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1

Measurement of velocity deficit at the downstream of a 1:10 axial hydrokinetic turbine model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wake recovery constrains the downstream spacing and density of turbines that can be deployed in turbine farms and limits the amount of energy that can be produced at a hydrokinetic energy site. This study investigates the wake recovery at the downstream of a 1:10 axial flow turbine model using a pulse-to-pulse coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP). In addition, turbine inflow and outflow velocities were measured for calculating the thrust on the turbine. The result shows that the depth-averaged longitudinal velocity recovers to 97% of the inflow velocity at 35 turbine diameter (D) downstream of the turbine.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Effects of Large Energetic Vortices on Axial-Flow Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large scale coherent motions around marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) machines can significantly increase the structural loading and affect the overall performance of the machines. Characterization of the approach turbulence and their impact on the instantaneous response of MHK devices is essential for improving their design and performance. This preliminary study investigates the effect of turbulence and dominant energetic coherent structures induced by a vertical cylinder on the structural load and energy production in a model MHK turbine. Results show that the power generated by the turbine is significantly reduced by the presence of the cylinder. This reduction depends on the distance from the cylinder and the level of turbulence around the rotor area.

Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Evaluations of blade-strike on an axial-flow Marine Hydrokinetic turbine were conducted using a conventional methodology as well as an alternative modeling approach proposed in the present document. The proposed methodology integrates the following components into a Computa- tional Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulations, (ii) ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The sensitivity of blade-strike prob- ability to the following conditions was also evaluated: (i) to the turbulent environment, (ii) to fish size and (iii) to mean stream flow velocity. The proposed methodology provided fraction of collisions and offered the capability of analyzing the causal relationships between the flow envi- ronment and resulting strikes on rotating blades. Overall, the conventional methodology largely overestimates the probability of strike, and lacks the ability to produce potential fish and aquatic biota trajectories as they interact with the rotating turbine. By using a set of experimental corre- lations of exposure-response of living fish colliding on moving blades, the occurrence, frequency and intensity of the particle collisions was next used to calculate the survival rate of fish crossing the MHK turbine. This step indicated survival rates always greater than 98%. Although the proposed CFD framework is computationally more expensive, it provides the advantage of evaluating multiple mechanisms of stress and injury of hydrokinetic turbine devices on fish.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Marine & hydrokinetic technology development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind and Water Power Program supports the development of marine and hydrokinetic devices, which capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, the natural flow of water in rivers, and marine thermal gradients, without building new dams or diversions. The program works closely with industry and the Department of Energy's national laboratories to advance the development and testing of marine and hydrokinetic devices. In 2008, the program funded projects to develop and test point absorber, oscillating wave column, and tidal turbine technologies. The program also funds component design, such as techniques for manufacturing and installing coldwater pipes critical for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems. Rigorous device testing is necessary to validate and optimize prototypes before beginning full-scale demonstration and deployment. The program supports device testing by providing technology developers with information on testing facilities. Technology developers require access to facilities capable of simulating open-water conditions in order to refine and validate device operability. The program has identified more than 20 tank testing operators in the United States with capabilities suited to the marine and hydrokinetic technology industry. This information is available to the public in the program's Hydrodynamic Testing Facilities Database. The program also supports the development of open-water, grid-connected testing facilities, as well as resource assessments that will improve simulations done in dry-dock and closed-water testing facilities. The program has established two university-led National Marine Renewable Energy Centers to be used for device testing. These centers are located on coasts and will have open-water testing berths, allowing researchers to investigate marine and estuary conditions. Optimal array design, development, modeling and testing are needed to maximize efficiency and electricity generation at marine and hydrokinetic power plants while mitigating nearby and distant impacts. Activities may include laboratory and computational modeling of mooring design or research on device spacing. The geographies, resources, technologies, and even nomenclature of the U.S. marine and hydrokinetic technology industry have yet to be fully understood or defined. The program characterizes and assesses marine and hydrokinetic devices, and then organizes the collected information into a comprehensive and searchable Web-based database, the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. The database, which reflects intergovernmental and international collaboration, provides industry with one of the most comprehensive and up-to-date public resources on marine and hydrokinetic devices.

LiVecchi, Al (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Jepsen, Richard Alan

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

NREL: Water Power Research - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and...

7

MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water capable hydrokinetic turbine water capable hydrokinetic turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage 275px Technology Profile Primary Organization Hills Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description It is an axial flow shrouded turbine direct connected to a water pump that delivers water to an on shore genetator Being completely water proof and submersible the device can operate at any water depth Mooring Configuration An array of turbines are teathered to a cable that is anchored via a dead weight Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions This system is designed for use in Florida s Gulf Stream however any constant ocean current is suitable

8

Marine and Hydrokinetic | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic The Water Power Program's marine and hydrokinetic research and development (R&D) efforts focus on advancing technologies that capture energy from the nation's oceans and rivers. Unlike hydropower, marine and hydrokinetics represent an emerging industry with hundreds of potentially viable technologies. The program is therefore leading efforts to prove functionality; evaluate technical and economic viability; and generate cost, performance, and reliability data for a variety of devices. Marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies convert the energy of waves, tides, and river and ocean currents into electricity. The Department of Energy's "Marine and Hydrokinetic 101" video explains how these technologies work and highlights some of the Water Power Program's efforts

9

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

10

MHK Technologies/Hydrokinetic Power Barge | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Barge Power Barge < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Hydrokinetic Power Barge.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Onsite Recovered Energy LP Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Vurbine proprietary technology design and assembly mounted on a horizontal shaft on a twin hull pontoon or barge CAT or SWATH combines reaction and impulse technologies which can efficiently harvest hydrokinetic energy from flowing water in a low impact application Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 36:51.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage

11

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Hybrid) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

12

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary (Redirected from Attenuator) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

13

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database is currently (2009) being updated to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.[Taken from http://www2.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/hydrokinetic/

14

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

15

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources Marine and Hydrokinetic Resources (Redirected from Wave) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization 2 Current/Tidal/Riverine 3 Wave 4 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization To find out more about Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment and Characterization click on this link. Current/Tidal/Riverine Tile Current.jpg To find out more about Tidal Energy click on this link and for Current Energy this link. Wave Wave 02.jpg To find out more about Wave Energy click on this link. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Ocean Thermo 04.jpg To find out more about OTEC Energy click on this link. << Return to the MHK database homepage

16

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

Not Available

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics  

SciTech Connect

A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Simulating Collisions for Hydrokinetic Turbines. FY2010 Annual Progress Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbulent flow and particle motion are being conducted to evaluate the frequency and severity of collisions between marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy devices and debris or aquatic organisms. The work is part of a collaborative research project between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Sandia National Laboratories , funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program. During FY2010 a reference design for an axial flow MHK turbine was used to develop a computational geometry for inclusion into a CFD model. Unsteady simulations of turbulent flow and the moving MHK turbine blades are being performed and the results used for simulation of particle trajectories. Preliminary results and plans for future work are presented.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Perkins, William A.; Serkowski, John A.

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database Jump to: navigation, search Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy's Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Using the Database (1) Map illustrates marine & hydrokinetic demonstration projects around the

20

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy video. The words "Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy" appear onscreen. Montage of renewable energy technologies ending with shots of ocean waves. We all know energy can come from the wind and the sun, but there's a plentiful renewable resource covering more than 75% of the planet that you might not have thought about: our water! The movement of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents carries energy that can be harnessed and converted into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. The words "Kinetic Energy" appear onscreen with shots of ocean scientists at sea. The words "Marine & Hydrokinetic" appear onscreen.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Projects" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 379 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 4 MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project A MHK Projects/ADM 3 MHK Projects/ADM 4 MHK Projects/ADM 5 MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project MHK Projects/Agucadoura MHK Projects/Alaska 1 MHK Projects/Alaska 13 MHK Projects/Alaska 17 MHK Projects/Alaska 18 MHK Projects/Alaska 24 MHK Projects/Alaska 25

22

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology below to add it to the registry. If your technology is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that technology's fields and you may edit. MHK_Technologies/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Technologies/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the Marine and Hydrokinetic Database Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology&oldid=680669"

23

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? Click here for a user-friendly list of Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies. This category has the default of form Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology. Pages in category "Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 282 total. (previous 200) (next 200) 1 MHK Technologies/14 MW OTECPOWER A MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo MHK Technologies/AirWEC MHK Technologies/Anaconda bulge tube drives turbine MHK Technologies/AquaBuoy MHK Technologies/Aquanator MHK Technologies/Aquantis MHK Technologies/Archimedes Wave Swing MHK Technologies/Atlantis AN 150 MHK Technologies/Atlantis AR 1000

24

Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings, and cities. The oceans represent a largely untapped renewable energy resource with potential to provide clean electricity to coastal communities and cities across the United States. In this edition of Energy 101, learn how the Energy Department is supporting research on a range of innovative marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to capture energy from waves and currents. For more information on marine and hydrokinetic energy from the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, visit the Water Power Program

25

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

SciTech Connect

This collection of three reports describes desktop and laboratory flume studies that provide information to support assessment of the potential for injury and mortality of fish that encounter hydrokinetic turbines of various designs installed in tidal and river environments. Behavioral responses to turbine exposure also are investigated to support assessment of the potential for disruptions to upstream and downstream movements of fish. The studies: (1) conducted an assessment of potential injury mechanisms using available data from studies with conventional hydro turbines; (2) developed theoretical models for predicting blade strike probabilities and mortality rates; and (3) performed flume testing with three turbine designs and several fish species and size groups in two laboratory flumes to estimate survival rates and document fish behavior. The project yielded three reports which this document comprises. The three constituent documents are addressed individually below Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies Fish passing through the blade sweep of a hydrokinetic turbine experience a much less harsh physical environment than do fish entrained through conventional hydro turbines. The design and operation of conventional turbines results in high flow velocities, abrupt changes in flow direction, relatively high runner rotational and blade speeds, rapid and significant changes in pressure, and the need for various structures throughout the turbine passageway that can be impacted by fish. These conditions generally do not occur or are not significant factors for hydrokinetic turbines. Furthermore, compared to conventional hydro turbines, hydrokinetic turbines typically produce relatively minor changes in shear, turbulence, and pressure levels from ambient conditions in the surrounding environment. Injuries and mortality from mechanical injuries will be less as well, mainly due to low rotational speeds and strike velocities, and an absence of structures that can lead to grinding or abrasion injuries. Additional information is needed to rigorously assess the nature and magnitude of effects on individuals and populations, and to refine criteria for design of more fish-friendly hydrokinetic turbines. Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Evaluation of Fish Injury and Mortality Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considerable efforts have been underway to develop hydrokinetic energy resources in tidal and riverine environments throughout North America. Potential for fish to be injured or killed if they encounter hydrokinetic turbines is an issue of significant interest to resource and regulatory agencies. To address this issue, flume studies were conducted that exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral reactions and avoidance. Also, a theoreti...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

27

MHK Technologies/In stream River Hydrokinetics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In stream River Hydrokinetics In stream River Hydrokinetics < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization ABS Alaskan Inc Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description New Energy Corporation EnCurrent vertical axis turbine mounted on pontoon barge Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 10:01.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/In_stream_River_Hydrokinetics&oldid=680959" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

28

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

29

Category:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Tests | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Tests Jump to: navigation, search Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Test This category currently contains no pages or media. Retrieved from "http:...

30

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: River Hydrokinetic Resource Atlas Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Water Power Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Country: United States Web Application Link: maps.nrel.gov/river_atlas Cost: Free UN Region: Northern America Coordinates: 39.7412019515°, -105.172290802° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7412019515,"lon":-105.172290802,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

HYDROKAL: A module for in-stream hydrokinetic resource assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new tool for hydrokinetic energy potential assessment in rivers-HYDROKAL, which stands for a ''hydrokinetic calculator''-is presented. This tool was developed in the Fortran 90 programming language as an external module for the CCHE2D application, ... Keywords: Instantaneous power density, Numerical modeling, Resource assessment, Stream

Paul Duvoy; Horacio Toniolo

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estimation of the Risks of Collision or Strike to Freshwater Aquatic Organisms Resulting from Operation of Instream Hydrokinetic Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrokinetic energy technologies have been proposed as renewable, environmentally preferable alternatives to fossil fuels for generation of electricity. Hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of water in motion, either from waves, tides or from river currents. For energy capture from free-flowing rivers, arrays of rotating devices are most commonly proposed. The placement of hydrokinetic devices in large rivers is expected to increase the underwater structural complexity of river landscapes. Moore and Gregory (1988) found that structural complexity increased local fish populations because fish and other aquatic biota are attracted to structural complexity that provides microhabitats with steep flow velocity gradients (Liao 2007). However, hydrokinetic devices have mechanical parts, blades, wings or bars that move through the water column, posing a potential strike or collision risk to fish and other aquatic biota. Furthermore, in a setting with arrays of hydrokinetic turbines the cumulative effects of multiple encounters may increase the risk of strike. Submerged structures associated with a hydrokinetic (HK) project present a collision risk to aquatic organisms and diving birds (Cada et al. 2007). Collision is physical contact between a device or its pressure field and an organism that may result in an injury to that organism (Wilson et al. 2007). Collisions can occur between animals and fixed submerged structures, mooring equipment, horizontal or vertical axis turbine rotors, and structures that, by their individual design or in combination, may form traps. This report defines strike as a special case of collision where a moving part, such as a rotor blade of a HK turbine intercepts the path of an organism of interest, resulting in physical contact with the organism. The severity of a strike incidence may range from minor physical contact with no adverse effects to the organism to severe strike resulting in injury or death of the organism. Harmful effects to animal populations could occur directly (e.g., from strike mortality of individuals) or indirectly (e.g., if the loss of prey species to strike reduces food for predators). Although actively swimming or passively drifting animals may collide with any of the physical structures associated with hydrokinetic devices, turbine rotors are the most likely sources for risk of strike or significant collision (DOE 2009). It is also possible that during a close encounter with a HK device no physical contact will be made between the device and the organism, either because the animal avoids the device by successfully changing its direction of movement, or by successfully evading any moving parts of the device. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waterpower Program to evaluate strike potential and consequences for Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies in rivers and estuaries of the United States. We will use both predictive models and laboratory/field experiments to evaluate the likelihood and consequences of strike at HK projects in rivers. Efforts undertaken at ORNL address three objectives: (1) Assess strike risk for marine and freshwater organisms; (2) Develop experimental procedures to assess the risk and consequences of strike; and (3) Conduct strike studies in experimental flumes and field installations of hydrokinetic devices. During the first year of the study ORNL collected information from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) MHK database about geographical distribution of proposed hydrokinetic projects (what rivers or other types of systems), HK turbine design (horizontal axis, vertical axis, other), description of proposed axial turbine (number of blades, size of blades, rotation rate, mitigation measures), and number of units per project. Where site specific information was available, we compared the location of proposed projects rotors within the channel (e.g., along cutting edge bank, middle of thalweg, near bottom or in midwater) to the general locations of fish in the river (shoreline,

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Form Form Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Form:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Jump to: navigation, search Add a Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project Input the name of your Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Project below to add it to the registry. If your project is already in the registry, the form will be populated with that project's fields and you may edit. MHK_Projects/ Submit The text entered into this field will be used as the name of the project being defined. All projects are automatically prefixed with MHK_Projects/. The field is case sensitive so be sure to capitalize in the correct areas and type the full title properly. << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Form:Marine_and_Hydrokinetic_Technology_Project&oldid=688143"

35

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinet...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

easier. A screen capture of the MapSearch Map view option Marine & Hydrokinetic Maps Hydropower already provides 6-7% of the nation's electricity, and the ocean represents a...

36

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States Abstract This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the

37

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment – information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Multnomah County Hydrokinetic Feasibility Study: Final Feasibility Study Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HDR has completed a study of the technical, regulatory, and economic feasibility of installing hydrokinetic turbines under the Morrison, Broadway, and Sellwood bridges. The primary objective of installing hydrokinetic turbines is a demonstration of in-stream hydrokinetic technologies for public education and outreach. Due to the low gradient of the Lower Willamette and the effects of the tide, velocities in the area in consideration are simply not high enough to economically support a commercial installation. While the velocities in the river may at times provide enough energy for a commercial turbine to reach capacity, the frequency and duration of high flow events which provide suitable velocities is not sufficient to support a commercial hydrokinetic installation. We have observed that over an 11 year period, daily average velocities in the Lower Willamette exceeded a nominal cut-in speed of 0.75 m/s only 20% of the time, leaving net zero power production for the remaining 80% of days. The Sellwood Bridge site was estimated to have the best hydrokinetic resource, with an estimated average annual production of about 9,000 kWh. The estimated production could range from 2,500 kWh to 15,000 kWh. Based on these energy estimates, the amount of revenue generated through either a power purchase agreement (PPA) or recovered through net metering is not sufficient to repay the project costs within the life of the turbine. The hydrokinetic resource at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges is slightly smaller than at the Sellwood Bridge. While the Broadway and Morrison Bridges have existing infrastructure that could be utilized, the project is not expected to generate enough revenue to repay the investment. Despite low velocities and energy production, the sites themselves are favorable for installation of a demonstration or experimental project. With high public interest in renewable energy, the possibility exists to develop a hydrokinetic test site which could provide developers and scientists a location to temporarily deploy and test hydrokinetic devices, and also function as an educational tool for the general public. Bridge piers provide an excellent pre-existing anchor point for hydrokinetic devices, and existing infrastructure at the Morrison and Broadway Bridges may reduce installation costs. Opportunity exists to partner with local universities with engineering and environmental interest in renewable energy. A partnership with Portland State University�¢����s engineering school could provide students with an opportunity to learn about hydrokinetics through senior design projects. Oregon State University and University of Washington, which are partnered through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center (NNMREC) to study and test hydrokinetic technology, are also relatively local to the site. In addition to providing an opportunity for both public and private entities to learn technically about in-stream kinetics, this approach will encourage grant funding for outreach, education, and product development, while also serving as a positive community relations opportunity for the County and its partners.

Stephen Spain

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

39

Identifying How Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices Affect Aquatic Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research is under way to determine the potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic energy systems. This research, being guided and funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, is intended to address knowledge gaps and facilitate installation and operation of these systems.

Cada, G. F.; Copping, Andrea E.; Roberts, Jesse

2011-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

OpenHaRT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The OpenHaRT evaluation is modeled after the evaluation of the DARPA Multilingual Automatic Document Classification Analysis and Translation ...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Environmental Effects of Hydrokinetic Turbines on Fish: Desktop and Laboratory Flume Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Flume studies exposed fish to two hydrokinetic turbine designs to determine injury and survival rates and to assess behavioral responses. Also, a theoretical model developed for predicting strike probability and mortality of fish passing through conventional hydro turbines was adapted for use with hydrokinetic turbines and applied to the two designs evaluated during flume studies. The flume tests were conducted with the Lucid spherical turbine (LST), a Darrieus-type (cross flow) turbine, and the Welka UPG, an axial flow propeller turbine. Survival rates for rainbow trout tested with the LST were greater than 98% for both size groups and approach velocities evaluated. Turbine passage survival rates for rainbow trout and largemouth bass tested with the Welka UPG were greater than 99% for both size groups and velocities evaluated. Injury rates of turbine-exposed fish were low with both turbines and generally comparable to control fish. Video observations of the LST demonstrated active avoidance of turbine passage by a large proportion fish despite being released about 25 cm upstream of the turbine blade sweep. Video observations from behavior trials indicated few if any fish pass through the turbines when released farther upstream. The theoretical predictions for the LST indicated that strike mortality would begin to occur at an ambient current velocity of about 1.7 m/s for fish with lengths greater than the thickness of the leading edge of the blades. As current velocities increase above 1.7 m/s, survival was predicted to decrease for fish passing through the LST, but generally remained high (greater than 90%) for fish less than 200 mm in length. Strike mortality was not predicted to occur duri

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Amaral, Stephen V. [Alden Research Laboratory; Castro-Santos, Theodore [U.S. Geological Survey; Giza, Dan [Alden Research Laboratory; Haro, Alexander J. [U.S. Geological Survey; Hecker, George [Alden Research Laboratory; McMahon, Brian [Alden Research Laboratory; Perkins, Norman [Alden Research Laboratory; Pioppi, Nick [Alden Research Laboratory

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.1055,"lon":-70.7912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0234,"lon":-67.0672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.9828,"lon":-91.7994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

MHK Projects/Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project Sakonnet River Hydrokinetic Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6224,"lon":-71.2153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

46

MHK Projects/Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project Yukon River Hydrokinetic Turbine Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.7883,"lon":-141.198,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support ...

Akkelin, S V; Karpenko, Iu A; Sinyukov, Yu M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Readiness Level Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage This field indicates the stage of development/deployment that technologies, which are undergoing partial or full-scale device testing, are currently in. Contents 1 TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering 2 TRL 4: Proof of Concept 3 TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration 4 TRL 7/8: Open Water System Testing, Demonstration, and Operation 5 TRL 9: Commercial-Scale Production / Application TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development, Design, and Engineering The purpose of this stage is to evaluate, to the largest extent possible, the scientific or technical merit and feasibility of ideas that appear to

49

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

50

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than $37 million in funding to accelerate the technological and commercial readiness of emerging marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies, which seek to generate renewable electricity from the nation's oceans and free-flowing rivers and streams. The 27 projects range from concept studies and component design research to prototype development and in-water device testing. This unprecedented level of funding will advance the ability of marine and hydrokinetic energy technologies to

51

US Department of Energy National Lab Activities in Marine Hydrokinetics: Machine Performance Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology performance testing in the laboratory and field supports the US Department of Energy s MHK program goals to advance the technology readiness levels of MHK machines, to ensure environmentally responsible designs, to identify key cost drivers, and to reduce the cost of energy of MHK technologies. Laboratory testing results from scaled model machine testing at the University of Minnesota s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) main channel flume are presented, including simultaneous machine power and inflow measurements for a 1:10 scale three-bladed axial flow turbine used to assess machine performance in turbulent flows, and detailed measurements of inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence, including the assessment of the effects of large energetic organized vortex shedding on machine performance and wake turbulence downstream. Scaled laboratory testing provides accurate data sets for near- and far-field hydrodynamic models, and useful information on technology and environmental readiness levels before full-scale testing and demonstration in open water. This study validated turbine performance for a technology in order to advance its technology readiness level. Synchronized ADV measurements to calculate spatio-temporal characteristics of turbulence supported model development of the inflow turbulence model, Hydro-TurbSim, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate unsteady loading on MHK machines. Wake flow measurements supported model development of the far-field model, SNL-EFDC, developed by Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) to optimize spacing for MHK machine arrays.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [University of Minnesota

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

2011 Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PROGRAM PROGRAM � 2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report March 1, 2011 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation,

53

Template:Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Technology Jump to: navigation, search This is the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology template. It is designed for use by MHK Technologies Pages. To define an MHK Technology, please use this form. Parameters Image - Associated image file. (optional) Primary Organization - Field def missing! Project(s) where this technology is utilized - Field def missing! Technology Resource - Field def missing! Technology Type - Field def missing! Technology Readiness Level - Field def missing! Technology Description - Field def missing! Designed to Operate with Shore Connection - Field def missing! Power Transfer Method - Field def missing! Water Column Location - Field def missing! Mooring Configuration - Field def missing! Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions - Field def missing!

