Vorst, H.A. Computational Science Curriculum in Utrecht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vorst, Henk A.

    Van der Vorst, H.A. Computational Science Curriculum in Utrecht Abstract In 1993 Utrecht University of about 18 years old. 2. The Circumstances in Utrecht The main departments that are involved in Computational Science at Utrecht University are: ffl Department of Mathematics, with chairs in Algebra, Analysis

  9. BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BIDIMENSIONAL SAND PILE AND ICE PILE MODELS ENRICA DUCHI, ROBERTO MANTACI, HA DUONG PHAN, DOMINIQUE ROSSIN Abstract. In this paper we define an extension of the Sand Pile Model SPM and more generally of the Ice Pile Model IPM by adding a further dimension to the system. By drawing a parallel between

  10. Premio Perini Navi S.p.A. IL COMITATO LEONARDO ITALIAN QUALIT COMMITTE HA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    1 Premio Perini Navi S.p.A. IL COMITATO LEONARDO ­ ITALIAN QUALITÀ COMMITTE ­ HA DELIBERATO DI DELEGATO DI PERINI NAVI SPA. - ANNO 2011 - "Progetto di un natante ad uso tender per un'imbarcazione a vela dalla direzione della Perini Navi S.p.A. FINALITÀ: Premiare i due migliori progetti relativi ad un

  11. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria Chung-ha O. Davisa,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria Chung-ha O. Davisa,b , Keun-Young Kimc , Eric A (received for review March 12, 2014) It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adja- cent astrocytes. EM

  12. Fabrication and mechanical properties of PLA/HA composites: A study of in vitro degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    Fabrication and mechanical properties of PLA/HA composites: A study of in vitro degradation J perspective, the in vitro degradation behavior of such composites manufactured using a simple hot due to the degradation of the polymer phase. The degradation is more pronounced in samples with larger

  13. Light Collages: Lighting Design for Effective Visualization Chang Ha Lee Xuejun Hao Amitabh Varshney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varshney, Amitabh

    Light Collages: Lighting Design for Effective Visualization Chang Ha Lee Xuejun Hao Amitabh 20742 {chlee, hao, varshney}@cs.umd.edu ABSTRACT We introduce Light Collages ­ a lighting design system perception of features with lighting that is locally consistent and globally inconsistent. Inspired

  14. Abstract--Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenyon, Robert V.

    , exponential advances in miniaturization, and computing has laid the ground for transforming high tech gadgets]. More recently, his Singularity "movement" has been trending toward life extension through advances of human intelligence through computing is one of its core interests. However HA distinguishes itself from

  15. Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  16. Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xu-Guang

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

  17. An investigation of axial-flow compressor blade treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sangerhausen, Charles Roger

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of axial-flow compressor [5] . According to Schlicting [1], the basic methods of controlling the boundary layer on a body are (1) relative motion of the body surface w1th the flow, (2) acceleration of the boundary layer by blowing, (3) suction, (0) in...c methods. The literature survey revealed that three d1fferent techn1ques of boundary layer oontrol have been investigated for applicat1on to axial- flow compressor bladingi these are (1) the slotted blade, (2) the blade shape designed for a...

  18. The influence of silanisation on the mechanical and degradation behaviour of PLGA/HA composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naik, Ashutosh; Best, Serena M.; Cameron, Ruth E.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanical properties. Abbreviations: HA, Hydroxyapatite; MPTMS, Mercaptopropyl trimethoxy silane; APTMS, Aminopropyl trimethoxy silane; APTES, Aminopropyl triethoxy silane; PBS, Phosphate buffered saline; ICP-AES, Inductively coupled plasma... ) were mixed in a Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) container with acetone as solvent for 1 hour using an overhead magnetic stirrer. The mix was then allowed to stand for a further hour before drying in a vacuum oven at 40°C overnight. 2...

  19. Neutrino Physics and Nuclear Axial Two-Body Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Balantekin; H. Yuksel

    2004-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the counter-term describing isoscalar axial two-body currents in the nucleon-nucleon interaction, L1A, in the effective field theory approach. We determine this quantity using the solar neutrino data. We investigate the variation of L1A when different sets of data are used.

  20. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

  1. Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

    1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

  2. Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

  3. Collective quantization of axially symmetric gravitating B=2 skyrmion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hisayuki Sato; Nobuyuki Sawado; Noriko Shiiki

    2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we perform collective quantization of an axially symmetric skyrmion with baryon number two.The rotational and isorotational modes are quantized to obtain the static properties of a deuteron and other dibaryonic objects such as masses, charge densities, magnetic moments. We discuss how the gravity affects to those observables.

  4. Small core axial compressors for high efficiency jet aircraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiOrio, Austin Graf

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis quantifies mechanisms that limit efficiency in small core axial compressors, defined here as compressor exit corrected flow between 1.5 and 3.0 lbm/s. The first part of the thesis describes why a small engine ...

  5. The deep structure of Axial Volcano Michael West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Michael

    the competing roles or ocean ridge and hot spot at Axial Volcano Provide a template on which long-term studies;Airgun survey April '99 20 gun array 8670 in3 volume 8 days #12;Airgun survey, April '99 5000+ shots 1225

  6. Operational benefits of relaxed axial power distribution control limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitlan, M.S. Jr.; Miller, R.W.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Constant axial offset control (CAOC) was developed in the early 1970s in response to lower loss-of-coolant accident-based peaking factor limits. Th CAOC requires control of the axial power distribution within a specified band, typically +/- 5% or +3, -12% axial flux difference (AFD), about a measured target value of AFD. Operational outside of the CAOC limits results in the accumulation of penalty time. One hour of penalty time in any 24-h period is permitted. Although CAOC is sufficient to ensure peaking factor limits are satisfied, operation outside of CAOC limits is beneficial under certain conditions. Allowing a relaxation in CAOC restrictions can be used both to enhance the load follow capability of the plant by allowing control strategies that minimize the boron system duty or increase the return to power capability and to greatly increase the ability to return to power after a plant trip or shutdown. To achieve these benefits, relaxed axial offset control (RAOC) was developed. Other benefits of RAOC include a simplified technical specification and the ability to perform in-core/ex-core calibrations at higher powers. Duke Power Company has benefited in many of these ways by changing from CAOC power distribution limits to RAOC power distribution limits at the McGuire Nuclear Station. One of the chief benefits has been the ability to achieve full power much more quickly following shutdowns of short duration and reactor trips during the last half of the cycle lifetime.

  7. ELECTROMECHANICAL RELIABILITY TESTING OF THREE-AXIAL SILICON FORCE SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , available automatic test equipment for integrated circuits (ICs) can be leveraged [2]. The reliabilityELECTROMECHANICAL RELIABILITY TESTING OF THREE-AXIAL SILICON FORCE SENSORS S. Spinner1,2, J the measurement results. 1. INTRODUCTION The reliability of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) receives growing

  8. axial fuel optimization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    axial fuel optimization First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Trajectory optimization for...

  9. Molecular-Level Study of the Effect of Prior Axial Compression/Torsion on the Axial-Tensile Strength

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    that prior axial torsion can induce major changes in the material microstructure, causing significant, such as bullets, detonated-mine-induced soil ejecta, improvised explosive devices (IEDs), shell or turbine frag of high-fidelity material-constitutive models capa- ble of describing the behavior of fibers

  10. Modeling of FRP-jacketed RC columns subject to combined axial and lateral loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chung-Sheng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LOCATIONS #6 u-bars @ 4" 3" PVC for axial load and verticalsteel Steel jacket encasing load stub 2" PVC for clevisattatch 3" PVC for axial load A B Vertical tiedown Column

  11. European Fusion Theory Conference Non-local features of transport in the axial tokamak region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9th European Fusion Theory Conference Non-local features of transport in the axial tokamak region J effects in the axial region of an axi- symmetric tokamak equilibrium. The starting point is the guiding

  12. Effect of circumferential groove casing treatment parameters on axial compressor flow range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanley, Brian K. (Brian Kyle)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact on compressor flow range of circumferential casing grooves of varying groove depth, groove axial location, and groove axial extent is assessed against that of a smooth casing wall using computational experiments. ...

  13. A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    A Comparative Study of Modular Axial Flux Podded Generators for Marine Current Turbines Sofiane turbines (MCTs). Due to the submarine environment, maintenance operations are very hard, very costly current turbine, axial flux permanent magnet generator, design, optimization. Nomenclature MCT = Marine

  14. HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? . -. .- *'TH Ii ' HA'

  15. Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano with cosmic ray muon radiography"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aoki, Yosuke

    Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano with cosmic ray.1029/2011JB008256. [1] In the paper "Threedimensional computational axial tomography scan of a volcano. Aoki, R. Nishiyama, D. Shoji, and H. Tsuiji (2011), Correction to "Threedimensional computational axial

  16. AXIAL-FIELD SYNCHRONOUS MACHINE WITH HOMOPOLAR FLUX IN THE AIRGAP FOR A FLYWHEEL ACCUMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AXIAL-FIELD SYNCHRONOUS MACHINE WITH HOMOPOLAR FLUX IN THE AIRGAP FOR A FLYWHEEL ACCUMULATOR@bretagne.ens-cachan.fr Abstract: A new axial-field synchronous machine designed for a flywheel accumulator is presented herein with experimental results. Keywords: flywheel accumulator, axial-field synchronous machine, double-face printed

  17. Fondamenti di Finanza Matematica La Finanza Matematica ha lo scopo di studiare la corretta formalizzazione ed i calcoli legati

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vargiolu, Tiziano

    Capitolo 7 Fondamenti di Finanza Matematica La Finanza Matematica ha lo scopo di studiare la sono i due capisaldi su cui si basa la Finanza Matematica. Ogni modello, deterministico o stocastico'ammontare del costo del postulato (2) 'e chiamato interesse, ed 'e una funzione dell'importo che si ha

  18. Changes in the fish species composition of all Austrian lakes >50 ha during the last 150 years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filzmoser, Peter

    Changes in the fish species composition of all Austrian lakes >50 ha during the last 150 years D for Limnology, Mondsee, Austria Abstract The fish communities of all Austrian natural lakes (n ¼ 43) larger than 50 ha in surface area were assessed and the historical fish communities in c. 1850 were reconstructed

  19. Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bland, Robert J. (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

  20. Axial SiGe Heteronanowire Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Son T.; Jannaty, P.; Luo, Xu; Zaslavsky, A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Picraux, Samuel T.

    2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present silicon-compatible tri-gated p-Ge/i-Si/n-Si axial heteronanowire tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs), where on-state tunneling occurs in the Ge drain section, while off-state leakage is dominated by the Si junction in the source. Our TFETs have high ION ~ 2 µA/µm, fully suppressed ambipolarity, and a sub-threshold slope SS ~ 140 mV/decade over 4 decades of current with lowest SS ~ 50 mV/decade. Device operation in the tunneling mode is confirmed by three-dimensional TCAD simulation. Interestingly, in addition to the TFET mode, our devices work as standard nanowire FETs with good ION/IOFF ratio when the source-drain junction is forward-biased. The improved transport in both biasing modes confirms the benefits of utilizing bandgap engineered axial nanowires for enhancing device performance.

  1. Numerical analysis of a microwave torch with axial gas injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritsinin, S. I.; Davydov, A. M.; Kossyi, I. A., E-mail: kossyi@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation); Kulumbaev, E. B. [National Research University Belgorod State University (Russian Federation)] [National Research University Belgorod State University (Russian Federation); Lelevkin, V. M. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)] [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of a microwave discharge in an argon jet injected axially into a coaxial channel with a shortened inner electrode are numerically analyzed using a self-consistent equilibrium gas-dynamic model. The specific features of the excitation and maintenance of the microwave discharge are determined, and the dependences of the discharge characteristics on the supplied electromagnetic power and gas flow rate are obtained. The calculated results are compared with experimental data.

  2. Measurement of axial injection displacement with trim coil current unbalance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covo, Michel Kireeff, E-mail: mkireeffcovo@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dee probe used for measuring internal radial beam intensity shows large losses inside the radius of 20 cm of the 88 in. cyclotron. The current of the top and bottom innermost trim coil 1 is unbalanced to study effects of the axial injection displacement. A beam profile monitor images the ion beam bunches, turn by turn. The experimental bunch center of mass position is compared with calculations of the magnetic mirror effect displacement and shows good agreement.

  3. Coral Extension Rate Analysis Using Computed Axial Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yudelman, Eleanor Ann

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    CORAL EXTENSION RATE ANALYSIS USING COMPUTED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY A Thesis by ELEANOR ANN YUDELMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Niall Slowey Committee Members, Deborah Thomas Benjamin Giese George P. Schmahl Head of Department, Deborah Thomas May 2014 Major Subject: Oceanography Copyright 2014 Eleanor Ann Yudelman ii ABSTRACT...

  4. Enhanced betatron X-rays from axially modulated plasma wakefields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palastro, J P; Gordon, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the cavitation regime of plasma-based accelerators, a population of high-energy electrons tailing the driver can undergo betatron motion. The motion results in X-ray emission, but the brilliance and photon energy are limited by the electrons' initial transverse coordinate. To overcome this, we exploit parametrically unstable betatron motion in a cavitated, axially modulated plasma. Theory and simulations are presented showing that the unstable oscillations increase both the total X-ray energy and average photon energy.

  5. Nuclear reactor control rod with uniformly changeable axial worth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.R.

    1987-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a fuel assembly having at least one hollow guide thimble, means to compensate for a reduction in reactivity occurring generally uniformly in a transverse direction and symmetric in the axial direction is described, comprising: (a) a control rod inserted in the guide thimble including (i) an elongated inner cylindrical member having a lower end, (ii) an elongated outer cylindrical member surrounding the inner member and having a lower end with concentrically-arranged lower inner and outer edge portions defined thereon, (iii) each of the members being composed of alternating poison and nonpoison regions, (iv) the inner member being axially movable relative to the outer member, (v) an outwardly projecting ledge adapted to support in a rest relationship the lower end of the outer member; and (b) means for retaining the outer member in a stationary position in the guide thimble while the inner member is movable axially relative thereto to adjust the degree to which the poison regions of the members overlap with the nonpoison regions and thereby change the overall worth of the rod. (c) The retaining means are in a lower portion of the guide thimble and sized to support the lower end of the outer member at its lower outer edge portion. The retaining means have a central hole sized to allow passage of the lower end and ledge of the inner member therethrough.

  6. Axial-vector coupling constants and chiral-symmetry restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, E.M. (Department of Physics FM-15 and Institute for Nuclear Theory HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Hwang, W.P. (Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan 10764 (Taiwan, Province of China)); Kisslinger, L.S. (Department of Physics, Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The isovector axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}} is determined by using the method of QCD sum rules. A sum rule for ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1) is obtained, and it is shown that, with standard values of the quark condensates, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}=1.26{plus minus}0.08. It is also shown that the isovector axial-vector coupling ({ital g}{sub {ital A}}{minus}1)=0 in the limit in which chiral symmetry is restored, and the quark condensate vanishes. A sum rule is also obtained for the isoscalar'' axial-vector coupling constant {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}, which is found to be 0.13 if the isovector values of susceptibilities are used. On the other hand, {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}0.68 if the quark condensate is set to zero while {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}}={minus}1.00 if both the quark and gluon condensates vanish in the event of chiral-symmetry restoration. The values of {ital g}{sub {ital A}} and {ital g}{sub {ital A}}{sup {ital S}} allow us to deduce {Delta}{ital u} and {Delta}{ital d} in the proton.

  7. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

  8. Hydrokinetic Laboratory | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms |

  9. Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

  10. Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dayeh, Shadi A. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Gin, Aaron V.; Huang, Jian Yu; Picraux, Samuel Thomas (Los Alamos National Laboratory)

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Axial Ge/Si heterostructure nanowires (NWs) allow energy band-edge engineering along the axis of the NW, which is the charge transport direction, and the realization of asymmetric devices for novel device architectures. This work reports on two significant advances in the area of heterostructure NWs and tunnel FETs: (i) the realization of 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial heterostructure NWs with lengths suitable for device fabrication and (ii) the design and implementation of Schottky barrier tunnel FETs on these NWs for high-on currents and suppressed ambipolar behavior. Initial prototype devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a very high current drive in excess of 100 {micro}A/{micro}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios. Prior work on the synthesis of Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures through the VLS mechanism have resulted in axial Si/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} NW heterostructures with x{sub max} {approx} 0.3, and more recently 100% composition modulation was achieved with a solid growth catalyst. In this latter case, the thickness of the heterostructure cannot exceed few atomic layers due to the slow axial growth rate and concurrent radial deposition on the NW sidewalls leading to a mixture of axial and radial deposition, which imposes a big challenge for fabricating useful devices form these NWs in the near future. Here, we report the VLS growth of 100% doping and composition modulated axial Ge/Si heterostructure NWs with lengths appropriate for device fabrication by devising a growth procedure that eliminates Au diffusion on the NW sidewalls and minimizes random kinking in the heterostructure NWs as deduced from detailed microscopy analysis. Fig. 1 a shows a cross-sectional SEM image of epitaxial Ge/Si axial NW heterostructures grown on a Ge(111) surface. The interface abruptness in these Ge/Si heterostructure NWs is of the order of the NW diameter. Some of these NWs develop a crystallographic kink that is {approx}20{sup o} off the <111> axis at about 300 nm away from the Ge/Si interface. This provides a natural marker for placing the gate contact electrodes and gate metal at appropriate location for desired high-on current and reduced ambipolarity as shown in Fig. 2. The 1D heterostructures allow band-edge engineering in the transport direction, not easily accessible in planar devices, providing an additional degree of freedom for designing tunnel FETs (TFETs). For instance, a Ge tunnel source can be used for efficient electron/hole tunneling and a Si drain can be used for reduced back-tunneling and ambipolar behavior. Interface abruptness on the other hand (particularly for doping) imposes challenges in these structures and others for realizing high performance TFETs in p-i-n junctions. Since the metal-semiconductor contacts provide a sharp interface with band-edge control, we use properly designed Schottky contacts (aided by 3D Silvaco simulations) as the tunnel barriers both at the source and drain and utilize the asymmetry in the Ge/Si channel bandgap to reduce ambipolar transport behavior generally observed in TFETs. Fig. 3 shows the room-temperature transfer curves of a Ge/Si heterostructure TFET (H-TFET) for different V{sub DS} values showing a maximum on-current of {approx}7 {micro}A, {approx}170 mV/decade inverse subthreshold slope and 5 orders of magnitude I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios for all V{sub DS} biases considered here. This high on-current value is {approx}1750 X higher than that obtained with Si p-i-n{sup +} NW TFETs and {approx}35 X higher than that obtained with CNT TFET. The I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratio and inverse subthreshold slope compare favorably to that of Si {approx} 10{sup 3} I{sub on}/I{sub off} and {approx} 800 mV/decade SS{sup -1} but lags behind those of CNT TFET due to poor PECVD nitride gate oxide quality ({var_epsilon}{sub r} {approx} 3-4). The asymmetry in the Schottky barrier heights used here eliminates the stringent requirements of abrupt doped interfaces used in p-i-n based TFETs, which is hard to achieve both in thin-film and

  11. Electrostatic waves in carbon nanotubes with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdikian, Alireza [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Malayer University, Malayer 65719-95863 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bagheri, Mehran [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Laser and Plasma Research Institute, Shahid Beheshti University, G. C., Evin, Tehran 19835-63113 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on a linearized hydrodynamic model and within the quasi-static approximation, the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating through single-walled carbon nanotubes subject to an axial magnetic field is theoretically explored. In the classical limit, we obtain two main possible waves which in turn are divided into two branches, a low-frequency acoustical and a high-frequency optical plasmon branch. In the quantum case, we have found that the dispersion relation is substantially modified when the electron wavelength becomes large enough compared to the propagation wavelength of the electrostatic waves in the quantum plasma. We also show that the axial magnetic field manifest itself on the perturbed electron density through the quantum term and gives rise to the propagation of the electrostatic waves within the quantum plasma. As a result, the effect of the magnetic field is pronounced in the plasma dispersion relations in such a way that their curves approach to zero when the magnetic field is weak; and for the strong magnetic field, they asymptotically meet the constant lines.

  12. Competition between modes with different axial structures in gyrotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khutoryan, Eduard M. [O. Ya. Usikov Institute for Radiophysics and Electronics, 12, Proskura str., Kharkiv 61085 (Ukraine); Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Sinitsyn, Oleksandr V. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-3511 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was motivated by some experiments in which it was found that during the voltage rise, instead of expected excitation of a high-frequency parasitic mode, the excitation of a lower-frequency parasitic mode takes place in a certain range of voltages. For explaining this fact, the dependence of start currents of possible competing modes on the beam voltage was carried out in the cold-cavity approximation and by using the self-consistent approach. It was found that in the case of cavities, which consist of the combination of a section of constant radius waveguide and a slightly uptapered waveguide, these two approaches yield completely different results. Thus, experimentally observed excitation of the low-frequency parasitic mode can be explained by the self-consistent modification of the axial profile of the excited field, which has strong influence on the diffractive quality factor of competing modes. This modification is especially pronounced in the case of excitation of modes with many axial variations which can be excited in the region of beam interaction with the backward-wave component of such modes.