54

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

SciTech Connect

The Jobs and Economic Development Impact Model (JEDI) for Marine and Hydrokinetics (MHK) is a user-friendly spreadsheet-based tool designed to demonstrate the economic impacts associated with developing and operating MHK power systems in the United States. The JEDI MHK User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the sources and parameters used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

Goldberg, M.; Previsic, M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

Ketcham, Jerod W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

58

Hydro-kinetic approach to relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop a combined hydro-kinetic approach which incorporates a hydrodynamical expansion of the systems formed in \\textit{A}+\\textit{A} collisions and their dynamical decoupling described by escape probabilities. The method corresponds to a generalized relaxation time ($\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$) approximation for the Boltzmann equation applied to inhomogeneous expanding systems; at small $\\tau_{\\text{rel}}$ it also allows one to catch the viscous effects in hadronic component - hadron-resonance gas. We demonstrate how the approximation of sudden freeze-out can be obtained within this dynamical picture of continuous emission and find that hypersurfaces, corresponding to a sharp freeze-out limit, are momentum dependent. The pion $m_{T}$ spectra are computed in the developed hydro-kinetic model, and compared with those obtained from ideal hydrodynamics with the Cooper-Frye isothermal prescription. Our results indicate that there does not exist a universal freeze-out temperature for pions with different momenta, and support an earlier decoupling of higher $p_{T}$ particles. By performing numerical simulations for various initial conditions and equations of state we identify several characteristic features of the bulk QCD matter evolution preferred in view of the current analysis of heavy ion collisions at RHIC energies.

S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

Fish Passage Through Turbines: Application of Conventional Hydropower Data to Hydrokinetic Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for fish populations to be negatively impacted by hydrokinetic turbines is a major issue associated with the development and licensing of this type of renewable energy source. Such impacts may include habitat alteration, disruptions in migrations and movements, and injury and mortality to fish that encounter turbines. In particular, there is considerable concern for fish and other aquatic organisms to interact with hydrokinetic turbines in a manner that could lead to alterations in normal b...

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

THORs Power Method for Hydrokinetic Devices - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current energy represents a vast untapped source of renewable energy that exists on the outer continental shelf areas of the 5 major continents. Ocean currents are unidirectional in nature and are perpetuated by thermal and salinity sea gradients, as well as coriolis forces imparted from the earth's rotation. This report details THORs Power Method, a breakthrough power control method that can provide dramatic increases to the capacity factor over and above existing marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices employed in the extraction of energy from ocean currents. THORs Power Method represents a constant speed, variable depth operational method that continually locates the ocean current turbine at a depth at which the rated power of the generator is routinely achieved. Variable depth operation is achieved by using various vertical force effectors, including ballast tanks for variable weight, a hydrodynamic wing for variable lift or down force and drag flaps for variable vehicle drag forces.

J. Turner Hunt; Joel Rumker

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development Technical Support and General Environmental Studies Report on Outreach to Stakeholders for Fiscal Year 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on activities working with stakeholders in the emerging marine and hydrokinetic energy industry during FY09, for DOE EERE Office of Waterpower.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

62

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Devices, Potential Navigational Hazards and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies. A technical report addressing our findings is available on this Science and Technology Information site under the Product Title, "Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures". This product is a brochure, primarily for project developers, that summarizes important issues in that more comprehensive report, identifies locations where that report can be downloaded, and identifies points of contact for more information.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine and Hydrokinetic Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5000-57605 February 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop W. Musial, M. Lawson, and S. Rooney National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. WA09.3406

64

Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Technologies: Potential Navigational Impacts and Mitigation Measures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On April 15, 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Advanced Water Power Projects which included a Topic Area for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy Market Acceleration Projects. Within this Topic Area, DOE identified potential navigational impacts of marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy technologies and measures to prevent adverse impacts on navigation as a sub-topic area. DOE defines marine and hydrokinetic technologies as those capable of utilizing one or more of the following resource categories for energy generation: ocean waves; tides or ocean currents; free flowing water in rivers or streams; and energy generation from the differentials in ocean temperature. PCCI was awarded Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-08GO18177 from the DOE to identify the potential navigational impacts and mitigation measures for marine hydrokinetic technologies, as summarized herein. The contract also required cooperation with the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and two recipients of awards (Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision) in a sub-topic area to develop a protocol to identify streamlined, best-siting practices. Over the period of this contract, PCCI and our sub-consultants, David Basco, Ph.D., and Neil Rondorf of Science Applications International Corporation, met with USCG headquarters personnel, with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters and regional personnel, with U.S. Navy regional personnel and other ocean users in order to develop an understanding of existing practices for the identification of navigational impacts that might occur during construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning. At these same meetings, “standard” and potential mitigation measures were discussed so that guidance could be prepared for project developers. Concurrently, PCCI reviewed navigation guidance published by the USCG and international community. This report summarizes the results of this effort, provides guidance in the form of a checklist for assessing the navigational impacts of potential marine and hydrokinetic projects, and provides guidance for improving the existing navigational guidance promulgated by the USCG in Navigation Vessel Inspection Circular 02 07. At the request of the USCG, our checklist and mitigation guidance was written in a generic nature so that it could be equally applied to offshore wind projects. PCCI teleconferenced on a monthly basis with DOE, Pacific Energy Ventures and reVision in order to share information and review work products. Although the focus of our effort was on marine and hydrokinetic technologies, as defined above, this effort drew upon earlier work by the USCG on offshore wind renewable energy installations. The guidance provided herein can be applied equally to marine and hydrokinetic technologies and to offshore wind, which are collectively referred to by the USCG as Renewable Energy Installations.

Cool, Richard, M.; Hudon, Thomas, J.; Basco, David, R.; Rondorf, Neil, E.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

65

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Glossary | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Glossary Technology Glossary (Redirected from Axial Flow Turbine) Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Contents 1 Wave Power 1.1 Point Absorber 1.1.1 Submerged Pressure Differential (Example of a Point Absorber) 1.2 Oscillating Water Column 1.3 Overtopping Device 1.4 Attentuator 1.5 Oscillating Wave Surge Converter 2 Current Power 2.1 Axial Flow Turbine 2.2 Cross Flow Turbine 2.3 Reciprocating Device 2.3.1 Oscillating Hydrofoil: (Example of a Reciprocating Device) 3 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 3.1 Closed-cycle 3.2 Open-cycle 3.3 Hybrid Wave Power Graphics adapted from Bedard and Thresher Point Absorber Pointabsorber.jpg Wave energy capture device, with principal dimension relatively small compared to the wavelength, and is able to capture energy from a wave front

66

OpenHaRT 2013 Information Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... OpenHaRT Pipeline (version 1.1.2, last uploaded May 24, 2013) - a software tool that evaluates OpenHaRT evaluation submissions. ...

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

67

MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.6853,"lon":-75.0694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

68

NREL: Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools - Marine & Hydrokinetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Data Marine & Hydrokinetic Data This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices. The total available energy resource along the U.S. continental shelf edge,

69

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology and results of the most rigorous assessment to date of the riverine hydrokinetic energy resource in the contiguous 48 states and Alaska, excluding tidal waters. The assessment provides estimates of the gross, naturally available resource, termed the theoretical resource, as well as estimates, termed the technically recoverable resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

70

Performance Evaluation of HYCOM-GOM for Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment in the Florida Strait  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) is assessing and mapping the potential off-shore ocean current hydrokinetic energy resources along the U.S. coastline, excluding tidal currents, to facilitate market penetration of water power technologies. This resource assessment includes information on the temporal and three-dimensional spatial distribution of the daily averaged power density, and the overall theoretical hydrokinetic energy production, based on modeled historical simulations spanning a 7-year period of record using HYCOM-GOM, an ocean current observation assimilation model that generates a spatially distributed three-dimensional representation of daily averaged horizontal current magnitude and direction time series from which power density time series and their statistics can be derived. This study ascertains the deviation of HYCOM-GOM outputs, including transport (flow) and power density, from outputs based on three independent observation sources to evaluate HYCOM-GOM performance. The three independent data sources include NOAA s submarine cable data of transport, ADCP data at a high power density location, and HF radar data in the high power density region of the Florida Strait. Comparisons with these three independent observation sets indicate discrepancies with HYCOM model outputs, but overall indicate that the HYCOM-GOM model can provide an adequate assessment of the ocean current hydrokinetic resource in high power density regions like the Florida Strait. Additional independent observational data, in particular stationary ADCP measurements, would be useful for expanding this model performance evaluation study. ADCP measurements are rare in ocean environments not influenced by tides, and limited to one location in the Florida Strait. HF radar data, although providing great spatial coverage, is limited to surface currents only.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL; Ryou, Albert S [ORNL

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Power Program Water Power Program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new tech- nologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renew- able, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity. The program's research and development efforts fall under two categories: Technology Development and Market Acceleration. Technology Development The Water Power Program works with industry partners, universities, and the Department of Energy's national

72

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2011: Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in collaboration with the Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington (APL-UW), has carried out a detailed preliminary fluid flow field study at site selected for testing of marine and hydrokinetic turbines using Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV) measurements, Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements, and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements. In FY-2011 these measurements were performed continuously for two weeks, in order to collect data during neap and spring tides, as well as during diurnal tidal variations.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

2011 Marine Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop: Final Report; March 1, 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the NREL Marine and Hydrokinetic Device Modeling Workshop. The objectives for the modeling workshop were to: (1) Review the designs of existing MHK device prototypes and discuss design and optimization procedures; (2) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling techniques and methods presently used for modeling MHK devices; (3) Assess the utility and limitations of modeling methods used in other areas, such as naval architecture and ocean engineering (e.g., oil & gas industry); and (4) Identify the necessary steps to link modeling with other important components that analyze MHK devices (e.g., tank testing, PTO design, mechanical design).

Li, Y.; Reed, M.; Smith, B.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

International Standards Development for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy - Final Report on Technical Status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress toward development of International Standards for Marine and Hydrokinetic Renewable Energy, as funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 114. The project has three main objectives: 1. Provide funding to support participation of key U.S. industry technical experts in 6 (originally 4) international working groups and/or project teams (the primary standards-making committees) and to attend technical meetings to ensure greater U.S. involvement in the development of these standards. 2. Provide a report to DOE and industry stakeholders summarizing the IEC standards development process for marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, new international standards and their justifications, and provide standards guidance to industry members. 3. Provide a semi-annual (web-based) newsletter to the marine renewable energy community. The newsletter will educate industry members and stakeholders about the processes, progress, and needs of the US efforts to support the international standards development effort. The newsletter is available at www.TC114.us

Rondorf, Neil E.; Busch, Jason; Kimball, Richard

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mr. J . Kieling, Acting Chief Ha zardous Waste Bureau Department of Energy Carlsbad Field Office P. O. Box 3090 Carlsbad , New Mexico 88221 DEC 1 6 2011 New Mexico Environment...

76

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5021 5021 August 2009 Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors D. Sale University of Tennessee J. Jonkman and W. Musial National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the ASME 28 th International Conference on Ocean, Offshore, and Arctic Engineering Honolulu, Hawaii May 31-June 5, 2009 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (ASE), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and ASE retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

77

Assessing the Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Development on Marine and Estuarine Resources  

SciTech Connect

The world’s oceans and estuaries offer an enormous potential to meet the nation’s growing demand for energy. The use of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices to harness the power of wave and tidal energy could contribute significantly toward meeting federal- and state-mandated renewable energy goals while supplying a substantial amount of clean energy to coastal communities. Locations along the eastern and western coasts of the United States between 40° and 70° north latitude are ideal for MHK deployment, and recent estimates of energy potential for the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and California suggest that up to 25 gigawatts could be generated from wave and tidal devices in these areas. Because energy derived from wave and tidal devices is highly predictable, their inclusion in our energy portfolio could help balance available sources of energy production, including hydroelectric, coal, nuclear, wind, solar, geothermal, and others.

Ward, Jeffrey A.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Copping, Andrea E.

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey K. Chandrashekhara

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Tethys: The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System -- Requirements Specification -- Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental impacts knowledge management system (KMS), dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek goddess of the seas, is being developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program (WHTP) by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This requirements specification establishes the essential capabilities required of Tethys and clarifies for WHTP and the Tethys development team the results that must be achieved by the system.

Butner, R. Scott; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Ellis, Peter C.

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida  

SciTech Connect

Dehlsen Associates, LLC was awarded a grant by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Golden Field Office for a project titled 'Siting Study Framework and Survey Methodology for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Project in Offshore Southeast Florida,' corresponding to DOE Grant Award Number DE-EE0002655 resulting from DOE funding Opportunity Announcement Number DE-FOA-0000069 for Topic Area 2, and it is referred to herein as 'the project.' The purpose of the project was to enhance the certainty of the survey requirements and regulatory review processes for the purpose of reducing the time, efforts, and costs associated with initial siting efforts of marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion facilities that may be proposed in the Atlantic Ocean offshore Southeast Florida. To secure early input from agencies, protocols were developed for collecting baseline geophysical information and benthic habitat data that can be used by project developers and regulators to make decisions early in the process of determining project location (i.e., the siting process) that avoid or minimize adverse impacts to sensitive marine benthic habitat. It is presumed that such an approach will help facilitate the licensing process for hydrokinetic and other ocean renewable energy projects within the study area and will assist in clarifying the baseline environmental data requirements described in the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (formerly Minerals Management Service) final regulations on offshore renewable energy (30 Code of Federal Regulations 285, published April 29, 2009). Because projects generally seek to avoid or minimize impacts to sensitive marine habitats, it was not the intent of this project to investigate areas that did not appear suitable for the siting of ocean renewable energy projects. Rather, a two-tiered approach was designed with the first step consisting of gaining overall insight about seabed conditions offshore southeastern Florida by conducting a geophysical survey of pre-selected areas with subsequent post-processing and expert data interpretation by geophysicists and experienced marine biologists knowledgeable about the general project area. The second step sought to validate the benthic habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data by conducting benthic video and photographic field surveys of selected habitat types. The goal of this step was to determine the degree of correlation between the habitat types interpreted from the geophysical data and what actually exists on the seafloor based on the benthic video survey logs. This step included spot-checking selected habitat types rather than comprehensive evaluation of the entire area covered by the geophysical survey. It is important to note that non-invasive survey methods were used as part of this study and no devices of any kind were either temporarily or permanently attached to the seabed as part of the work conducted under this project.

Vinick, Charles; Riccobono, Antonino, MS; Messing, Charles G., Ph.D.; Walker, Brian K., Ph.D.; Reed, John K., Ph.D.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Environmentally Benign and Permanent Modifications to Prevent Biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semprus Biosciences is developing environmentally benign and permanent modifications to prevent biofouling on Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Biofouling, including growth on external surfaces by bacteria, algae, barnacles, mussels, and other marine organisms, accumulate quickly on MHK devices, causing mechanical wear and changes in performance. Biofouling on crucial components of hydrokinetic devices, such as rotors, generators, and turbines, imposes substantial mass and hydrodynamic loading with associated efficiency loss and maintenance costs. Most antifouling coatings leach toxic ingredients, such as copper and tributyltin, through an eroding process, but increasingly stringent regulation of biocides has led to interest in the development of non-biocidal technologies to control fouling. Semprus Biosciences research team is developing modifications to prevent fouling from a broad spectrum of organisms on devices of all shapes, sizes, and materials for the life of the product. The research team designed and developed betaine-based polymers as novel underwater coatings to resist the attachment of marine organisms. Different betaine-based monomers and polymers were synthesized and incorporated within various coating formulations. The formulations and application methods were developed on aluminum panels with required adhesion strength and mechanical properties. The coating polymers were chemically stable under UV, hydrolytic and oxidative environments. The sulfobetaine formulations are applicable as nonleaching and stable underwater coatings. For the first time, coating formulations modified with highly packed sulfobetaine polymers were prepared and demonstrated resistance to a broad spectrum of marine organisms. Assays for comparing nonfouling performance were developed to evaluate protein adsorption and bacteria attachment. Barnacle settlement and removal were evaluated and a 60-day field test was performed. Silicone substrates including a commercial fouling release coating were used for comparison. Compared with the unmodified silicone substrates, the sulfobetaine-modified formulations were able to exhibit a 98% reduction in fibrinogen adsorption, 97.0% (E. coli), 99.6% (S. aureus), and 99.5% (C. lytica) reduction in bacteria attachment, and 100% reduction in barnacles cyprid attachment. In addition to the significant improvement in fouling resistance of various organisms, the 60-day field test also showed an evident efficacy from visual assessment, foul rating, and fouling removal test. The research confirmed that the novel antifouling mechanism of betaine polymers provides a new avenue for marine coating development. The developed coatings out-performed currently used nontoxic underwater coatings in a broad spectrum of fouling resistance. By further developing formulations and processing methods for specific devices, the technology is ready for the next stage of development with demonstration in MHK systems.

Zheng Zhang

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

Attraction to and Avoidance of instream Hydrokinetic Turbines by Freshwater Aquatic Organisms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of hydrokinetic (HK) energy projects is under consideration at over 150 sites in large rivers in the United States, including the Mississippi, Ohio, Tennessee, and Atchafalaya Rivers. These waterbodies support numerous fish species that might interact with the HK projects in a variety of ways, e.g., by attraction to or avoidance of project structures. Although many fish species inhabit these rivers (about 172 species in the Mississippi River alone), not all of them will encounter the HK projects. Some species prefer low-velocity, backwater habitats rather than the high-velocity, main channel areas that would be the best sites for HK. Other, riverbank-oriented species are weak swimmers or too small to inhabit the main channel for significant periods of time. Some larger, main channel fish species are not known to be attracted to structures. Based on a consideration of habitat preferences, size/swim speed, and behavior, fish species that are most likely to be attracted to HK structures in the main channel include carps, suckers, catfish, white bass, striped bass, smallmouth bass, spotted bass, and sauger. Proper siting of the project in order to avoid sensitive fish populations, backwater and fish nursery habitat areas, and fish migration corridors will likely minimize concerns about fish attraction to or avoidance of HK structures.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology (MHK) Instrumentation, Measurement, and Computer Modeling Workshop was hosted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Broomfield, Colorado, July 9-10, 2012. The workshop brought together over 60 experts in marine energy technologies to disseminate technical information to the marine energy community and collect information to help identify ways in which the development of a commercially viable marine energy industry can be accelerated. The workshop was comprised of plenary sessions that reviewed the state of the marine energy industry and technical sessions that covered specific topics of relevance. Each session consisted of presentations, followed by facilitated discussions. During the facilitated discussions, the session chairs posed several prepared questions to the presenters and audience to encourage communication and the exchange of ideas between technical experts. Following the workshop, attendees were asked to provide written feedback on their takeaways and their best ideas on how to accelerate the pace of marine energy technology development. The first four sections of this document give a general overview of the workshop format, provide presentation abstracts and discussion session notes, and list responses to the post-workshop questions. The final section presents key findings and conclusions from the workshop that suggest how the U.S. Department of Energy and national laboratory resources can be utilized to most effectively assist the marine energy industry.

Musial, W.; Lawson, M.; Rooney, S.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Field Measurements at River and Tidal Current Sites for Hydrokinetic Energy Development: Best Practices Manual  

SciTech Connect

In this report, existing data collection techniques and protocols for characterizing open channel flows are reviewed and refined to further address the needs of the MHK industry. The report provides an overview of the hydrodynamics of river and tidal channels, and the working principles of modern acoustic instrumentation, including best practices in remote sensing methods that can be applied to hydrokinetic energy site characterization. Emphasis is placed upon acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV) and acoustic-Doppler current profiler (ADCP) instruments, as these represent the most practical and economical tools for use in the MHK industry. Incorporating the best practices as found in the literature, including the parameters to be measured, the instruments to be deployed, the instrument deployment strategy, and data post-processing techniques. The data collected from this procedure aims to inform the hydro-mechanical design of MHK systems with respect to energy generation and structural loading, as well as provide reference hydrodynamics for environmental impact studies. The standard metrics and protocols defined herein can be utilized to guide field experiments with MHK systems.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect

Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic community as to whether strong currents produce propagating sound. (2) Analyzed data collected from a tidal turbine operating at the European Marine Energy Center to develop a profile of turbine sound and developed a framework to evaluate the acoustic effects of deploying similar devices in other locations. This framework has been applied to Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish Country's demonstration project in Admiralty Inlet to inform postinstallation acoustic and marine mammal monitoring plans. (3) Demonstrated passive acoustic techniques to characterize the ambient noise environment at tidal energy sites (fixed, long-term observations recommended) and characterize the sound from anthropogenic sources (drifting, short-term observations recommended). (4) Demonstrated the utility and limitations of instrumentation, including bottom mounted instrumentation packages, infrared cameras, and vessel monitoring systems. In doing so, also demonstrated how this type of comprehensive information is needed to interpret observations from each instrument (e.g., hydrophone data can be combined with vessel tracking data to evaluate the contribution of vessel sound to ambient noise). (5) Conducted a study that suggests harbor porpoise in Admiralty Inlet may be habituated to high levels of ambient noise due to omnipresent vessel traffic. The inability to detect behavioral changes associated with a high intensity source of opportunity (passenger ferry) has informed the approach for post-installation marine mammal monitoring. (6) Conducted laboratory exposure experiments of juvenile Chinook salmon and showed that exposure to a worse than worst case acoustic dose of turbine sound does not result in changes to hearing thresholds or biologically significant tissue damage. Collectively, this means that Chinook salmon may be at a relatively low risk of injury from sound produced by tidal turbines located in or near their migration path. In achieving these accomplishments, the project has significantly advanced the District's goals of developing a demonstration-scale tidal energy proj

Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Technological cost%3CU%2B2010%3Ereduction pathways for axial%3CU%2B2010%3Eflow turbines in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes potential technical costreduction pathways for axialflow turbines designed for tidal, river, and ocean current resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were utilized to understand current cost drivers and develop a list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to axialflow turbines, the U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model effort, and informal webinars and other targeted interactions with industry developers. Data from these various information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy. The four most promising costreduction pathways include structural design optimization; improved deployment, maintenance, and recovery; system simplicity and reliability; and array optimization.