  13. Maintenance and elimination of long-term axial progenitors in mouse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wymeersch, Filip Jos

    2012-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Elongation of the vertebrate rostrocaudal axis depends on localised populations of axial progenitors. Previous work has demonstrated the presence of Neuromesodermal (NM) progenitors that behave a ...

  14. The $N-?$ Weak Axial-Vector Amplitude $C_{5}^a(0)$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milton Dean Slaughter

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The weak $N-\\Delta$ axial-vector transition amplitude $$ - important in $N^{*}$ production processes in general and in isobar models describing $\

  15. Nuclear reactor control rod with uniformly changeable axial worth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.R.

    1989-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A control rod is described for use in a nuclear reactor core to provide xenon compensation, comprising: (a) an elongated inner cylindrical member having a lower end; and (b) an elongated outer cylindrical member surrounding the inner member and having a lower end with concentrically-arranged inner and outer edge portions defined thereon; (c) each of the members being composed of alternating poison and nonpoison regions; (d) the inner member being axially movable relative to the outer member to adjust the degree to which the poison regions of the members overlap with the nonpoison regions thereof and thereby change the overall worth of the rod; and (e) the lower end of the inner member having defined thereon a radially outwardly projecting ledge for supporting in a rest relationship thereon the lower end of the outer member at only its inner edge portion for retaining the outer member about the inner member.

  16. Feedback control of inertial microfluidics using axial control forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prohm, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial microfluidics is a promising tool for many lab-on-a-chip applications. Particles in channel flows with Reynolds numbers above one undergo cross-streamline migration to a discrete set of equilibrium positions in square and rectangular channel cross sections. This effect has been used extensively for particle sorting and the analysis of particle properties. Using the lattice Boltzmann method, we determine equilibrium positions in square and rectangular cross sections and classify their types of stability for different Reynolds numbers, particle sizes, and channel aspect ratios. Our findings thereby help to design microfluidic channels for particle sorting. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an axial control force, which slows down the particles, shifts the stable equilibrium position towards the channel center. Ultimately, the particles then stay on the centerline for forces exceeding a threshold value. This effect is sensitive to particle size and channel Reynolds number and therefore suggests an efficie...

  17. Nucleon axial form factors from two-flavour Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. M. Junnarkar; S. Capitani; D. Djukanovic; G. von Hippel; J. Hua; B. Jäger; H. B. Meyer; T. D. Rae; H. Wittig

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present preliminary results on the axial form factor $G_A(Q^2)$ and the induced pseudoscalar form factor $G_P(Q^2)$ of the nucleon. A systematic analysis of the excited-state contributions to form factors is performed on the CLS ensemble `N6' with $m_\\pi = 340 \\ \\text{MeV}$ and lattice spacing $a \\sim 0.05 \\ \\text{fm}$. The relevant three-point functions were computed with source-sink separations ranging from $t_s \\sim 0.6 \\ \\text{fm}$ to $t_s \\sim \\ 1.4 \\ \\text{fm}$. We observe that the form factors suffer from non-trivial excited-state contributions at the source-sink separations available to us. It is noted that naive plateau fits underestimate the excited-state contributions and that the method of summed operator insertions correctly accounts for these effects.

  18. TGF-?/HA complex promotes tympanic membrane keratinocyte migration and proliferation via ErbB1 receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei Teh, Bing, E-mail: bing.teh@earscience.org.au [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Redmond, Sharon L. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Shen, Yi [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck, Ningbo Lihuili Hospital (Ningbo Medical Centre), Ningbo, Zhejiang (China); Atlas, Marcus D. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia); Department of Otolaryngology, Head, Neck and Skull Base Surgery, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Marano, Robert J.; Dilley, Rodney J. [Ear Sciences Centre, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands, WA (Australia); Ear Science Institute Australia, Subiaco, WA (Australia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tympanic membrane perforations are common and represent a management challenge to clinicians. Current treatments for chronic perforations involve a graft surgery and require general anaesthesia, including associated costs and morbidities. Bioactive molecules (e.g. growth factors, cytokines) play an important role in promoting TM wound healing following perforation and the use of growth factors as a topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations has been suggested as an alternative to surgery. However, the choice of bioactive molecules best suited to promote wound healing has yet to be identified. We investigated the effects of hyaluronic acid, vitronectin, TGF-?, IL-24 and their combinations on migration, proliferation and adhesion of cultured human tympanic membrane-derived keratinocytes (hTM), in addition to their possible mechanisms of action. We found that TGF-?, TGF-?/HA and TGF-?/IL-24 promoted wound healing by significantly increasing both migration and proliferation. TGF-? and/or HA treated cells showed comparable cell–cell adhesion whilst maintaining an epithelial cell phenotype. With the use of receptor binding inhibitors for ErbB1 (AG1478) and CD44 (BRIC235), we revealed that the activation of ErbB1 is required for TGF-?/HA-mediated migration and proliferation. These results suggest factors that may be incorporated into a tissue-engineered membrane or directly as topical treatment for tympanic membrane perforations and hence reduce the need for a surgery. - Highlights: ? TGF-?, TGF-?/HA and TGF-?/IL-24 improved hTM keratinocyte migration and proliferation. ? TGF-? and/or HA maintained epithelial cell phenotype. ? TGF-?/HA-mediated migration and proliferation requires activation of ErbB1 receptor.

  19. A Moore-Greitzer axial compressor model with spool Jan Tommy Gravdahl and Olav Egeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    A Moore-Greitzer axial compressor model with spool dynamics. Jan Tommy Gravdahl and Olav Egeland, N-7034 Trondheim, Norway Email: fTommy.Gravdahl,Olav.Egelandg@itk.ntnu.no Abstract The compressor-parameter on the post stall transients of an axial compressor is demonstrated through simulations of a compression

  20. On the linear stability of the extreme Kerr black hole under axially symmetric perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio Dain; Ivan Gentile de Austria

    2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that for axially symmetric linear gravitational perturbations of the extreme Kerr black hole there exists a positive definite and conserved energy. This provides a basic criteria for linear stability in axial symmetry. In the particular case of Minkowski, using this energy we also prove pointwise boundedness of the perturbation in a remarkable simple way.

  1. Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    processes such as two-phase catalytic monolith reactors,3­6 polymer blow molding, enhanced oil recovery,7 is periodically broken in the serpentine channel leading to enhanced axial dispersion. It is also found channel geometries. In addition to the enhanced mix- ing, the segmentation also reduces the axial

  2. 1 Mayne & Schneider EVALUATING AXIAL DRILLED SHAFT RESPONSE BY SEISMIC CONE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    1 Mayne & Schneider EVALUATING AXIAL DRILLED SHAFT RESPONSE BY SEISMIC CONE Paul W. Mayne1 , M using the results of seismic piezocone penetration tests (SCPTU) to provide continuous profiles of small to discuss the use of seismic piezocone testing for the evaluation of both axial capacity (obtained from

  3. Tuning linear and nonlinear optical properties of wurtzite GaN by c-axial stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Duanjun; 10.1088/0022-3727/42/18/185107

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the linear and nonlinear optical properties of wurtzite GaN under c-axial stress field, using density functional theory calculations. The fully structural optimization at each c-axial strain was performed. The calculated dielectric functions show that tensile c-axial strain effectively improves the linear optical efficiency, especially for the band-edge transitions, and significantly increase the mobility of electrons in the conduction band. Second-order nonlinear optical susceptibilities show that the tensile c-axial strain will enhance the zero- and low-frequency nonlinear responses of GaN. The enhancement of the nonlinear optical property is explained by the reduction of the polarization of wurtzite GaN under tensile c-axial strains. Based on these findings, we propose a method for improving the electrical and optical properties of the crystal through imposing appropriate stress on the high symmetry crystalline directions.

  4. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Tehran 16844 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  5. Carbon storage: the economic efficiency of storing CO2 in leaky reservoirs Minh Ha-Duong, David W. Keith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Carbon storage: the economic efficiency of storing CO2 in leaky reservoirs Minh Ha-Duong, David W carbon underground), we derive analytic expressions for the value of leaky CO2 storage compared to perfect storage when storage is a marginal component of the energy system. If the annual leak rate is 1

  6. TERMODIN`AMICA Estudi dels processos en que hi ha intercanvis d'energia en forma de calor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batiste, Oriol

    TERMODIN`AMICA Estudi dels processos en que hi ha intercanvis d'energia en forma de calor. (Estudi TERMODIN`AMICA: equilibri t`ermic. #12;PRIMER PRINCIPI. Conservaci´o de l'energia U = Q - W U variaci´o de

  7. Denial-of-Service Attacks on Battery-powered Mobile Computers Thomas Martin, Michael Hsiao, Dong Ha, Jayan Krishnaswami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Dong S.

    computer, the battery is expected to give a certain battery life under a set of usage conditions whereDenial-of-Service Attacks on Battery-powered Mobile Computers Thomas Martin, Michael Hsiao, Dong Ha device inoperable by draining the battery more quickly than it would be drained under normal usage. We

  8. Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine Nunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine. We utilized microfluidic methods to investigate the role of geometric structures, e.g. thin spherical, microfluidic devices with two consecutive flow-focusing junctions were used to generate air bubble

  9. Feedback control of inertial microfluidics using axial control forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Prohm; Holger Stark

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial microfluidics is a promising tool for many lab-on-a-chip applications. Particles in channel flows with Reynolds numbers above one undergo cross-streamline migration to a discrete set of equilibrium positions in square and rectangular channel cross sections. This effect has been used extensively for particle sorting and the analysis of particle properties. Using the lattice Boltzmann method, we determine equilibrium positions in square and rectangular cross sections and classify their types of stability for different Reynolds numbers, particle sizes, and channel aspect ratios. Our findings thereby help to design microfluidic channels for particle sorting. Furthermore, we demonstrate how an axial control force, which slows down the particles, shifts the stable equilibrium position towards the channel center. Ultimately, the particles then stay on the centerline for forces exceeding a threshold value. This effect is sensitive to particle size and channel Reynolds number and therefore suggests an efficient method for particle separation. In combination with a hysteretic feedback scheme, we can even increase particle throughput.

  10. Reliability of steam generator tubes with axial cracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cizelj, L.; Mavko, B. [Jozef Stefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia). Reactor Engineering Div.; Vencelj, P. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Faculty of Mathematics and Physics

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for estimating the failure probability of tubes containing through-wall axial cracks has already been proposed by the authors. It is based on probabilistic fracture mechanics and accounts for scatter in tube geometry and material properties, scatter in residual and operational stresses responsible for crack propagation, and characteristics of nondestructive examination and plugging procedures (e.g., detection probability, sizing accuracy, human errors). Results of preliminary tests demonstrated wide applicability of this approach and triggered some improvements. The additions to the model are extensively discussed in this paper. Capabilities are demonstrated by results of analysis of steam generator no. 1 in Slovenian nuclear power plant located in Krsko after the 1992 inspection and plugging campaign. First, the number of cracked tubes and the crack length distribution were estimated using data obtained by the 100% motorized pancake coil inspection. The inspection and plugging activities were simulated in the second step to estimate the efficiency of maintenance in terms of single and multiple-tube rupture probabilities. They were calculated as a function of maximum allowable crack length. The importance of human errors and some limitations of present nondestructive examination techniques were identified. The traditional wall thickness and crack-length-based plugging criteria are compared. The crack-length-based criterion is shown to be more efficient and more safe, especially because of strong suppression effect on probability of multiple-tube rupture. The results are considered to be important for safety and maintenance of existing plants and for further research.

  11. Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

  12. EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FLOW INSIDE A CONFIGURATION INCLUDING AN AXIAL PUMP AND A TUBULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    EXPERIMENTAL AND NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF THE FLOW INSIDE A CONFIGURATION INCLUDING AN AXIAL PUMP-30723) In centrifugal and axial pumps, the flow is characterized by a turbulent and complex behavior and also of a configuration that includes an axial pump and a bundle of tubes that mimics the cool source of a heat exchanger

  13. haRVey: satisfaisabilite et theories Diego Caminha B. de Oliveira (Univ. Rio Grande do Norte, Bresil)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fontaine, Pascal

    haRVey: satisfaisabilit´e et th´eories Diego Caminha B. de Oliveira (Univ. Rio Grande do Norte, Br´esil) David D´eharbe (Univ. Rio Grande do Norte, Br´esil), Pascal Fontaine (LORIA ­ Universit´e de Nancy) Univ. Rio Grande do Norte, Br´esil / LORIA ­ Universit´e de Nancy Le probl`eme de la satisfaisabilit´e de

  14. Aquí no ha pasado nada': Narcotráfico, corrupción y violencia en Golpe de suerte y El paso de La Candelaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garavito, Lucí a

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sucia), a los ataques contra indigentes, gamines, homosexuales, prostitutas (la llamada "limpieza social"), a los conflictos y asesinatos que son producto de los grupos de autodefensa, ha venido a sumarse la violencia originada por la actividad del... autodefensa, etc. El lenguaje corporal y gestual - la segunda de las estrategias de representación - capta con admirable destreza el nivel emotivo asociado con las diversas situaciones y los juegos de violencia y poder. Los extraños generalmente están...

  15. Impact of unsteady flow processes on the performance of a high speed axial flow compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botros, Barbara Brenda

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the unsteady interactions between blade rows in a high Mach number, highly-loaded compressor stage. Two straight vane/rotor configurations with different axial spacing between vane and rotor are ...

  16. Determination of the ?(1232) axial and pseudoscalar form factors from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrou, Constantia

    We present a lattice QCD calculation of the ?(1232) matrix elements of the axial-vector and pseudoscalar currents. The decomposition of these matrix elements into the appropriate Lorentz invariant form factors is carried ...

  17. Møller Energy-Momentum Complex for an Axially Symmetric Scalar Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Radinschi

    2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the energy-distribution for an axially symmetric scalar field in the M{\\o}ller prescription. The total energy is given by the parameter m of the space-time.

  18. On the solution of the static Maxwell system in axially symmetric inhomogeneous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kira V. Khmelnytskaya; Vladislav V. Kravchenko; Hector Oviedo

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the static Maxwell system with an axially symmetric dielectric permittivity and construct complete systems of its solutions which can be used for analytic and numerical solution of corresponding boundary value problems.

  19. Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor-fuel-module construction. [LWBR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cowell, G.K.; DiGuiseppe, C.P.

    1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wherein the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements.

  20. A simple criterion for three-dimensional flow separation in axial compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Vai-Man

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most modem blade designs in axial-flow compressors diffuse the flow efficiently over 20% to 80% of blade span and it is the endwall regions that set the limits in compressor performance. This thesis addresses the estimation, ...

  1. Impact of unsteady secondary air flow interaction with main flow on loss generation in axial turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clifton, David (David Madison)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary air, often called purge air, is injected through the endwall gap between stationary vanes and rotating rotors in axial turbines to prevent ingestion of the hot working gas into the endwall cavities. Three-dimensional ...

  2. Performance characteristics of a low pressure cyclone for axial-flow fan exhausts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Shay Lynn

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on axial-flow fan exhausts to significantly reduce particulate emissions. Average emission concentrations, cut-point diameters, PMIO emission concentrations, and fractional efficiencies from this cyclone operating at different cyclone inlet velocities...

  3. Multi-axial fracture behaviour of notched carbon-fibre/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Julian Lip Yi

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    conditions in structural systems such as aircrafts and automobiles has immensely motivated the development of controlled multi-axial and biaxial loading tests. According to Chen & Matthews (1993), two main types of specimens are used for combined loading...

  4. Effect of flow oscillations on axial energy transport in a porous material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, R. (NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (USA))

    1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been shown analytically and experimentally that flow oscillations of a fluid within a channel can enhance the axial transfer of energy. The transport arises from an axial gradient in fluid temperature resulting from having reservoirs at different temperatures at either end of the channel. The present analysis develops relations for axial energy diffusion in a porous medium with oscillating flow. In some devices, such as the Sterling engine, there are regenerators with oscillating flow. Axial transport in the regenerator provides an energy loss; hence it is desirable to determine what factors can limit this diffusion. A regenerator in the form of a porous medium is difficult to model since the flow is continually disrupted by the irregularities of the porous structure. The formulation here will employ an internal heat transfer coefficient that couples the fluid and solid temperatures. The final result shows how the diffusion depends on the magnitude of the heat transfer coefficient and the maximum fluid displacement.

  5. The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todreas, Neil E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

  6. Relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov Theory With Density Dependent Meson Couplings in Axial Symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebran, J.-P.; Khan, E.; Arteaga, D. Pena; Grasso, M. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Vretenar, D. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10 000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Most nuclei on the nuclear chart are deformed, and the development of new RIB facilities allows the study of exotic nuclei near the drip lines where a successful theoretical description requires both realistic pairing and deformation approaches. Relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model taking into account axial deformation and pairing correlations is introduced. Preliminary illustrative results with density dependent meson-nucleon couplings in axial symmetry will be discussed.

  7. Electron Diamagnetic Effect on Axial Force in an Expanding Plasma: Experiments and Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding current-free plasma is directly measured for three different experimental configurations and compared with a two-dimensional fluid theory. The force component solely resulting from the expanding field is directly measured and identified as an axial force produced by the azimuthal current due to an electron diamagnetic drift and the radial component of the magnetic field. The experimentally measured forces are well described by the theory.

  8. 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Deployment (MA&D)-Hoyt Battey, U.S. Department of Energy Survival and Behavior of Fish Exposed to an Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbine-Mark Bevelhimer, Oak Ridge National...

  9. Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

  10. Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

  11. ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daugherty, W.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

  12. Effect of Axial Loading on Quench Performance in Nb3Sn Magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ambrosio, G.; Bordini, B.; Caspi, S.; Dietderich, D.R.; Felice, H.; Hafalia, A.R.; Hannaford, C.R.; Lizarazo, J.; Lietzke, A.F.; McInturff, A.D.; Sabbi, G.L.; DiMarco, J.D.; Tartaglia, M.; Vedrice, P.; Ferracin, P.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests has been performed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) with the goal of assessing the influence of coil axial pre-load on Nb{sub 3}Sn magnet training. The tests involved two subscale Nb{sub 3}Sn magnets: SQ02, a quadrupole magnet fabricated as part of the US LHC Accelerator Research Program (LARP), and SD01, a dipole magnet developed in collaboration between CEA/Saclay and LBNL. Both magnets used similar Nb{sub 3}Sn flat racetrack coils from LBNL Subscale Magnet Program, and implemented an axial support system composed of stainless steel end-plates and aluminum rods. The system was designed to withstand full longitudinal electro-magnetic forces and provide controllable preloads. Quench performances, training, and quench locations have been recorded in various axial loading conditions. Test results are reported.

  13. Flexural support member having a high ratio of lateral-to-axial stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, W.M.B.

    1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A convoluted flexible support structure is provided which is capable of supplying a lateral to axial spring rate in excess of 1000 to 1. A support member in the form of a steel disc having a specified number of rather large radius, concentric convolutions and a thickness in the range of from about 0.01 to 0.02 inch has an axial stiffness of about 50 pounds/inch while the lateral stiffness is about 100,000 pounds/inch. The support member may be used to support a vibration device where the lateral motion of the vibrator must be highly restricted while providing relatively free axial displacement of about +-0.25 inch.

  14. Axial seal system for a gas turbine steam-cooled rotor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashey, Thomas Charles (Anderson, SC)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An axial seal assembly is provided at the interface between adjacent wheels and spacers of a gas turbine rotor and disposed about tubes passing through openings in the rotor adjacent the rotor rim and carrying a thermal medium. Each seal assembly includes a support bushing for supporting a land of the thermal medium carrying tube, an axially registering seat bushing disposed in the opposed opening and a frustoconical seal between the seal bushing and seat. The seal bushing includes a radial flange having an annular recess for retaining the outer diameter edge of the seal, while the seat bushing has an axially facing annular surface forming a seat for engagement by the inner diameter edge of the seal.

  15. Production of low axial energy spread ion beams with multicusp sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.H.Y. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multicusp ion sources are capable of producing ions with low axial energy spread which are necessary in applications such as: ion projection lithography (IPL) and focused ion beams for the next generation lithographic tools and nuclear science experiments such as radioactive ion beam production. The axial ion energy spread for multicusp source is approximately 6 eV which is too large for IPL and radioactive ion beam applications. The addition of a magnetic filter which consists of a pair of permanent magnets to the multicusp source reduces the energy spread considerably. The reduction is due to the improvement in the uniformity of the axial plasma potential distribution in the discharge region. Axial ion energy spread of the filament driven ion source has been measured using three different techniques. In all cases, it was found to be less than 2 eV. Energy spread of the radio frequency (RF) driven source has also been explored, and it was found to be less than 3 eV with the proper RF-shielding. A new multicusp source configuration has been designed and constructed to further reduce the energy spread. To achieve a more uniform axial plasma potential distribution, a cylindrical magnetic filter has been designed and constructed for a 2-cm-diameter source. This new source configuration, the co-axial source, is new in its kind. The energy spread in this source has been measured to be a record low of 0.6 eV. Because of the novelty of this device, some plasma parameters inside the source have been studied. Langmuir probe has been used to measure the plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density distribution.

  16. Cardy-Verlinde formula for an axially symmetric dilaton-axion black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mubasher Jamil; M. Akbar; M. R. Setare

    2011-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of an axially symmetric dilaton-axion black hole can be expressed as a Cardy-Verlinde formula. By utilizing the first order quantum correction in the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy we find the modified expressions for the Casimir energy and pure extensive energy. The first order correction to the Cardy-Verlinde formula in the context of axially symmetric dilaton-axion black hole are obtained with the use of modified Casimir and pure extensive energies.

  17. Note: Simultaneous measurement of transverse speed and axial velocity from a single optical beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moro, Erik A.; Briggs, Matthew E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for simultaneously measuring transverse speed and axial velocity using a single optical beam and a standard photon Doppler velocimetry (PDV) sensing architecture. This result is of particular interest given the recent, widespread use of PDV and the fact that optical velocimetry has thus far been limited to measuring motion in one dimension per probe. Further, this result demonstrates that both axial velocity data and transverse speed data (at least qualitative) may be obtained entirely through signal analysis; not requiring hardware modification. This result is immediately relevant to analyses of existing PDV data and to future efforts in high-speed optical velocimetry.

  18. An axially propagating two-stream instability in the Hall thruster plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsikata, S., E-mail: sedina.tsikata@cnrs-orleans.fr [ICARE, CNRS (UPR 3021), 1C ave. de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans (France); Cavalier, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic); Héron, A. [CPHT, CNRS (UMR 7644), Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Honoré, C.; Grésillon, D. [LPP, CNRS (UMR 7648), Ecole Polytechnique-Univ. Paris-Sud-UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Lemoine, N.; Coulette, D. [IJL, CNRS (UMR 7198), Université de Lorraine, BP 70239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Collective Thomson scattering experiments reveal the presence of high-frequency, axial electron density fluctuations at millimetric wavelengths in the Hall thruster plasma. The properties of these fluctuations are investigated experimentally and via linear kinetic theory. The relative drift of electrons and ions in the axial direction is found to be insufficient to cause excitation of the observed mode. Instead, the mode is determined to be a two-stream instability arising due to the velocity difference between singly and doubly charged ion populations in the plume.

  19. Ctedra de Estudios de Violencia de Gnero El ao 2012 ha sido el primero, desde la puesta en marcha de la Ctedra de Estudios de

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oro, Daniel

    Consejería de Bienestar Social a finales del mes de junio de 2012 llevó como consecuencia el contrato menor con el Instituto Mallorquín de Asuntos Sociales, que ha permitido realizar actividades de carácter

  20. A. International Journals IJ-1. James M. Janky, Bruce B. Lusignan, Lin-shan Lee, Eng-chong Ha, Edward F. Reinhart, "New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Detection of Satellite Beacon Polarization Using Cascaded Heterodyne Phase Locked Loops", IEEE Transactions for Multi-mode Polarization Analysis in Satellite Commmunications", IEEE Transactions on Comunications, Vol Differential Technique for Detection of Circularly Polarized Satellite Signal Parameters at Low Axial Ratios

  1. Synthesis, structural characterization and properties of aluminum (III) meso-tetraphenylporphyrin complexes axially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) complexes axially bonded to phosphinate anions and present their properties as supramolecular building free base (H2TPP) as starting material (Figure 1). H2TPP was treated with AlMe3 and the phosphinic acid in high yield (85-87%). Figure 2. X-ray structure of [1.EtOH] supramolecular chains. Light gray, C

  2. New Structural Model for Multicomponent Pile Cross Sections under Axial Load

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    New Structural Model for Multicomponent Pile Cross Sections under Axial Load John S. Horvath, Ph.D., P.E., M.ASCE1 Abstract: Piles composed of more than one material in their cross section have been used for more than 100 years. Originally this was limited to driven steel shell or pipe piles filled

  3. MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MOISTURE EFFECT ON DURABILITY OF AXIALLY LOADED CONCRETE-FILLED TUBULAR FRP PILES Miguel Pando, Ph_rizkalla@ncsu.edu ABSTRACT Fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) composite piles are a possible foundation alternative for projects located in harsh marine environments. Problems associated with traditional pile materials used in harsh

  4. Cost effective combined axial fan and throttling valve control of ventilation rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sengun, Mehmet Haluk

    Cost effective combined axial fan and throttling valve control of ventilation rate C.J. Taylor 1 P with Proportional-Integral-Plus (PIP) control of ventilation rate in mechanically ventilated agricultural buildings ventilation. The new combined fan/valve configuration is compared with a commercially available PID

  5. Single pulse ultrafast laser imprinting of axial dot arrays in bulk glasses C. Mauclair,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Single pulse ultrafast laser imprinting of axial dot arrays in bulk glasses C. Mauclair,1, A sam- ples were irradiated with 160 fs pulses from an 800 nm Ti:Sapphire amplified ultrafast laser.mauclair@univ-st-etienne.fr Compiled December 20, 2010 Ultrafast laser processing of bulk transparent materials can significantly gain

  6. Axial and radial preliminary results of the neutron radiation from miniature plasma focus devices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Axial and radial preliminary results of the neutron radiation from miniature plasma focus devices. Introduction. The plasma focus (PF) is a dense transient plasma source of high temperature, when it operate of understanding the physics related to the plasma focus working at this limit of unexplored energy, b) to develop

  7. Gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a neutron star: Axial mode case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuhiro Tominaga; Motoyuki Saijo; Kei-ichi Maeda

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a metric perturbation method, we study gravitational waves from a test particle scattered by a spherically symmetric relativistic star. We calculate the energy spectrum and the waveform of gravitational waves for axial modes. Since metric perturbations in axial modes do not couple to the matter fluid of the star, emitted waves for a normal neutron star show only one peak in the spectrum, which corresponds to the orbital frequency at the turning point, where the gravitational field is strongest. However, for an ultracompact star (the radius $R \\lesssim 3M$), another type of resonant periodic peak appears in the spectrum. This is just because of an excitation by a scattered particle of axial quasinormal modes, which were found by Chandrasekhar and Ferrari. This excitation comes from the existence of the potential minimum inside of a star. We also find for an ultracompact star many small periodic peaks at the frequency region beyond the maximum of the potential, which would be due to a resonance of two waves reflected by two potential barriers (Regge-Wheeler type and one at the center of the star). Such resonant peaks appear neither for a normal neutron star nor for a Schwarzschild black hole. Consequently, even if we analyze the energy spectrum of gravitational waves only for axial modes, it would be possible to distinguish between an ultracompact star and a normal neutron star (or a Schwarzschild black hole).

  8. Earth Planets Space, 64, 113120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gurnett, Donald A.

    Earth Planets Space, 64, 113­120, 2012 Upper ionosphere of Mars is not axially symmetrical E to the ionosphere providing momentum and energy transfer to the upper layers of the ionospheric plasma. While dependence rather closely follow the Chapman model (Gurnett et al., 2008; Morgan et al., 2008; Withers, 2009

  9. Optimization of a Microscale, Axial-Flux, Permanent-Magnet Generator D. P. Arnold1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -phase, axial- flux, PM machine, consisting of a stator with Cu surface windings and a multi-pole SmCo PM rotor of the overall machine geometry and stator winding patterns. 2. MACHINE OVERVIEW The generator is a three back iron and a stator with Cu surface windings on a magnetically soft substrate, which serves

  10. Influence of constraints on axial growth reduction of cylindrical Li-ion battery electrode particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeevanjyoti Chakraborty; Colin P. Please; Alain Goriely; S. Jonathan Chapman

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Volumetric expansion of silicon anode particles in a lithium-ion battery during charging may lead to the generation of undesirable internal stresses. For a cylindrical particle such growth may also lead to failure by buckling if the expansion is constrained in the axial direction due to other particles or supporting structures. To mitigate this problem, the possibility of reducing axial growth is investigated theoretically by studying simple modifications of the solid cylinder geometry. First, an annular cylinder is considered with lithiation either from the inside or from the outside. In both cases, the reduction of axial growth is not found to be significant. Next, explicit physical constraints are studied by addition of a non-growing elasto-plastic material: first, an outer annular constraint on a solid silicon cylinder, and second a rod-like inner constraint for an annular silicon cylinder. In both cases, it is found that axial growth can be reduced if the yield stress of the constraining material is significantly higher than that of silicon and/or the thickness of the constraint is relatively high. Phase diagrams are presented for both the outer and the inner constraint cases to identify desirable operating zones. Finally, to interpret the phase diagrams and isolate the key physical principles two different simplified models are presented and are shown to recover important qualitative trends of the numerical simulation results.

  11. Tip clearance flows in axial compressors: stall inception and stability enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weichert, Stephanie April

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow in the rotor tip clearance gap in an axial compressor influences the loss levels and the stall onset point. The role of tip clearance flows in the stall inception process is still debated, though. The aim of this thesis is to improve...

  12. Investigation of Non-synchronous Vibration Mechanism for a High Speed Axial Compressor Using Delayed DES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Gecheng

    Investigation of Non-synchronous Vibration Mechanism for a High Speed Axial Compressor Using compressor. DDES is a hybrid model for turbulence simulation, which uses RANS model within the wall boundary of the compressor occurs due to the rotating flow instability in the vicinity of the rotor tip at a stable operation

  13. Instability inside a rotating gas cylinder subject to axial periodic strain Y. Duguet,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of viscous flow inside a closed circular cylinder rotating about its axis, periodically compressed by meansInstability inside a rotating gas cylinder subject to axial periodic strain Y. Duguet,a J. F. Scott are known to support inertial oscillations whose frequencies are less than twice the basic rotation rate.1

  14. Non-Axial Octupole Deformations and Tetrahedral Symmetry in Heavy Nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazurek, Katarzyna [Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Cracow (Poland); Dudek, Jerzy [Institut de Recherches Subatomiques, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France); Universite Louis Pasteur, F-67037 Strasbourg Cedex 2 (France)

    2005-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The total energies of about 120 nuclei in the Thorium region have been calculated within the macroscopic-microscopic method in the 5-dimensional space of deformation parameters {alpha}20, {alpha}22, {alpha}30, {alpha}32 and {alpha}40. The macroscopic energy term contains the nuclear surface-curvature dependence as proposed within the LSD approach. The microscopic energies are calculated with the Woods-Saxon single particle potential employing the universal set of parameters.We study a possible presence of the octupole axial and non-axial degrees of freedom all-over in the ({beta}, {gamma})-plane focussing on the ground-states, secondary minima and in the saddle points. In fact, a competition between axial and tri-axial octupole deformation parameters is obtained at the saddle points and in the secondary minima for many isotones with N > 136. The presence of the tetrahedral symmetry minima is predicted in numerous nuclei in the discussed region, although most of the time at relatively high excitation energies.

  15. VASCONCELOS, BARRETO: RELATIVE POSE BETWEEN AXIAL CAMERAS 1 Towards a minimal solution for the relative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barreto, Joao

    is central iff all the back-projection rays intersect in a single point in 3D, that is the viewpoint in 3D (the axis). The axial camera can be used to model vision systems and imaging situations of practical interest. Examples include any catadioptric system that combines a revolution mirror

  16. Nucleon axial charge from quenched lattice QCD with domain wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoichi Sasaki; Kostas Orginos; Shigemi Ohta; Tom Blum; for the RBCK Collaboration

    2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quenched lattice calculation of the nucleon isovector vector and axial-vector charges gV and gA. The chiral symmetry of domain wall fermions makes the calculation of the nucleon axial charge particularly easy since the Ward-Takahashi identity requires the vector and axial-vector currents to have the same renormalization, up to lattice spacing errors of order O(a^2). The DBW2 gauge action provides enhancement of the good chiral symmetry properties of domain wall fermions at larger lattice spacing than the conventional Wilson gauge action. Taking advantage of these methods and performing a high statistics simulation, we find a significant finite volume effect between the nucleon axial charges calculated on lattices with (1.2 fm)^3 and (2.4 fm)^3 volumes (with lattice spacing, a, of about 0.15 fm). On the large volume we find gA = 1.212 +/- 0.027(statistical error) +/- 0.024(normalization error). The quoted systematic error is the dominant (known) one, corresponding to current renormalization. We discuss other possible remaining sources of error. This theoretical first principles calculation, which does not yet include isospin breaking effects, yields a value of gA only a little bit below the experimental one, 1.2670 +/- 0.0030.

  17. HIGH-SPEED AXIAL-FLUX PERMANENT MAGNET MICROMOTORS WITH ELECTROPLATED WINDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the other. The folded-coil stator fabrication process is detailed, followed by the motor driver topology- plated multi-phase stator windings and their use in a high-speed permanent magnet micromotor. As the stator windings of an axial- flux micromotor, both single-plated folded coils, and two-layer double

  18. Proterozoic low orbital obliquity and axial-dipolar geomagnetic field from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    record. Magnetic inclinations are consistent with low orbital obliquity and a geocentric-axial-dipole magnetic field for most of the past two billion years, and the snowball Earth hypothesis accordingly tropical oceans6,7 . An alternative to global refrigeration invokes a high Precambrian planetary obliquity

  19. Reducing axial offset and improving stability in PWRs by using uraniumethorium fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    Reducing axial offset and improving stability in PWRs by using uraniumethorium fuel Cheuk Wah Lau a that a new type uraniumethorium (UeTh) based fuel assembly could be used to achieve a more homogenous radial that a core containing UeTh fuel assemblies also reduces the AO and improves the core stability

  20. Hydrogen bonding preference of equatorial versus axial hydroxyl groups in pyran and cyclohexane rings in organic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    Paper Hydrogen bonding preference of equatorial versus axial hydroxyl groups in pyran of the hydrogen bonding counts in crystalline pyranose monosaccharides, we noticed that equatorial hydroxyls formed more hydrogen bonds, on average, than axial groups. A survey of the Cambridge Structural Database

  1. Convective Heat Transfer and Reference Free-stream Temperature Determination near the Casing of an Axial Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camci, Cengiz

    of an Axial Flow Turbine B. Gumusel 2 and C. Camci 1 Turbomachinery Aero-Heat Transfer Laboratory Department on the casing of an axial flow turbine. The goal is to develop an accurate steady-state heat transfer method for the comparison of various casing surface and tip designs used for turbine performance improvements. The free

  2. 516 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 7 / April 1, 2003 Optical bistability in axially modulated OmniGuide fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    demonstrate the feasibility of optical bistability in an axially modulated nonlinear OmniGuide fiber through516 OPTICS LETTERS / Vol. 28, No. 7 / April 1, 2003 Optical bistability in axially modulated OmniGuide fibers Marin Soljacic´, Mihai Ibanescu, Steven G. Johnson, and J. D. Joannopoulos Department of Physics

  3. Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL ELECTRIC FIELDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    Volume 152, number 4,s CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 18 November 1988 NON-INTRUSIVE MEASUREMENT OF AXIAL pertur- bations by sheath accumulation. Non-intrusive mea- surements of the electric fields through for the non- perturbative measurement of the axial electric fields in glow discharges. The A `n, + X I&+ (4

  4. Deflagrations in hybrid CONe white dwarfs: a route to explain the faint Type Iax supernova 2008ha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kromer, M; Pakmor, R; Ruiter, A J; Hillebrandt, W; Marquardt, K S; Roepke, F K; Seitenzahl, I R; Sim, S A; Taubenberger, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stellar evolution models predict the existence of hybrid white dwarfs (WDs) with a carbon-oxygen core surrounded by an oxygen-neon mantle. Being born with masses ~1.1 Msun, hybrid WDs in a binary system may easily approach the Chandrasekhar mass (MCh) by accretion and give rise to a thermonuclear explosion. Here, we investigate an off-centre deflagration in a near-MCh hybrid WD under the assumption that nuclear burning only occurs in carbon-rich material. Performing hydrodynamics simulations of the explosion and detailed nucleosynthesis post-processing calculations, we find that only 0.014 Msun of material is ejected while the remainder of the mass stays bound. The ejecta consist predominantly of iron-group elements, O, C, Si and S. We also calculate synthetic observables for our model and find reasonable agreement with the faint Type Iax SN 2008ha. This shows for the first time that deflagrations in near-MCh WDs can in principle explain the observed diversity of Type Iax supernovae. Leaving behind a near-MCh...

  5. Radiofrequency hydrogen ion source with permanent magnets providing axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oikawa, Kohei, E-mail: oikawa@ecei.tohoku.ac.jp; Saito, Yuta; Komizunai, Shota; Takahashi, Kazunori; Ando, Akira [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uniform axial magnetic field of about 70 G is applied to a radiofrequency (rf) hydrogen ion source by arrays of permanent magnets. The plasma density and electron temperature downstream of the source and near the magnetic filter are compared with those in the previously described ion source, where the axial field has been applied by two solenoids. The source is operated at ?350 kHz and above 10 kW rf power with a field-effect-transistor-based invertor power supply in 1.5 Pa hydrogen. The results show that the plasma density of ?10{sup 19} m{sup ?3} near the source exit and ?10{sup 18} m{sup ?3} near the magnetic filter can be obtained, which are higher than those with the solenoids.

  6. Theoretical and experimental investigation of axial power extraction from a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemke, R.W.; DeMuth, G.E.; Biggs, A.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Air Force Weapons Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (USA); Alabama Univ., Huntsville, AL (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The utility of the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) as a high power microwave source depends on how efficiently power can be extracted from it. We have designed a slow-wave stepped transformer for the purpose of axially extracting microwave power from a 3.6 GHz coaxial MILO. The slow-wave transformer design was optimized using particle-in-cell simulation, and tested in experiments performed on the HPM Simulation Division's GEMINI and GYPSY water Blumlein pulse power sources. In this paper we summarize the slow-wave stepped transformer design, and describe MILO axial power extraction experiments which yielded up to 300 MW of radiated power. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Axial anomaly of QED in a strong magnetic field and noncommutative anomaly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadooghi, N. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute for Studies in Theoretical Physics and Mathematics (IPM), School of Physics, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafari Salim, A. [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Adler-Bell-Jackiw (ABJ) anomaly of a 3+1 dimensional QED is calculated in the presence of a strong magnetic field. It is shown that in the regime with the lowest Landau level (LLL) dominance a dimensional reduction from D=4 to D=2 dimensions occurs in the longitudinal sector of the low energy effective field theory. In the chiral limit, the resulting anomaly is therefore comparable with the axial anomaly of a two-dimensional massless Schwinger model. It is further shown that the U{sub A}(1) anomaly of QED in a strong magnetic field is closely related to the nonplanar axial anomaly of a conventional noncommutative U(1) gauge theory.

  8. Neutrino- and antineutrino-deuteron elastic scattering and the axial isoscalar nucleon current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederico, T.; Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. (Department of Physics, FM-15 and Institute for Nuclear Theory, HN-12, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate the neutrino and antineutrino elastic scattering cross section on unpolarized deuterons at energies from a few MeV to several GeV and squared momentum transfers up to 5 GeV{sup 2}. These cross sections can be used to deduce the unknown weak SU(2) isoscalar and SU(3) flavor-scalar axial-vector coupling to nucleons. This observable can be related to the strangeness axial-vector matrix element in the absence of QCD radiative or isospin-violating corrections. We show that the unknown weak magnetic vector coupling may also be gleaned from these measurements. We use different techniques at different energies, including light-cone impulse approximation at the highest energies, and show that they connect smoothly to each other.

  9. Comments on the U(1) axial symmetry and the chiral transition in QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Meggiolaro

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze (using a chiral effective Lagrangian model) the scalar and pseudoscalar meson mass spectrum of QCD at finite temperature, above the chiral transition at $T_c$, looking, in particular, for signatures of a possible breaking of the $U(1)$ axial symmetry above $T_c$. A detailed comparison between the case with a number of light quark flavors $N_f\\geq 3$ and the (remarkably different) case $N_f=2$ is performed.