Laird, Daniel L.; Johnson, Erick L.; Ochs, Margaret Ellen; Boren, Blake [Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded the Electric Power Research Institute and its collaborative partners, University of Alaska ? Anchorage, University of Alaska ? Fairbanks, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, to provide an assessment of the riverine hydrokinetic resource in the continental United States. The assessment benefited from input obtained during two workshops attended by individuals with relevant expertise and from a National Research Council panel commissioned by DOE to provide guidance to this and other concurrent, DOE-funded assessments of water based renewable energy. These sources of expertise provided valuable advice regarding data sources and assessment methodology. The assessment of the hydrokinetic resource in the 48 contiguous states is derived from spatially-explicit data contained in NHDPlus ?a GIS-based database containing river segment-specific information on discharge characteristics and channel slope. 71,398 river segments with mean annual flow greater than 1,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) mean discharge were included in the assessment. Segments with discharge less than 1,000 cfs were dropped from the assessment, as were river segments with hydroelectric dams. The results for the theoretical and technical resource in the 48 contiguous states were found to be relatively insensitive to the cutoff chosen. Raising the cutoff to 1,500 cfs had no effect on estimate of the technically recoverable resource, and the theoretical resource was reduced by 5.3%. The segment-specific theoretical resource was estimated from these data using the standard hydrological engineering equation that relates theoretical hydraulic power (Pth, Watts) to discharge (Q, m3 s-1) and hydraulic head or change in elevation (??, m) over the length of the segment, where ? is the specific weight of water (9800 N m-3): ??? = ? ? ?? For Alaska, which is not encompassed by NPDPlus, hydraulic head and discharge data were manually obtained from Idaho National Laboratory?s Virtual Hydropower Prospector, Google Earth, and U.S. Geological Survey gages. Data were manually obtained for the eleven largest rivers with average flow rates greater than 10,000 cfs and the resulting estimate of the theoretical resource was expanded to include rivers with discharge between 1,000 cfs and 10,000 cfs based upon the contribution of rivers in the latter flow class to the total estimate in the contiguous 48 states. Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a power-take-off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drivetrain, power generator, and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost, and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency and low maintenance and cost, with a low impact on the device cost-of-energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Marine Hydrokinetic Turbine Power-Take-Off Design for Optimal Performance and Low Impact on Cost-of-Energy: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine hydrokinetic devices are becoming a popular method for generating marine renewable energy worldwide. These devices generate electricity by converting the kinetic energy of moving water, wave motion or currents, into electrical energy through the use of a Power-Take-Off (PTO) system. Most PTO systems incorporate a mechanical or hydraulic drive train, power generator and electric control/conditioning system to deliver the generated electric power to the grid at the required state. Like wind turbine applications, the PTO system must be designed for high reliability, good efficiency, and long service life with reasonable maintenance requirements, low cost and an appropriate mechanical design for anticipated applied steady and unsteady loads. The ultimate goal of a PTO design is high efficiency, low maintenance and cost with a low impact on the device Cost-of-Energy (CoE).

Beam, M.; Kline, B.; Elbing, B.; Straka, W.; Fontaine, A.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Thresher, R.; Previsic, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Laboratory Experiments on the Effects of Blade Strike from Hydrokinetic Energy Technologies on Larval and Juvenile Freshwater Fishes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in the development of marine and hydrokinetic energy projects in rivers, estuaries, and coastal ocean waters of the United States. Hydrokinetic (HK) technologies convert the energy of moving water in river or tidal currents into electricity, without the impacts of dams and impoundments associated with conventional hydropower or the extraction and combustion of fossil fuels. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) maintains a database that displays the geographical distribution of proposed HK projects in inland and tidal waters (FERC 2012). As of March 2012, 77 preliminary permits had been issued to private developers to study HK projects in inland waters, the development of which would total over 8,000 MW. Most of these projects are proposed for the lower Mississippi River. In addition, the issuance of another 27 preliminary permits for HK projects in inland waters, and 3 preliminary permits for HK tidal projects (totaling over 3,100 MW) were under consideration by FERC. Although numerous HK designs are under development (see DOE 2009 for a description of the technologies and their potential environmental effects), the most commonly proposed current-based projects entail arrays of rotating devices, much like submerged wind turbines, that are positioned in the high-velocity (high energy) river channels. The many diverse HK designs imply a diversity of environmental impacts, but a potential impact common to most is the risk for blade strike to aquatic organisms. In conventional hydropower generation, research on fish passage through reaction turbines at low-head dams suggested that strike and mortality for small fish could be low. As a consequence of the large surface area to mass ratio of small fish, the drag forces in the boundary layer flow at the surface of a rotor blade may pull small fish around the leading edge of a rotor blade without making physical contact (Turnpenny 1998, Turnpenny et al. 2000). Although there is concern that small, fragile fish early life stages may be unable to avoid being struck by the blades of hydrokinetic turbines, we found no empirical data in the published literature that document survival of earliest life-stage fish in passage by rotor blades. In addition to blade strike, research on passage of fish through conventional hydropower turbines suggested that fish mortalities from passage through the rotor swept area could also occur due to shear stresses and pressure chances in the water column (Cada et al. 1997, Turnpenny 1998). However, for most of the proposed HK turbine designs the rotors are projected to operate a lower RPM (revolutions per minute) than observed from conventional reaction turbines; the associated shear stress and pressure changes are expected to be lower and pose a smaller threat to fish survival (DOE 2009). Only a limited number of studies have been conducted to examine the risk of blade strike from hydrokinetic technologies to fish (Turnpenny et al. 1992, Normandeau et al. 2009, Seitz et al. 2011, EPRI 2011); the survival of drifting or weakly swimming fish (especially early life stages) that encounter rotor blades from hydrokinetic (HK) devices is currently unknown. Our study addressed this knowledge gap by testing how fish larvae and juveniles encountered different blade profiles of hydrokinetic devices and how such encounters influenced survivorship. We carried out a laboratory study designed to improve our understanding of how fish larvae and juvenile fish may be affected by encounters with rotor blades from HK turbines in the water column of river and ocean currents. (For convenience, these early life stages will be referred to as young of the year, YOY). The experiments developed information needed to quantify the risk (both probability and consequences) of rotor-blade strike to YOY fish. In particular, this study attempted to determine whether YOY drifting in a high-velocity flow directly in the path of the blade leading edge will make contact with the rotor blade or will bypass the blade while entrained in the boundary l

Schweizer, Peter E [ORNL; Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

FFP/NREL Collaboration on Hydrokinetic River Turbine Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-00473  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This shared resources CRADA defines collaborations between the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Free Flow Power (FFP) set forth in the following Joint Work Statement. Under the terms and conditions described in this CRADA, NREL and FFP will collaborate on the testing of FFP's hydrokinetic river turbine project on the Mississippi River (baseline location near Baton Rouge, LA; alternate location near Greenville, MS). NREL and FFP will work together to develop testing plans, instrumentation, and data acquisition systems; and perform field measurements.

Driscoll, F.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

J.M. Acaglione

2003-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Contribution of Environmental Siting and Permitting Requirements to the Cost of Energy for Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Responsible deployment of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) devices in estuaries, coastal areas, and major rivers requires that biological resources and ecosystems be protected through siting and permitting (consenting) processes. Scoping appropriate deployment locations, collecting pre-installation (baseline) and post-installation data add to the cost of developing MHK projects, and hence to the cost of energy. Under the direction of the U.S. Department of Energy, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientists have developed logic models that describe studies and processes for environmental siting and permitting. Each study and environmental permitting process has been assigned a cost derived from existing and proposed tidal, wave, and riverine MHK projects. Costs have been developed at the pilot scale, and for commercial arrays. This work is carried out under the U.S. Department of Energy reference model project, with the costs for engineering, deployment strategies, mooring and anchoring configurations, and maintenance operations, being developed by a consortium of Department of Energy national laboratories and universities. The goal of the reference model is to assist the MHK industry to become a cost-competitive contributor of renewable energy, by identifying those aspects of MHK projects that contribute significantly to the cost of energy, and directing research funding towards lowering those costs.

Copping, Andrea E.; Geerlofs, Simon H.

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

95

Save Energy with Axial Fans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are several ways to save energy in wet cooling towers and air cooled heat exchangers using axial fans. This paper will discuss ways to improve fan system efficiency in wet and dry towers both during the design phase and after installation by specifying energy efficient equipment. Variable pitch fan versus fixed pitch fan operation is discussed in terms of energy savings and means of control. The areas of interest to wet cooling tower users would be the influence on fan diameter and operating point on horsepower, how and when are velocity recovery stacks effective, the effect of varying fan speed to improve efficiency, and tip clearance effects. The areas of interest to dry tower (air cooled heat exchanger) users would be the effect of inlet losses, approach velocity losses, and losses due to air recirculation.

Monroe, R. C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Orientation of stationary axial collectors  

SciTech Connect

Attention is drawn to the fact that stationary solar collectors with axial symmetry have a third degree of freedom which must be considered, in addition to their azimuth and tilt angles, if their orientation is to be optimized on an annual or seasonal basis. The authors set up the equations needed to describe collector orientation in terms of all angles, including this extra degree of freedom which they refer to as skewness. Examples of the use of these equations are then given, both for northern and southern latitudes, which illustrate the manner in which skewness may be taken into consideration and highlight the importance of doing this. For the sake of simplicity the illustrative examples treat only the direct beam component of the total insolation intercepted by the collector.

Faiman, D.; Mills, D.R. (Sydney Univ., New South Wales (Australia))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Origin of axial current in scyllac  

SciTech Connect

The origin of the axial current observed in Scyllac (a high beta stellarator experiment) is discussed. A shaped coil and/or helical winding produce rotational transform which links magnetic lines of force to the plasma column and the axial current is induced electromagnetically. This phenomenon is inherent in a pulsed high-beta stellarator. The rotational transform produced by the induced axial current is much smaller than that associated with the l = 1, 0 equilibrium fields. The effect of the axial current on the equilibrium and stability of the plasma column is thus small. It is also shown that the magnetic field shear near a plasma surface is very strong. (auth)

Sugisaki, K.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Hydrodynamic design of axial hydraulic turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a complete methodology of the hydrodynamic design for the runner of axial hydraulic turbines (Kaplan) using the finite element method. The procedure starts with the parametric design of the meridian channel. Next, the stream traces ... Keywords: QTurbo3D, axial hydraulic turbines, design, meridian channel, runner blade

Daniel Balint; Viorel Câmpian

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Axial interaction free-electron laser  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electron orbits from a helical axial wiggler in an axial guide field are absolutely unstable as power is extracted from the particles. For off-axis beams an axial FEL mechanism exists when the axial electric field in a TM mode is wiggled to interact with the axial velocity of the electrons that form the beam. The interaction strength is comparable to that for helical FELs and is insensitive to beam orbit errors. The orbits for this mechanism are extremely stable in the absence of space charge and lead to high extraction efficiencies without particle phasing incoherence or interception. This interaction mechanism is suitable for use with intense annular electron beams for high power generation at microwave frequencies.

Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electric Axial motor ­ Develop axial gap permanent-magnet electricCAVT A University of Alabama Axial-Gap Electric Motor Developmenty Research Center OBJECTIVE motor topologies with high torque and power densities MOTIVATION ­ Axial-gap ("pancake") motors have

Carver, Jeffrey C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

BoneMaster™ HA Coating – An In Vivo Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... group (668 N) demonstrated significantly higher pull out strength than control PPS group (348 N). After 32 weeks, the pull out strength for BoneMaster HA and PPS groups ... Facilitates Neural Stem Cell Adhesion, Proliferation and Differentiation ... Sol-Gel Synthesis of Bio-Active Nanoporous Sodium Zirconate Coated on ...

102

Performance limits of axial turbomachine stages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the limits of stage efficiency for axial compressor and turbine stages. A stage model is developed, consisting of a specified geometry and a surface velocity distribution with turbulent boundary layers. ...

Hall, David Kenneth

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Axial grading of inert matrix fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Animated axial surface mapping: The multimedia companion  

SciTech Connect

This newly expanded version of AAPG`s first DataShare Disk brings to life the concepts and applications of a new method of structural trend analysis. Through the dynamic use of color, sound, animation, and humor, this multimedia companion to the May 1994 article on Axial Surface Mapping introduces the reader (or viewer) to the concepts of rigid-block translation, fault-bend folding, and axial surface mapping. Animated models of growing fault-bend folds allow the viewer to see in four dimensions. The axial surface map shows the horizontal plane; the folding lines show depth planes; and the animations show the structure and its two-dimensional map changing with time and increasing slip. The animations create theoretical map patterns under varying, but controlled conditions that can be compared to axial surface maps from real data. The model patterns are then used to interpret seismic data and axial surface maps from a producing gas field in offshore California and from an exploration play in Pennsylvania.

Hook, S.C.; Shaw, J.H. [Texaco EPTD, Houston, TX (United States); Suppe, J. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigating the Influence of Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code D.C. Maniaci Pennsylvania State University Y. Li National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at the Oceans 11 Conference Kona, Hawaii September 19-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5000-52306 October 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

106

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This paper summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30{sup o} of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Investigating the Influence of the Added Mass Effect to Marine Hydrokinetic Horizontal-Axis Turbines Using a General Dynamic Wake Wind Turbine Code: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a recent study to investigate the applicability of a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) structural dynamics and unsteady aerodynamics analysis program (FAST and AeroDyn respectively) to modeling the forces on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. It summarizes the added mass model that has been added to AeroDyn. The added mass model only includes flow acceleration perpendicular to the rotor disc, and ignores added mass forces caused by blade deflection. A model of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment (UAE) Phase VI wind turbine was analyzed using FAST and AeroDyn with sea water conditions and the new added mass model. The results of this analysis exhibited a 3.6% change in thrust for a rapid pitch case and a slight change in amplitude and phase of thrust for a case with 30 degrees of yaw.

Maniaci, D. C.; Li, Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Signatures of confinement in axial gauge QCD  

SciTech Connect

A comparative dynamical study of axial gauge QED and QCD is presented. Elementary excitations associated with particular field configurations are investigated. Gluonic excitations analogous to linearly polarized photons are shown to acquire infinite energy. Suppression of this class of excitations in QCD results from quantization of the chromo-electric flux and is interpreted as a dual Meissner effect, i.e., as expulsion from the QCD vacuum of chromo-electric fields which are constant over significant distances. This interpretation is supported by a comparative evaluation of the interaction energy of static charges in the axial gauge representation of QED and QCD. {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

Lenz, F. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)]|[Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Moniz, E.J. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)]|[Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Thies, M. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Staudtstrasse 7, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

INL - Hydrokinetic & Wave Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Open-Center Turbine (790KB PDF) Hydromatrix - Innovative Solution For Low Impact Hydropower at Existing Engineered Structures (2.2MB PDF) Hydraulic Cross-Flow Turbines (3.5MB...

110

Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Axial Compressor Performance Maintenance Guide Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To deal with volatile fuel prices and growing pressures to limit greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, combustion turbine (CT) operators are striving for maximum fuel efficiency. The axial compressor is a leading cause of short term and long term CT efficiency losses due to fouling, corrosion, and erosion. This report reviews the technology being advanced for compressor maintenance to achieve improved compressor and the CT efficiencies.

2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

1982-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Strategic Capacity Axial-Compressor Maintenance Program (SCAMP) Version 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Strategic Capacity Axial-Compressor Maintenance Program (SCAMP) spreadsheet provides combustion turbine operators with a low-cost, easy-to-install, easy-to-use program for monitoring combustion turbine (CT) axial compressor performance. Utilities can use it to diagnose the condition of axial compressors and to determine the benefits of maintenance actions such as an off-line compressor wash.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

115

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiography  

SciTech Connect

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A.S.; McDonald, W.M.; Doupont, P.A.; McKinney, R.L.; Lee, M.M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

116

Axial Tomography from Digitized Real Time Radiography  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Axial tomography from digitized real time radiographs provides a useful tool for industrial radiography and tomography. The components of this system are: x-ray source, image intensifier, video camera, video line extractor and digitizer, data storage and reconstruction computers. With this system it is possible to view a two dimensional x-ray image in real time at each angle of rotation and select the tomography plane of interest by choosing which video line to digitize. The digitization of a video line requires less than a second making data acquisition relatively short. Further improvements on this system are planned and initial results are reported.

Zolnay, A. S.; McDonald, W. M.; Doupont, P. A.; McKinney, R. L.; Lee, M. M.

1985-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Secondary air interaction with main flow in axial turbines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Secondary air, known as purge air, is injected through seals in the hub and shroud of axial turbines to prevent hot gas ingestion into the… (more)

Zlatinov, Metodi B. (Metodi Blagoev)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimization of Active Noise Control for Small Axial Cooling Fans.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous work has shown that active noise control is a feasible solution to attenuate tonal noise radiated by small axial cooling fans, such as those… (more)

Monson, Brian B 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Absorption of axially asymmetric waves in inhomogeneous plasma  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the periphery of an inhomogeneous plasma is trasparent to axially asymmetric waves with certain azimuthal indices.(AIP)

Dnestrovskii, Y.N.; Kostomarov, D.P.; Pereverzev, G.V.

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Axial charges of the nucleon and N* resonances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The axial charges of the nucleon and the well-established N* resonances are studied within a consistent framework. For the first time the axial charges of the N* resonances are produced for the relativistic constituent quark model. The axial charge of the nucleon is predicted close to experiment, and the ones of N*(1535) and N*(1650), the only cases where such a comparison is possible, agree well with results from quantum chromodynamics on the lattice that have recently become available. The relevance of the magnitudes of the N* axial charges for the low-energy behavior of quantum chromodynamics is discussed.

Ki-Seok Choi; W. Plessas; R. F. Wagenbrunn

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Energy generated by the world’s oceans and rivers offers the potential to make substantial contributions to the domestic and global renewable energy supply. However, the marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy industry faces challenges related to siting, permitting, construction, and operation of pilotand commercial-scale facilities. One of the challenges is to understand the potential effects to marine organisms from electromagnetic fields, which are produced as a by-product of transmitting power from offshore to onshore locations through underwater transmission cables. This report documents the progress of the third year of research (fiscal year 2012) to investigate environmental issues associated with marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) generation. This work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Wind and Water Technologies Office. The report addresses the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on selected marine species where significant knowledge gaps exist. The species studied this fiscal year included one fish and two crustacean species: the Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister), and American lobster (Homarus americanus).

Woodruff, Dana L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Copping, Andrea E.; Marshall, Kathryn E.

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

High Power Co-Axial SRF Coupler  

SciTech Connect

There are over 35 coupler designs for SRF cavities ranging in frequency from 325 to 1500 MHz. Two-thirds of these designs are coaxial couplers using disk or cylindrical ceramics in various combinations and configurations. While it is well known that dielectric losses go down by several orders of magnitude at cryogenic temperatures, it not well known that the thermal conductivity also goes down, and it is the ratio of thermal conductivity to loss tangent (SRF ceramic Quality Factor) and ceramic volume which will determine the heat load of any given design. We describe a novel robust co-axial SRF coupler design which uses compressed window technology. This technology will allow the use of highly thermally conductive materials for cryogenic windows. The mechanical designs will fit into standard-sized ConFlat® flanges for ease of assembly. Two windows will be used in a coaxial line. The distance between the windows is adjusted to cancel their reflections so that the same window can be used in many different applications at various frequencies.

M.L. Neubauer, R.A. Rimmer

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Conservative axial burnup distributions for actinide-only burnup credit  

SciTech Connect

Unlike the fresh fuel approach, which assumes the initial isotopic compositions for criticality analyses, any burnup credit methodology must address the proper treatment of axial burnup distributions. A straightforward way of treating a given axial burnup distribution is to segment the fuel assembly into multiple meshes and to model each burnup mesh with the corresponding isotopic compositions. Although this approach represents a significant increase in modeling efforts compared to the uniform average burnup approach, it can adequately determine the reactivity effect of the axial burnup distribution. A major consideration is what axial burnup distributions are appropriate for use in light of many possible distributions depending on core operating conditions and histories. This paper summarizes criticality analyses performed to determine conservative axial burnup distributions. The conservative axial burnup distributions presented in this paper are included in the Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages, Revision 1 submitted in May 1997 by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). When approved by NRC, the conservative axial burnup distributions may be used to model PWR spent nuclear fuel for the purpose of gaining actinide only burnup credit.

Kang, C.; Lancaster, D.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Secondary air interaction with main flow in axial turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Secondary air, known as purge air, is injected through seals in the hub and shroud of axial turbines to prevent hot gas ingestion into the endwall cavities. An investigation into the interaction of purge ow with turbine ...

Zlatinov, Metodi B. (Metodi Blagoev)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Axial Compression of a Hollow Cylinder Filled with a Foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Axial Compression of a Hollow Cylinder Filled with a Foam: A Porcupine ... Characterization of (Ti,Mg)N Thin Film Coatings Produced Via Physical Vapor Deposition ... Non-Toxic SPD Processed Ti Alloys for Orthopaedics.

127

Nonlinear Axially Symmetric Circulations in a Nearly Inviscid Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of certain axially symmetric circulations in a stably stratified, differentially heated, rotating Boussinesq fluid on a sphere is analyzed. A simple approximate theory [similar to that introduced by Schneider (1977)] is developed ...

Isaac M. Held; Arthur Y. Hou

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Applications of axial and radial compressor dynamic system modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presented work is a compilation of four different projects related to axial and centrifugal compression systems. The projects are related by the underlying dynamic system modeling approach that is common in all of them. ...

Spakovszky, Zoltán S. (Zoltán Sándor), 1972-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines  

SciTech Connect

An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Hudson, S.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

PWR Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Guidelines, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Axial offset anomaly (AOA) is defined as a significant negative axial offset deviation from the predicted nuclear design value. AOA results from the incorporation of boron within corrosion product deposits on the upper spans of high-duty pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. The consequences of this process are an erosion of shutdown margin and loss of operational flexibility by control room operators, particularly during power transients.

2004-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

Cowell, Gary K. (Monroeville, PA); DiGuiseppe, Carl P. (West Mifflin, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document described the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program efforts to promote the development and deployment of advanced water power devices.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Allan Cormack, Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT), and Magnetic Resonance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allan M. Cormack, Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT) Allan M. Cormack, Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Resources with Additional Information magnetic resonance imaging system Computed axial tomography, commonly known as CAT scanning, was introduced in 1972. During a CAT scan, a large coil of x-ray tubes rotates around the patient's body, taking x-rays from all angles. A computer integrates all of these x-rays into a single, three-dimensional image on a television screen. The data can be saved on the computer. Allan M. Cormack, a high energy physicist at Tufts University, shared the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine for his key work in developing the methods for CAT scanners. At the time of development, these methods were widely regarded as the most significant advance in medical radiography since the 1895 discovery of x-rays.

135

Axial Current Generation from Electric Field: Chiral Electric Separation Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a relativistic plasma containing charged chiral fermions in an external electric field. We show that with the presence of both vector and axial charge densities, the electric field can induce an axial current along its direction and thus cause chirality separation. We call it the Chiral Electric Separation Effect (CESE). On very general basis, we argue that the strength of CESE is proportional to $\\mu_V\\mu_A$ with $\\mu_V$ and $\\mu_A$ the chemical potentials for vector charge and axial charge. We then explicitly calculate this CESE conductivity coefficient in thermal QED at leading-log order. The CESE can manifest a new gapless wave mode propagating along the electric field. Potential observable of CESE in heavy-ion collisions is also discussed.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

136

Electrons Confined with an Axially Symmetric Magnetic Mirror Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low energy non-neutral electron plasmas were confined with an axially symmetric magnetic mirror field and an electrostatic potential to investigate the basic confinement properties of a simple magnetic mirror trap. As expected the confinement time became longer as a function of the mirror ratio. The axial electrostatic oscillations of a confined electron plasma were also observed. Obtained results suggested an improved scheme to accumulate low energy charged particles with the use of a magnetic mirror field, which would enable the investigation of electron-positron plasmas.

Higaki, H.; Ito, K.; Kira, K.; Okamoto, H. [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

137

Stability of magnetic configurations containing the toroidal and axial fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stability properties of magnetic-field configurations containing the toroidal and axial field are considered. The stability is treated by making use of linear analysis. It is shown that the conditions required for the onset of instability are essentially different from those given by the necessary condition $d (s B_{\\phi})/ds > 0$, where $s$ is the cylindrical radius. The growth rate of instability is calculated for a wide range of the parameters. We argue that the instability can operate in two different regimes depending on the strength of the axial field and the profile of the toroidal field.

Bonanno, Alfio

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Analysis and optimization of service availability in a HA cluster with load-dependent machine availability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of service availability of a High- Availability (HA) cluster are usually based on the assumption of load-independent machine availabilities. In this paper, we study the issues and show how the service availabilities can be calculated under ... Keywords: High Availability, cluster computing, Markov chains, Markov decision processes, dynamic programming, neuro-dynamic programming

Chee-Wei Ang; Chen-Khong Tham

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combuston chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end of the combustor chamber and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Small core axial compressors for high efficiency jet aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis quantifies mechanisms that limit efficiency in small core axial compressors, defined here as compressor exit corrected flow between 1.5 and 3.0 lbm/s. The first part of the thesis describes why a small engine ...

DiOrio, Austin Graf

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Calculation of the nucleon axial charge in lattice QCD  

SciTech Connect

Protons and neutrons have a rich structure in terms of their constituents, the quarks and gluons. Understanding this structure requires solving Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). However QCD is extremely complicated, so we must numerically solve the equations of QCD using a method known as lattice QCD. Here we describe a typical lattice QCD calculation by examining our recent computation of the nucleon axial charge.

D. B. Renner; R. G. Edwards; G. Fleming; Ph. Hagler; J. W. Negele; K. Orginos; A. V. Pochinsky; D. G. Richards; W. Schroers

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Inflationary Behaviour in Axial-symmetric Gravitational Collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the interior of a charged, spinning black hole formed from a general axially symmetric gravitational collapse is unstable to inflation of both its mass and angular momentum parameters. Although our results are formulated in the context of $(2+1)$-dimensional black holes, we argue that they are applicable to $(3+1)$ dimensions.

J. S. F. Chan; R. B. Mann

1994-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint. 2 figs.

O' Connor, D.G.; Gerth, H.L.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Hydrostatic self-aligning axial/torsional mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a self-aligning axial/torsional loading mechanism for testing the strength of brittle materials which are sensitive to bending moments. Disposed inside said self-aligning loading mechanism is a frictionless hydrostatic ball joint with a flexure ring to accommodate torsional loads through said ball joint.

O' Connor, Daniel G. (Knoxville, TN); Gerth, Howard L. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Cyclone reactor with internal separation and axial recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cyclone combustor apparatus contains a circular partition plate containing a central circular aperture is described. The partition plate divides the apparatus into a cylindrical precombustor chamber and a combustor chamber. A coal-water slurry is passed axially into the inlet end of the precombustor chamber, and primary air is passed tangentially into said chamber to establish a cyclonic air flow. Combustion products pass through the partition plate aperture and into the combustor chamber. Secondary air may also be passed tangentially into the combustor chamber adjacent the partition plate to maintain the cyclonic flow. Flue gas is passed axially out of the combustor chamber at the outlet end and ash is withdrawn tangentially from the combustor chamber at the outlet end. A first mixture of flue gas and ash may be tangentially withdrawn from the combustor chamber at the outlet end and recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber with the coal-water slurry. A second mixture may be tangentially withdrawn from the outlet end and passed to a heat exchanger for cooling. Cooled second mixture is then recirculated to the axial inlet of the precombustor chamber. In another embodiment a single cyclone combustor chamber is provided with both the recirculation streams of the first mixture and the second mixture. 10 figs.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

None

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Plan for the Startup of HA-21I Furnace Operations at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Achievement of Thermal Stabilization mission elements require the installation and startup of three additional muffle furnaces for the thermal stabilization of plutonium and plutonium bearing materials at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The release to operate these additional furnaces will require an Activity Based Startup Review. The conduct of the Activity Based Startup Review (ABSR) was approved by Fluor Daniel Hanford on October 15, 1999. This plan has been developed with the objective of identifying those activities needed to guide the controlled startup of five furnaces from authorization to unrestricted operations by adding the HA-211 furnaces in an orderly and safe manner after the approval to Startup has been given. The Startup Plan provides a phased approach that bridges the activities between the completion of the Activity Based Startup Review authorizing the use of the three additional furnaces and the unrestricted operation of the five thermal stabilization muffle furnaces. The four phases are: (1) the initiation of five furnace operations using three empty (simulated full) boat charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C; (2) three furnace operations (one full charge from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); (3) four furnace operations (two full charges from HA-211 and two full charges from HC-21C); and (4) integrated five furnace operations and unrestricted operations. Phase 1 of the Plan will be considered as the cold runs. This Plan also provides management oversight and administrative controls that are to be implemented until unrestricted operations are authorized. It also provides a formal review process for ensuring that all preparations needed for full five furnace operations are completed and formally reviewed prior to proceeding to the increased activity levels associated with five furnace operations. Specific objectives include: (1) To ensure that activities are conducted in a safe manner. (2) To provide supplemental technical and managerial support to Thermal Stabilization activities during the initial use of the HA-211 Furnaces until the commencement of full five furnace, unrestricted operations. (3) Ensure that operations can be conducted in a manner that meets PFP and DOE expectations associated with the principles of integrated safety management. (4) To ensure that all interfacing activities needed to meet Thermal Stabilization mission objectives are completed.

WILLIS, H.T.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Axial Ge/Si nanowire heterostructure tunnel FETs  

SciTech Connect

The vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of semiconductor nanowires allows doping and composition modulation along their axis and the realization of axial 1 D heterostructures. This provides additional flexibility in energy band-edge engineering along the transport direction which is difficult to attain by planar materials growth and processing techniques. We report here on the design, growth, fabrication, and characterization of asymmetric heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFETs) based on 100% compositionally modulated Si/Ge axial NWs for high on-current operation and low ambipolar transport behavior. We discuss the optimization of band-offsets and Schottky barrier heights for high performance HTFETs and issues surrounding their experimental realization. Our HTFET devices with 10 nm PECVD SiN{sub x} gate dielectric resulted in a measured current drive exceeding 100 {mu}A/{mu}m (I/{pi}D) and 10{sup 5} I{sub on}/I{sub off} ratios.

Picraux, Sanuel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daych, Shadi A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Axially staged combustion system for a gas turbine engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An axially staged combustion system is provided for a gas turbine engine comprising a main body structure having a plurality of first and second injectors. First structure provides fuel to at least one of the first injectors. The fuel provided to the one first injector is adapted to mix with air and ignite to produce a flame such that the flame associated with the one first injector defines a flame front having an average length when measured from a reference surface of the main body structure. Each of the second injectors comprising a section extending from the reference surface of the main body structure through the flame front and having a length greater than the average length of the flame front. Second structure provides fuel to at least one of the second injectors. The fuel passes through the one second injector and exits the one second injector at a location axially spaced from the flame front.

Bland, Robert J. (Oviedo, FL)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effect of circumferential groove casing treatment parameters on axial compressor flow range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The impact on compressor flow range of circumferential casing grooves of varying groove depth, groove axial location, and groove axial extent is assessed against that of a smooth casing wall using computational experiments. ...

Hanley, Brian K. (Brian Kyle)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Designing Axial Flow Fan for Flow and Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive finite element methodology is developed to predict the compressible flow performance of a non-symmetric 7-blade axial flow fan, and to quantify the source strength and sound pressure levels at any location in the system. The acoustic and flow performances of the fan are predicted simultaneously using a computational aero-acoustic technique combining transient flow analysis and noise propagation. The calculated sound power levels compare favorably with the measured sound power data per AMCA 300-96 code.

Subrata Roy; Phillip Cho; Fred Périé; International Off-highway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Axial inlet conversion to a centrifugal compressor with magnetic bearings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NOVA's Alberta Gas Transmission Division transports natural gas via pipeline throughout the province of Alberta, Canada, exporting it to eastern Canada, US, and British Columbia. There is a continuing effort to operate the facilities and pipeline at the highest possible efficiency. One area being addressed to improve efficiency is compression of the gas. By improving compressor efficiency, fuel consumption and hence operating costs can be reduced. One method of improving compressor efficiency is by converting the compressor to an axial inlet configuration, a conversion that has been carried out more frequently in the past years. Concurrently, conventional hydrodynamic bearings have been replaced with magnetic bearings on many centrifugal compressors. This paper discusses the design and installation for converting a radial overhung unit to an axial inlet configuration, having both magnetic bearings and a thrust reducer. The thrust reducer is required to reduce axial compressor shaft loads, to a level that allows the practical installation of magnetic bearings within the space limitations of the compressor (Bear and Gibson, 1992).

Novecosky, T. (NOVA Corp., Edmonton, Alberta (Canada))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CSER 99-007 Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for PFP Glovebox HA-21I Muffle Furnace Operation for Plutonium Stabilization  

SciTech Connect

Criticality Safety Evaluation Report for operation of PFP Glovebox HA-21I muffle furnace for plutonium stabilization. Glovebox limits are specified for processing metal and oxide fissile materials.

DOBBIN, K.D.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

155

Fabrication and characterization of collagen-immobilized porous PHBV/HA nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The porous composite scaffolds (PHBV/HA) consisting of poly (3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) and hydroxyapatite (HA) were fabricated using a hot-press machine and salt-leaching. Collagen (type I) was then immobilized on the surface of ...

Jin-Young Baek; Zhi-Cai Xing; Giseop Kwak; Keun-Byoung Yoon; Soo-Young Park; Lee Soon Park; Inn-Kyu Kang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Activity Report for Hanford WTP LAW Melter HA Development, July 31 - August 5, 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report HSS Independent Activity Report Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Dates of Activity : 07/31/13 - 08/05/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, conducted from July 31 to August 5, 2013, was to observe and

157

Activity Report for Hanford WTP LAW Melter HA Development, July 31 - August 5, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report HSS Independent Activity Report Report Number: HIAR-WTP-2013-07-31 Site: Hanford Site Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Operational Awareness of Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant Low Activity Waste Melter Process System Hazards Analysis Activity Dates of Activity : 07/31/13 - 08/05/13 Report Preparer: James O. Low Activity Description/Purpose: The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) staff observed a limited portion of the hazards analysis (HA) for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) Melter Process (LMP) system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, conducted from July 31 to August 5, 2013, was to observe and

158

Recovering partial conservation of axial current in diffractive neutrino scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model of diffractive neutrino scattering is formulated in terms of the chiral hadronic current which is conserved in the limit of vanishing pion mass. This current has the correct singularity structure and, naturally, does not lead to contradictions with a partial conservation of the axial current (PCAC). In that respect we differ from earlier work in the literature, where a breakdown of PCAC had been reported. We show that such a breakdown of PCAC is an artifact of the hadronic current non-conservation in the model developed there.

V. A. Novikov; V. R. Zoller

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

A conducting ball in an axial electric field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the distribution of a charge, the electric moments of arbitrary order and the force acting on a conducting ball on the axis of the axial electric field. We determine the full charge and the dipole moments of the first order for a conducting ball in an arbitrary inhomogeneous harmonic electric field. All statements are formulated in the form of theorems with proofs basing on properties of the matrix of moments of the Legendre polynomials. The analysis and proof of these properties are presented in Appendix.

Alexander Savchenko

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Effect of axial exposure distributions in burnup credit criticality analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnup credit is the application of the effects of fuel exposure or burnup to nuclear criticality considerations in the design of spent fuel transport and storage facilities. One unique issue in this design approach is the proper treatment of the axial variation in burnup experienced by pressurized-water-reactor fuel assemblies. This paper describes calculations and results quantifying this effect in the criticality analysis of spent fuel array geometries. Recommendations are made to provide guidance in evaluating these effects via three different approaches. Final selection of the analysis methodology would be dependent on the specific application and the degree of accuracy required.

Marotta, C.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Brady, M.C (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Napolitano, D.G. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Boston, MA (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Effect of axial exposure distributions in burnup credit criticality analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burnup credit is the application of the effects of fuel exposure or burnup to nuclear criticality considerations in the design of spent fuel transport and storage facilities. One unique issue in this design approach is the proper treatment of the axial variation in burnup experienced by pressurized-water-reactor fuel assemblies. This paper describes calculations and results quantifying this effect in the criticality analysis of spent fuel array geometries. Recommendations are made to provide guidance in evaluating these effects via three different approaches. Final selection of the analysis methodology would be dependent on the specific application and the degree of accuracy required.

Marotta, C.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, M.C [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Napolitano, D.G. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Boston, MA (United States)

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Preliminary Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System: Task 2.1.1: Evaluating Effects of Stressors – Fiscal Year 2010 Progress Report: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possible environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term effects. An understanding of risk associated with likely interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help reduce the level of uncertainty and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases - a tidal project in Puget Sound using Open Hydro turbines, a wave project off the coast of Oregon using Ocean Power Technologies point attenuator buoys, and a riverine current project in the Mississippi River using Free Flow turbines. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in all three cases were the effects of the dynamic physical presence of the device (e.g., strike), accidents, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the four highest tiers of risk were dominated by marine mammals (cetaceans and pinnipeds) and birds (diving and non-diving); only the riverine case (Free Flow) included different receptors in the third tier (fish) and the fourth tier (benthic invertebrates). Although this screening analysis provides a preliminary analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis, especially of risk associated with chemical toxicity and accidents such as oil spills or lost gear, will be necessary to further understand high-priority risks. Subject matter expert review of this process and results is required and is planned for the first quarter of FY11. Once expert review is finalized, the screening analysis phase of ERES will be complete.

Anderson, Richard M.; Copping, Andrea E.; Van Cleve, Frances B.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Process hazards analysis (PrHA) program, bridging accident analyses and operational safety  

SciTech Connect

Recently the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) for the Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Technical Area 55 (TA-55) was revised and submitted to the US. Department of Energy (DOE). As a part of this effort, over seventy Process Hazards Analyses (PrHAs) were written and/or revised over the six years prior to the FSAR revision. TA-55 is a research, development, and production nuclear facility that primarily supports US. defense and space programs. Nuclear fuels and material research; material recovery, refining and analyses; and the casting, machining and fabrication of plutonium components are some of the activities conducted at TA-35. These operations involve a wide variety of industrial, chemical and nuclear hazards. Operational personnel along with safety analysts work as a team to prepare the PrHA. PrHAs describe the process; identi fy the hazards; and analyze hazards including determining hazard scenarios, their likelihood, and consequences. In addition, the interaction of the process to facility systems, structures and operational specific protective features are part of the PrHA. This information is rolled-up to determine bounding accidents and mitigating systems and structures. Further detailed accident analysis is performed for the bounding accidents and included in the FSAR. The FSAR is part of the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) that defines the safety envelope for all facility operations in order to protect the worker, the public, and the environment. The DSA is in compliance with the US. Code of Federal Regulations, 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management and is approved by DOE. The DSA sets forth the bounding conditions necessary for the safe operation for the facility and is essentially a 'license to operate.' Safely of day-to-day operations is based on Hazard Control Plans (HCPs). Hazards are initially identified in the PrI-IA for the specific operation and act as input to the HCP. Specific protective features important to worker safety are incorporated so the worker can readily identify the safety parameters of the their work. System safety tools such as Preliminary Hazard Analysis, What-If Analysis, Hazard and Operability Analysis as well as other techniques as necessary provide the groundwork for both determining bounding conditions for facility safety, operational safety, and day-to-clay worker safety.

Richardson, J. A. (Jeanne A.); McKernan, S. A. (Stuart A.); Vigil, M. J. (Michael J.)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

SCAMP Code -- Strategic Capacity Axial-Compressor Maintenance Program, Version 2.00  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Strategic Capacity Axial-Compressor Maintenance Program (SCAMP) spreadsheet provides combustion turbine operators with a low-cost, easy-to-install, easy-to-use program for monitoring combustion turbine axial compressor and overall turbine performance. It can be used to diagnose the condition of axial compressors and to determine the benefits of maintenance actions such as an off-line compressor wash. Important features of the SCAMP spreadsheet include the following: o Operates as a spreadsheet with m...

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

PRE-SW Strategic Capacity Axial Compressor Maintenance Program (SCAMP) Version 3.0, Beta  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Strategic Capacity Axial-Compressor Maintenance Program (SCAMP) spreadsheet provides combustion turbine operators with a low-cost, easy-to-install, easy-to-use program for monitoring combustion turbine axial compressor and overall turbine performance.  It can be used to diagnose the condition of axial compressors and to determine the benefits of maintenance actions such as an off-line compressor wash.Benefits & ...

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Charmonium Decays to Axial-Vector Plus Pseudoscalar Mesons  

SciTech Connect

A sample of 3.79{times}10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) events is used to study the decays of charmonium to axial-vector plus pseudoscalar mesons. The branching fraction for the decay {psi}(2S){r_arrow}b{sup {plus_minus}}{sub 1} (1235){pi}{sup {minus_plus}} agrees with expectations based on scaling the corresponding J/{psi} branching fraction. Flavor-SU(3)-violating K{sub 1}(1270) -K{sub 1}(1400) asymmetries with opposite character for {psi}(2S) and J/{psi} decays are observed. This contrasting behavior cannot be accommodated by adjustments of the singlet-triplet mixing angle. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; He, K.L.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Luo, X.L.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Y.Z.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, G.W.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, B.Q.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, K.J.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Yu, Y.H. [Hangzhou Unv., Hangzhou 310028, People`s Republic of (China)] [Hangzhou Unv., Hangzhou 310028, People`s Republic of (China); Ban, Y. [Peking Unv. (China)] [Peking Unv. (China)

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Axial dipolar dynamo action in the Taylor-Green vortex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a numerical study of the magnetic field generated by the Taylor-Green vortex. We show that periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic realistic boundary conditions by prescribing the symmetries of the velocity and magnetic fields. This gives insight in some problems of central interest for dynamos: the possible effect of velocity fluctuations on the dynamo threshold, the role of boundary conditions on the threshold and on the geometry of the magnetic field generated by dynamo action. In particular, we show that an axial dipolar dynamo similar to the one observed in a recent experiment can be obtained with an appropriate choice of the symmetries of the magnetic field. The nonlinear saturation is studied and a simple model explaining the magnetic Prandtl number dependence of the super/sub critical nature of the dynamo transition is given.

Giorgio Krstulovic; Gentien Thorner; Julien-Piera Vest; Stephan Fauve; Marc Brachet

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

168

Energy harvesting efficiency of piezoelectric flags in axial flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-sustained oscillations resulting from fluid-solid instabilities, such as the flutter of a flexible flag in axial flow, can be used to harvest energy if one is able to convert the solid energy into electricity. Here, this is achieved using piezoelectric patches attached to the surface of the flag that convert the solid deformation into an electric current powering purely resistive output circuits. Nonlinear numerical simulations in the slender-body limit, based on an explicit description of the coupling between the fluid-solid and electric systems, are used to determine the harvesting efficiency of the system, namely the fraction of the flow kinetic energy flux effectively used to power the output circuit, and its evolution with the system's parameters. The role of the tuning between the characteristic frequencies of the fluid-solid and electric systems is emphasized, as well as the critical impact of the piezoelectric coupling intensity. High fluid loading, classically associated with destabilization by ...

Michelin, Sebastien

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Electro-deposition of Bi-axial Textured Layers on a Substrate ...  

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed ... Solar Photovoltaic ... uniformly in one of the three axial directions in three-dimensional space, ...

170

Strangeness contribution to the vector and axial form factors of the nucleon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strangeness contribution to the vector and axial form factors of the nucleon is presented for momentum transfers in the range $0.45Lab, and elastic $\

S. F. Pate; G. A. MacLachlan; D. W. McKee; V. Papavassiliou

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

171

Feedback Applications in Active Noise Control for Small Axial Cooling Fans.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Feedback active noise control (ANC) has been applied as a means of attenuating broadband noise from a small axial cooling fan. Such fans are used… (more)

Green, Matthew J 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

J. Ceomag. Geoelectr., 49, 1327-1342, 1997 Seafloor Electromagnetic Measurements above Axial Seamount,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in fractures or pipes. 1. Introduction AxialSeamountlieson the Juan deFucaRidge,about 500km westof-Eickelberg Seamount Chain (Johnson and Embley, 1990).Basalts fromAxial Seamount are broadly similar to those from-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) affinity. The volcano is the shallowestpart of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, indicating

Constable, Steve

173

Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow: Effects of alternating channel curvature Metin of channel curvature on the axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flows are studied computationally.1063/1.3531742 I. INTRODUCTION Segmented gas-liquid flow also known as Taylor flow has been studied extensively

Muradoglu, Metin

174

The synchronous force control of a double-axial pneumatic actuating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the design of the synchronous force controller of a double-axial pneumatic actuating system. This system is ideally decomposed into two independent subsystems, and the coupling effect is considered as the noise effect. So, each ... Keywords: STC, double-axial pneumatic system, synchronous force control

Ying-Tsai Wang; Ming-Kun Chang

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effects of Electromagnetic Fields on Fish and Invertebrates: Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fiscal year (FY) 2011 progress report (Task 2.1.3 Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.3.1.1 Electromagnetic Fields) describes studies conducted by PNNL as part of the DOE Wind and Water Power Program to examine the potential effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF) from marine and hydrokinetic devices on aquatic organisms, including freshwater and marine fish and marine invertebrates. In this report, we provide a description of the methods and results of experiments conducted in FY 2010-FY 2011 to evaluate potential responses of selected aquatic organisms. Preliminary EMF laboratory experiments during FY 2010 and 2011 entailed exposures with representative fish and invertebrate species including juvenile coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch), Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus), California halibut (Paralicthys californicus), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), and Dungeness crab (Metacarcinus magister). These species were selected for their ecological, commercial, and/or recreational importance, as well as their potential to encounter an MHK device or transmission cable during part or all of their life cycle. Based on previous studies, acute effects such as mortality were not expected to occur from EMF exposures. Therefore, our measurement endpoints focused on behavioral responses (e.g., detection of EMF, interference with feeding behavior, avoidance or attraction to EMF), developmental changes (i.e., growth and survival from egg or larval stage to juvenile), and exposure markers indicative of physiological responses to stress. EMF intensities during the various tests ranged from 0.1 to 3 millitesla, representing a range of upper bounding conditions reported in the literature. Experiments to date have shown there is little evidence to indicate distinct or extreme behavioral responses in the presence of elevated EMF for the species tested. Several developmental and physiological responses were observed in the fish exposures, although most were not statistically significant. Additional species are currently planned for laboratory testing in the next fiscal year (e.g. an elasmobranch, American lobster) to provide a broader assessment of species important to stakeholders. The collective responses of all species will be assessed in terms of life stage, exposure scenarios, and biological relevance, to address current uncertainties related to effects of EMF on aquatic organisms.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Schultz, Irvin R.; Marshall, Kathryn E.; Ward, Jeffrey A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Screening Analysis for the Environmental Risk Evaluation System Task 2.1.1.2: Evaluating Effects of Stressors Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

Potential environmental effects of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy development are not well understood, and yet regulatory agencies are required to make decisions in spite of substantial uncertainty about environmental impacts and their long-term consequences. An understanding of risks associated with interactions between MHK installations and aquatic receptors, including animals, habitats, and ecosystems, can help define key uncertainties and focus regulatory actions and scientific studies on interactions of most concern. As a first step in developing the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Risk Evaluation System (ERES), PNNL scientists conducted a preliminary risk screening analysis on three initial MHK cases. During FY 2011, two additional cases were added: a tidal project in the Gulf of Maine using Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGenTM turbines and a wave project planned for the coast of Oregon using Aquamarine Oyster surge devices. Through an iterative process, the screening analysis revealed that top-tier stressors in the two FY 2011 cases were the dynamic effects of the device (e.g., strike), accidents/disasters, and effects of the static physical presence of the device (e.g., habitat alteration). Receptor interactions with these stressors at the highest tiers of risk were dominated by threatened and endangered animals. Risk to the physical environment from changes in flow regime also ranked high. Peer review of this process and results will be conducted in early FY 2012. The ERES screening analysis provides an analysis of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations, probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors. “Risk” has two components: (1) The likelihood, or “probability”, of the occurrence of a given interaction or event, and (2) the potential “consequence” if that interaction or event were to occur. During FY 2011, the ERES screening analysis focused primarily on the second component of risk, “consequence”, with focused probability analysis for interactions where data was sufficient for probability modeling. Consequence analysis provides an assessment of vulnerability of environmental receptors to stressors associated with MHK installations. Probability analysis is needed to determine specific risk levels to receptors and requires significant data inputs to drive risk models. During FY 2011, two stressor-receptor interactions were examined for the probability of occurrence. The two interactions (spill probability due to an encounter between a surface vessel and an MHK device; and toxicity from anti-biofouling paints on MHK devices) were seen to present relatively low risks to marine and freshwater receptors of greatest concern in siting and permitting MHK devices. A third probability analysis was scoped and initial steps taken to understand the risk of encounter between marine animals and rotating turbine blades. This analysis will be completed in FY 2012.