  10. Scattering of particles by neutron stars: Time-evolutions for axial perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Ferrari; K. D. Kokkotas

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The excitation of the axial quasi-normal modes of a relativistic star by scattered particles is studied by evolving the time dependent perturbation equations. This work is the first step towards the understanding of more complicated perturbative processes, like the capture or the scattering of particles by rotating stars. In addition, it may serve as a test for the results of the full nonlinear evolution of binary systems.

  11. The development of blade profiles for a supersonic axial flow compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bearden, John Lee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Therefore, the Mach number before the normal shock is reduced, thereby reducing the shock losses. The adiabatic efficiency obtained was fairly low (0. 67). The authors attributed this to the detached bow wave remaining at the rotor inlet... be used when ). (t/c) is small compared to unity (28) . The last condi- tion is satisfied as long as the bow or leading edge shock is attached. Applying linearized theory to the flow problem in axial com- pressor rotors and stators, equations can...

  12. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  13. Using electron scattering to constrain the axial-vector form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. González-Jiménez; J. A. Caballero; T. W. Donnelly

    2015-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of elastic and quasielastic parity-violating (PV) electron scattering processes. These reactions can help to constrain the weak neutral current form factors of the nucleon that play an essential role in the description of neutrino cross sections at intermediate energies. We show that combining information from the analysis of elastic and quasielastic reactions the current knowledge on the strange and axial-vector form factors can be significantly improved.

  14. Using electron scattering to constrain the axial-vector form factor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    González-Jiménez, R; Donnelly, T W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of elastic and quasielastic parity-violating (PV) electron scattering processes. These reactions can help to constrain the weak neutral current form factors of the nucleon that play an essential role in the description of neutrino cross sections at intermediate energies. We show that combining information from the analysis of elastic and quasielastic reactions the current knowledge on the strange and axial-vector form factors can be significantly improved.

  15. Computation of the Field in an Axial Gap, Trapped-Flux Type Superconducting Electric Machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zejun; Ainslie, Mark D.; Campbell, Archie M.; Cardwell, David A.

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—The Bulk Superconductivity Group at the University of Cambridge is currently investigating the use of high temper- ature superconductors in wire and bulk form to increase the electrical and magnetic loading of an axial gap, trapped flux... electric machines are an importantapplication of superconducting materials in both bulk and wire forms. Bulk high temperature superconductors, in partic- ular, are capable of trapping magnetic fields greater than 17 T below 30 K [1], [2], as well as up to 3...

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community, and to collect information to help...

  17. Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pamphlet that describes the Office of EERE's Water Power Program in fiscal year 2009, including the fiscal year 2009 funding opportunities, the Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer Programs, the U.S. hydrodynamic testing facilities, and the fiscal year 2008 Advanced Water Projects awards.

  18. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Radar Friendly Blades Special Programs Techno-Economic Modeling, Analysis, and Support Analysis, Modeling, Cost of Energy, and Policy Impact: Wind Vision 2014...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Marine Hydrokinetics Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  20. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartmentShawn WangSioux Students2009

  1. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagement | Department of

  2. River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ristma

  3. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Market Acceleration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdates

  4. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Reference Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdatesDevelopment Reference Model

  5. Sandia Energy - Marine Hydrokinetics Technology: Technology Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePowerUpdatesDevelopment Reference

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3 BulletinProject »EnergyDepartment of

  7. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch8, 2006:Marina

  8. Siting Methodologies for Hydrokinetics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus GroupSherrellHanfordPlan2011 | Department

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesourceCharacterization 2

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. Experimental Design of Hydrokinetic Resource Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecular Solids |5Expanded PendingPlains419

  12. Manipulating Magnetism: Ru-2(5+) Paddlewheels Devoid of Axial Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiarella, Gina M [Texas A& M University; Cotton, F. A. [Texas A& M University; Murillo, Carlos A [Texas A& M University; Ventura, Karen [University of Texas at El Paso; Vilagran, Dino [University of Texas at El Paso; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variable-temperature magnetic and structural data of two pairs of diruthenium isomers, one pair having an axial ligand and the formula Ru-2(DArF)(4)Cl (where DArF is the anion of a diarylformamidine isomer and Ar = p-anisyl or m-anisyl) and the other one being essentially identical but devoid of axial ligands and having the formula [Ru-2(DArF)(4)]BF4, show that the axial ligand has a significant effect on the electronic structure of the diruthenium unit. Variable temperature crystallographic and magnetic data as well as density functional theory calculations unequivocally demonstrate the occurrence of pi interactions between the p orbitals of the chlorine ligand and the pi* orbitals in the Ru-2(5+) units. The magnetic and structural data are consistent with the existence of combined ligand sigma/metal sigma and ligand p pi/metal-d pi interactions. Electron paramagnetic resonance data show unambiguously that the unpaired electrons are in metal-based molecular orbitals.

  13. Torsional Alfven Waves in Solar Magnetic Flux Tubes of Axial Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, K; Musielak, Z E; Srivastava, A K; Kraskiewicz, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: Propagation and energy transfer of torsional Alfv\\'en waves in solar magnetic flux tubes of axial symmetry is studied. Methods: An analytical model of a solar magnetic flux tube of axial symmetry is developed by specifying a magnetic flux and deriving general analytical formulae for the equilibrium mass density and a gas pressure. The main advantage of this model is that it can be easily adopted to any axisymmetric magnetic structure. The model is used to simulate numerically the propagation of nonlinear Alfv\\'en waves in such 2D flux tubes of axial symmetry embedded in the solar atmosphere. The waves are excited by a localized pulse in the azimuthal component of velocity and launched at the top of the solar photosphere, and they propagate through the solar chromosphere, transition region, and into the solar corona. Results: The results of our numerical simulations reveal a complex scenario of twisted magnetic field lines and flows associated with torsional Alfv\\'en waves as well as energy transfer to t...

  14. Design and market considerations for axial flux superconducting electric machine design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ainslie, Mark D; Shaw, Robert; Dawson, Lewis; Winfield, Andy; Steketee, Marina; Stockley, Simon

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the authors investigate a number of design and market considerations for an axial flux superconducting electric machine design that uses high temperature superconductors. This work was carried out as part of the University of Cambridge's Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning ETECH Project programme, designed to accelerate entrepreneurship and diffusion of innovations based on early stage and potentially disruptive technologies from the University. The axial flux machine design is assumed to utilise high temperature superconductors in both wire (stator winding) and bulk (rotor field) forms, to operate over a temperature range of 65-77 K, and to have a power output in the range from 10s of kW up to 1 MW (typical for axial flux machines), with approximately 2-3 T as the peak trapped field in the bulk superconductors. The authors firstly investigate the applicability of this type of machine as a generator in small- and medium-sized wind turbines, including the current and forecasted market and pricin...

  15. Effect of Temporal Acquisition Parameters on the Image Quality of Ultrasound Axial Strain Time-constant Elastograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese, Joshua

    2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    constant (TC) have been developed. The axial strain TC is a parameter that is related to the viscoelastic and poroelastic behavior of tissues. Estimation of this parameter can be done using curve fitting methods. However, the effect of temporal...

  16. Il Consiglio di Facolt di Economia ha espresso, in un documento approvato il 23/11/2010, una valutazione critica sulle politiche per l'Universit.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    Il Consiglio di Facoltà di Economia ha espresso, in un documento approvato il 23/11/2010, una come quella di Economia di Genova, che si trova sotto dimensionata nel proprio organico di docenti, al'attenzione degli studenti, delle famiglie, del territorio. A questo scopo la Facoltà di Economia, nella giornata

  17. RE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glyde, Henry R.

    , for example, A. Yariv, Quantum Electronics (Wiley, New York, 1967), Chap. 21; N. Bloembergen, Nonlinear OpticsRE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either cussions. *Present address: Hasler A. G. , Bern, Switzerland. ~P. A. Franken, A. E. Hill, C. %'. Peters

  18. t E c N o l o G a y f u t u r o Por laura cHaParro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    t E c N o l o G í a y f u t u r o Por laura cHaParro El desastre nuclear de Fukushima del pasado 11 a la comunidad internacional. Cuatro de los seis reactores nucleares de la planta sufrieron serios

  19. Method for operating a nuclear reactor to accommodate load follow while maintaining a substantially constant axial power distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, N.P.; Rossi, C.E.; Scherpereel, L.R.

    1980-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a method of operating a nuclear reactor having a negative reactivity moderator temperature coefficient with the object of maintaining a uniform and symmetric xenon distribution above and below substantially the center of the core over a substantial axial length of the core during normal reactor operation including load follow. In one embodiment variations in the xenon distribution are controlled by maintaining a substantially symmetric axial power distribution. The axial offset, which is employed as an indication of the axial power distribution, is maintained substantially equal to a target value , which is modified periodically to account for core burnup. A neutron absorbing element within the core coolant, or moderator, is employed to assist control of reactivity changes associated with changes in power, with the full-length control rods mainly employed to adjust variations in the axial power distribution while the part-length rodsremain completely withdrawn from the fuel region of the core. Rapid changes in reactivity are implemented, to accommodate corresponding changes in load, by a controlled reduction of the core coolant temperature. Thus, active core coolant temperature control is employed to control the reactivity of the core during load follow operation and effectively increase the spinning reserve capability of a power plant without altering the axial power distribution.

  20. Simulation of in-core neutron noise measurements for axial void profile reconstruction in boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dykin, V.; Pazsit, I. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Div. of Nuclear Engineering, Dept. of Applied Physics, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A possibility to reconstruct the axial void profile from the simulated in-core neutron noise which is caused by density fluctuations in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) heated channel is considered. For this purpose, a self-contained model of the two-phase flow regime is constructed which has quantitatively and qualitatively similar properties to those observed in real BWRs. The model is subsequently used to simulate the signals of neutron detectors induced by the corresponding perturbations in the flow density. The bubbles are generated randomly in both space and time using Monte-Carlo techniques. The axial distribution of the bubble production is chosen such that the mean axial void fraction and void velocity follow the actual values of BWRs. The induced neutron noise signals are calculated and then processed by the standard signal analysis methods such as Auto-Power Spectral Density (APSD) and Cross-Power Spectral Density (CPSD). Two methods for axial void and velocity profiles reconstruction are discussed: the first one is based on the change of the break frequency of the neutron auto-power spectrum with axial core elevation, while the second refers to the estimation of transit times of propagating steam fluctuations between different axial detector positions. This paper summarizes the principles of the model and presents a numerical testing of the qualitative applicability to estimate the required parameters for the reconstruction of the void fraction profile from the neutron noise measurements. (authors)

  1. Determing Degradation Of Fiberboard In The 9975 Shipping Package By Measuring Axial Gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hackney, E. R.; Dougherty, W. L.; Dunn, K. A.; Stefek, T. M

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, thousands of model 9975 transportation packages are in use by the US Department of Energy (DOE); the design of which has been certified by DOE for shipment of Type B radioactive and fissile materials in accordance with Part 71, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), or 10 CFR 71, Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. These transportation packages are also approved for the storage of DOE-STD-3013 containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As such, the 9975 has been continuously exposed to the service environment for a period of time greater than the approved transportation service life. In order to ensure the material integrity as specified in the safety basis, an extensive surveillance program is in place in K-Area Complex (KAC) to monitor the structural and thermal properties of the fiberboard of the 9975 shipping packages. The surveillance approach uses a combination of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) field surveillance and Destructive Examination (DE) lab testing to validate the 9975 performance assumptions. The fiberboard in the 9975 is credited with thermal insulation, criticality control and resistance to crushing. During surveillance monitoring in KAC, an increased axial gap of the fiberboard was discovered on selected items packaged at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Many of these packages were later found to contain excess moisture. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the fiberboard under storage conditions and during transport. In laboratory testing, the higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction of fiberboard material and compaction rate. The fiberboard height is reduced by compression of the layers. This change is observed directly in the axial gap between the flange and the air shield. The axial gap measurement is made during the pre-use inspection or during the annual recertification process and is a screening measurement for changes in the fiberboard.

  2. Determination of the Axial-Vector Weak Coupling Constant with Ultracold Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UCNA Collaboration; J. Liu; M. P. Mendenhall; A. T. Holley; H. O. Back; T. J. Bowles; L. J. Broussard; R. Carr; S. Clayton; S. Currie; B. W. Filippone; A. Garcia; P. Geltenbort; K. P. Hickerson; J. Hoagland; G. E. Hogan; B. Hona; T. M. Ito; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; R. R. Mammei; J. W. Martin; D. Melconian; C. L. Morris; R. W. Pattie Jr.; A. Perez Galvan; M. L. Pitt; B. Plaster; J. C. Ramsey; R. Rios; R. Russell; A. Saunders; S. J. Seestrom; W. E. Sondheim; E. Tatar; R. B. Vogelaar; B. VornDick; C. Wrede; H. Yan; A. R. Young

    2010-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise measurement of the neutron decay $\\beta$-asymmetry $A_0$ has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) from the pulsed spallation UCN source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report $A_0 = -0.11966 \\pm 0.00089_{-0.00140}^{+0.00123}$, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon $g_A/g_V = -1.27590_{-0.00445}^{+0.00409}$.

  3. Determination of the Axial-Vector Weak Coupling Constant with Polarized Ultracold Neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, J; Holley, A T; Back, H O; Bowles, T J; Broussard, L J; Carr, R; Clayton, S; Currie, S; Filippone, B W; Garcia, A; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Hoagland, J; Hogan, G E; Hona, B; Ito, T M; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Martin, J W; Melconian, D; Morris, C L; Pattie, R W; Galvan, A Perez; Pitt, M L; Plaster, B; Ramsey, J C; Rios, R; Russell, R; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S; Sondheim, W E; Tatar, E; Vogelaar, R B; VornDick, B; Wrede, C; Yan, H; Young, A R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A precise measurement of the neutron decay $\\beta$-asymmetry $A_0$ has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) from the pulsed spallation UCN source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report $A_0 = -0.11966 \\pm 0.00089 _{-0.00140}^{+0.00123}$, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon $g_A/g_V = -1.27590 _{-0.00445}^{+0.00409}$.

  4. Spatiotemporal evolution of ponderomotive electron heating in axially inhomogeneous collisionless plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar (India); Sharma, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs 7624 (Hungary)] [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs, Pecs 7624 (Hungary)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the spatiotemporal focusing dynamics of a Gaussian laser pulse in preformed collisionless plasma subjected to an axial nonuniformity in the plasma density. In order to follow up the pulse dynamics, a nonlinear Schrödinger wave equation characterizing the beam spot size in space and time frame has been derived and solved numerically to investigate the propagation characteristics as the pulse advances in the plasma. The effect of inhomogeneity on focusing length and ponderomotive electron heating have been analyzed and illustrated graphically. It is seen that ponderomotive heating is quite sensitive to the inhomogeneity parameters and the energy gain by electrons can be optimized by suitable choice of parameters.

  5. Axial force imparted by a conical radiofrequency magneto-plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles, C.; Takahashi, K.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct thrust measurements of a low pressure ({approx}0.133 Pa) conical radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma source show a total axial force of about 5 mN for an effective rf power of 650 W and a maximum magnetic field of 0.018 T, of which a measured value of 2.5 mN is imparted by the magnetic nozzle. A simplified model of thrust including contributions from the electron pressure and from the magnetic field pressure is developed. The magnetic nozzle is modelled as a ''physical'' nozzle of increasing cross-sectional area.

  6. Fracture analysis of axially cracked pressure tube of pressurized heavy water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krishnan, S.; Bhasin, V.; Mahajan, S.C. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay (India)] [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Dimensional (313) finite element elastic plastic fracture analysis was done for through wall axially cracked thin pressure tubes of 220 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor. The analysis was done for Zr-2 and Zr-2.5Nb pressure tubes operating at 300{degrees}C and subjected to 9.5 Mpa internal pressure. Critical crack length was determined based on tearing instability concept. The analysis included the effect of crack face pressure due to the leaking fluid from tube. This effect was found to be significant for pressure tubes. The available formulae for calculating J (for axially cracked tubes) do not take into account the effect of crack face pressure. 3D finite element analysis also gives insight into variation of J across the thickness of pressure tube. It was observed that J is highest at the mid-surface of tube. The results have been presented in the form of across the thickness average J value and a peak factor on J. Peak factor on J is ratio of J at mid surface to average J value. Crack opening area for different cracked lengths was calculated from finite element results. The fracture assessment of pressure tubes was also done using Central Electricity Generating Board R-6 method. Ductile tearing was considered.

  7. Broken axial symmetry as essential feature to predict radiative capture in heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosse, Eckart; Massarczyk, Ralph

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections for neutron capture in the range of unresolved resonances are predicted for more than 140 spin-0 target nuclei with A > 50. Allowing the breaking of spherical and axial symmetry in nearly all these nuclei a combined parameterization for both, level density and photon strength is obtained which employs a surprisingly small number of parameters only. The strength functions used are based on a global fit to IVGDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians. They are based on theoretical predictions for the A-dependence of pole energies and spreading widths and add up to the TRK sum rule. For the small spins reached by capture resonance spacings are well described by a level density parameter close to the nuclear matter value; a significant collective enhancement is apparent due to the deviation from axial symmetry. Reliable predictions for compound nuclear reactions also outside the valley of stability (as important for nuclear astrophysics and for the transmutation of nuclear waste) are expected to re...

  8. Broken axial symmetry as essential feature to predict radiative capture in heavy nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckart Grosse; Arnd R. Junghans; Ralph Massarczyk

    2015-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cross sections for neutron capture in the range of unresolved resonances are predicted for more than 140 spin-0 target nuclei with A > 50. Allowing the breaking of spherical and axial symmetry in nearly all these nuclei a combined parameterization for both, level density and photon strength is obtained which employs a surprisingly small number of parameters only. The strength functions used are based on a global fit to IVGDR shapes by the sum of three Lorentzians. They are based on theoretical predictions for the A-dependence of pole energies and spreading widths and add up to the TRK sum rule. For the small spins reached by capture resonance spacings are well described by a level density parameter close to the nuclear matter value; a significant collective enhancement is apparent due to the deviation from axial symmetry. Reliable predictions for compound nuclear reactions also outside the valley of stability (as important for nuclear astrophysics and for the transmutation of nuclear waste) are expected to result from the global parameterization presented.

  9. Evaporative capillary instability for flow in porous media under the influence of axial electric field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar Awasthi, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshiitr.kumar@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies, Dehradun (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the linear analysis of electrohydrodynamic capillary instability of the interface between two viscous, incompressible and electrically conducting fluids in a fully saturated porous medium, when the phases are enclosed between two horizontal cylindrical surfaces coaxial with the interface and, when there is mass and heat transfer across the interface. The fluids are subjected to a constant electric field in the axial direction. Here, we use an irrotational theory in which the motion and pressure are irrotational and the viscosity enters through the jump in the viscous normal stress in the normal stress balance at the interface. A quadratic dispersion relation that accounts for the growth of axisymmetric waves is obtained and stability criterion is given in terms of a critical value of wave number as well as electric field. It is observed that heat transfer has stabilizing effect on the stability of the considered system while medium porosity destabilizes the interface. The axial electric field has dual effect on the stability analysis.

  10. A two-dimensional (azimuthal-axial) particle-in-cell model of a Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coche, P.; Garrigues, L., E-mail: laurent.garrigues@laplace.univ-tlse.fr [LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT Toulouse 118, route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell model in the azimuthal and axial directions of the Hall thruster. A scaling method that consists to work at a lower plasma density to overcome constraints on time-step and grid-spacing is used. Calculations are able to reproduce the breathing mode due to a periodic depletion of neutral atoms without the introduction of a supplementary anomalous mechanism, as in fluid and hybrid models. Results show that during the increase of the discharge current, an electron-cyclotron drift instability (frequency in the range of MHz and wave number on the order of 3000 rad s{sup ?1}) is formed in the region of the negative gradient of magnetic field. During the current decrease, an axial electric wave propagates from the channel toward the exhaust (whose frequency is on the order of 400?kHz) leading to a broadening of the ion energy distribution function. A discussion about the influence of the scaling method on the calculation results is also proposed.

  11. Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiharto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Abidin, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

  12. Measuring the axial form factor of {sup 3}He using weak capture of polarized electrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, D. [Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, MS 39762 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A low energy, high intensity polarized electron beam could enable the extraction of the A=3 weak axial form factors F{sub A} using the reaction ?e+{sup 3}He?{sup 3}H+?. These form factors have never been measured before. We discuss the feasibility of such an experiment using a small toroidal magnet and a radial low energy recoil detector to tag the recoil tritons. A moderately high intensity polarized electron beam (>500 ?A) with beam energies between 50 - 150 MeV is necessary for the cross section measurement and to provides a free clean measurement of the background. Moreover, in addition to the cross section, by measuring the electron spin and recoil triton correlation coefficient it may be possible to search for second class currents and to extract the ratio of the axial to the vector form factor of the nucleon. Such novel electron scattering based measurements would have a completely different set of systematic uncertainties compared to polarized neutron beta decay, neutrino scattering and muon capture experiments which are typically used to extract the weak form-factors.

  13. Clean measurements of the nucleon axial-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandre Deur

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the axial-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured model-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the axial mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01

  14. Natural Circulation and Linear Stability Analysis for Liquid-Metal Reactors with the Effect of Fluid Axial Conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Qiao Wu; James J. Sienicki

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of fluid axial thermal conduction on one-dimensional liquid metal natural circulation and its linear stability was performed through nondimensional analysis, steady-state assessment, and linear perturbation evaluation. The Nyquist criterion and a root-search method were employed to find the linear stability boundary of both forward and backward circulations. The study provided a relatively complete analysis method for one-dimensional natural circulation problems with the consideration of fluid axial heat conduction. The results suggest that fluid axial heat conduction in a natural circulation loop should be considered only when the modified Peclet number is {approx}1 or less, which is significantly smaller than the practical value of a lead liquid metal-cooled reactor.

  15. Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, B.J.; White, M.J.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters. A numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger was developed and the effect of various design parameters on overall heat exchanger size was investigated. It was found that highly conductive metals should be avoided in the design of compact JT heat exchangers. For the geometry considered, the optimal conductivity is around 3.5 W/m-K and can range from 0.3-10 W/m-K without a large loss in performance. The model was implemented with an isenthalpic expansion process. Increasing the cold side inlet temperature from 2K to 2.2 K decreased the liquid fraction from 0.856 to 0.839 which corresponds to a 0.12 g/s increase in supercritical helium supply needed to maintain liquid level in the cooling bath. Lastly, it was found that the effectiveness increased when the heat load was below the design value. Therefore, the heat exchanger should be sized on the high end of the required heat load.

  16. Nucleon and Delta axial-vector couplings in 1/N{sub c}-Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goity, Jose Luis [JLAB; Calle Cordon, Alvaro [JLAB

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this contribution, baryon axial-vector couplings are studied in the framework of the combined 1/N{sub c} and chiral expansions. This framework is implemented on the basis of the emergent spin-flavor symmetry in baryons at large N{sub c} and HBChPT, and linking both expansions ({xi}-expansion), where 1/N{sub c} is taken to be a quantity order p. The study is carried out including one-loop contributions, which corresponds to order xi to the third for baryon masses and order {xi} square for the axial couplings.

  17. Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alton, Gerald D. (Kingston, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

  18. Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics Integral Field Spectroscopy of a Tightly Collimated Bipolar Jet from the Herbig Ae star LkHa 233

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall D. Perrin; James R. Graham

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the integral field spectrograph OSIRIS and laser guide star adaptive optics at Keck Observatory to obtain high angular resolution (0.06"), moderate spectral resolution (R ~ 3800) images of the bipolar jet from the Herbig Ae star LkHa 233, seen in near-IR [Fe II] emission at 1.600 & 1.644 microns. This jet is narrow and tightly collimated, with an opening angle of only 9 degrees, and has an average radial velocity of ~ 100 km/s. The jet and counterjet are asymmetric, with the red-shifted jet much clumpier than its counterpart at the angular resolution of our observations. The observed properties are in general similar to jets seen around T Tauri stars, though it has a relatively large mass flux of (1.2e-7 +- 0.3e-7) M_sun/year, near the high end of the observed mass flux range around T Tauri stars. We also spatially resolve an inclined circumstellar disk around LkHa 233, which obscures the star from direct view. By comparison with numerical radiative transfer disk models, we estimate the disk midplane to be inclined i = 65 +- 5 degrees relative to the plane of the sky. Since the star is seen only in scattered light at near-infrared wavelengths, we detect only a small fraction of its intrinsic flux. Because previous estimates of its stellar properties did not account for this, either LkHa 233 must be located closer than the previously believed, or its true luminosity must be greater than previously supposed, consistent with its being a ~4 M_sun star near the stellar birthline.

  19. Axial force imparted by a current-free magnetically expanding plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding, current-free, radiofrequency plasma is directly measured. For an argon gas flow rate of 25 sccm and an effective rf input power of {approx}800W, a maximum force of {approx}6mN is obtained; {approx}3mN of which is transmitted via the expanding magnetic field. The measured forces are reasonably compared with a simple fluid model associated with the measured electron pressure. The model suggests that the total force is the sum of an electron pressure inside the source and a Lorentz force due to the electron diamagnetic drift current and the applied radial magnetic field. It is shown that the Lorentz force is greatest near the magnetic nozzle surface where the radial pressure gradient is largest.

  20. Failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes; A probabilistic fracture mechanics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Cizelj, L. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Reactor Engineering Div., P.O. Box 100, 61111 Ljubljana, Slovenia (YU))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a model for estimating the failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes is proposed. The model compares observed crack length distribution with critical crack length distribution by means of probabilistic fracture mechanics. The observed crack length is influenced by measured data, measurement reliability, sizing accuracy, and predicted crack growth rate. The critical crack length is defined by a deterministic mechanical model. All cracks are conservatively assumed to extend through the tube wall. The effect of the plugging limit is studied along with the number of cracked tubes to perform risk-based lifetime optimization of steam generators. A numerical example presented considers hypothetical accidental operating conditions during a feedwater line break.

  1. A magnetic liquid deformable mirror for high stroke and low order axially symmetrical aberrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brousseau, D; Parent, J; Ruel, H J; Borra, Ermanno F.; Brousseau, Denis; Parent, Jocelyn; Ruel, Hubert-Jean

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new class of magnetically shaped deformable liquid mirrors made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). Deformable liquid mirrors offer advantages with respect to deformable solid mirrors: large deformations, low costs and the possibility of very large mirrors with added aberration control. They have some disadvantages (e.g. slower response time). We made and tested a deformable mirror, producing axially symmetrical wavefront aberrations by applying electric currents to 5 concentric coils made of copper wire wound on aluminum cylinders. Each of these coils generates a magnetic field which combines to deform the surface of a ferrofluid to the desired shape. We have carried out laboratory tests on a 5 cm diameter prototype mirror and demonstrated defocus as well as Seidel and Zernike spherical aberrations having amplitudes up to 20 microns, which was the limiting measurable amplitude of our equipment

  2. A magnetic liquid deformable mirror for high stroke and low order axially symmetrical aberrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis Brousseau; Ermanno F. Borra; Hubert-Jean Ruel; Jocelyn Parent

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new class of magnetically shaped deformable liquid mirrors made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). Deformable liquid mirrors offer advantages with respect to deformable solid mirrors: large deformations, low costs and the possibility of very large mirrors with added aberration control. They have some disadvantages (e.g. slower response time). We made and tested a deformable mirror, producing axially symmetrical wavefront aberrations by applying electric currents to 5 concentric coils made of copper wire wound on aluminum cylinders. Each of these coils generates a magnetic field which combines to deform the surface of a ferrofluid to the desired shape. We have carried out laboratory tests on a 5 cm diameter prototype mirror and demonstrated defocus as well as Seidel and Zernike spherical aberrations having amplitudes up to 20 microns, which was the limiting measurable amplitude of our equipment

  3. Exponential Decay of Eigenfunctions and Accumulation of Eigenvalues on Manifolds with Axial Analytic Asymptotically Cylindrical Ends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Kalvin

    2010-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we continue our study of the Laplacian on manifolds with axial analytic asymptotically cylindrical ends initiated in~arXiv:1003.2538. By using the complex scaling method and the Phragm\\'{e}n-Lindel\\"{o}f principle we prove exponential decay of the eigenfunctions corresponding to the non-threshold eigenvalues of the Laplacian on functions. In the case of a manifold with (non-compact) boundary it is either the Dirichlet Laplacian or the Neumann Laplacian. We show that the rate of exponential decay of an eigenfunction is prescribed by the distance from the corresponding eigenvalue to the next threshold. Under our assumptions on the behaviour of the metric at infinity accumulation of isolated and embedded eigenvalues occur. The results on decay of eigenfunctions combined with the compactness argument due to Perry imply that the eigenvalues can accumulate only at thresholds and only from below. The eigenvalues are of finite multiplicity.

  4. Axial strain in GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biermanns, Andreas; Pietsch, Ullrich [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany)] [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Rieger, Torsten; Gruetzmacher, Detlev; Ion Lepsa, Mihail [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum, 52425 Juelich (Germany) [Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum, 52425 Juelich (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Bussone, Genziana [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany) [Universitaet Siegen, Festkoerperphysik, 57068 Siegen (Germany); ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, BP220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the axial strain relaxation in GaAs/InAs core-shell nanowire heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Besides a gradual strain relaxation of the shell material, we find a significant strain in the GaAs core, increasing with shell thickness. This strain is explained by a saturation of the dislocation density at the core-shell interface. Independent measurements of core and shell lattice parameters by x-ray diffraction reveal a relaxation of 93% in a 35 nm thick InAs shell surrounding cores of 80 nm diameter. The compressive strain of -0.5% compared to bulk InAs is accompanied by a tensile strain up to 0.9% in the GaAs core.

  5. Microscopic derivation of nuclear rotation-vibration model, axially symmetric case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulshani, Parviz

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive from first principles the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude, and provides microscopic expressions for the interaction operators among the rotation, vibration, and intrinsic motions, for the moment of inertia, vibration mass, and for the deformation variables. The method uses canonical transformations to collective co-ordinates, followed by a constrained variational method, with the associated constraints imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For deformed harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for the energies, moments of inertia, quadrupole moments and transition...

  6. Hamiltonian dynamics of a symmetric top in external fields having axial symmetry. Levitating Orbitron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanislav S. Zub; Sergiy I. Zub

    2015-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The symmetric top is a special case of the general top, and canonical Poisson structure on $T^*SE(3)$ is the common method of its description. This structure is invariant under the right action of $SO(3)$, but the Hamiltonian of the symmetric top is invariant only under the right action of subgroup $S^1$ that corresponds to the rotation around the symmetry axis of the symmetric top. So, its Poisson structure was obtained as the reduction $T^*SE(3)/S^1$. Next we propose the Hamiltonian that describes the wide class of the interaction models of symmetric top and axially-symmetric external field. The stability of the levitating Orbitron in relative equilibrium was proved.

  7. First-Forbidden beta decay Medium enhancement of the axial charge at A=16

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warburton, E K; Brown, B A

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations are presented for four relatively strong first-forbidden $\\beta$ decays in the region A=11-16 in order to study the very large mesonic-exchange-current enhancement of the rank-zero components. The $\\mu^-$ capture on $^{16}$O is considered on the same footing. The wave functions utilized include up to 4$\\hbar\\omega$ excitations. Two-body exchange-current matrix elements are calculated as well as one-body impulse approximation matrix elements. The resultant enhancement factor that multiplies the impulse-approximation axial-charge matrix element is thereby determined by comparison to experiment to be $\\epsilon_{exp}$ = 1.61 $\\pm$ 0.03 from three $\\beta^-$ decays and $\\mu^-$ capture on $^{16}$O, which is in excellent agreement with meson-exchange calculations in the soft-pion approximation.

  8. WIMP identification through a combined measurement of axial and scalar couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertone, G; Collar, J I; Odom, B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the prospects for detecting Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that in case of detection, comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF3I and C4F10 bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs, and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  9. WIMP identification through a combined measurement of axial and scalar couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bertone; D. G. Cerdeno; J. I. Collar; B. Odom

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the prospects for detecting Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs), in a number of phenomenological scenarios, with a detector composed of a target simultaneously sensitive to both spin-dependent and spin-independent couplings, as is the case of COUPP (Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle Physics). First, we show that sensitivity to both couplings optimizes chances of initial WIMP detection. Second, we demonstrate that in case of detection, comparison of the signal on two complementary targets, such as in COUPP CF3I and C4F10 bubble chambers, allows a significantly more precise determination of the dark matter axial and scalar couplings. This strategy would provide crucial information on the nature of the WIMPs, and possibly allow discrimination between neutralino and Kaluza-Klein dark matter.

  10. Cyclic powder formation during pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane in an axially asymmetric radiofrequency argon discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Despax, B.; Makasheva, K. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse 09 (France); CNRS, LAPLACE, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 09 (France); Caquineau, H. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d'Energie), 118 route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse 09 (France)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new approach of periodic production of dusty plasma consisting of pulsed injection of hexamethyldisiloxane (HMDSO) in argon axially asymmetric radiofrequency (RF) discharge was investigated in this work. The range of plasma operating conditions in which this dusty plasma can exist was closely examined. The obtained results clearly show that a net periodicity in the formation/disappearance of dust particles in the plasma can be maintained on a very large scale of discharge duration. The significance of discharge axial asymmetry to the dust particles behaviour in the plasma is revealed by the development of an asymmetric in shape void shifted towards the powered RF electrode. The key role of the reactive gas and its pulsed injection on each stage of the oscillating process of formation/disappearance of dust particles is disclosed by optical and electrical measurements. It is shown that the period of dusty plasma formation/disappearance is inversely related to the HMDSO injection time. Moreover, the impact of time injection over short period (5 s) is examined. It indicates the conflicting role played by the HMDSO on the reduction of dusty plasma during the reactive gas injection and the reappearance of particles in the plasma during the time off. The electronegative behavior of the plasma in the presence of negatively charged particles seems to explain the energetic modifications in the discharge. A frequency analysis of the floating potential reveals all these cyclic processes. Particularly, in the 10-200 Hz frequency range, the presence and the evolution of dust particles in the plasma over one generation can be observed.

  11. Isospin-invariant Skyrme energy-density-functional approach with axial symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Sheikh; N. Hinohara; J. Dobaczewski; T. Nakatsukasa; W. Nazarewicz; K. Sato

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the isospin-invariant Skyrme-EDF method by considering local densities in all possible isospin channels and proton-neutron (p-n) mixing terms as mandated by the isospin symmetry. The EDF employed has the most general form that depends quadratically on the isoscalar and isovector densities. We test and benchmark the resulting p-n EDF approach, and study the general properties of the new scheme by means of the cranking in the isospin space. We extend the existing axial DFT solver HFBTHO to the case of isospin-invariant EDF approach with all possible p-n mixing terms. Explicit expressions have been derived for all the densities and potentials that appear in the isospin representation. In practical tests, we consider the Skyrme EDF SkM* and, as a first application, concentrate on Hartree-Fock aspects of the problem, i.e., pairing has been disregarded. Calculations have been performed for the (A=78, T~11), (A=40, T~8), and (A=48, T~4) isobaric analog chains. Isospin structure of self-consistent p-n mixed solutions has been investigated with and without the Coulomb interaction, which is the sole source of isospin symmetry breaking in our approach. The extended axial HFBTHO solver has been benchmarked against the symmetry-unrestricted HFODD code for deformed and spherical states. We developed and tested a general isospin-invariant Skyrme-EDF framework. The new approach permits spin-isospin densities that may give rise to, hitherto, unexplored modes in the excitation spectrum. The new formalism has been tested in the Hartree-Fock limit. A systematic comparison between HFODD and HFBTHO results show a maximum deviation of about 10 keV on the total binding energy for deformed nuclei when the Coulomb term is included. Without this term, the results of both solvers agree down to a ~10 eV level.

  12. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  13. Supplemental Material for Severson et al. The axial element protein HTP-3 promotes cohesin loading and meiotic axis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Barbara

    Supplemental Material for Severson et al. The axial element protein HTP-3 promotes cohesin loading ......................................................................................... 7 Disrupting REC-8, HTP-3, or HTP-1/2 function reduces the lethality of spo-11(me44) mutants ....................................................................................... 13 The htp-3 deletion allele tm3655 phenocopies htp-3(y428). Supplemental Figure 8

  14. Path-integral solution for a two-dimensional model with axial-vector-current--pseudoscalar derivative interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Botelho, L.C.L.

    1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a two-dimensional quantum field model with axial-vector-current--pseudoscalar derivative interaction using path-integral methods. We construct an effective Lagrangian by performing a chiral change in the fermionic variables leading to an exact solution of the model.

  15. The effect of axial strain cycling on the critical current density and n-value of ITER niobium-tin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hampshire, Damian

    The effect of axial strain cycling on the critical current density and n-value of ITER niobium niobium-tin VAC and EM-LMI strands and the detailed characterisation of the EM-LMI-TFMC strand at -0 current density and n-value of two ITER candidate niobium-tin strands (EM- LMI and VAC). The strands were

  16. Identification of spin wave modes in yttrium iron garnet strongly coupled to a co-axial cavity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambert, N. J.; Haigh, J. A.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    AIP/123-QED Identification of spin wave modes in yttrium iron garnet strongly coupled to a co-axial cavity. N. J. Lambert,1 J. A. Haigh,2 and A. J. Ferguson1 1)Microelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0HE...

  17. History of Has (Ha) Valley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tshewang, Ven. Lam Pema

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , a visitor came to sell the head of the statue. The sculptor tried to fit the head to the torso, to which it straightaway stuck as if drawn by a magnet. The head, as can be seen even today, is slightly bent and somewhat large in proportion... of Drukpa Kunley, the impression of which, like a mark made on clay, can be seen till today on a big chunk of stone. The tail of the Kuptshonapatra comes through the rock of Nyangtoekha. In ancient times, a boy of herdsman wearing a coarse yak...

  18. Strain and stability of ultrathin Ge layers in Si/Ge/Si axial heterojunction nanowires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ross, Frances M.; Stach, Eric A.; Wen, Cheng -Yen; Reuter, Mark C.; Su, Dong

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The abrupt heterointerfaces in the Si/Ge materials system presents useful possibilities for electronic device engineering because the band structure can be affected by strain induced by the lattice mismatch. In planar layers, heterointerfaces with abrupt composition changes are difficult to realize without introducing misfit dislocations. However, in catalytically grown nanowires, abrupt heterointerfaces can be fabricated by appropriate choice of the catalyst. Here we grow nanowires containing Si/Ge and Si/Ge/Si structures respectively with sub-1nm thick Ge "quantum wells" and we measure the interfacial strain fields using geometric phase analysis. Narrow Ge layers show radial strains of several percent, with a correspondingmore »dilation in the axial direction. Si/Ge interfaces show lattice rotation and curvature of the lattice planes. We conclude that high strains can be achieved, compared to what is possible in planar layers. In addition, we study the stability of these heterostructures under heating and electron beam irradiation. The strain and composition gradients are supposed to the cause of the instability for interdiffusion.« less

  19. Creep Testing Plastic-Bonded Explosives in Uni-axial Compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagliardi, F J; Cunningham, B J

    2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    High fidelity measurements of time-dependent strain in the plastic-bonded explosives LX-17-1 and PBX 9502 have been performed under constant, uni-axial, compressive load using a custom designed apparatus. The apparatus uses a combination of extensometers and linear variable differential transformers coupled with a data acquisition system, thermal controls, and gravitational loading. The materials being tested consist of a crystalline explosive material mixed with a polymeric binder. The behavior of each material is related to the type of explosive and to the percentage and type of binder. For any given plastic-bonded explosive, the creep behavior is also dependent on the stress level and test temperature. Experiments were conducted using a 3 x 3 stress-temperature matrix with a temperature range of 24 C to 70 C and with stresses ranging from 250-psi to 780-psi. Analysis of the data has shown that logarithmic curve fits provide an accurate means of quantification and facilitate a long-term predictive capability. This paper will discuss the design of the apparatus, experimental results, and analyses.

  20. Ultra-high speed permanent magnet axial gap alternator with multiple stators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawsey, Robert A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, J. Milton (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-high speed, axial gap alternator that can provide an output to a plurality of loads, the alternator providing magnetic isolation such that operating conditions in one load will not affect operating conditions of another load. This improved alternator uses a rotor member disposed between a pair of stator members, with magnets disposed in each of the rotor member surfaces facing the stator members. The magnets in one surface of the rotor member, which alternate in polarity, are isolated from the magnets in the other surface of the rotor member by a disk of magnetic material disposed between the two sets of magents. In the preferred embodiment, this disk of magnetic material is laminated between two layers of non-magnetic material that support the magnets, and the magnetic material has a peripheral rim that extends to both surfaces of the rotor member to enhance the structural integrity. The stator members are substantially conventional in construction in that equally-spaced and radially-oriented slots are provided, and winding members are laid in these slots. A unit with multiple rotor members and stator members is also described.