Copping, Andrea E.; Blake, Kara M.; Anderson, Richard M.; Zdanski, Laura C.; Gill, Gary A.; Ward, Jeffrey A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Numerical Simulations of the Island-Induced Circulations over the Island of Hawaii during HaRP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5)/land surface model (LSM) is used to simulate the diurnal island-scale circulations over the island of Hawaii during the Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP, 11 July–24 ...

Yang Yang; Yi-Leng Chen; Francis M. Fujioka

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; /Fermilab; Bromberg, C.; /Michigan State U.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L. /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Axial couplings of heavy hadrons from domain-wall lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate matrix elements of the axial current for static-light mesons and baryons in lattice QCD with dynamical domain wall fermions. We use partially quenched heavy hadron chiral perturbation theory in a finite volume to extract the axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3} from the data. These axial couplings allow the prediction of strong decay rates and enter chiral extrapolations of most lattice results in the b sector. Our calculations are performed with two lattice spacings and with pion masses down to 227 MeV.

W. Detmold, C.J.D. Lin, S. Meinel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A full-waveform inversion of two-ship, wide-aperture, seismic reflection data from a ridge-crest seismic line at the southern East Pacific Rise indicates that the axial magma chamber here is about 50 m thick, is embedded within a solid roof, and has a solid floor. The 50-60-m-thick roof is overlain by a 150-200-m-thick low-velocity zone that may correspond to a fracture zone that hosts the hydrothermal circulation,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A simple criterion for three-dimensional flow separation in axial compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most modem blade designs in axial-flow compressors diffuse the flow efficiently over 20% to 80% of blade span and it is the endwall regions that set the limits in compressor performance. This thesis addresses the estimation, ...

Lei, Vai-Man

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

European Fusion Theory Conference Non-local features of transport in the axial tokamak region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9th European Fusion Theory Conference Non-local features of transport in the axial tokamak region J.P. Christiansen and P. Helander EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB

183

Determination of the ?(1232) axial and pseudoscalar form factors from lattice QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a lattice QCD calculation of the ?(1232) matrix elements of the axial-vector and pseudoscalar currents. The decomposition of these matrix elements into the appropriate Lorentz invariant form factors is carried ...

Alexandrou, Constantia

184

Axial Wind Effects on Stratification and Longitudinal Salt Transport in an Idealized, Partially Mixed Estuary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D hydrodynamic model [Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS)] is used to investigate how axial wind influences stratification and to explore the associated longitudinal salt transport in partially mixed estuaries. The model is configured to ...

Shih-Nan Chen; Lawrence P. Sanford

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Short pulse high power microwave generation from an axially extracted virtual cathode oscillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary experimental results of an axially extracted virtual cathode oscillator (vircator) built on the low impedance pulsed electron beam accelerator AMBICA-600 is reported. The AMBICA-600 pulsed power system mainly comprises of a coaxial waterline ...

Rishi Verma; Anurag Shyam; Tushar Patel; Y. C. Saxena

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Spin Polarized Photons and Di-leptons from Axially Charged Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axial charge in a QCD plasma is P- and CP-odd. We propose and study P- and CP-odd observables in photon and di-lepton emissions from an axially charged QCD plasma, which may provide possible experimental evidences of axial charge fluctuation and triangle anomaly in the plasma created in heavy-ion collisions. Our observables measure spin alignments of the emitted photons and di-leptons, and are shown to be related to the imaginary part of chiral magnetic conductivity at finite frequency-momentum, which ultimately arises from the underlying triangle anomaly of the QCD plasma with a finite axial charge density. We present an exemplar computation of these observables in strongly coupled regime using AdS/CFT correspondence.

Kiminad A. Mamo; Ho-Ung Yee

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Spin Polarized Photons and Di-leptons from Axially Charged Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axial charge in a QCD plasma is P- and CP-odd. We propose and study P- and CP-odd observables in photon and di-lepton emissions from an axially charged QCD plasma, which may provide possible experimental evidences of axial charge fluctuation and triangle anomaly in the plasma created in heavy-ion collisions. Our observables measure spin alignments of the emitted photons and di-leptons, and are shown to be related to the imaginary part of chiral magnetic conductivity at finite frequency-momentum, which ultimately arises from the underlying triangle anomaly of the QCD plasma with a finite axial charge density. We present an exemplar computation of these observables in strongly coupled regime using AdS/CFT correspondence.

Mamo, Kiminad A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Subdiffusive axial transport of granular materials in a long drum mixer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular mixtures rapidly segregate radially by size when tumbled in a partially filled horizontal drum. The smaller component moves toward the axis of rotation and forms a buried core, which then splits into axial bands. Models have generally assumed that the axial segregation is opposed by diffusion. Using narrow pulses of the smaller component as initial conditions, we have characterized axial transport in the core. We find that the axial advance of the segregated core is well described by a self-similar concentration profile whose width scales as $t^\\alpha$, with $\\alpha \\sim 0.3 < 1/2$. Thus, the process is subdiffusive rather than diffusive as previously assumed. We find that $\\alpha$ is nearly independent of the grain type and drum rotation rate within the smoothly streaming regime. We compare our results to two one-dimensional PDE models which contain self-similarity and subdiffusion; a linear fractional diffusion model and the nonlinear porous medium equation.

Zeina S. Khan; Stephen W. Morris

2004-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Impact of unsteady flow processes on the performance of a high speed axial flow compressor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the unsteady interactions between blade rows in a high Mach number, highly-loaded compressor stage. Two straight vane/rotor configurations with different axial spacing between vane and rotor are ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Hadley Circulations in Radiative–Convective Equilibrium in an Axially Symmetric Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hadley circulations in radiative–convective equilibrium are investigated using an idealistic axially symmetric model. Calculations show that the distribution of temperature in the Hadley cell is controlled by the moist process; the vertical ...

Masaki Satoh

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Sensitivity of 5-cm Wavelength Polarimetric Radar Variables to Raindrop Axial Ratio and Drop Size Distribution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of polarimetric variables at a 5-cm wavelength to raindrop size and axial ratio is examined using T-matrix modeling of the scattering process for gamma raindrop size distributions fitted to tropical rainfall collected at Darwin, ...

T. D. Keenan; L. D. Carey; D. S. Zrni?; P. T. May

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Global Circulation in an Axially Symmetric Shallow Water Model Forced by Equinoctial Differential Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solutions of an axially symmetric inviscid shallow-water model (SWM) on the earth forced by equinoctial differential heating are constructed using numerical integration of the time-dependent equations and analysis of their steady states. The ...

Ori Adam; Nathan Paldor

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Electron Diamagnetic Effect on Axial Force in an Expanding Plasma: Experiments and Theory  

SciTech Connect

The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding current-free plasma is directly measured for three different experimental configurations and compared with a two-dimensional fluid theory. The force component solely resulting from the expanding field is directly measured and identified as an axial force produced by the azimuthal current due to an electron diamagnetic drift and the radial component of the magnetic field. The experimentally measured forces are well described by the theory.

Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

195

Vermont Yankee's benefits and concerns operating with Axially zoned GE9 fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vermont Yankee (VY) is a 368-assembly, D-lattice, boiling water reactor (BWR)/4. The current cycle 16 contains 252 GE9 assemblies with axial zoning of gadolinium and enrichment, 112 GE8 assemblies with axially zoned gadolinium, and 4 Siemens 9 x 9-IX lead qualification assemblies. In this paper, the performance of the GE9-dominated core is evaluated against previous cores containing less sophisticated fuel designs.

Woehlke, R.A. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses  

SciTech Connect

This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

Wagner, J.C.

2002-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

ANALYSIS OF THE AXIAL GAP VS FIBERBOARD MOISTURE CONTENT IN A 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

The fiberboard assembly within a 9975 shipping package contains a modest amount of moisture, which can migrate to the cooler regions of the package when an internal heat load is present. Typically, this leads to increased moisture levels in the bottom fiberboard layers, along with elevated chloride levels which can leach from the fiberboard. Concerns have been raised that this condition could lead to corrosion of the stainless steel drum. It has been postulated that checking the axial gap at the top of the package against the current 1 inch maximum criterion provides a sufficient indication regarding the integrity of the fiberboard and drum. This report estimates the increase in axial gap that might be expected for a given moisture increase in the bottom fiberboard layers, and the likelihood that the increase will create a nonconforming condition that will lead to identification of the moisture increase. Using data relating the fiberboard moisture content with the degree of compaction under load, the present analysis indicates that the axial gap will increase by 0.282 inch as the bottom fiberboard layers approach the saturation point. This increase will cause approximately 58% of packages with otherwise nominal package component dimensions to fail the axial gap criterion, based on a survey of axial gap values recorded in K-Area surveillance activities. As the moisture content increases above saturation, the predicted increase in axial gap jumps to 0.405 inch, which would result in 92% or more of all packages failing the axial gap criterion. The data and analysis described in this report are specific to cane fiberboard. While it is expected that softwood fiberboard will behave similarly, such behavior has not yet been demonstrated.

Daugherty, W.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Charged Axially Symmetric Solution, Energy and Angular Momentum in Tetrad Theory of Gravitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged axially symmetric solution of the coupled gravitational and electromagnetic fields in the tetrad theory of gravitation is derived. The metric associated with this solution is an axially symmetric metric which is characterized by three parameters ``$ $the gravitational mass $M$, the charge parameter $Q$ and the rotation parameter $a$". The parallel vector fields and the electromagnetic vector potential are axially symmetric. We calculate the total exterior energy. The energy-momentum complex given by M{\\o}ller in the framework of the Weitzenb$\\ddot{o}$ck geometry ``$ ${\\it characterized by vanishing the curvature tensor constructed from the connection of this geometry}" has been used. This energy-momentum complex is considered as a better definition for calculation of energy and momentum than those of general relativity theory. The energy contained in a sphere is found to be consistent with pervious results which is shared by its interior and exterior. Switching off the charge parameter, one finds that no energy is shared by the exterior of the charged axially symmetric solution. The components of the momentum density are also calculated and used to evaluate the angular momentum distribution. We found no angular momentum contributes to the exterior of the charged axially symmetric solution if zero charge parameter is used.

Gamal G. L. Nashed

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Axial seal system for a gas turbine steam-cooled rotor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An axial seal assembly is provided at the interface between adjacent wheels and spacers of a gas turbine rotor and disposed about tubes passing through openings in the rotor adjacent the rotor rim and carrying a thermal medium. Each seal assembly includes a support bushing for supporting a land of the thermal medium carrying tube, an axially registering seat bushing disposed in the opposed opening and a frustoconical seal between the seal bushing and seat. The seal bushing includes a radial flange having an annular recess for retaining the outer diameter edge of the seal, while the seat bushing has an axially facing annular surface forming a seat for engagement by the inner diameter edge of the seal.

Mashey, Thomas Charles (Anderson, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Global Calculations of Ground-State Axial Shape Asymmetry of Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Important insight into the symmetry properties of the nuclear ground-state (gs) shape is obtained from the characteristics of low-lying collective energy-level spectra. In the 1950s, experimental and theoretical studies showed that in the gs many nuclei are spheroidal in shape rather than spherical. Later, a hexadecapole component of the gs shape was identified. In the 1970-1995 time frame, a consensus that reflection symmetry of the gs shape was broken for some nuclei emerged. Here we present the first calculation across the nuclear chart of axial symmetry breaking in the nuclear gs. We show that we fulfill a necessary condition: Where we calculate axial symmetry breaking, characteristic gamma bands are observed experimentally. Moreover, we find that, for those nuclei where axial asymmetry is found, a systematic deviation between calculated and measured masses is removed.

Moeller, Peter [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bengtsson, Ragnar; Carlsson, B. Gillis; Olivius, Peter [Department of Mathematical Physics, Lund Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Ichikawa, Takatoshi [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of solution exposure on the combined axial-shear behaviour of unidirectional CFRP rods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the peer reviewed version of Scott, P. and Lees, J.M. (2012) "Effects of solution exposure on the combined axial-shear behaviour of unidirectional CFRP rods" Composites Part A: Applied science and manufacturing v. 43A, (9) 1599–1611 which... has been published on http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compositesa.2012.03.027 Effects of solution exposure on the combined axial-shear behaviour of unidirectional CFRP rods P. Scott1 and J.M. Lees2 1 Department of Engineering, University...

Lees, J. M.; Scott, P

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

A study of swirl and axial velocity profile effects on orifice flowmeters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to measure the response of the orifice meter to known upstream flow field disturbances generated by a concentric tube flow conditioner and a vane-type swirl generator. These disturbances are characterized by flan measuring the axial and tangential velocity profiles at the upstream tap with no orifice plate present. Two different flow rates are examined which correspond to Reynolds numbers of 91,100 and 120,000 in a 50.8 mm diameter pipe. Eight orifice plates with [ ] ratios of 0.43, 0.45, 0.484, 0.55, 0.6, 0.65, 0.7 and 0.726 are studied at both flow rates. The response of each orifice meter to the disturbance is measured by determining the axial pressure distribution near the orifice plate, and by determining the discharge coefficient. The axial momentum distribution is quantified by calculating the second order moment of axial momentum (91 2[U]) from the velocity profile data. Swirl is quantified by determining the centripetal acceleration flux of the flow, also from the velocity profile data. Surface fits indicating the variation of discharge coefficient as a function of P ratio and 9i2[U] or swirl number are developed. These are useful in evaluating variations in the discharge coefficient for flows where the inlet velocity profile has been measured.

Hauglie, Jayden Edward

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

An Axial-Flow Cyclone for Aircraft-Based Cloud Water Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new aircraft-based cloud water collection system has been developed to provide samples of cloud water for chemical analysis. The collection system makes use of centrifugal separation in an axial-flow cyclone to remove cloud drops from the ...

Derek J. Straub; Jeffrey L. Collett Jr.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A computational study of axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow Metin Muradoglua  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A computational study of axial dispersion in segmented gas-liquid flow Metin Muradoglua Department-dimensional gas-liquid flow is studied computationally using a finite-volume/front-tracking method. The effects models. © 2007 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.2750295 I. INTRODUCTION Segmented gas-liquid

Muradoglu, Metin

205

Segmentation of female pelvic organs in axial magnetic resonance images using coupled geometric deformable models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The segmentation of pelvic structures in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the female pelvic cavity is a challenging task. This paper proposes the use of three novel geometric deformable models to segment the bladder, vagina and rectum in axial MR images. ... Keywords: Bladder, Image segmentation, Imaging appearance, Level set, Prior shape knowledge, Rectum, Vagina

Zhen Ma; Renato M. Natal Jorge; Teresa Mascarenhas; JoãO Manuel R. S. Tavares

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Original articles: Vortex states in axially symmetric superconductors in applied magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We solve analytically the linearized Ginzburg-Landau (GL) equation in the presence of an uniform magnetic field with cylindrical boundary conditions. The solution of the non-linear GL equation is provided as an expansion in the basis of linearized solutions. ... Keywords: Axial magnetic field, Mesoscopic superconductivity, Nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau equation, Vortex

Andrei Ludu; Milorad V. Miloševi?; Francois M. Peeters

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Low inductance axial flux BLDC motor drive for more electric aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the aircraft technology is moving towards more electric architecture, use of electric motors in aircraft is increasing.12 Axial-flux BLDC motors are becoming popular in aero application because of their ability to meet the demand of light weight, ...

Sukumar De; Milan Rajne; Srikant Poosapati; Chintan Patel; K. Gopakumar

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Influence of induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches  

SciTech Connect

The influence of an induced axial magnetic field on plasma dynamics and radiative characteristics of Z pinches is investigated. An axial magnetic field was induced in a novel Z-pinch load: a double planar wire array with skewed wires (DPWAsk), which represents a planar wire array in an open magnetic configuration. The induced axial magnetic field suppressed magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities (with m = 0 and m = 1 instability modes) in the Z-pinch plasma. The influence of the initial axial magnetic field on the structure of the plasma column at stagnation was manifested through the formation of a more uniform plasma column compared to a standard double planar wire array (DPWA) load [V. L. Kantsyrev et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 030704 (2008)]. The DPWAsk load is characterized by suppression of MRT instabilities and by the formation of the sub-keV radiation pulse that occurs before the main x-ray peak. Gradients in plasma parameters along the cathode-anode gap were observed and analyzed for DPWAsk loads made from low atomic number Z (Al) and mid-Z (brass) wires.

Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Shlyaptseva, V. V. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Velikovich, A. L. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Rudakov, L. I. [Icarus Research Inc., Bethesda, Maryland 20824 (United States); Williamson, K. M. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory, Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, TX 78412 (United States)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

The existence theorem for steady Navier--Stokes equations in the axially symmetric case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the nonhomogeneous boundary value problem for Navier-Stokes equations of steady motion of a viscous incompressible fluid in a three-dimensional bounded multiply connected domain. We prove that this problem has a solution in some axially symmetric cases, in particular, when all components of the boundary intersect the axis of symmetry.

Mikhail Korobkov; Konstantin Pileckas; Remigio Russo

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

210

Analysis and Design of a High Power Density Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Synchronous Machine Used for Stirling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a high power density axial flux permanent magnet linear synchronous machine and the stirling system will be introduced. This machine is a tubular axial flux permanent magnet machine. It comprises two parts: stator and mover. With the 2D finite-element ... Keywords: permanent magnet, stirling engine, linear motor

Ping Zheng; Xuhui Gan; Lin Li

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Nonlinear Control and Modeling of Rotating Stall in an Axial Flow Compressor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on understanding the use of air injection as a means of controlling rotating stall in an axial flow compressor, involving modeling, dynamical systems analysis, and experimental investigations. The first step towards this understanding was the development of a low order model for air injection control, the starting point of which was the Moore and Greitzer model for axial flow compressors. The Moore and Greitzer model was extended to include the effects of air injection and bifurcation analysis was performed to determine how the closed loop system dynamics are different from those of the open loop system. This low order model was then used to determine the optimal placement of the air injection actuators. Experimental work focused on verifying that the low order model, developed for air injection actuation, qualitatively captured the behavior of the Caltech compressor rig. Open loop tests were performed to determine how the placement of the air injectors on the rig a...

Robert L. Behnken; Robert L. Behnken

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger ...

Hansen, B J; Klebaner, A; 10.1063/1.4706971

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Theoretical and experimental investigation of axial power extraction from a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator  

SciTech Connect

The utility of the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) as a high power microwave source depends on how efficiently power can be extracted from it. We have designed a slow-wave stepped transformer for the purpose of axially extracting microwave power from a 3.6 GHz coaxial MILO. The slow-wave transformer design was optimized using particle-in-cell simulation, and tested in experiments performed on the HPM Simulation Division's GEMINI and GYPSY water Blumlein pulse power sources. In this paper we summarize the slow-wave stepped transformer design, and describe MILO axial power extraction experiments which yielded up to 300 MW of radiated power. 10 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Lemke, R.W.; DeMuth, G.E.; Biggs, A.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Air Force Weapons Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (USA); Alabama Univ., Huntsville, AL (USA). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrophoretic Migration and Axial Diffusion of Individual Nanoparticles in Cylindrical Nanopores  

SciTech Connect

Membranes with straight, vertical nanopores have found widespread applications in chemical and biological sciences, including separation, detection, catalysis, and drug delivery. They can also serve as a model system to understand molecular behavior and fundamental mechanisms of separation, bridging the gap between conventional model systems such as flat surfaces and real chromatographic stationary phases such as micrometer-sized porous particles. We recently found that the axial motion of individual biomolecules inside nanopores can be significantly slower than in bulk solution. This suggests that either chromatographic adsorption was present and/or the viscosity inside the nanopores was unusually high. In this study, we measured the electrophoretic motion as well as the axial diffusion of individual nanoparticles in cylindrical alumina nanopores. We found that the electrophoretic mobilities and the diffusion coefficients of polystyrene nanoparticles were both substantially smaller compared to bulk solution independent of particle size or pore diameter. The results imply that the apparent solution viscosity in nanodomains is anomalous.