  1. Octupole deformation in light actinides within an analytic quadrupole octupole axially symmetric model with Davidson potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonatsos, Dennis; Minkov, N; Karampagia, S; Petrellis, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytic quadrupole octupole axially symmetric model, which had successfully predicted 226Ra and 226Th as lying at the border between the regions of octupole deformation and octupole vibrations in the light actinides using an infinite well potential (AQOA-IW), is made applicable to a wider region of nuclei exhibiting octupole deformation, through the use of a Davidson potential (AQOA-D). Analytic expressions for energy spectra and B(E1), B(E2), B(E3) transition rates are derived. The spectra of 222-226Ra and 224,226Th are described in terms of the two parameters phi_0 (expressing the relative amount of octupole vs. quadrupole deformation) and beta_0 (the position of the minimum of the Davidson potential), while the recently determined B(EL) transition rates of 224Ra, presenting stable octupole deformation, are successfully reproduced. A procedure for gradually determining the parameters appearing in the B(EL) transitions from a minimum set of data, thus increasing the predictive power of the model, is out...

  2. Analysis of rabbit intervertebral disc physiology based on water metabolism. II. Changes in normal intervertebral discs under axial vibratory load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, N.; Tsuji, H.; Ohshima, H.; Kitano, S.; Itoh, T.; Sano, A.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Metabolic changes induced by axial vibratory load to the spine were investigated based on water metabolism in normal intervertebral discs of rabbits with or without pentobarbital anesthesia. Tritiated water concentration in the intervertebral discs of unanesthetized rabbits was reduced remarkably by axial vibration for 30 minutes using the vibration machine developed for this study. Repeated vibratory load for 18 and 42 hours duration showed the recovery of /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration of the intervertebral disc without anesthesia. Computer simulation suggested a reduction of blood flow surrounding the intervertebral disc following the vibration stress. However, no reduction of the /sup 3/H/sub 2/O concentration in the intervertebral disc was noted under anesthesia. Emotional stress cannot be excluded as a factor in water metabolism in the intervertebral disc.

  3. B -> K1 gamma and tests of factorization for two-body non leptonic Bdecays with axial-vector mesons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Nardulli; T. N. Pham

    2005-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The large branching ratio for B-> K1 gamma recently measured at Belle implies a large B -> K1 transition form factor and large branching ratios for non leptonic B decays involving an axial-vector meson. In this paper we present an analysis of two-body B decays with an axial-vector meson in the final state using naive factorization and the B -> K1 form factors obtained from the measured radiative decays. We find that the predicted B -> J/psi K1 branching ratio is in agreement with experiment. We also suggest that the decay rates of B -> K1 pi, B -> a1 K and B -> b1 K could be used to test the factorization ansatz.

  4. Experimental verification of J. S. Alford's mathematical model that predicts Alford's destabilizing force in axial flow machinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laudadio, Frank James

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compressors and turbines causes unbalanced torque forces which, in turn, can cause severe rotor whirl; a rotordynamic instabzlity. In his 1965 paper, "Protecting Turbomachinery from Self Excited Rotor 'whirl", Alford presented the equations to predict... were prominent during operation of the rotors at high pressures and power levels. Alford presents two mechanisms which can cause severe rotor whirl in axial compressors and turbines. One is due to the circumferential variation of static pressure...

  5. Laser cooling in the Penning trap: an analytical model for cooling rates in the presence of an axializing field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Hendricks; E. S. Phillips; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson

    2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ions stored in Penning traps may have useful applications in the field of quantum information processing. There are, however, difficulties associated with the laser cooling of one of the radial motions of ions in these traps, namely the magnetron motion. The application of a small radio-frequency quadrupolar electric potential resonant with the sum of the two radial motional frequencies has been shown to couple these motions and to lead to more efficient laser cooling. We present an analytical model that enables us to determine laser cooling rates in the presence of such an 'axializing' field. It is found that this field leads to an averaging of the laser cooling rates for the two motions and hence improves the overall laser cooling efficiency. The model also predicts shifts in the motional frequencies due to the axializing field that are in qualitative agreement with those measured in recent experiments. It is possible to determine laser cooling rates experimentally by studying the phase response of the cooled ions to a near resonant excitation field. Using the model developed in this paper, we study the expected phase response when an axializing field is present.

  6. Axial and transverse acoustic radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in Bessel beam standing wave tweezers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitri, F.G., E-mail: mitri@chevron.com

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The axial and transverse radiation forces on a fluid sphere placed arbitrarily in the acoustical field of Bessel beams of standing waves are evaluated. The three-dimensional components of the time-averaged force are expressed in terms of the beam-shape coefficients of the incident field and the scattering coefficients of the fluid sphere using a partial-wave expansion (PWE) method. Examples are chosen for which the standing wave field is composed of either a zero-order (non-vortex) Bessel beam, or a first-order Bessel vortex beam. It is shown here, that both transverse and axial forces can push or pull the fluid sphere to an equilibrium position depending on the chosen size parameter ka (where k is the wave-number and a the sphere’s radius). The corresponding results are of particular importance in biophysical applications for the design of lab-on-chip devices operating with Bessel beams standing wave tweezers. Moreover, potential investigations in acoustic levitation and related applications in particle rotation in a vortex beam may benefit from the results of this study. -- Highlights: •The axial and transverse forces on a fluid sphere in acoustical Bessel beams tweezers are evaluated. •The attraction or repulsion to an equilibrium position in the standing wave field is examined. •Potential applications are in particle manipulation using standing waves.

  7. Operation of a test bed axial-gap brushless DC rotor with a superconducting stator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, J.W.; Sohns, C.W.; Schwenterly, S.W.; Young, R.W. Sr.; Campbell, V.W.; Hickey, M.H.; Ott, G.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bailey, J.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-speed axial-gap motor with a stator consisting of four liquid helium cooled superconducting electromagnets (two pole pairs) was built and proof tested up to 608 rpm in November 1990 as a tool for joint industry-laboratory evaluation of coils fabricated from high-temperature oxide superconductors. A second rotor was fabricated with improved material, winding configuration, and wire type, and the drive system was modified to eliminate current spiking. The modified motor was characterized to design speed, 188 rad/s (1800 rpm), to acquire a performance baseline for future comparison with that of high-temperature superconducting (HTS) wire. As it becomes commercially available, HTS wire will replace the low-temperature electromagnet wire in a stator modified to control wire temperatures between 4 K and 77 K. Measurements of the superconducting electromagnetic field and locked rotor torque as functions of cryocurrent and dc current through two phases of the rotor, respectively, provided data to estimate power that could be developed by the rotor. Back emf and parasitic mechanical and electromagnetic drag torques were measured as functions of angular velocity to calculate actual rotor power developed and to quantify losses, which reduce the motor`s efficiency. A detailed measurement of motor power at design speed confirmed the developed power equation. When subsequently operated at the 33-A maximum available rotor current, the motor delivered 15.3 kW (20.5 hp) to the load. In a final test, the cryostat was operated at 2500 A, 200 A below its critical current. At rotor design current of 60 A and 2500 A stator current, the extrapolated developed power would be 44.2 kW (59.2 hp) with 94% efficiency.

  8. Dynamics of multiple viscoelastic carbon nanotube based nanocomposites with axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karli?i?, Danilo; Caji?, Milan [Mathematical Institute of the SASA, Kneza Mihaila 36, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Murmu, Tony [School of Engineering, University of the West of Scotland, Paisley PA12BE (United Kingdom); Kozi?, Predrag [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of Niš, A. Medvedeva 14, 18000 Niš (Serbia); Adhikari, Sondipon [College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocomposites and magnetic field effects on nanostructures have received great attention in recent years. A large amount of research work was focused on developing the proper theoretical framework for describing many physical effects appearing in structures on nanoscale level. Great step in this direction was successful application of nonlocal continuum field theory of Eringen. In the present paper, the free transverse vibration analysis is carried out for the system composed of multiple single walled carbon nanotubes (MSWCNT) embedded in a polymer matrix and under the influence of an axial magnetic field. Equivalent nonlocal model of MSWCNT is adopted as viscoelastically coupled multi-nanobeam system (MNBS) under the influence of longitudinal magnetic field. Governing equations of motion are derived using the Newton second low and nonlocal Rayleigh beam theory, which take into account small-scale effects, the effect of nanobeam angular acceleration, internal damping and Maxwell relation. Explicit expressions for complex natural frequency are derived based on the method of separation of variables and trigonometric method for the “Clamped-Chain” system. In addition, an analytical method is proposed in order to obtain asymptotic damped natural frequency and the critical damping ratio, which are independent of boundary conditions and a number of nanobeams in MNBS. The validity of obtained results is confirmed by comparing the results obtained for complex frequencies via trigonometric method with the results obtained by using numerical methods. The influence of the longitudinal magnetic field on the free vibration response of viscoelastically coupled MNBS is discussed in detail. In addition, numerical results are presented to point out the effects of the nonlocal parameter, internal damping, and parameters of viscoelastic medium on complex natural frequencies of the system. The results demonstrate the efficiency of the suggested methodology to find the closed form solutions for the free vibration response of multiple nanostructure systems under the influence of magnetic field.

  9. Criticality and axial offset searches based on the integrated neutron balance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Osso, A. [AREVA NP Tour AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Van Geemert, R. [AREVA GmbH, Paul Gossenstrasse 100, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality and axial offset (AO) searches are key features in the simulation of plant operation procedures. Typically, the dedicated algorithms consist of either a Newton method or a secant method that features the successive computation of difference quotients to be used as derivatives. Within this context, computational robustness and efficiency are of paramount importance. This applies in particular to when the variations imposed during the search are spatially heterogeneous, such as in the case of tuning control rod positions for achieving target AO. In order to optimize this kind of search capability in AREVA NP's reactor code ARTEMIS in accordance with this design principle, a generalized approach has been implemented that harmonizes very well numerically with the overall multi-physics iterative solution process. As embedded in the latter, the new neutronic integral re-balancing approach is defined through periodic whole-core space-energy integrations of the principal terms in the core-integrated process-rate balance terms (i.e. neutron absorption, production and leakage). This procedure yields sequences of single zero-dimensional equations from which the chosen tuning parameters can be solved directly in dependence of the imposed (and systematically fixed) values for the response quantities k{sub eff} and/or AO. The converged result of the iteration sequence of successively obtained search parameter values is final in terms of being fully consistent with the entire set of multi-physics equations while enabling the accurate fulfillment of the target response value. The k etc and AO searches can be pursued simultaneously. Judging from the results of pursued verifications, the neutronic integral re-balancing approach fulfils the above-mentioned expectations convincingly. Specific verification examples are presented, such as the determination of the insertion depth of a critical control bank, a double search on target criticality and target AO by adjusting the boron concentration and the position of a control bank, and a critical power search during reactor cycle stretch out. (authors)

  10. Hybrid experimental-numerical determination of the loading path to fracture in TRIP780 sheets subjected to multi-axial loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunand, Matthieu

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of ductile fracture models of metals requires reliable measurements of the stress and strain histories up to the onset of fracture in multi-axial experiments. In the present work, a hybrid experimental-numerical ...

  11. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

    1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

  12. Strong Room-temperature Negative Transconductance In An Axial Si/Ge Hetero-nanowire Tunneling Field-effect Transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Peng; Le, Son T.; Hou, Xiaoxiao; Zaslavsky, A.; Perea, Daniel E.; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Picraux, Samuel T.

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on room-temperature negative transconductance (NTC) in axial Si/Ge hetero-nanowire tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs). The NTC produces a current peak-to-valley ratio > 45, a high value for a Si-based device. We characterize the NTC characteristics over a range of gate VG and drain VD voltages, finding that NTC persists down to VD = –50 mV. The physical mechanism responsible for the NTC is the VG-induced depletion in the p-Ge section that eventually reduces the maximum electric field that triggers the tunneling ID, as confirmed via three-dimensional TCAD simulations.

  13. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  14. Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

  15. Este trabajo ha contado con la financiacin del Plan Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologa (CICYT TEL96 1304C0201) y del Departamento de Industria del Gobierno Vasco (PGTI96 CO96RO01).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel-Alonso, José

    Este trabajo ha contado con la financiación del Plan Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CICYT TEL96 formación a distancia: IKASTEL J. Aramberri, F. Abal, M. Gamboa, J. Lasa y J. Miguel Departamento de para el aprendizaje a distancia. Las universidades tradicionales se basan en un modelo de aprendizaje

  16. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auluck, S K H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally-unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of ...

  17. Neutron tomography of axially symmetric objects using 14 MeV neutrons from a portable neutron generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersson, P., E-mail: peter.andersson@physics.uu.se; Andersson-Sunden, E.; Sjöstrand, H.; Jacobsson-Svärd, S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Division of Applied Nuclear Physics, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsgatan 1, 751 20 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear boiling water reactor cores, the distribution of water and steam (void) is essential for both safety and efficiency reasons. In order to enhance predictive capabilities, void distribution assessment is performed in two-phase test-loops under reactor-relevant conditions. This article proposes the novel technique of fast-neutron tomography using a portable deuterium-tritium neutron generator to determine the time-averaged void distribution in these loops. Fast neutrons have the advantage of high transmission through the metallic structures and pipes typically concealing a thermal-hydraulic test loop, while still being fairly sensitive to the water/void content. However, commercially available fast-neutron generators also have the disadvantage of a relatively low yield and fast-neutron detection also suffers from relatively low detection efficiency. Fortunately, some loops are axially symmetric, a property which can be exploited to reduce the amount of data needed for tomographic measurement, thus limiting the interrogation time needed. In this article, three axially symmetric test objects depicting a thermal-hydraulic test loop have been examined; steel pipes with outer diameter 24 mm, thickness 1.5 mm, and with three different distributions of the plastic material POM inside the pipes. Data recorded with the FANTOM fast-neutron tomography instrument have been used to perform tomographic reconstructions to assess their radial material distribution. Here, a dedicated tomographic algorithm that exploits the symmetry of these objects has been applied, which is described in the paper. Results are demonstrated in 20 rixel (radial pixel) reconstructions of the interior constitution and 2D visualization of the pipe interior is demonstrated. The local POM attenuation coefficients in the rixels were measured with errors (RMS) of 0.025, 0.020, and 0.022 cm{sup ?1}, solid POM attenuation coefficient. The accuracy and precision is high enough to provide a useful indication on the flow mode, and a visualization of the radial material distribution can be obtained. A benefit of this system is its potential to be mounted at any axial height of a two-phase test section without requirements for pre-fabricated entrances or windows. This could mean a significant increase in flexibility of the void distribution assessment capability at many existing two-phase test loops.

  18. Cylindrically confined pair-ion-electron and pair-ion plasmas having axial sheared flow and radial gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batool, Nazia; Saleem, H. [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan)] [National Centre for Physics (NCP), Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The linear and nonlinear dynamics of pair-ion (PI) and pair-ion-electron plasmas (PIE) have been investigated in a cylindrical geometry with a sheared plasma flow along the axial direction having radial dependence. The coupled linear dispersion relation of low frequency electrostatic waves has been presented taking into account the Guassian profile of density and linear gradient of sheared flow. It is pointed out that the quasi-neutral cold inhomogeneous pure pair ion plasma supports only the obliquely propagating convective cell mode. The linear dispersion relation of this mode has been solved using boundary conditions. The nonlinear structures in the form of vortices formed by different waves have been discussed in PI and PIE plasmas.

  19. Exact analysis of particle dynamics in combined field of finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of a charged particle is studied in the field of a relativistically intense linearly polarized finite duration laser pulse in the presence of a static axial magnetic field. For a finite duration laser pulse whose temporal shape is defined by Gaussian profile, exact analytical expressions are derived for the particle trajectory, momentum, and energy as function of laser phase. From the solutions, it is shown that, unlike for the monochromatic plane wave case, resonant phase locking time between the particle and laser pulse is finite. The net energy transferred to the particle does not increase monotonically but tends to saturate. It is further shown that appropriate tuning of cyclotron frequency of the particle with the characteristic frequency in the pulse spectrum can lead to the generation of accelerated particles with variable energies in MeV-TeV range.

  20. Two-dimensional simulations of thermonuclear burn in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion targets under compressed axial magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, L. J.; Logan, B. G.; Zimmerman, G. B.; Werner, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report for the first time on full 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic implosion simulations that explore the impact of highly compressed imposed magnetic fields on the ignition and burn of perturbed spherical implosions of ignition-scale cryogenic capsules. Using perturbations that highly convolute the cold fuel boundary of the hotspot and prevent ignition without applied fields, we impose initial axial seed fields of 20–100 T (potentially attainable using present experimental methods) that compress to greater than 4 × 10{sup 4} T (400 MG) under implosion, thereby relaxing hotspot areal densities and pressures required for ignition and propagating burn by ?50%. The compressed field is high enough to suppress transverse electron heat conduction, and to allow alphas to couple energy into the hotspot even when highly deformed by large low-mode amplitudes. This might permit the recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic instabilities.

  1. Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichner, Philip (Plum Borough, PA); Dollard, Walter J. (Churchill Borough, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

  2. Department o f Math ema tics , Tucso n, AZ 85721 520.626.6145 i me @mat h.a rizo na. edu im e. mat h.ar izona .e du ANNUAL REPORT, 20072008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    Department o f Math ema tics , Tucso n, AZ 85721 · 520.626.6145 · i me @mat h.a rizo na. edu · im e. mat h.ar izona .e du ANNUAL REPORT, 2007­2008 INSTITUTE FOR MATHEMATICS AND EDUCATION #12;#12;I ns ti Education, March 20­22, 2008 5 Southwestern Network Meeting and Proof Workshop, September 27, 2008 5 Facing

  3. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bear, New Energy Corporation; Mary Ann Adonizio, Verdant Power; Sean Anderton, Ocean Renewable Power Company; Roger Bedard, EPRI (retired); Howard Hanson, Florida Atlantic...

  4. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Sequim Bay facility, which is a part of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Tests will reveal anti-biofouling efficacy of coatings developed for MHK technology...

  5. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program is seeking to better understand the current state of development of existing wave energy converter systems and current energy converter systems nearing one of two...

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NETHERLANDS 31-20-716-8076 0800-020-0351 NEW ZEALAND 64-9-970-4606 0800-456-270 NORWAY 47-21-590-025 800-18093 PANAMA 011-001-800-5072372 PERU 0800-53731 PHILIPPINES...

  7. SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

  8. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    University Consortium." This funding opportunity is supporting the advancement of wave and tidal energy technologies while developing a globally competitive MHK workforce....

  9. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and...

  10. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office ofDemonstrationDepartment

  11. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group current C3E AmbassadorsUS-EU-Japan-JapanHighlyFrom

  12. MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy Information Basin

  13. MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:Energy Information BasinRiver

  14. MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma:EnergyECO Auger < MHK Technologies JumpBarge

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0808-238-9817 UNITED KINGDOM LEEDS 44-113-301-0013 0808-238-9817 UNITED KINGDOM LONDON 44-20-7950-1322 0808-238-9817 UNITED KINGDOM MANCHESTER 44-161-601-0113 0808-238-9817...

  16. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    as the device performed as expected, with no discernible harm to river-dwelling fish. Free Flow has also completed preliminary designs of utility-scale installations at a...

  17. Free Flow Power Partners to Improve Hydrokinetic Turbine Performance and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdfStatement of Christopher47328 Vol.ModernFrancis

  18. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: Congestion Study CommentsStolar,NEACEnergy AviationThis

  19. Funding Opportunity Announcement for a Marine and Hydrokinetic Development

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies ProgramOutfittedof Energydetails to

  20. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Environmental

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005UNS Electric,RMPipeline FirstSpent Nuclear Fuels Request ForMonitoring

  1. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelLists for Companies"Image

  2. Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual ModelLists for

  3. In-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:DepartmentDepartment of EnergyEnergy JohnExcel Version

  4. First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project in

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,,of ScienceCurrentEmergencyU.S.U.S. DOEField

  5. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Energy NorthB O N N E V I L L E

  6. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCODepartment ofRecipients |Demonstration Project and the

  7. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership of theArctic Energy Summit26

  8. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005Site-Level Exercise

  9. DOE Announces Marine and Hydrokinetic Open Data Effort | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,CraftyChair'sAnnounces Dates for 2014Energy DOE

  10. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements

  11. Sandia Energy - Biofouling Studies on Sandia's Marine Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatings Initiated at PNNL's Sequim Bay Coatings Initiated at PNNL's

  12. Sandia Energy - Investigations on Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Foil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand RequirementsCoatingsUltra-High-VoltagePower Company'sInAsInternationalStructural Health

  13. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Research & Development | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3 BulletinProject »Energy

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Development and Testing | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3 BulletinProject »EnergyDepartment

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3 BulletinProject

  16. Upcoming Funding Opportunity for Competitive Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian Nuclear Warheads intoMansoor Ghassem ) )3/03DepartmentUntitled

  17. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next > Sun Mon Tue Wed ThuofDemonstration Crosscuton

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch8,of Energy Marine

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch8,of Energy

  20. MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformation Other4Q07)AK ProjectMS Project

  1. MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet.7413°, -155.488° Project PhaseSakonnet

  2. MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg BendWillapaInformation

  3. MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlane <Turbines <

  4. MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship <Helix <ITRI20kW.jpgstream

  5. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesourceCharacterization 2

  6. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesourceCharacterization 2Information

  7. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60 DATE:AnnualDepartment ofPotential Healthon Aquatic

  8. Request for Information Regarding the Testing of Marine and Hydrokinetic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission to China at

  9. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferApril 1,(EAC) Richard Cowart,Department ofCommercialDepartment ofMarine

  10. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Technology Development Risk Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECSEnergy Plans

  11. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez PuebloManteca,Marana,MariesWave) Jump to:

  12. NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photo of twoInstrumentation,

  13. Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained ByManagement IncDrillbe nice if logos could betemplate. It

  14. New Report States That Hydrokinetic Turbines Have Minimal Environmental

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9, 2013 V-237:MultimediaConsumers' UtilityPenetrations

  15. Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) Databases and Systems Fact Sheet | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe District of ColumbiaDepartment of EnergyDepartmentMarinaThisof

  16. Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe District of ColumbiaDepartment of

  17. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015of 2005 atthe District of ColumbiaDepartment ofEnergy Photo of several

  18. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy

  19. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group JumpNew Hampshire:Marin Energy

  20. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to EnergyDepartment ofMarginal Energy Prices - RECS97 Update

  1. Marine and Hydrokinetic Market Acceleration and Deployment | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction to EnergyDepartment ofMarginal Energy Prices - RECS97 UpdateDepartment

  2. Enviro effects of hydrokinetic turbines on fish | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGeneration | Department ofDecember 2014Hurdles:

  3. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGeneration | Department56-2011DepartmentThird

  4. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansasAshford,Asotin County,Resource | Open

  5. Sandia Energy - Numerical Simulations of Hydrokinetics in the Roza Canal,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757Kelley RuehlReport Posted North AmericanStudy

  6. Sandia Energy - Sandia Releases Open-Source Hydrokinetic Turbine Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffects of Wave-Energy ConvertersModel,

  7. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Milestone | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,Forked River,eventInformation

  8. Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs ValleyCity,Forked

  9. Notice of Intent to Fund Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaeferAprilOverview | DepartmentofEmergingKevin Craft WhatDepartment of

  10. Request for Information for Marine and Hydrokinetic Field Measurements |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues CellsReportDepartment of Energy for Marine

  11. Paper No. 11.02 1 Axial-Compressive Capacities of a New Type of Tapered Steel Pipe Pile at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Paper No. 11.02 1 Axial-Compressive Capacities of a New Type of Tapered Steel Pipe Pile at the John driven piles have been the deep foundation of choice at the well-known John F. Kennedy International. For many decades naturally tapered timber piles were used primarily but various brands of closed-end steel

  12. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 547 (2005) 663678 Determining axial fuel-rod power-density profiles from in-core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shultis, J. Kenneth

    is proposed for determining power-density profiles in nuclear reactor fuel rods from neutron flux measurementsNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 547 (2005) 663­678 Determining axial fuel-rod power-density profiles from in-core neutron flux measurements J. Kenneth Shultis� Department

  13. Anomalous junctions characterized by Raman spectroscopy in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Han, Jinyun; Cheng, Zhaofang; Liang, Chunping; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of junctions in nanowires by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with spherical aberration correction is tricky and tedious. Many disadvantages also exist, including rigorous sample preparation and structural damage inflicted by high-energy electrons. In this work, we present a simple, low-cost, and non-destructive Raman spectroscopy method of characterizing anomalous junctions in nanowires with axially degraded components. The Raman spectra of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are studied in detail using a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. Three Raman peaks (?{sub Si–Si}?=?490?cm{sup ?1}, ?{sub Si–Ge}?=?400?cm{sup ?1}, and ?{sub Ge–Ge}?=?284?cm{sup ?1}) up-shift with increased Si content. This up-shift originates in the bond compression induced by a confined effect on the radial direction of nanowire. The anomalous junctions in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are then observed by Raman spectroscopy and verified by transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The anomalous junctions of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are due to the vortex flow of inlet SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} gas in their synthesis. The anomalous junctions can be used as raw materials for fabricating devices with special functions.

  14. Tri-axial magnetic anisotropies in RE{sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub 15?y} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horii, Shigeru, E-mail: horii.shigeru.7e@kyoto-u.ac.jp; Doi, Toshiya [Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Okuhira, Shota; Yamaki, Momoko [Department of Environmental Systems Engineering, Kochi University of Technology, Tosa-Yamada, Kami-shi, Kochi 782-8502 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji; Shimoyama, Jun-ichi [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel quantification method of tri-axial magnetic anisotropy in orthorhombic substances containing rare earth (RE) ions using tri-axial magnetic alignment and tri-axial magnetic anisotropies depending on the type of RE in RE-based cuprate superconductors. From the changes in the axes for magnetization in magnetically aligned powders of (RE?{sub 1?x}RE?{sub x}){sub 2}Ba{sub 4}Cu{sub 7}O{sub y} [(RE?,RE?)247] containing RE ions with different single-ion magnetic anisotropies, the ratios of three-dimensional magnetic anisotropies between RE?247 and RE?247 could be determined. The results in (Y,Er)247, (Dy,Er)247, (Ho,Er)247, and (Y,Eu)247 systems suggest that magnetic anisotropies largely depended on the type of RE? (or RE?), even in the heavy RE ions with higher magnetic anisotropies. An appropriate choice of RE ions in RE-based cuprate superconductors enables the reduction of the required magnetic field for the production of their bulks and thick films based on the tri-axial magnetic alignment technique using modulated rotation magnetic fields.

  15. Experimental study of blade thickness effects on the overall and local performances of a Controlled Vortex Designed axial-flow fan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the dissipation of energy in the von K´arm´an street behind the blades so that the per- formances of the fan Vortex Designed axial-flow fan C. Sarrafa , H. Nouria , F. Raveleta, , F. Bakira aArts et Metiers Paris

  16. Anderson-Gregory; Constable-Steven; Orcutt-John; Staudigel-Hubert; Tolstoy-Maya; Wyatt-Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    -Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical Union de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.22; 2, Pages 147-150. 1995. Baker-Edward-T; Fox eruption of Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Geophysical Research Letters.26; 23, Pages 3445-3448. 1999

  17. GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells with Axial p-i-n Junctions Maoqing Yao, Ningfeng Huang, Sen Cong, Chun-Yung Chi, M. Ashkan Seyedi, Yen-Ting Lin, Yu Cao,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    for future low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics. KEYWORDS: Nanowires, solar cells, gallium arsenide, axial.58% efficiency. Simulations show that axial junctions are more tolerant to doping variation than radial junctions and shallow junctions are essential for a high extraction efficiency. Our approach opens up great opportunity

  18. Arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pidcoe, Stephen V. (Bonita, CA); Zink, Roger A. (Desoto, TX); Boroski, William N. (Aurora, IL); McCaw, William R. (Burr Ridge, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An arrangement for measuring the field angle of a magnetic field as a function of axial position within a magnet bore tube of a magnet such as is used with the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The arrangement includes a magnetic field alignment gauge that is carried through the magnet bore tube by a positioning shuttle in predetermined increments. The positioning shuttle includes an extensible body assembly which is actuated by an internal piston arrangement. A pair of spaced inflatable cuffs are carried by the body assembly and are selectively actuated in cooperation with pressurizing of the piston to selectively drive the positioning shuttle in an axial direction. Control of the shuttle is provided by programmed electronic computer means located exteriorly of the bore tube and which controls valves provided pressurized fluid to the inflatable cuss and the piston arrangement.

  19. Instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi; Mehrabi, Narges [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dispersion relation of a two-stream free-electron laser (TSFEL) with a one-dimensional helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field is studied. Also, all relativistic effects on the space-charge wave and radiation are considered. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to find the unstable interaction among the all wave modes. Numerical calculations show that the growth rate is considerably enhanced in comparison with single-stream FEL. The effect of the velocity difference of the two electron beams on the two-stream instability and the FEL resonance is investigated. The maximum growth rate of FEL resonance is investigated numerically as a function of the axial magnetic field.

  20. A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations simulating dynamic pulse buckling tests of cylindrical shells under axial impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the study is to compare the performance of the various analysis codes and element types with respect to a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry.

  1. Axial magnetic field and toroidally streaming fast ions in the dense plasma focus are natural consequences of conservation laws in the curved axisymmetric geometry of the current sheath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auluck, S. K. H. [Physics Group, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurement of axial magnetic field in the PF-1000 dense plasma focus (DPF), and its reported correlation with neutron emission, call for a fresh look at previous reports of existence of axial magnetic field component in the DPF from other laboratories, and associated data suggesting toroidal directionality of fast ions participating in fusion reactions, with a view to understand the underlying physics. In this context, recent work dealing with application of the hyperbolic conservation law formalism to the DPF is extended in this paper to a curvilinear coordinate system, which reflects the shape of the DPF current sheath. Locally unidirectional shock propagation in this coordinate system enables construction of a system of 7 one-dimensional hyperbolic conservation law equations with geometric source terms, taking into account all the components of magnetic field and flow velocity. Rankine-Hugoniot jump conditions for this system lead to expressions for the axial magnetic field and three components of fluid velocity having high ion kinetic energy.

  2. Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    East, Building 1 Santa Fe , New Mexico 87505-6303 Subject: Notification of Class 1 Permit Modification to the Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, Number: NM4890139088-TSDF Dear...

  3. MARY PARK HA hrough 6 and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @sfsu.ed 2011] s: Floors 1 th ny resident in M ooms and livin East [odd] side ooms. An asse rs 1, 2, 4, 5

  4. art Phones ha versity of Wa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queitsch, Christine

    nts a potentia ed smart pho icer (CISO) e secure the sm ss code or PI e or PIN with one to lock au of the CISO bile work force d to importa ty application y, integrity, an y business, th er the followin ccess

  5. Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'.SolarUS Dept of Energy,Moving Quarks Help JohnMr. J

  6. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  7. www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 293 31 AUGUST 2001 1563 Ha Ha, Fooled You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Daniel A.

    not from a pet-filled aquarium but a lab studying the origin and spread of cancer. Crosses be- tween, behaviorists, and others interested in these colorful natives of Mexico and Central America. You'll find

  8. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onda, Kenji [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)]. E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Kawakubo, Yo [Department of Dermatology, Teikyo University School of Medicine, Ichihara Hospital, Chiba (Japan); Inoue, Shota [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Hirano, Toshihiko [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Oka, Kitaro [Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan)

    2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  9. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. During the pulse buckling tests, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using PRONTO, a Sandia developed transient dynamics analysis code, and ABAQUS/Explicit with both shell and continuum elements. The calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history.

  10. Self-field effects on instability of wave modes in a two-stream free-electron laser with an axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohsenpour, Taghi, E-mail: mohsenpour@umz.ac.ir; Rezaee Rami, Omme Kolsoum [Department of Physics, Faculty of Basic Sciences, University of Mazandaran, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Free electron lasers (FEL) play major roles in the Raman Regime, due to the charge and current densities of the beam self-field. The method of perturbation has been applied to study the influence of self-electric and self-magnetic fields. A dispersion relation for two-stream free electron lasers with a helical wiggler and an axial magnetic field has been found. This dispersion relation is solved numerically to investigate the influence of self-fields on the FEL coupling and the two-stream instability. It was found that self-fields can produce very large effects on the FEL coupling, but they have almost negligible effects on two-stream instability.

  11. Measurement of the forming limit stress curve using a multi-axial tube expansion test with a digital image correlation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakoyama, Tomoyuki [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Graduate school of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakacho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan); Kuwabara, Toshihiko [Division of Advanced Mechanical Systems Engineering, Institute of Engineering, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 2-24-16, Nakacho, Koganei-shi, Tokyo, 184-8588 (Japan)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A servo-controlled tension-internal pressure testing machine with an optical 3D deformation analysis system (ARAMIS) was used to measure the multi-axial plastic deformation behavior of a high-strength steel sheet for a range of strain from initial yield to fracture. The testing machine is capable of applying arbitrary principal stress or strain paths to a tubular specimen using an electrical, closed-loop servo-control system for axial force and internal pressure. Tubular specimens with an inner diameter of 44.6 mm were fabricated from a high-strength steel sheet with a tensile strength of 590 MPa and a thickness of 1.2 mm by roller bending and laser welding. Several linear and non-linear stress paths in the first quadrant of the stress space were applied to the tubular specimens in order to measure the forming limit curve (FLC) and forming limit stress curve (FLSC) of the as-received test material, in addition to the contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates. The contours of plastic work and the directions of plastic strain rates measured for the linear stress path experiments were compared with those calculated using selected yield functions in order to identify the most appropriate yield function for the test material. Moreover, a Marciniak-Kuczy?ski type (M-K) forming limit analysis was performed using the most appropriate yield function. The calculated and measured FLC and FLSC were compared in order to validate the M-K approach. The path-dependence of the FLC and FLSC was also investigated.

  12. Please cite this article in press as: Flammang, B.E., The fish tail as a derivation from axial musculoskeletal anatomy: an integrative analysis of functional morphology. Zoology (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.zool.2013.10.001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flammang, Brooke

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Please cite this article in press as: Flammang, B.E., The fish tail as a derivation from axial The fish tail as a derivation from axial musculoskeletal anatomy: an integrative analysis of functional October 2013 Accepted 9 October 2013 Available online xxx Keywords: Caudal fin musculature Fish tail

  13. Dynamic pulse buckling of cylindrical shells under axial impact: A comparison of 2D and 3D finite element calculations with experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several 2D and 3D finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the work is to investigate the performance of various analysis codes and element types on a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry. Four axial impact tests were performed on 4 in-diameter, 8 in-long, 304 L stainless steel cylinders with a 3/16 in wall thickness. The cylinders were struck by a 597 lb mass with an impact velocity ranging from 42.2 to 45.1 ft/sec. During the impact event, a buckle formed at each end of the cylinder, and one of the two buckles became unstable and collapsed. The instability occurred at the top of the cylinder in three tests and at the bottom in one test. Numerical simulations of the test were performed using the following codes and element types: PRONTO2D with axisymmetric four-node quadrilaterals; PRONTO3D with both four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons; and ABAQUS/Explicit with axisymmetric two-node shells and four-node quadrilaterals, and 3D four-node shells and eight-node hexahedrons. All of the calculations are compared to the tests with respect to deformed shape and impact load history. As in the tests, the location of the instability is not consistent in all of the calculations. However, the calculations show good agreement with impact load measurements with the exception of an initial load spike which is proven to be the dynamic response of the load cell to the impact. Finally, the PRONIT02D calculation is compared to the tests with respect to strain and acceleration histories. Accelerometer data exhibited good qualitative agreement with the calculations. The strain comparisons show that measurements are very sensitive to gage placement.

  14. An Attempt to Calibrate and Validate a Simple Ductile Failure Model Against Axial-Torsion Experiments on Al 6061-T651.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reedlunn, Benjamin; Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report details a work in progress. We have attempted to calibrate and validate a Von Mises plasticity model with the Johnson-Cook failure criterion ( Johnson & Cook , 1985 ) against a set of experiments on various specimens of Al 6061-T651. As will be shown, the effort was not successful, despite considerable attention to detail. When the model was com- pared against axial-torsion experiments on tubes, it over predicted failure by 3 x in tension, and never predicted failure in torsion, even when the tube was twisted by 4 x further than the experiment. While this result is unfortunate, it is not surprising. Ductile failure is not well understood. In future work, we will explore whether more sophisticated material mod- els of plasticity and failure will improve the predictions. Selecting the appropriate advanced material model and interpreting the results of said model are not trivial exercises, so it is worthwhile to fully investigate the behavior of a simple plasticity model before moving on to an anisotropic yield surface or a similarly complicated model.

  15. SU-E-T-300: Spatial Variations of Multiple Off-Axial Targets for a Single Isocenter SRS Treatment Plan in ExacTrac 6D Robotic Couch System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S [Genesis Medical Center, Davenport, IA (United States); Tseng, T [Mount Sinai Hospital, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the spatial variations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) treatment plan in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system (BrainLab AG). Methods: Five metallic ball bearing (BB) markers were placed sparsely in 3D off-axial locations (non-coplanar) inside a skull phantom as the representatives of multiple targets mimicking multiple brain metastases. The locations of the BB markers were carefully chosen to minimize overlapping of each other in a port imaging detector plane. The skull phantom was immobilized by a frameless mask and CT scanned with a BrainLab Head and Neck Localizer using a GE Optima MDCT scanner. The CT images were exported to iPlan software (BrainLab AG) and a multiple target PTV was drawn by combining all the contours of the BBs. The margin of the MLC opening was selected as 3 mm expansion outward. Two coplanar arc beams were placed to generate a single isocenter SRS plan to treat the PTV. The arc beams were delivered using Novalis Tx system with portal imaging acquisition mode per 10% temporal resolution. The locations of the BBs were visualized and analyzed with respect to the MLC aperture in the treatment plan similar to the Winston-Lutz test. Results: All the BBs were clearly identified inside the MLC openings. The positional errors for the BBs were overall less than 1 mm along the rotational path of the two arcs. Conclusion: This study verified that the spatial deviations of multiple off-axial targets for a single isocenter SRS treatment plan is within sub-millimeter range in ExacTrac 6D robotic couch system. Accompanied with the Winston-Lutz test, this test will quality-assure the spatial accuracies of the isocenter as well as the positions of multiple off-axial targets for the SRS treatment using a single isocenter multiple target treatment plan.

  16. Save Energy with Axial Fans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, R. C.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling systems would be as follows: In all our discussions dry cooling towers refers to air cooled heat exchangers using no evaporative cooling. A comparison of the systems is shown below and in Fi gs. 1 and 2: TYPICAl FORCED DRAFT AIR COOLER FIG.1... 1----v.fIl. STACK TYPICAL WET COOLING TOWER Flg.2 428 ESL-IE-81-04-73 Proceedings from the Third Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 26-29, 1981 CONDITION DRY COOLING WET COOLING Approach Imaginary cylinder Supporting...

  17. Name Name Address Place Zip Category Sector Telephone number...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydro Marine and Hydrokinetic http acep uaf edu facilities tanana river hydrokinetic test site aspx Alden Research Laboratory Inc Alden Research Laboratory Inc Shrewsbury Street...

  18. New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Industry New Request for Information on Strategy to Advance the Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy...

  19. Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, E.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

  20. NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

  1. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

  2. On freeze-out problem in hydro-kinetic approach to A+A collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. M. Sinyukov; S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama

    2002-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for evaluating spectra and correlations in the hydrodynamic approach is proposed. It is based on an analysis of Boltzmann equations (BE) in terms of probabilities for constituent particles to escape from the interacting system. The conditions of applicability of Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription are considered within the method. The results are illustrated with a non-relativistic exact solution of BE for expanding spherical fireball as well as with approximate solutions for ellipsoidally expanding ones.

  3. Rheological properties of soft-glassy flows from hydro-kinetic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Benzi; M. Bernaschi; M. Sbragaglia; S. Succi

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on numerical simulations of a lattice kinetic model for soft-glassy materials, we characterize the global rheology of a dense emulsion-like system, under three representative load conditions: Couette flow, time-oscillating Strain and Kolmogorov flow. It is found that in all cases the rheology is described by a Herschel-Bulkley (HB) relation, $\\sigma = {\\sigma}_{Y} + A S^{\\beta}$, with the yield stress ${\\sigma}_{Y}$ largely independent of the loading scenario. A proper rescaling of the HB parameters permits to describe heterogeneous flows with space-dependent stresses, based on the notion of cooperativity, as recently proposed to characterize the degree of non-locality of stress relaxation phenomena in soft-glassy materials.

  4. Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of ”eddies” at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

  5. Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

  6. Effects on Freshwater Organisms of Magnetic Fields Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Turner, Julie W [ORNL

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underwater cables will be used to transmit electricity between turbines in an array (interturbine cables), between the array and a submerged step-up transformer (if part of the design), and from the transformer or array to shore. All types of electrical transmitting cables (as well as the generator itself) will emit EMF into the surrounding water. The electric current will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of animals. Because direct electrical field emissions can be prevented by shielding and armoring, we focused our studies on the magnetic fields that are unavoidably induced by electric current moving through a generator or transmission cable. These initial experiments were carried out to evaluate whether a static magnetic field, such as would be produced by a direct current (DC) transmitting cable, would affect the behavior of common freshwater fish and invertebrates.