Han, Rui; Wang, Gufeng; Qi, Shengda; Ma, Changbei; Yeung, Edward S.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Axial Flux, Modular, Permanent-Magnet Generator with a Toroidal Winding for Wind Turbine Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CP-500-24996 Ÿ UC Category: 1213 CP-500-24996 Ÿ UC Category: 1213 Axial Flux, Modular, Permanent- Magnet Generator with a Toroidal Winding for Wind Turbine Applications E. Muljadi C.P. Butterfield Yih-Huei Wan National Wind Technology Center National Renewable Energy Laboratory Presented at IEEE Industry Applications Conference St. Louis, MO November 5-8, 1998 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard

216

Fe XII STALKS AND THE ORIGIN OF THE AXIAL FIELD IN FILAMENT CHANNELS  

SciTech Connect

Employing Fe XII images and line-of-sight magnetograms, we deduce the direction of the axial field in high-latitude filament channels from the orientation of the adjacent stalklike structures. Throughout the rising phase of the current solar cycle 24, filament channels poleward of latitude 30 Degree-Sign overwhelmingly obeyed the hemispheric chirality rule, being dextral (sinistral) in the northern (southern) hemisphere, corresponding to negative (positive) helicity. During the deep minimum of 2007-2009, the orientation of the Fe XII stalks was often difficult to determine, but no obvious violations of the rule were found. Although the hemispheric trend was still present during the maximum and early declining phase of cycle 23 (2000-2003), several high-latitude exceptions were identified at that time. From the observation that dextral (sinistral) filament channels form through the decay of active regions whose Fe XII features show a counterclockwise (clockwise) whorl, we conclude that the axial field direction is determined by the intrinsic helicity of the active regions. In contrast, generation of the axial field component by the photospheric differential rotation is difficult to reconcile with the observed chirality of polar crown and circular filament channels, and with the presence of filament channels along the equator. The main role of differential rotation in filament channel formation is to expedite the cancellation of flux and thus the removal of the transverse field component. We propose further that, rather than being ejected into the heliosphere, the axial field is eventually resubmerged by flux cancellation as the adjacent unipolar regions become increasingly mixed.

Wang, Y.-M.; Sheeley, N. R. Jr. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Stenborg, G., E-mail: yi.wang@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: neil.sheeley@nrl.navy.mil, E-mail: guillermo.stenborg.ctr.ar@nrl.navy.mil [George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

217

Experimental Verification of the Root Cause Mechanism for Axial Offset Anomaly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology built a test facility designed to experimentally verify the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Tests consisted of depositing materials from the simulated PWR coolant on zircaloy-4 test elements, followed by rapid isolation from the boron-rich coolant to trap within the deposit layer any boron compounds having retrograde solubility. Although significant amounts of boron (up to 8 weight percent) were i...

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

218

EPRI Phased Array Performance Demonstration for Axial Entry Blade Attachment Inspection - Technical Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disk rim blade attachment area is one of the most highly stressed components of the steam turbine rotor. Reliable and accurate inspection of the disk rim blade attachment area is essential for the determination of rotor operability and remaining life. The purpose of the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Phased Array Performance Demonstration for Axial Entry Blade Attachment Inspection Project is to determine the inspection performance levels of commercial entities offering these inspection...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

219

Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar  

SciTech Connect

We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

Behaviour of GFRP Adhesive Pipe Joints Subjected to Pressure and Axial Loadings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represent an attractive alternative for pipelines subjected to severe internal or external environments in onshore or offshore applications. One important issue in the design of GFRP pipe systems is the material anisotropy, which poses certain... properties, the fibre volume fraction and the winding angle. For pipe applications, ± 55° (with respect to the axial direction) fibre winding angles are commonly used. A further aspect in the design of any advanced composite system is the joint detail...

Lees, J. M.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Design and market considerations for axial flux superconducting electric machine design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, the authors investigate a number of design and market considerations for an axial flux superconducting electric machine design that uses high temperature superconductors. This work was carried out as part of the University of Cambridge's Centre for Entrepreneurial Learning ETECH Project programme, designed to accelerate entrepreneurship and diffusion of innovations based on early stage and potentially disruptive technologies from the University. The axial flux machine design is assumed to utilise high temperature superconductors in both wire (stator winding) and bulk (rotor field) forms, to operate over a temperature range of 65-77 K, and to have a power output in the range from 10s of kW up to 1 MW (typical for axial flux machines), with approximately 2-3 T as the peak trapped field in the bulk superconductors. The authors firstly investigate the applicability of this type of machine as a generator in small- and medium-sized wind turbines, including the current and forecasted market and pricin...

Ainslie, Mark D; Shaw, Robert; Dawson, Lewis; Winfield, Andy; Steketee, Marina; Stockley, Simon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Collimation of a Circulating Beam in the U_70 Synchrotron by Use of Reflections in Axially - Oriented Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibilities of the extraction and collimation of a circulating beam by a new method due to the reflection of particles in crystals with axial orientation were experimentally investigated in the Fall-2010 run at the U_70 synchrotron. Such crystals have positive features, because the axial potential is five times larger than the planar potential. It has been shown that the collimation efficiency can reach 90% due to axial effects in the crystal. Losses of the circulating beam on a collimator have been reduced by several times; this makes it possible to suppress the muon jet near the steel collimator of the circulating beam.

Afonin, A G; Bulgakov, M K; Voinov, I S; Gorlov, V N; Ivanova, I V; Krylov, D M; Lunn'kov, A N; Maisheev, V A; Reshetnikov, S F; Savin, D A; Syshchikov, E A; Terekhov, V I; Chesnokov, Yu A; Chirkov, P N; Yazynin, I A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Axial, induced pseudoscalar, and pion-nucleon form factors in manifestly Lorentz-invariant chiral perturbation theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We calculate the nucleon form factors G{sub A} and G{sub P} of the isovector axial-vector current and the pion-nucleon form factor G{sub {pi}}{sub N} in manifestly Lorentz-invariant baryon chiral perturbation theory up to and including order O(p{sup 4}). In addition to the standard treatment including the nucleon and pions, we also consider the axial-vector meson a{sub 1} as an explicit degree of freedom. This is achieved by using the reformulated infrared renormalization scheme. We find that the inclusion of the axial-vector meson effectively results in one additional low-energy coupling constant that we determine by a fit to the data for G{sub A}. The inclusion of the axial-vector meson results in an improved description of the experimental data for G{sub A}, while the contribution to G{sub P} is small.

Schindler, M. R.; Fuchs, T.; Scherer, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Gegelia, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi, Georgia (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Prospecting for Hydrothermal Vents Using Moored Current and Temperature Data: Axial Volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tidal and inertial currents and profuse hydrothermal discharge at recently erupted Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge, cause relatively large and rapid temperature (T) changes in the near-bottom water column. Measurements show short-term T ...

J. W. Lavelle; M. A. Wetzler; E. T. Baker; R. W. Embley

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Hierarchical Disaster Image Classification for Situation Report Enhancement Yimin Yang, Hsin-Yu Ha, Fausto Fleites, Shu-Ching Chen, Steven Luis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response situations. The HDIC framework classifies images into different disaster categories and subHierarchical Disaster Image Classification for Situation Report Enhancement Yimin Yang, Hsin-Yu Ha In this paper, a hierarchical disaster image classification (HDIC) framework based on multi-source data fusion

Chen, Shu-Ching

226

Determing Degradation Of Fiberboard In The 9975 Shipping Package By Measuring Axial Gap  

SciTech Connect

Currently, thousands of model 9975 transportation packages are in use by the US Department of Energy (DOE); the design of which has been certified by DOE for shipment of Type B radioactive and fissile materials in accordance with Part 71, Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), or 10 CFR 71, Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Material. These transportation packages are also approved for the storage of DOE-STD-3013 containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As such, the 9975 has been continuously exposed to the service environment for a period of time greater than the approved transportation service life. In order to ensure the material integrity as specified in the safety basis, an extensive surveillance program is in place in K-Area Complex (KAC) to monitor the structural and thermal properties of the fiberboard of the 9975 shipping packages. The surveillance approach uses a combination of Non-Destructive Examination (NDE) field surveillance and Destructive Examination (DE) lab testing to validate the 9975 performance assumptions. The fiberboard in the 9975 is credited with thermal insulation, criticality control and resistance to crushing. During surveillance monitoring in KAC, an increased axial gap of the fiberboard was discovered on selected items packaged at Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Many of these packages were later found to contain excess moisture. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) testing has resulted in a better understanding of the relationship between the fiberboard moisture level and compaction of the fiberboard under storage conditions and during transport. In laboratory testing, the higher moisture content has been shown to correspond to higher total compaction of fiberboard material and compaction rate. The fiberboard height is reduced by compression of the layers. This change is observed directly in the axial gap between the flange and the air shield. The axial gap measurement is made during the pre-use inspection or during the annual recertification process and is a screening measurement for changes in the fiberboard.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Axial force imparted by a conical radiofrequency magneto-plasma thruster  

SciTech Connect

Direct thrust measurements of a low pressure ({approx}0.133 Pa) conical radiofrequency (rf at 13.56 MHz) argon plasma source show a total axial force of about 5 mN for an effective rf power of 650 W and a maximum magnetic field of 0.018 T, of which a measured value of 2.5 mN is imparted by the magnetic nozzle. A simplified model of thrust including contributions from the electron pressure and from the magnetic field pressure is developed. The magnetic nozzle is modelled as a ''physical'' nozzle of increasing cross-sectional area.

Charles, C.; Takahashi, K.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Axial thermal medium delivery tubes and retention plates for a gas turbine rotor  

SciTech Connect

In a multi-stage turbine rotor, tubes are disposed in openings adjacent the rotor rim for flowing a thermal medium to rotor buckets and returning spent thermal medium. The tubes have axially spaced lands of predetermined wall thickness with thin-walled tube sections between the lands and of increasing thickness from the forward to the aft ends of the tubes. A pair of retention plates are carried on the aft end face of the aft wheel and straddle the tube and engage against a shoulder on the tube to preclude displacement of the tube in an aft direction.

Mashey, Thomas Charles (Coxsackie, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determination of the Axial-Vector Weak Coupling Constant with Polarized Ultracold Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the neutron decay $\\beta$-asymmetry $A_0$ has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) from the pulsed spallation UCN source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report $A_0 = -0.11966 \\pm 0.00089 _{-0.00140}^{+0.00123}$, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon $g_A/g_V = -1.27590 _{-0.00445}^{+0.00409}$.

Liu, J; Holley, A T; Back, H O; Bowles, T J; Broussard, L J; Carr, R; Clayton, S; Currie, S; Filippone, B W; Garcia, A; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Hoagland, J; Hogan, G E; Hona, B; Ito, T M; Liu, C -Y; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Martin, J W; Melconian, D; Morris, C L; Pattie, R W; Galvan, A Perez; Pitt, M L; Plaster, B; Ramsey, J C; Rios, R; Russell, R; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S; Sondheim, W E; Tatar, E; Vogelaar, R B; VornDick, B; Wrede, C; Yan, H; Young, A R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Determination of the Axial-Vector Weak Coupling Constant with Ultracold Neutrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the neutron decay $\\beta$-asymmetry $A_0$ has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN) from the pulsed spallation UCN source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report $A_0 = -0.11966 \\pm 0.00089_{-0.00140}^{+0.00123}$, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon $g_A/g_V = -1.27590_{-0.00445}^{+0.00409}$.

UCNA Collaboration; J. Liu; M. P. Mendenhall; A. T. Holley; H. O. Back; T. J. Bowles; L. J. Broussard; R. Carr; S. Clayton; S. Currie; B. W. Filippone; A. Garcia; P. Geltenbort; K. P. Hickerson; J. Hoagland; G. E. Hogan; B. Hona; T. M. Ito; C. -Y. Liu; M. Makela; R. R. Mammei; J. W. Martin; D. Melconian; C. L. Morris; R. W. Pattie Jr.; A. Perez Galvan; M. L. Pitt; B. Plaster; J. C. Ramsey; R. Rios; R. Russell; A. Saunders; S. J. Seestrom; W. E. Sondheim; E. Tatar; R. B. Vogelaar; B. VornDick; C. Wrede; H. Yan; A. R. Young

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

231

Determination of the Axial-Vector Weak Coupling Constant with Ultracold Neutrons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A precise measurement of the neutron decay {beta} asymmetry A{sub 0} has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons from the pulsed spallation ultracold neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report A{sub 0}=-0.119 66{+-}0.000 89{sub -0.00140}{sup +0.00123}, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon g{sub A}/g{sub V}=-1.275 90{sub -0.00445}{sup +0.00409}.

Liu, J. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Mendenhall, M. P.; Carr, R.; Filippone, B. W.; Hickerson, K. P.; Perez Galvan, A.; Russell, R. [Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Holley, A. T.; Hoagland, J.; VornDick, B. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Back, H. O.; Pattie, R. W. Jr.; Young, A. R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Bowles, T. J.; Clayton, S.; Currie, S.; Hogan, G. E.; Ito, T. M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tests of a two-stage, axial-flow, two-phase turbine  

SciTech Connect

A two-phase-flow turbine with two stages of axial-flow impulse rotors was tested with three different working-fluid mixtures at a shaft power of 30 kW. The turbine efficiency was 0.55 with nitrogen-and-water of 0.02 quality and 94 m/s velocity, 0.57 with Refrigerant 22 of 0.27 quality and 123 m/s velocity, and 0.30 with steam-and-water of 0.27 quality and 457 m/s velocity. The efficiencies with nitrogen-and-water and Refrigerant 22 were 86% of theoretical. At that fraction of theoretical, the efficiencies of optimized two-phase turbines would be in the low 60% range with organic working fluids and in the mid 50% range with steam-and-water. The recommended turbine design is a two-stage axial-flow impulse turbine followed by a rotary separator for discharge of separate liquid and gas streams and recovery of liquid pressure.

Elliott, D.G.

1982-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

Sugiharto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Abidin, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Analysis of the thorium axial blanket experiments in the proteus reactor  

SciTech Connect

Detailed analysis has been completed for the ThO/sub 2/ and Th-metal axial blanket experiments performed at the Swiss PROTEUS critical facility in order to compare reaction rates and neutron spectra measured in prototypic GCFR configurations with calculated results. The PROTEUS configurations allowed the analysis of infinitely dilute thorium data in a PuO/sub 2//UO/sub 2/ fast lattice spectrum at core center as well as the analysis of resonance self-shielding effects in the thorium-bearing axial blankets. These comparisons indicate that significant deficiencies still exist in the latest evaluated infinitely dilute thorium data file. Specifically, the analysis showed that the /sup 232/Th capture is underpredicted by ENDF/B-IV data, and the discrepancies are further exaggerated by ENDF/B-V data. On the other hand, ENDF/B-V /sup 232/Th fission data appear to be significantly improved relative to ENDF/B-IV data, while discrepancies are extremely large for the (n,2n) process in both data files. Finally, the (n,n') cross sections for thorium also appear improved in ENDF/B-V, except for a small energy range just above the 50 keV threshold. Therefore, these combined data deficiencies suggest that relatively large uncertainties should be associated with many of the results obtained from recent fast reactor alternate fuel cycle analyses. 38 figures, 12 tables.

White, J.R.; Ingersoll, D.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Effects of axial heat conduction and material properties on the performance characteristics of a thermal transient anemometer probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an investigation of the axial heat transfer within a thermal transient anemometer probe. A previous study, evaluated the performance characteristics of a thermal transient anemometer system. The study revealed discrepancies between a simplified theory and test results in the development of a universal calibration curve for probes of varying diameters. Although the cause of these discrepancies were left uncertain due to an inadequate theoretical model, the study suggested that axial conduction within the probe could account for the deviations. In this paper, computer simulations are used to further investigate axial heat conduction within the probes. The effect on calibration of axial variations of material properties along the probes is also discussed. Results from the computer simulation are used in lieu of the theoretical model used in the previous study to develop a satisfactory universal calibration curve. The computer simulations provide evidence that there is significant axial heat conduction within the probes, and that this was the cause of the discrepancies noted in the previous study.

Bailey, J.L.; Page, R.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Acharya, M. [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States). Fluid Dynamics Research Center

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Interaction of a rotational motion and an axial flow in small geometries for a Couette-Taylor problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the stability of a cylindrical Couette flow under the imposition of a weak axial flow in case of a very short cylinder with a narrow annulus gap. We consider an incompressible viscous fluid which is contained in the narrow gap between two concentric short cylinders, where the inner cylinder rotates with constant angular velocity. The caps of the cylinders have narrow tubes conically tapering to super narrow slits which allow for an axial flow along the surface of the inner cylinder. The approximated solution for the Couette flow for short cylinders was found and used for the stability analysis instead of the exact but bulky solution. The sensitivity of the Couette flow to general small perturbations and to the weak axial flow was studied. We demonstrate that perturbations coming from the axial flow cause the propagation of dispersive waves in the Taylor-Couette flow. The coexistence of a rotation and of an axial flow requires to study in addition to the energy and the angular momentum also the heli...

Bordag, L A; Froehner, M; Myrnyy, V

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Field Evaluation of the Comanagement of Utility Low-Volume Wastes with High-Volume Coal Combustion By-Products: HA Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Typically, utilities comanage some or all of their low-volume wastes with their high-volume by-products in disposal facilities. This report presents the results of a field study of comanagement of coal combustion by-products at a utility-owned impoundment in the midwestern United States (HA site). The findings from this research provided technical information for use in a study of comanagement practices by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Plate Fin Heat Exchanger Model with Axial Conduction and Variable Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities, as part of Project X at Fermilab, will be cooled to superfluid helium temperatures by a cryogenic distribution system supplying cold supercritical helium. To reduce vapor fraction during the final Joule-Thomson (J-T) expansion into the superfluid helium cooling bath, counter-flow, plate-fin heat exchangers will be utilized. Due to their compact size and ease of fabrication, plate-fin heat exchangers are an effective option. However, the design of compact and high-effectiveness cryogenic heat exchangers operating at liquid helium temperatures requires consideration of axial heat conduction along the direction of flow, in addition to variable fluid properties. Here we present a numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger. The model is used to guide design decisions on heat exchanger material choice and geometry. In addition, the J-T expansion process is modeled with the heat exchanger to analyze the effect of heat load and cryogenic supply parameters. A numerical model that includes the effects of axial conduction and variable properties for a plate fin heat exchanger was developed and the effect of various design parameters on overall heat exchanger size was investigated. It was found that highly conductive metals should be avoided in the design of compact JT heat exchangers. For the geometry considered, the optimal conductivity is around 3.5 W/m-K and can range from 0.3-10 W/m-K without a large loss in performance. The model was implemented with an isenthalpic expansion process. Increasing the cold side inlet temperature from 2K to 2.2 K decreased the liquid fraction from 0.856 to 0.839 which corresponds to a 0.12 g/s increase in supercritical helium supply needed to maintain liquid level in the cooling bath. Lastly, it was found that the effectiveness increased when the heat load was below the design value. Therefore, the heat exchanger should be sized on the high end of the required heat load.

Hansen, B.J.; White, M.J.; Klebaner, A.; /Fermilab

2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Natural Circulation and Linear Stability Analysis for Liquid-Metal Reactors with the Effect of Fluid Axial Conduction  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fluid axial thermal conduction on one-dimensional liquid metal natural circulation and its linear stability was performed through nondimensional analysis, steady-state assessment, and linear perturbation evaluation. The Nyquist criterion and a root-search method were employed to find the linear stability boundary of both forward and backward circulations. The study provided a relatively complete analysis method for one-dimensional natural circulation problems with the consideration of fluid axial heat conduction. The results suggest that fluid axial heat conduction in a natural circulation loop should be considered only when the modified Peclet number is {approx}1 or less, which is significantly smaller than the practical value of a lead liquid metal-cooled reactor.

Piyush Sabharwall; Qiao Wu; James J. Sienicki

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Axial force imparted by a current-free magnetically expanding plasma  

SciTech Connect

The axial force imparted from a magnetically expanding, current-free, radiofrequency plasma is directly measured. For an argon gas flow rate of 25 sccm and an effective rf input power of {approx}800W, a maximum force of {approx}6mN is obtained; {approx}3mN of which is transmitted via the expanding magnetic field. The measured forces are reasonably compared with a simple fluid model associated with the measured electron pressure. The model suggests that the total force is the sum of an electron pressure inside the source and a Lorentz force due to the electron diamagnetic drift current and the applied radial magnetic field. It is shown that the Lorentz force is greatest near the magnetic nozzle surface where the radial pressure gradient is largest.

Takahashi, Kazunori [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan); Lafleur, Trevor; Charles, Christine; Alexander, Peter; Boswell, Rod W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Laboratory, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

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241

An Axial Dispersion Model for Gas - Liquid Reactors Based on the Penetration Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An axial dispersion reactor model for gas -- liquid reaction systems is proposed in this paper based on the penetration theory. The mass transfer mechanism accompanied by a chemical irreversible first-order reaction is mathematically treated in a new way in order to use its results to develop the model conveniently. Analytical solutions can be obtained for the equation system involving linear differential equations by using of the eigenvalues of the equation system. In addition, an iteration procedure is given to solve the nonlinear differential equation system numerically. The influences of the important model parameters on the concentration profile, the mass transfer and the reactant conversion are also studied. 1997 Elsevier Science S.A.

Jinfu Wang; Shejiao Han; Fei Wei; Zhiqing Yu; Yong Jin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Computed axial tomography (CAT) contribution for dosimetry and treatment evaluation in lung cancer  

SciTech Connect

The use of computed axial tomography (CAT) scans in postoperative patients with lung cancer was studied to evaluate its contribution in dosimetry and to study the late effects of irradiation. Comparisons were made between the treatment planning generated from CAT scan data and that obtained from two orthogonal radiographs. Both methods offered a good approximation but with orthogonal radiographs possible mediastinal and lung shift could not be seen and the dose delivered to the spinal cord was overestimated. A control CAT scan performed 6 to 18 months after treatment showed a lung fibrosis that was strictly correlated with the treatment planning and related with doses and volume treated. CAT scans allowed more accurate treatment planning.

Van Houtte, P.; Piron, A.; Lustman-Marechal, J.; Osteaux, M.; Henry, J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Failure analysis of radioisotopic heat source capsules tested under multi-axial conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to qualify small radioisotopic heat sources for a 25-yr design life, multi-axial mechanical tests were performed on the structural components of the heat source. The results of these tests indicated that failure predominantly occurred in the middle of the weld ramp-down zone. Examination of the failure zone by standard metallographic techniques failed to indicate the true cause of failure. A modified technique utilizing chemical etching, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis was employed and dramatically indicated the true cause of failure, impurity concentration in the ramp-down zone. As a result of the initial investigation, weld parameters for the heat sources were altered. Example welds made with a pulse arc technique did not have this impurity buildup in the ramp-down zone.

Zielinski, R.E.; Stacy, E.; Burgan, C.E.

244

Constraining the Leading Weak Axial Two-body Current by SNO and Super-K  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and Super-Kamiokande (SK) data on charged current (CC), neutral current (NC) and neutrino electron elastic scattering (ES) reactions to constrain the leading weak axial two-body current parameterized by L_1A. This two-body current is the dominant uncertainty of every low energy weak interaction deuteron breakup process, including SNO's CC and NC reactions. Our method shows that the theoretical inputs to SNO's determination of the CC and NC fluxes can be self-calibrated, be calibrated by SK, or be calibrated by reactor data. The only assumption made is that the total flux of active neutrinos has the standard ^8B spectral shape (but distortions in the electron neutrino spectrum are allowed). We show that SNO's conclusion about the inconsistency of the no-flavor-conversion hypothesis does not contain significant theoretical uncertainty, and we determine the magnitude of the active solar neutrino flux.