  7. MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMARECInformationGriffinCA

  8. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear13SummerBookmark andMaps

  9. ORNL/TM-2012/221 Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResourcesThe Value News and AwardsORNL/TM-2012/221

  10. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Initiative TIDAL ENERGY SYSTEM FOR ON-SHORE POWER GENERATION

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamics in807 DE899 06 Revision 0U7114-

  11. Proceedings of the Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prev next > SunChallenge to DriveElectric GridProceedings of

  12. Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »of EnergyLearning & DevelopmentEnergythe

  13. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch8, 2006:Marina Sofosto

  14. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch8,of EnergyMarine

  15. NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemicalIndustryIssuePhoto ofData

  16. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0andEnergyGlobal Nuclear EnergySouth

  17. Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 ThisFinalResearch and Development |

  18. Potential Impacts of Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Conversion Technologies on Aquatic Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1Department of60 DATE:AnnualDepartment ofPotential Healthon Aquatic

  19. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies, Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 2012 (MECSEnergy Plans andWorkerandPROGRAM C L

  20. Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems |AsApril 1, 2014May1TECHNICAL

  1. Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies, 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGeneration | Department56-2011DepartmentThirdEnvironmental

  2. Report to Congress on the Potential Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy using Fues CellsReport on Separate Disposal6 Report

  3. Tinamus osgoodi ha sido registrada en algunas loca-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuervo, Andrés

    geográfica Tinamus osgoodi #12;58 Caquetá: vereda La Esmeralda (1°20'55''N 76°6'11''O), municipio San José

  4. System design Active/Active HA Job Scheduler and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engelmann, Christian

    of scheduled job No loss of running job No restart of running jobs Leading to uninterruptible service overview Project goals failure of head node job submitted job runs job resubmitted job runs job done job resubmitted job runs job done job runs job done job continues job done Resubmission without checkpointing

  5. Harmonic analysis of the Ha velocity field of NGC 4254

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Chemin; Olivier Hernandez; Chantal Balkowski; Claude Carignan; Philippe Amram

    2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The ionized gas kinematics of the Virgo Cluster galaxy NGC 4254 (Messier 99) is analyzed by an harmonic decomposition of the velocity field into Fourier coefficients. The aims of this study are to measure the kinematical asymmetries of Virgo cluster galaxies and to connect them to the environment. The analysis reveals significant $m=1,2,4$ terms which origins are discussed.

  6. By Diana Ha, Undergraduate, UNLV The Forensics Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    .com/journal/the_internet_journal_of_forensic_science.html) Forensic Science Communications (an open access journal from the FBI) (http://www.fbi

  7. November 2012 H&A in the News Featured Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    will be announced on November 10. Also, three eatre Arts students(Sarah Kate Anderson, Melinda Marks, and J.D. Jeans) presented papers at the Irish Studies West Conference in Park City, Utah and Sarah Kate Anderson was awarded Professors Jonathan Lovell and Mary Warner in the English Department: sanjosewritingproject@sjsu.edu. e

  8. ADVANCES IN RADIATION MUTAGENESIS THROUGH STUDIES ON DROSOHiHA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See the EnergyTAMANG, APIL. AProvenanceGte d N a t i o

  9. The development of CACTUS : a wind and marine turbine performance simulation code.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Murray, Jonathan

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CACTUS (Code for Axial and Cross-flow TUrbine Simulation) is a turbine performance simulation code, based on a free wake vortex method, under development at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as part of a Department of Energy program to study marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. The current effort builds upon work previously done at SNL in the area of vertical axis wind turbine simulation, and aims to add models to handle generic device geometry and physical models specific to the marine environment. An overview of the current state of the project and validation effort is provided.

  10. Analysis of the approximations applied in the continuum-distorted-wave-eikonal-initial-state theory for the evaluation of ionization cross sections: Post-prior discrepancy, axial symmetry, and ion-ion interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, S. D.; Garibotti, C. R. [CONICET and Centro Atomico Bariloche, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Fiori, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Nacional de Salta, 4400 Salta (Argentina)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    When the continuum distorted wave with eikonal initial state (CDW-EIS) [D. S. Crothers and J. F. McCann, J. Phys B 16, 3229 (1983)] theory is applied to the evaluation of ionization cross sections, many additional approximations are assumed. However, usually, the influence of these approximations is not clear. Aiming to estimate them, we compare the differential and total cross sections obtained with diverse approximations for ionization of He atoms by proton impact. We analyze the post-prior discrepancy, which depends on the perturbative Hamiltonian applied in the scattering amplitude. We study the dependence of the cross sections on the description of the initial and final states. For this purpose, we use the 1Z and 5Z variational and numerical Optimized Potential Model (OPM) [J. D. Talman, Comput. Phys. Commun. 54, 85 (1989)] bound states for the initial target state, and for the final target state we set Coulomb waves with proper effective charges or the continuum state of an OPM potential model. The cross sections resulting from OPM post and prior versions are identical and show excellent agreement with experimental data in each case. Nevertheless, the cross section derived by the prior CDW-EIS, 5Z initial wave, and corresponding continuum state gives comparable results, requiring shorter computational work. Then we study the determination of the impact parameter ionization probability from the transition amplitudes, also including an axial symmetry for the ionization process. The hypothesis of this axial symmetry saves an angular integration in the evaluation of the probabilities. We analyze the variation of these probabilities within the post and prior formalisms and mention initial and final states, according to the supposed symmetry. We found that the probabilities derived with the axial symmetry concentrate at a lower impact parameter than the usual ones and are quite sensitive to the approximations used for the CDW-EIS evaluation. Furthermore, these probabilities underestimate distant collisions. In the last section we introduce the projectile-residual ion potential, and we discuss the effect of the diverse approximations on the dependence of the cross section as a function of the projectile scattering angle. We compare the projectile angular distribution resulting from a full Coulomb interaction between the ions with the one obtained by a screened potential, but in the latter case the theoretical distributions underestimate the experimental data. The OPM and 5Z functions give a good description of the experimental data.

  11. Figure 1. A result from a 14-year old subject with sleep related breathing disorder. (a,b) Axial MR image frames representing that there is (a) no apneic event and (b) central apnea. A marked reduction of the airway cross-sectional area is observed in (b)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Figure 1. A result from a 14-year old subject with sleep related breathing disorder. (a,b) Axial MR information of the nasal and pharyngeal airway [1]. MRI has the potential to visualize sites of airway are 1) simultaneous recording of relevant physiological signals (e.g., heart rate, oxygen saturation

  12. Atropisomerism Axial Chirality in Nature and Synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Monday 11/14/2005 8 pm 147 Noyes R R MLn * R R O O OH MeO MeO OH OMe OMe OH OH O O OH OH Me OH Me O Me

  13. The Axial Anomaly Revisted \\Lambda Paul Federbush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fermion coupled to two gauge bosons described by the formal Lagrangian L = i ¯ \\Psifl ¯ (@ ¯ + ieA ¯ + ifl the Lagrangian: L g = i ¯ \\Psifl ¯ (@ u + ieA ¯ + if fl 5 B ¯ )\\Psi \\Gamma 1 4 F ¯š F ¯š \\Gamma 1 4 G ¯š G ¯š

  14. High Power Co-Axial Coupler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, M. [Muons, Inc.; Dudas, A. [Muons, Inc.; Rimmer, Robert A. [JLAB; Guo, Jiquan [JLAB; Williams, R. Scott [JLAB

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very high power Coax RF Coupler (MW-Level) is very desirable for a number of accelerator and commercial applications. For example, the development of such a coupler operating at 1.5 GHz may permit the construction of a higher-luminosity version of the Electron-Ion Collider (EIC) being planned at JLab. Muons, Inc. is currently funded by a DOE STTR grant to develop a 1.5-GHz high-power doublewindowcoax coupler with JLab (about 150 kW). Excellent progress has been made on this R&D project, so we propose an extension of this development to build a very high power coax coupler (MW level peak power and a max duty factor of about 4%). The dimensions of the current coax coupler will be scaled up to provide higher power capability.

  15. Rapid-quench axially staged combustor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feitelberg, Alan S. (Niskayuna, NY); Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY); Goebel, Steven George (Clifton Park, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combustor cooperating with a compressor in driving a gas turbine includes a cylindrical outer combustor casing. A combustion liner, having an upstream rich section, a quench section and a downstream lean section, is disposed within the outer combustor casing defining a combustion chamber having at least a core quench region and an outer quench region. A first plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a first diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the core region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. A second plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a second diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the outer region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. In an alternative embodiment, the combustion chamber quench section further includes at least one middle region and at least a third plurality of quench holes disposed within the liner at the quench section having a third diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to at least one middle region of the quench section of the combustion chamber.

  16. Baroclinic tides in an axially symmetric basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Edward Paul

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stratification can be described using only the lowest inodes and exhibit much more realistic behavior. Baroclinic tide generation is confined to the upper slope and the magnitudes of baroclinic tidal currents compare well with observed values. In contrast... to previous ray tracing models, the present model does not generate beams of baroclinic tidal energy. This agrees with most measurements and is probably an effect of the generation region. For the bathymetry and stratification chosen for this model...

  17. Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kropp, Roy K.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

  18. T H E S C H O OL O F P H A R M A C Y A ND P H A R MA C E U TI C A L S C I E NC ES P H A R MA C EU T I C A L S C I EN C E S T H E S C HO O L OF P HA R MA C Y A N D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    1 T H E S C H O OL O F P H A R M A C Y A ND P H A R MA C E U TI C A L S C I E NC ES P H A R MA C EU T I C A L S C I EN C E S T H E S C HO O L OF P HA R MA C Y A N D S C IE N C E S T H E S C H O O L O F P H A RM A C Y A N D P H A R M A C E U T IC A L P H A R M A C Y A ND P H A R MA C E U TI C A L P U R

  19. The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

    2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

  20. Sudden freeze-out vs continuous emission: duality in hydro-kinetic approach to A+A collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. V. Akkelin; M. S. Borysova; Yu. M. Sinyukov

    2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of spectra formation in hydrodynamic approach to A+A collisions is discussed. It is analyzed in terms of the two different objects: distribution and emission functions. We show that though the process of particle liberation, described by the emission function, is, usually, continuous in time, the observable spectra can be also expressed by means of the Landau/Cooper-Frye prescription. We argue that such an approximate duality results from some symmetry properties that systems in A+A collisions reach to the end of hydrodynamic evolution and reduction of the collision rate at post hydrodynamic stage

  1. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  2. Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

  3. Statistical Analysis of a Three-dimensional Axial Strain and Axial-shear Strain Elastography Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mohan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of decorrelation in the RF data. In this thesis, a 3D elastography algorithm that estimates all the three components of tissue displacement is implemented and tested statistically. In this research, displacement fields of mechanical models are simulated. RF signals...

  4. Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dag Hammarskjlds vg B Uppsala S Marine and Hydrokinetic http http www currentpower se Sweden Current Power AB Dag Hammarskjlds vg B Uppsala S Marine and Hydrokinetic http http www...

  5. Perch`e Frances E. Allen ha vinto la Turing Award 2006?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moggi, Eugenio

    logico inglese Alan Turing (1912-54), che negli anni '30 f`u tra i fondatori della Teoria della`o esibire un com- portamento "intelligente" al pari di un essere umano. Maggiori informazioni su Alan Turing

  6. Graffiacane Non avere paura. Guarda qui. Questo un AK47. Ha una

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frosini, Patrizio

    mamma e mi aspettate là. Però mi devi ubbidire. Quando esco tu non stai a guardare me. Esci dal retro e

  7. A survey on the public perception of CCS in Minh Ha-Duong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    § December 21, 2007 Abstract An awareness and opinion survey on Carbon Capture and Storage was conducted: questioning one half about `Stockage' (English: storage), the other about `Sequestration'. Manipulating of or opposition to' the use of Carbon Capture and Storage in France was conducted to explore the variability

  8. IIDA Hidefusa Sungbin Ha The Graduate School of Law (GSL) and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    of Commerce (Kobe University of Economics). Sparing no effort in its quest to become a leading institution a reputable academic center that is highly ranked in Japan. Located on the foothills of the lush green Rokko provide a five-year graduate program consisting of a two-year program leading to a Master's degree

  9. Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented a mathematic model for a cylindrical water tank with a cylindrical condenser as its heat source. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, FLUENT, was used to study hot water temperature distribution in the tank of the ASHPWH...

  10. Premio G.S.E. Gestore Servizi Energetici IL COMITATO LEONARDO -ITALIAN QUALITY COMMITTEE -HA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segatti, Antonio

    Vattani, Nerio Alessandri, Piero Antinori, Corrado Antonini, Giandomenico Auricchio, Aurelio De Laurentiis

  11. Discovery potential for the MSSM H/A bosons decaying to two muons at ATLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milosavljevic, M. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade, Serbia (Serbia and Montenegro); Kourkoumelis, C.; Fassouliotis, D.; Nikolopoulos, K. [University of Athens, Athens (Greece)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS sensitivity for the H/A{yields} {mu}{mu} decay (mA =300 GeV/c2 and tan{beta} =30) for the initial detector setup has been estimated using the full simulation. The selection criteria have been optimized for both the direct and the associated production (bbH/A) of the Higgs bosons. The irreducible Drell-Yan background dominates in the direct production case and overwhelms the signal in such a way that the direct production has lower signal significance. In the associated production case, the Zb b-bar background is the irreducible one, but the most abundant is the tt-bar background and the selection criteria applied were optimized for its reduction. The signal significance was calculated for both analyses separately and for their combination.

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE David A. Bailey Peter B. Rhines Sirpa Ha kkinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a shortage of buoyant surface water (or ex- cess of high salinity water) leads to overly strong con- vection of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice­ocean model of the Arctic­North Atlantic Oceans Received: 16 investigate the formation process and pathways of deep water masses in a coupled ice­ocean model of the Arctic

  13. HaPPy: Hyperthread-aware Power Profiling Dynamically University of Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    . Specifically, we introduce a hyperthread-aware power model that differentiates be- tween the states when both. As we are reaching the limits of cur- rent power delivery systems, many datacenter infrastruc- tures server. This ability allows software to control power consumption at the level of individual applications

  14. Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

    ­ Jidoka) 4. (Kaizen ­ Continuous Improvement) etc. #12;Why lean Thinking in Healthcare ? 1. 80 : 80

  15. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  16. atlanto-axial joint: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In 1981,193 joint ventures with the par- ticipation of Japanese capital were operating in 47 nations 13 Joint Degrees & Promotion towards European Students Computer...

  17. An analytically solvable, axially non-homogeneous reactor model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pázsit, Imre

    and Glasstone,1970) and analytically in 1-D noise problems (Kosa ly et al., 1977). The general conclusion

  18. Strong Room-temperature Negative Transconductance In An Axial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Si-based device. We characterize the NTC characteristics over a range of gate VG and drain VD voltages, finding that NTC persists down to VD –50 mV. The physical...

  19. Axial SiGe Heteronanowire Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tunneling field-effect transistors (TFETs), where on-state tunneling occurs in the Ge drain section, while off-state leakage is dominated by the Si junction in the source. Our...

  20. axial flow compressors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compressor performance Peraire, Jaime 126 FEASIBILITY OF SOLAR-FIRED, COMPRESSOR-ASSISTED Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: FEASIBILITY OF...

  1. axial flow compressor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    compressor performance Peraire, Jaime 126 FEASIBILITY OF SOLAR-FIRED, COMPRESSOR-ASSISTED Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: FEASIBILITY OF...

  2. axial diffusion coefficient: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffusion is examined. Kazuhiko Seki; Saurabh Mogre; Shigeyuki Komura 2014-02-05 5 Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions Nonlinear Sciences (arXiv)...

  3. Properties of an axially periodic magnetic field in a betatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zvontsov, A.A.; Filinova, V.A.; Chakhlov, V.L.

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown by solving an equation for the vector potential A (r, z) of the magnetic field that under appropriate conditions the focusing properties of a betatron magnetic field are periodic with respect to the z coordinate. Under these conditions there may be several equilibrium orbits lying in parallel planes z = 0, z = z/sub 01/ xxx, z = mz/sub 01/ in the accelerator. An equation is derived for the distance z/sub 01/ between the equilibrium orbit planes for a given orbit radius r/sub 0/ and field decay exponent n/sub 0/. The operation of such accelerators is described.

  4. axial piston type: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    functions of n low order Ceragioli, Francesca 114 The Green Potential of Free-Piston Stirling Engines Engineering Websites Summary: a distillate fuel like gasoline and can...

  5. axially radiated power: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (radiations). Experimental evidence indicates that low energy nuclear reactions (LENR) occur on or very near to the surfaces of solid lattices. The rates of such reactions...

  6. axial sagittal coronal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we determine average values for magnetic field together with a magnetic map of the quiet Sun. The interaction between global coronal waves and coronal loops allows us to study loop...

  7. Coanda injection system for axially staged low emission combustors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evulet, Andrei Tristan (Clifton Park, NY); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Cincinnati, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); ElKady, Ahmed Mostafa (Niskayuna, NY); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The low emission combustor includes a combustor housing defining a combustion chamber having a plurality of combustion zones. A liner sleeve is disposed in the combustion housing with a gap formed between the liner sleeve and the combustor housing. A secondary nozzle is disposed along a centerline of the combustion chamber and configured to inject a first fluid comprising air, at least one diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to a downstream side of a first combustion zone among the plurality of combustion zones. A plurality of primary fuel nozzles is disposed proximate to an upstream side of the combustion chamber and located around the secondary nozzle and configured to inject a second fluid comprising air and fuel to an upstream side of the first combustion zone. The combustor also includes a plurality of tertiary coanda nozzles. Each tertiary coanda nozzle is coupled to a respective dilution hole. The tertiary coanda nozzles are configured to inject a third fluid comprising air, at least one other diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to one or more remaining combustion zones among the plurality of combustion zones.

  8. axial 3-d pet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D...

  9. Influence of loading rate on axially loaded piles in clay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garland Ponce, Enrique Eduardo

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    International Conference on Soil Mechanics and Founda- tion Engineerinq, London, V. l, pp. 207-210 Bjerrum, L. Simons, N. Torblaa, I. (1958) Crawford, C. B. (1959) The Effect of Time on the Shear Strength of a Soft Marine Clay The Influence of Rate... of Strain on Effective Stresses in Sensitive Clay Norweqian Geotechnical Institute, Publication No. 33, pp. 135-142. American Society of Testing Materials (Special Technical Publication No. 361), pp. 36-61. Richardson, A. M. Whitman, R. V. (1963...

  10. axial power profile: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    profiles in high-power optical fiber components Vladimir Goloborodko, Shay in temperature distribution caused by coupling a high-power laser beam into an optical fiber and...

  11. axially heterogeneous core: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: Sequential Consistency for Heterogeneous-Race-Free DEREK R. HOWER, BRADFORD M. BECKMANN, BENEDICT R: Sequential Consistency for Data-Race-Free (SC for...

  12. Quantifying non-axial deformations in rat myocardium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghassibake, Kristina Diane

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    comprise the sarcomere, the fundamental unit of contraction. The sarcomere 4 is bounded on both sides by the Z line, which is the structural backbone of the actin filaments (Opie, 2004). Fig. 1. Diagram of myofilament arrangement in striated muscle... shortens the sarcomere and is thought to be the fundamental mechanism of muscle contraction. Relaxation occurs when, in the presence of ATP, the myosin heads detach from the actin filaments and resume their un-flexed configuration (Opie, 2004). 6...

  13. axially cracked pressure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V (NDE). These now cover most aspects of advanced ultrasonic inspection (adding in TOFD), and are specifically aimed at boiler and piping inspections. The three new AUT...

  14. axial flow blood: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the case of an aneurism. Delestre, Olivier 2012-01-01 193 Blood-Flow Modelling Along and Trough a Braided Multi-Layer Metallic Stent CERN Preprints Summary: In this work we study...

  15. Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sorin, Fabien

    Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices exhibit a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

  16. Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lestoquoy, Guillaume

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices display a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

  17. axially loaded steel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    image correlation and FE analysis Mathematics Websites Summary: conducted on dual-phase high-strength steel in a split-Hopkinson tension bar at a strain-rate in the...

  18. axially loaded magnetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam...

  19. axial crushing loads: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    right-handed fermions with opposite signs, may generate an equilibrium dissipationless energy flow of fermions in the direction of the field even in the presence of interactions....

  20. axial turbine experimentelle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    forces. The results obtained are discussed and reported. G. Narendranath(m. Tech 87 VARIABLE SPEED WIND TURBINE CiteSeer Summary: Wind energy is currently the fastest-growing...