Jiunn-Wei Chen; Karsten M. Heeger; R. G. Hamish Robertson

2002-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

An imaging co-axial tube electrodynamic trap for manipulation of charged particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tubular particle trapping device was designed and fabricated using two co-axial electrically conductive tubes with diameters of 5 mm and 7 mm, respectively. The device was integrated with an imaging camera and optical fiber bundle for real time monitoring of trapped particle motion. Charged microparticles of 3 to 50 m diameter can be suspended in air at ambient pressure using the device utilizing a quadrupole potential with an alternating voltage of amplitude 300 V to 750 V and frequency of 30 Hz to 140 Hz. Controlled trapping of a single particle or multiple particles can be achieved by tuning the voltage amplitude. The particle remained trapped when the entire assembly was translated or rotated. The device can be used as a manipulator for charged particle transport and repositioning.

Jiang, Ms. Linan [University of Arizona; Whitten, William B [ORNL; Pau, Dr. Stanley [University of Arizona/Bell Labs

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state  

SciTech Connect

We present a systematic study of exclusive charmless nonleptonic two-body B decays including axial-vector mesons in the final state. We calculate branching ratios of B{yields}PA, VA, and AA decays, where A, V, and P denote an axial vector, a vector, and a pseudoscalar meson, respectively. We assume a naive factorization hypothesis and use the improved version of the nonrelativistic Isgur-Scora-Grinstein-Wise quark model for form factors in B{yields}A transitions. We include contributions that arise from the effective {delta}B=1 weak Hamiltonian H{sub eff}. The respective factorized amplitudes of these decays are explicitly shown and their penguin contributions are classified. We find that decays B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, B{sup -}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, B{sup 0}{yields}a{sub 1}{sup +}K{sup -}, B{sup 0}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup 0}, B{sup -}{yields}f{sub 1}K{sup -}, B{sup -}{yields}K{sub 1}{sup -}(1400){eta}{sup (')}, B{sup -}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup -}K{sup 0}, and B{sup 0}{yields}b{sub 1}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}(K{sup -}) have branching ratios of the order of 10{sup -5}. We also study the dependence of branching ratios for B{yields}K{sub 1}P(V,A) decays [K{sub 1}=K{sub 1}(1270), K{sub 1}(1400)] with respect to the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}.

Calderon, G.; Munoz, J. H.; Vera, C. E. [Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Coahuila, CP 27000, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Tolima, Apartado Aereo 546, Ibague (Colombia)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Axially-grooved heat pipe: accelerated life test results  

SciTech Connect

The results through SIG/Galileo contract close-out of accelerated life testing performed from June 1978 to June 1979 on axially-grooved, copper/water heat pipes are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the expected lifetime of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes. The heat pipe failure rate, due to either a leak or a build-up of non-condensible gas, was determined. The secondary objective of the test was to determine the effects of time and temperature on the thermal performance parameters relevant to long-term (> 50,000 h) operation on a space power generator. The results showed that the gas generation rate appears to be constant with time after an initial sharp rise although there are indications that it drops to approximately zero beyond approx. 2000 h. During the life test, the following pipe-hours were accumulated: 159,000 at 125/sup 0/C, 54,000 at 165/sup 0/C, 48,000 at 185/sup 0/C, and 8500 at 225/sup 0/C. Heated hours per pipe ranged from 1000 to 7500 with an average of 4720. Applying calculated acceleration factors yields the equivalent of 930,000 pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C. Including the accelerated hours on vendor tested pipes raises this number to 1,430,000 pipe-hours at 125/sup 0/C. It was concluded that, for a heat pipe temperature of 125/sup 0/C and a mission time of 50,000 h, the demonstrated heat pipe reliability is between 80% (based on 159,000 actual pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C) and 98% (based on 1,430,000 accelerated pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C). Measurements indicate some degradation of heat transfer with time, but no detectable degradation of heat transport. (LCL)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.  

SciTech Connect

We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Microwave electron cyclotron electron resonance (ECR) ion source with a large, uniformly distributed, axially symmetric, ECR plasma volume  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source includes a primary mirror coil disposed coaxially around a vacuum vessel in which a plasma is induced and introducing a solenoidal ECR-producing field throughout the length of the vacuum vessel. Radial plasma confinement is provided by a multi-cusp, multi-polar permanent magnet array disposed azimuthally around the vessel and within the primary mirror coil. Axial confinement is provided either by multi-cusp permanent magnets at the opposite axial ends of the vessel, or by secondary mirror coils disposed on opposite sides of the primary coil.

Alton, Gerald D. (Kingston, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

New analytic solutions of the collective Bohr hamiltonian for a beta-soft, gamma-soft axial rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New analytic solutions of the quadrupole collective Bohr hamiltonian are proposed, exploiting an approximate separation of the beta and gamma variables to describe gamma-soft prolate axial rotors. The model potential is a sum of two terms: a beta-dependent term taken either with a Coulomb-like or a Kratzer-like form, and a gamma-dependent term taken as an harmonic oscillator. In particular it is possible to give a one parameter paradigm for a beta-soft, gamma-soft axial rotor that can be applied, with a considerable agreement, to the spectrum of 234U.

Lorenzo Fortunato; Andrea Vitturi

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: copper/water axially-grooved heat pipe topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the major accomplishments for the development, fabrication, and testing of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes for Selenide Isotopic Generator (SIG) applications. The early development consisted of chemical, physical, and analytical studies to define an axially-grooved tube geometry that could be successfully fabricated and provide the desired long term (up to seven years) performance is presented. Heat pipe fabrication procedures, measured performance and accelerated life testing of heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 conducted at B and K Engineering are discussed. S/N AL-5 was the first axially-grooved copper/water heat pipe that was fabricated with the new internal coating process for cupric oxide (CuO) and the cleaning and water preparation methods developed by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Heat pipe S/N LT-57 was fabricated along with sixty other axially-grooved heat pipes allocated for life testing at Teledyne Energy Systems. As of June 25, 1979, heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 have been accelerated life tested for 13,310 and 6,292 respectively, at a nominal operating temperature of 225/sup 0/C without any signs of thermal performance degradation. (TFD)

Strazza, N.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering Fall 2011 Torque and Axial Measurement Device for Soil Abrasion Testing Overview The Penn State Department of Energy and Mineral Engineering to completely re-design with five weeks left. This left minimal time for machining, assembly, testing

Demirel, Melik C.

253

Calculation of the heavy-hadron axial couplings g1, g2, and g3 using lattice QCD  

SciTech Connect

In a recent paper [arXiv:1109.2480] we have reported on a lattice QCD calculation of the heavy-hadron axial couplings g{sub 1}, g{sub 2}, and g{sub 3}. These quantities are low-energy constants of heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory (HH{chi}PT) and are related to the B*B{pi}, {Sigma}{sub b}*{Sigma}{sub b}{pi}, and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*)}{Lambda}{sub b}{pi} couplings. In the following, we discuss important details of the calculation and give further results. To determine the axial couplings, we explicitly match the matrix elements of the axial current in QCD with the corresponding matrix elements in HH{chi}PT. We construct the ratios of correlation functions used to calculate the matrix elements in lattice QCD, and study the contributions from excited states. We present the complete numerical results and discuss the data analysis in depth. In particular, we demonstrate the convergence of SU(4|2) HH{chi}PT for the axial current matrix elements at pion masses up to about 400 MeV and show the impact of the nonanalytic loop contributions. Finally, we present additional predictions for strong and radiative decay widths of charm and bottom baryons.

Will Detmold, David Lin, Stefan Meinel

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Global Circulation in an Axially Symmetric Shallow-Water Model, Forced by Off-Equatorial Differential Heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An axially symmetric inviscid shallow-water model (SWM) on the rotating Earth forced by off-equatorial steady differential heating is employed to characterize the main features of the upper branch of an ideal Hadley circulation. The steady-state ...

Ori Adam; Nathan Paldor

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

A malignant breast carcinoma size assessment using multiple orientation axial, lateral, and shear elastographies: the second stage of a pilot study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elastography is the imaging modality focusing on detection of stiffness variation within inhomogeneous soft tissue. We extended a conventional 2D axial radio frequency (RF) spline correlation based elastography method to multiple orientations, and strengthened ... Keywords: 2D multiple orientation ultrasound elasticities, axial, lateral, malignant breast cancer, shear strains, size assessment

Ying Chi; Michael J. Brady; Ruth E. English; Junbo Li; J. Alison Noble

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Active Control of an Axial Flow Compressor via Pulsed Air Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the use of pulsed air injection to control the onset of rotating stall in a low-speed, axial flow compressor. By measuring the unsteady pressures near the rotor face, a control algorithm determines the magnitude and phase of the first mode of rotating stall and controls the injection of air in the front of the rotor face. Experimental results show that this technique slightly extends the stall point of the compressor and eliminates the hysteresis loop normally associated with rotating stall. A parametric study is used to determine the optimal control parameters for suppression of stall. Analytic results---using a low-dimensional model developed by Moore and Greitzer combined with an unsteady shift in the compressor characteristic to model the injectors---give further insights into the operation of the controller. Based on this model, we show that the behavior of the experiment can be explained as a change in the bifurcation behavior of the system under non...

Raffaello D' Andrea; Robert L. Behnken; Richard M. Murray; Asme J. Turbomachinery

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen turbines for space power systems: A simplified axial flow gas turbine model  

SciTech Connect

This paper descirbes a relatively simple axial flow gas expansion turbine mass model, which we developed for use in our space power system studies. The model uses basic engineering principles and realistic physical properties, including gas conditions, power level, and material stresses, to provide reasonable and consistent estimates of turbine mass and size. Turbine design modifications caused by boundary layer interactions, stress concentrations, stage leakage, or bending and thermal stresses are not accounted for. The program runs on an IBM PC, uses little computer time and has been incorporated into our system-level space power platform analysis computer codes. Parametric design studies of hydrogen turbines using this model are presented for both nickel superalloy and carbon/carbon composite turbines. The effects of speed, pressure ratio, and power level on hydrogen turbine mass are shown and compared to a baseline case 100-MWe, 10,000-rpm hydrogen turbine. Comparison with more detailed hydrogen turbine designs indicates that our simplified model provides mass estimates that are within 25% of the ones provided by more complex calculations. 8 figs.

Hudson, S.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ultra-high speed permanent magnet axial gap alternator with multiple stators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra-high speed, axial gap alternator that can provide an output to a plurality of loads, the alternator providing magnetic isolation such that operating conditions in one load will not affect operating conditions of another load. This improved alternator uses a rotor member disposed between a pair of stator members, with magnets disposed in each of the rotor member surfaces facing the stator members. The magnets in one surface of the rotor member, which alternate in polarity, are isolated from the magnets in the other surface of the rotor member by a disk of magnetic material disposed between the two sets of magents. In the preferred embodiment, this disk of magnetic material is laminated between two layers of non-magnetic material that support the magnets, and the magnetic material has a peripheral rim that extends to both surfaces of the rotor member to enhance the structural integrity. The stator members are substantially conventional in construction in that equally-spaced and radially-oriented slots are provided, and winding members are laid in these slots. A unit with multiple rotor members and stator members is also described.

Hawsey, Robert A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bailey, J. Milton (Knoxville, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Trapped and escaping orbits in an axially symmetric galactic-type potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present article, we investigate the behavior of orbits in a time independent axially symmetric galactic type potential. This dynamical model can be considered to describe the motion in the central parts of a galaxy, for values of energies larger than the energy of escape. We use the classical method of the surface of section, in order to visualize and interpret the structure of the phase space of the dynamical system. Moreover, the Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (LCE), is used in order to make an estimation of the degree of the chaoticity of the orbits in our galactic model. Our numerical calculations suggest that in this galactic type potential, there are two kinds of orbits: (i) escaping orbits and (ii) trapped orbits which do not escape at all. Furthermore, a large number of orbits of the dynamical system, display chaotic motion. Among the chaotic orbits, there are orbits that escape fast and also orbits that remain trapped for vast time intervals. When the value of the test particle's energy exce...

Zotos, Euaggelos E

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Axial flux, modular, permanent-magnet generator with a toroidal winding for wind turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Permanent-magnet generators have been used for wind turbines for many years. Many small wind turbine manufacturers use direct-drive permanent-magnet generators. For wind turbine generators, the design philosophy must cover the following characteristics: low cost, light weight, low speed, high torque, and variable speed generation. The generator is easy to manufacture and the design can be scaled up for a larger size without major retooling. A modular permanent-magnet generator with axial flux direction was chosen. The permanent magnet used is NdFeB or ferrite magnet with flux guide to focus flux density in the air gap. Each unit module of the generator may consist of one, two, or more phases. Each generator can be expanded to two or more unit modules. Each unit module is built from simple modular poles. The stator winding is formed like a torus. Thus, the assembly process is simplified and the winding insertion in the slot is less tedious. The authors built a prototype of one unit module and performed preliminary tests in the laboratory. Follow up tests will be conducted in the lab to improve the design.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Wan, Y.H.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Apparatus for positioning a sample in a computerized axial tomographic scanner  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for positioning a sample in a radiation field of a computerized axial tomographic scanner (CAT) for scanning by the CAT, the apparatus comprising: a first support means positioned on a first side of the CAT having a first guide means; a first trolly means having means for engaging the first guide means; means for moving the first trolley means along the first guide means; a second support means positioned on a second side of the CAT, the second side being opposite the first side and the second support means having a second guide means; a second trolley means having means for engaging the second guide means; means for coupling the first trolley means to the second trolley means such that movement of the first trolley means causes similar movement of the second trolley means, the coupling means passing through the radiation field of the CAT; means attached to the coupling means for holding the sample; means for sensing the position of the sample holding means; and control means connected to the moving means and sensing means for controlling the positioning of the sample.

Vinegar, H.J.; Wellington, S.L.

1986-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Axial strength of cement borehole plugs in granite and basalt. Topical report on rock mass sealing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental and theoretical studies of the axial strength of cement plugs installed in boreholes drilled coaxially in granite and in basalt cylinders. Experimental work has consisted of loading the cement plugs to failure while measuring loads and displacements. Such tests have been performed on borehole plugs with a diameter and a length ranging from 2.5 cm to 10 cm. Results from over one hundred experiments show that the strength is high, sufficient for anticipated loads at repository depths, but very variable, complicating the design of very short plugs. Significant residual strength (thirty to fifty percent of the peak strength) is observed. A frictional model of the interface shear strength, tau = c + sigma(tan phi), in combination with the assumption of an exponential shear stress distribution or plug-rock load transfer, provides the simplest realistic model for plug strength characterization. The integrated strength thus calculated compares moderately well with experimental results. An extensive review is given of more sophisticated analysis procedures that should be of value for general plug design applications. Generic analyses and their implications for plug performance are included. Variability of experimental results complicates the assessment of their direct detailed applicability. 115 references, 70 figures, 19 tables.

Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Mode conversion between Alfven wave eigenmodes in axially inhomogeneous two-ion-species plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uniform cylindrical plasma model of Litwin and Hershkowitz (Phys. Fluids {bold 30}, 1323 (1987)) is shown to predict mode conversion between the lowest radial order {ital m}=+1 fast magnetosonic surface and slow ion-cyclotron global eigenmodes of the Alfven wave at the light-ion species Alfven resonance of a cold two-ion plasma. A hydrogen ({ital h})--deuterium ({ital d}) plasma is examined in experiments. The fast mode is efficiently excited by a rotating field antenna array at {omega}{similar to}{Omega}{sub {ital h}} in the central cell of the Phaedrus-B tandem mirror (Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 51}, 1955(1983)). Radially scanned magnetic probes observe the propagating eigenmode wave fields within a shallow central cell magnetic gradient in which the conversion zone is axially localized according to {ital n}{sub {ital d}}/{ital n}{sub {ital h}}. A low radial-order slow ion-cyclotron mode, observed in the vicinity of the conversion zone, gives evidence for the predicted mode conversion.

Roberts, D.R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Tataronis, J.A. (Department of Nuclear Engineering Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (USA))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Deformation Behavior and TExture Evolution of Steel Alloys under Axial-Torsional Loading  

SciTech Connect

Using hollow cylinder samples with suitable geometry obtained from round bar stock, the deformation behavior of bcc Fe based 12L14 steel alloy is evaluated under multi-axial conditions. A stacked strain gage rosette and extensometer mounted on the cylindrical surface at the mid height of the specimen provided strain tensor as a function of applied stress for pure tensile and torsion tests prior to yielding. This study examines elastic and yield behavior and effects of these with respect to texture evolution. Hollow cylinder specimen geometry (tubes) with small wall thickness and relatively (to its thickness) large inner diameter is used. The variation of observed yield surface in deviatoric plane and the effect on mode of deformation (tension versus torsion versus its combination) on stress-strain behavior is discussed. Bulk texture was studied using neutron time-of-flight diffractometer at High-Pressure-Preferred Orientation (HIPPO) - Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) instrument and the evolution of texture and related anisotropy for pure tension versus torsion are also included.

Siriruk, A.; Kant, M.; Penumadu, D.; Garlea, E.; Vogel, S.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Power source for an axial-flow CO/sub 2/laser tube  

SciTech Connect

A power device is described for an axial-flow-type CO/sub 2/ laser shell comprising: a high voltage DC power source directly connected to a cathode of the laser shell, in which a discharge for laser pumping takes place, for applying a constant high DC voltage to the cathode; and a high voltage pulse power source connected through a ballast resistance to an anode of the laser shell for applying a high pulse voltage to the anode, the high voltage pulse power source having a DC power circuit, a switching element having a first terminal to receive a command signal instructing switching operation, and second and third terminals connected or disconnected by the switching operation, the second terminal being connected to the DC power circuit and the third terminal being connected to the anode of the laser shell through ballast resistance, and a PWM controller having an output terminal connected to the first terminal of the switching element, for outputting a pulsed voltage with a predetermined repetition frequency and width, as the command signal.

Koseki, R.

1988-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Constraints on Two-Body Axial Currents from Reactor Antineutrino-Deuteron Breakup Reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss how to reduce theoretical uncertainties in the neutrino-deuteron breakup cross-sections crucial to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory's efforts to measure the solar neutrino flux. In effective field theory, the dominant uncertainties in all neutrino-deuteron reactions can be expressed through a single, common, isovector axial two-body current parameterized by $L_{1,A}$. After briefly reviewing the status of fixing $L_{1,A}$ experimentally, we present a constraint on $L_{1,A}$ imposed by existing reactor antineutrino-deuteron breakup data. This constraint alone leads to an uncertainty of 6-7% at 7 MeV neutrino energy in the cross-sections relevant to the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. However, more significantly for the Sudbury experiment, the constraint implies an uncertainty of only 0.7% in the ratio of charged to neutral current cross-sections used to verify the existence of neutrino oscillations, at the same energy. This is the only direct experimental constraint from the two-body system, to date, of the uncertainty in these cross-sections.

Malcolm Butler; Jiunn-Wei Chen; Petr Vogel

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

Trapped and escaping orbits in an axially symmetric galactic-type potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present article, we investigate the behavior of orbits in a time independent axially symmetric galactic type potential. This dynamical model can be considered to describe the motion in the central parts of a galaxy, for values of energies larger than the energy of escape. We use the classical method of the surface of section, in order to visualize and interpret the structure of the phase space of the dynamical system. Moreover, the Lyapunov Characteristic Exponent (LCE), is used in order to make an estimation of the degree of the chaoticity of the orbits in our galactic model. Our numerical calculations suggest that in this galactic type potential, there are two kinds of orbits: (i) escaping orbits and (ii) trapped orbits which do not escape at all. Furthermore, a large number of orbits of the dynamical system, display chaotic motion. Among the chaotic orbits, there are orbits that escape fast and also orbits that remain trapped for vast time intervals. When the value of the test particle's energy exceeds slightly the energy of escape, the amount of the trapped regular orbits increases, as the the value of the angular momentum increases. Therefore, the extent of the chaotic regions observed in the phase plane decreases as the value of the energy increases. Moreover, we calculate the average value of the escape period of the chaotic orbits and we try to correlate it with the value of the energy and also with the maximum value of the z component of the orbits. In addition, we find that the value of the LCE corresponding to each chaotic region, for different values of the energy, increases exponentially as the value of the energy increases. Some theoretical arguments in order to support the numerically obtained outcomes are presented.

Euaggelos E. Zotos

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

268

Laser cooling in the Penning trap: an analytical model for cooling rates in the presence of an axializing field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ions stored in Penning traps may have useful applications in the field of quantum information processing. There are, however, difficulties associated with the laser cooling of one of the radial motions of ions in these traps, namely the magnetron motion. The application of a small radio-frequency quadrupolar electric potential resonant with the sum of the two radial motional frequencies has been shown to couple these motions and to lead to more efficient laser cooling. We present an analytical model that enables us to determine laser cooling rates in the presence of such an 'axializing' field. It is found that this field leads to an averaging of the laser cooling rates for the two motions and hence improves the overall laser cooling efficiency. The model also predicts shifts in the motional frequencies due to the axializing field that are in qualitative agreement with those measured in recent experiments. It is possible to determine laser cooling rates experimentally by studying the phase response of the cooled ions to a near resonant excitation field. Using the model developed in this paper, we study the expected phase response when an axializing field is present.

R. J. Hendricks; E. S. Phillips; D. M. Segal; R. C. Thompson

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--Construction --Commercial Weatherization --Commercial Heating & Cooling --Commercial Lighting --Solar Decathlon -Manufacturing Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar --Wind...

270

Department of Energy Awards $37 Million for Marine and Hydrokinetic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Technology Development September 9, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced selections for more than 37 million...

271

Regulators approve first commercial hydrokinetic projects in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

When the tube sections flex, hydraulic arms move in opposite directions and turn a generator that produces power. Sea snakes are being tested in Scotland and Portugal.

272

SITING PROTOCOLS FOR MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY PROJECTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project Objective: The purpose of this project is to identify and address regulatory issues that affect the cost, time and the management of potential effects as it relates to siting and permitting advanced water power technologies. Background: The overall goal of this effort is to reduce the cost, time and effort of managing potential effects from the development advanced water power projects as it relates to the regulatory process in siting and permitting. To achieve this goal, a multi-disciplinary team will collect and synthesize existing information regarding regulatory processes into a user-friendly online format. In addition, the team will develop a framework for project planning and assessment that can incorporate existing and new information. The team will actively collaborate and coordinate with other efforts that support or influence regulatory process. Throughout the process, the team will engage in an iterative, collaborative process for gathering input and testing ideas that involves the relevant stakeholders across all sectors at the national, regional, and all state levels.

Kopf, Steven; Klure, Justin; Hofford, Anna; McMurray, Greg; Hampton, Therese

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

resource, that account for selected technological factors affecting capture and conversion of the theoretical resource. The technically recoverable resource does not account...

274

Dynamic Modeling and Environmental Analysis of Hydrokinetic Energy Extraction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The world is facing an imminent energy supply crisis. Our well-being is linked to the energy supply, and energy is in high demand in both… (more)

Miller, Veronica Bree

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Implementation of control system for hydrokinetic energy converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Uppsala University, a research group is investigating a system for converting the power in freely flowing water using a verticalaxis turbine directly connected to a permanent magnet generator. An experimental setup comprising a turbine, a generator, ...

Katarina Yuen, Senad Apelfröjd, Mats Leijon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

NREL Developing Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M.; Li, Y.; Moriarty, P. (2012). "A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Wake Propagation and Power Production in an Array of Tidal-Current Turbines." Accepted by Proceedings of the...

277

JEDI Marine and Hydrokinetic Model: User Reference Guide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reductions in the short term. For the purpose of this assessment, it was assumed that no learning curve effects are present. Only effects of manufacturing multiple units for the...

278

Water Power Program: Marine and Hydrokinetic Resource Assessment...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Tidal Streams Resource Map. Tidal Streams Resource Assessment The Assessment of the Energy Production from Tidal Streams in the United States report, created by Georgia Tech,...

279

First Commercial, Grid-Connected, Hydrokinetic Tidal Energy Project...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Image courtesy of Ocean Renewable Power Company ORPC's TidGen(tm) turbine generator unit. R&D Opportunity Advanced water power technologies include devices capable of extracting...

280

Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects on the Mississippi River Mississippi River Southwestern Federal Hydropower Conference 10 June 2010 Jeff Artman, P.E. MVD Hydropower Business Line Manager Line Manager...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Microsoft PowerPoint - MVD Hydrokinetics, SW Regional Hydropower...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Free Flow Power Corporation (generators mounted on poles placed in the river bottom) * Hydro Green Energy (barge mounted generators) * MarMC Enterprises (generators submerged in...

282

A co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer and investigations of hydrogen bound molecular complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer is reported. The spectrometer has been constructed to observe molecular complexes that exhibit non-covalent interactions with energies much less than that of a traditional covalent bond. The structure of molecular complexes such as those formed between a rare gas and a hydrogen halide, Rg:HX where Rg is a rare gas (Rg=Ne, Ar and Kr) and HX (X=F, Cl, Br and I) can be determined directly and accurately. The center of mass interaction distance, RCM, as well as the angle of the hydrogen halide is determined, along with direct evaluation of the intermolecular vibrations as well as accurate isomerization energies between the hydrogen bound and van der Waals forms. The accuracy of the frequency determination of rovibrational transitions using the submillimeter spectrometer is also evaluated by direct comparison with the state-of-theart pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, and this accuracy is estimated to be less than 1 kHz at 300 GHz. The tunneling or geared bending vibration of a dimer of hydrogen bromide or hydrogen iodide has been investigated. The selection rules, nuclear statistics and intensity alternation for transitions observed in these dimmers, which is a consequence of interchanging two identical nuclei in the low frequency geared bending vibration of the molecular complex, are reported. Furthermore, the rotation and quadrupole coupling constants are used to determine a vibrationally averaged structure of the complex. The energy of the low frequency bending vibration can then be compared with ab initio based potential energy surfaces. A study of the multiple isomeric forms of the molecular complex OC:HI is also presented. Multiple isotopic substitutions are used to determine the relevant ground state structures and data reported evidence for an anomalous isotope effect supporting a ground state isotopic isomerization effect. All spectroscopic data that has been reported here has been additionally used to subsequently model and generate vibrationally complete morphed potential energy surfaces that are capable or reproducing the experimentally observed data. The utility of this procedure is evaluated on a predicative basis and comparisons made with newly observed data.

McElmurry, Blake Anthony

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Strange Quark Contribution to the Vector and Axial Form Factors of the Nucleon: Combined Analysis of G0, HAPPEx, and Brookhaven E734 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The strange quark contribution to the vector and axial form factors of the nucleon has been determined for momentum transfers in the range $0.45Lab, and elastic $\

S. F. Pate; D. W. McKee; V. Papavassiliou

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

284

Measurement of the axial distribution of radioactivity in the auxiliary charcoal bed of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment at ORNL  

SciTech Connect

The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory commenced operation in 1964 and was shut down in 1969. It was fueled with {sup 233}UF{sub 4} in a carrier salt of LiF-BeF{sub 2}-ZrF{sub 4}, and it operated at 1,200 F. After it was shut down, the fuel was heated annually to 200 C to recombine fluorine (with the fuel) released due to radiation-induced reactions in the fuel salt. However, a competing reaction oxidized uranium to UF{sub 6}, which was released (along with F{sub 2}) from the fuel and trapped in one of four charcoal filters in the auxiliary charcoal bed (ACB). One of the tasks for decommissioning of the MSRE requires that at least 90% of the estimated 3 kg of {sup 233}U, and radioactive decay products, in this filter be removed, and one of the proposed methods is to vacuum the charcoal above a specified axial position in the filter. This requires that the axial distribution of activity in the filter be measured in a 60 rad/h radiation field to determine where this penetration can be made. To accomplish this, the shielded detector with a pinhole collimator, and with a laser positioning capability, was remotely translated to various axial positions to accomplish these measurements. Activities in the steel screen, and various regions of the charcoal bed, are estimated, and uncertainties in these estimates are generally {lt}1%. Results from this analysis are used for continued operational decisions for decommissioning of the MSRE.

Miller, L.F.; Buckner, M.; Buchanan, M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of an intense axial magnetic field in vacuum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acceleration of electrons by a circularly polarized laser pulse in the presence of a short duration intense axial magnetic field has been studied. Resonance occurs between the electrons and the laser field for an optimum magnetic field leading to effective energy transfer from laser to electrons. The value of optimum magnetic field is independent of the laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy. The electrons rotate around the axis of the laser pulse with small angle of emittance and small energy spread. Acceleration gradient increases with laser intensity and decreases with initial electron energy.

Singh, K. P. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Baryon-Number-Induced Chern-Simons Couplings of Vector and Axial-Vector Mesons in Holographic QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that holographic models of QCD predict the presence of a Chern-Simons coupling between vector and axial-vector mesons at finite baryon density. In the Anti de Sitter/Conformal Field Theory dictionary, the coefficient of this coupling is proportional to the baryon number density and is fixed uniquely in the five-dimensional holographic dual by anomalies in the flavor currents. For the lightest mesons, the coupling mixes transverse {rho} and a{sub 1} polarization states. At sufficiently large baryon number densities, it produces an instability, which causes the {rho} and a{sub 1} mesons to condense in a state breaking both rotational and translational invariance.

Domokos, Sophia K.; Harvey, Jeffrey A. [Enrico Fermi Institute and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus is made having a generator section containing axially elongated electrochemical cells, a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet, a gaseous feed oxidant inlet, and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel, where the spent fuel exit channel passes from the generator chamber to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet at a mixing apparatus, reformable fuel mixture channel passes through the length of the generator chamber and connects with the mixing apparatus, that channel containing entry ports within the generator chamber, where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces, where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports. 2 figures.

Reichner, P.; Dollard, W.J.

1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

288

Transition form factors of B decays into p-wave axial-vector mesons in the perturbative QCD approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The B{sub u,d,s}{yields}V, A form factors are studied in the perturbative QCD approach (V, A denote a vector meson and two kinds of p-wave axial-vector mesons: {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}P{sub 1} states, respectively). The form factors are directly studied in the large recoiling region and extrapolated to the whole kinematic region within the dipole parametrization. Adopting decay constants with different signs for the two kinds of axial vectors, we find that the two kinds of B{yields}A form factors have the same sign. The two strange mesons K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B} mix with each other via the SU(3) symmetry breaking effect. In order to reduce the ambiguities in the mixing angle between K{sub 1A} and K{sub 1B}, we propose a model-independent way that utilizes the B decay data. Most of the branching fractions of the semilteptonic B{yields}Al{nu}{sub l} decays are of the order 10{sup -4}, which still need experimental tests in the ongoing and forthcoming experiments.

Li Rungui [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4) Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physics, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Lue Caidian [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4) Beijing 100049 (China); Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of High Energy Physics, P.O. Box 918(4) Beijing 100049 (China)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Imprints of the nuclear symmetry energy on gravitational waves from the axial w-modes of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The eigen-frequencies of the axial w-modes of oscillating neutron stars are studied using the continued fraction method with an Equation of State (EOS) partially constrained by the recent terrestrial nuclear laboratory data. It is shown that the density dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy $E_{sym}(\\rho)$ affects significantly both the frequencies and the damping times of these modes. Besides confirming the previously found universal behavior of the mass-scaled eigen-frequencies as functions of the compactness of neutron stars, we explored several alternative universal scaling functions. Moreover, the $w_{II}$-mode is found to exist only for neutron stars having a compactness of $M/R\\geq 0.1078$ independent of the EOS used.

De-Hua Wen; Bao-An Li; Plamen G. Krastev

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Exact analysis of particle dynamics in combined field of finite duration laser pulse and static axial magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dynamics of a charged particle is studied in the field of a relativistically intense linearly polarized finite duration laser pulse in the presence of a static axial magnetic field. For a finite duration laser pulse whose temporal shape is defined by Gaussian profile, exact analytical expressions are derived for the particle trajectory, momentum, and energy as function of laser phase. From the solutions, it is shown that, unlike for the monochromatic plane wave case, resonant phase locking time between the particle and laser pulse is finite. The net energy transferred to the particle does not increase monotonically but tends to saturate. It is further shown that appropriate tuning of cyclotron frequency of the particle with the characteristic frequency in the pulse spectrum can lead to the generation of accelerated particles with variable energies in MeV-TeV range.

Sagar, Vikram; Sengupta, Sudip; Kaw, Predhiman [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Electrochemical cell apparatus having axially distributed entry of a fuel-spent fuel mixture transverse to the cell lengths  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical apparatus (10) is made having a generator section (22) containing axially elongated electrochemical cells (16), a fresh gaseous feed fuel inlet (28), a gaseous feed oxidant inlet (30), and at least one gaseous spent fuel exit channel (46), where the spent fuel exit channel (46) passes from the generator chamber (22) to combine with the fresh feed fuel inlet (28) at a mixing apparatus (50), reformable fuel mixture channel (52) passes through the length of the generator chamber (22) and connects with the mixing apparatus (50), that channel containing entry ports (54) within the generator chamber (22), where the axis of the ports is transverse to the fuel electrode surfaces (18), where a catalytic reforming material is distributed near the reformable fuel mixture entry ports (54).

Reichner, Philip (Plum Borough, PA); Dollard, Walter J. (Churchill Borough, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Computerized axial tomography of the chest for visualization of ''absent'' pulmonary arteries  

SciTech Connect

To expand the search for central pulmonary arteries in six patients with absence of cardiac-pulmonary continuity, computerized axial tomography (CAT) of the chest was performed. The CAT scans were compared with previous arteriograms and pulmonary vein wedge angiograms. Three patients with type IV truncus arteriosus were studied, and none had a central, right or left pulmonary artery on CAT scan. However, two patients with tetralogy of Fallot with pulmonary atresia and a patent ductus arteriosus to the right lung demonstrated the presence of a left pulmonary artery. In addition, one child with truncus arteriosus with ''absent'' left pulmonary artery demonstrated a left pulmonary artery on the CAT scan. The CAT scan may therefore enhance our ability to search for disconnected pulmonary arteries in children with complex cyanotic congenital heart disease.

Sondheimer, H.M. (Upstate Medical Center, Syracuse, NY); Oliphant, M.; Schneider, B.; Kavey, R.E.W.; Blackman, M.S.; Parker, F.B. Jr.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

EFFECT OF NEUTRON IRRADIATION ON MATERIALS SUBJECTED TO MULTI-AXIAL STRESS DISTRIBUTIONS. Quarterly Report for the Period Ending June 30, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Activities in a program to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on A-302B steel are reported. Plans are discussed concerning performance tests on tensile, notched tensile, tube, and Charpy specimens. An irradiation capsule design was finalized. A theoretical analysis of the critical conditions arising in a tube subjected to both internal pressure and axial load is included. (J.R.D.)

Trozera, T A

1962-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

295

Computerized axial tomography: technology and equipment. January, 1977-May, 1981 (Citations from the International Information Service for the Physics and Engineering Communities data base). Report for January 1977-May 1981  

SciTech Connect

This retrospective bibliography contains citations concerning many recent developments in the instrumentation, technology, and application of computerized axial tomography (CAT). Production model CAT scanners are compared and evaluated for noise, spatial resolution, axial position sensitivity, artefact and dose. Research and development on new scanners are considered. (Contains 71 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ginzburg-Landau phase diagram for dense matter with axial anomaly, strange quark mass, and meson condensation  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the phase structure of dense matter, in particular, the nature of the transition between hadronic and quark matter. Calculations within a Ginzburg-Landau approach show that the axial anomaly can induce a critical point in this transition region. This is possible because in three-flavor quark matter with instanton effects a chiral condensate can be added to the color-flavor locked phase without changing the symmetries of the ground state. In (massless) two-flavor quark matter such a critical point is not possible since the corresponding color superconductor (2SC) does not break chiral symmetry. We study the effects of a nonzero but finite strange quark mass which interpolates between these two cases. Since at ultrahigh density the first reaction of the color-flavor locked phase to a nonzero strange quark mass is to develop a kaon condensate, we extend previous Ginzburg-Landau studies by including such a condensate. We discuss the fate of the critical point systematically and show that the continuity between hadronic and quark matter can be disrupted by the onset of a kaon condensate. Moreover, we identify the mass terms in the Ginzburg-Landau potential which are needed for the 2SC phase to occur in the phase diagram.

Schmitt, Andreas; Stetina, Stephan [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Wien, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Tachibana, Motoi [Department of Physics, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Axial-flux modular permanent-magnet generator with a toroidal winding for wind-turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

Permanent-magnet (PM) generators have been used for wind turbines for many years. Many small wind-turbine manufacturers use direct-drive PM generators. For wind-turbine generators, the design philosophy must cover the following characteristics: low cost, light weight, low speed, high torque, and variable-speed generation. The generator is easy to manufacture and the design can be scaled up for a larger size without major retooling. A modular PM generator with axial flux direction was chosen. The permanent magnet used is NdFeB or ferrite magnet with flux guide to focus flux density in the air gap. Each unit module of the generator may consist of one, two, or more phases. Each generator can be expanded to two or more unit modules. Each unit module is built from simple modular poles. The stator winding is formed like a torus. Thus, the assembly process is simplified and the winding insertion in the slot is less tedious. The authors built a prototype of one unit module and performed preliminary tests in the laboratory. Follow-up tests will be conducted in the laboratory to improve the design.

Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P.; Wan, Y.H.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

FE Magnetic Field Analysis Simulation Models based Design, Development, Control and Testing of An Axial Flux Permanent Magnet Linear Oscillating Motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract- Development, finite element(FE) analysis of magnetic field distribution, performance, control and testing of a new axial flux permanent magnet linear oscillating motor (PMLOM) along with a suitable speed and thrust control technique is described in this paper. The PMLOM can perform precision oscillation task without exceeding the given limit on allowable average power dissipation. The use of new powerful permanent magnet materials such as Neodymium-Iron-Boron alloys can greatly improve the performance of electrical machines. Also its performance parameters, such as the force, current etc. are experimentally assessed. The objective of this paper is to determine the forces for aluminium mover embedded with rare earth permanent magnet experimentally and analytically through FEMM software and develop a microcontroller based IGBT Inverter for its control. Index Terms- Axial flux machine, finite element analysis, microcontroller based IGBT inverter, permanent magnet linear oscillating motor, rare earth permanent magnet. I.

Govindaraj T; Prof Dr; Ashoke K. Ganguli

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The Influence of Blank-Width Ratio on Stress Field during Heavy Axial Forgings Manufacturing with Horizontal V-Shaped Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forging method with horizontal V-shaped anvils (HVA) is effective in the control of inner stress states, metal tissue, etc. FEM numerical simulation is conducted for the HVA forging method, given the blank-width ratio 0.5, 1.0 and 1.2, respectively, ... Keywords: horizontal V-shaped anvil, anvil-width ratio, blank-width ratio, axial forging, stress field

Li Li; Wang Qian; Yu Suoqing; Ni Liyong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ha Shengcheng Hajia kun Hawandija yiusanni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the remaining parts of the family’s house and inviting my mother6 and some other members from the family and treating them in a restaurant in the township town. They were given several hundred renminbi, several brick teas and several khadag, a Tibetan ritual...

Ha, Mingzong

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Ha Shenglin Hawan Hajia kunni lorjini kilesanni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or type (i.e. epic, song, ritual) Interview Name of recorder (if different from collector) Date of recording Feb. 18, 2005 Place of recording Hawan village, Tiantang Town, Tianzhu Tibetan Autonomous County, Gansu Province, China ????????????????? Name...

Ha, Mingzong

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Globalization 300million ha forest area loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from sustainable managed forests using vegetable inks and water-based varnish. Citation UNEP (2011. Our distribution policy aims to reduce UNEP's carbon footprint. #12;i Keeping Track of Our Changing

303

O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) production in flowing He/O{sub 2} plasmas. I. Axial transport and pulsed power formats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical oxygen-iodine lasers (COILs) have promising applications due to their high efficiency and ease of scaling to multikilowatt powers. Recent research has focused on pumping the iodine with O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) produced by electric discharges. In a previous work, a global model was used to develop reaction mechanisms and determine the specific energy deposition (eV/O{sub 2}) required to obtain high O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields for electric discharge COILs. Experiments have recently achieved positive laser gain and oscillation with these energy depositions and have highlighted the importance of axial expansion of the plasma in optimizing excitation of the O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}). In this work, the consequences of axial transport on O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields have been computationally investigated in flowing He/O{sub 2} plasmas at a few Torrs using a one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and kinetics model. We show that the experimentally observed extension of the plasma glow upstream and downstream of the electrodes is due to electron diffusion and capacitive coupling of the radio-frequency power source. We also show that {approx_equal}50% higher O{sub 2}({sup 1}{delta}) yields can be achieved with a pulsed discharge combined with continuous-wave discharge.

Stafford, D. Shane; Kushner, Mark J. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Expanding the One-Dimensional CdS-CdSe Composition Landscape: Axially Anisotropic CdS{sub 1-x}Se{sub x} Nanorods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the synthesis and characterization of CdS{sub 1–x}Se{sub x} nanorods with axial anisotropy. These nanorods were synthesized via single injection of a mixture of trioctylphosphine sulfur and selenium precursors to a cadmium–phosphonate complex at high temperature. Transmission electron microscopy shows nanoparticle morphology changes with relative sulfur and selenium loading. When the synthetic selenium loading is between 5% and 10% of total chalcogenides, the nanorods exhibit pronounced axial anisotropy characterized by a thick “head” and a thin “tail”. The nanorods’ band gap red shifts with increasing selenium loading. X-ray diffraction reveals that CdS{sub 1–x}Se{sub x} nanorods have a wurtzite crystal structure with a certain degree of alloying. High-resolution and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirm the head of the anisotropic nanorods is rich in selenium, whereas the tail is rich in sulfur. Time evolution and mechanistic studies confirm the nanorods form by quick growth of the CdSe-rich head, followed by slow growth of the CdS-rich tail. Metal photodeposition reactions with 575 nm irradiation, which is mostly absorbed by the CdSe-rich segment, show effective electronic communication between the nanorod head and tail segments.

Ruberu, T. Purnima A.; Vela, Javier

2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

305

PTC, ITC, or Cash Grant? An Analysis of the Choice Facing Renewable Power Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydroelectric, and marine and hydrokinetic power, are notmarine and hydrokinetic facilities. For wind, closed-loop biomass, and geothermal power,

Bolinger, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effects on Freshwater Organisms of Magnetic Fields Associated with Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Underwater cables will be used to transmit electricity between turbines in an array (interturbine cables), between the array and a submerged step-up transformer (if part of the design), and from the transformer or array to shore. All types of electrical transmitting cables (as well as the generator itself) will emit EMF into the surrounding water. The electric current will induce magnetic fields in the immediate vicinity, which may affect the behavior or viability of animals. Because direct electrical field emissions can be prevented by shielding and armoring, we focused our studies on the magnetic fields that are unavoidably induced by electric current moving through a generator or transmission cable. These initial experiments were carried out to evaluate whether a static magnetic field, such as would be produced by a direct current (DC) transmitting cable, would affect the behavior of common freshwater fish and invertebrates.

Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Riemer, Kristina P [ORNL; Turner, Julie W [ORNL

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

NREL Developing a Numerical Simulation Tool to Study Hydrokinetic Energy Conversion Devices and Arrays (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New code will help accelerate design improvements by providing a high-fidelity simulation tool to study power performance, structural loading, and the interactions between devices in arrays.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

On freeze-out problem in hydro-kinetic approach to A+A collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for evaluating spectra and correlations in the hydrodynamic approach is proposed. It is based on an analysis of Boltzmann equations (BE) in terms of probabilities for constituent particles to escape from the interacting system. The conditions of applicability of Cooper-Frye freeze-out prescription are considered within the method. The results are illustrated with a non-relativistic exact solution of BE for expanding spherical fireball as well as with approximate solutions for ellipsoidally expanding ones.

Yu. M. Sinyukov; S. V. Akkelin; Y. Hama

2002-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

309

Wave and Hydrokinetics Interest Group 1st Meeting of 2009/2010 Year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S. wave power plant license issued by FERC for the 1-MW Makah Bay, WA project was surrendered by Finavera Status ­ Wave power plant projects are being permitted in Europe ­ The time, cost and complexity of the U five years . · Economic Status: The first U.S. commercial wave plant project in Reedsport, OR, was made

310

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Hydrokinetic Oscillators for Energy Harvesting via Coupling Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) and Electromagnetics.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Sustainable energy generation has received a great deal of interest recently because the presence of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere is at an unprecedented high.… (more)

Hudzik II, Alan Michael

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Assssment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Segment-specific theoretical resource was aggregated by major hydrologic region in the contiguous, lower 48 states and totaled 1,146 TWh/yr. The aggregate estimate of the Alaska theoretical resource is 235 TWh/yr, yielding a total theoretical resource estimate of 1,381 TWh/yr for the continental US. The technically recoverable resource in the contiguous 48 states was estimated by applying a recovery factor to the segment-specific theoretical resource estimates. The recovery factor scales the theoretical resource for a given segment to take into account assumptions such as minimum required water velocity and depth during low flow conditions, maximum device packing density, device efficiency, and flow statistics (e.g., the 5 percentile flow relative to the average flow rate). The recovery factor also takes account of ?back effects? ? feedback effects of turbine presence on hydraulic head and velocity. The recovery factor was determined over a range of flow rates and slopes using the hydraulic model, HEC-RAS. In the hydraulic modeling, presence of turbines was accounted for by adjusting the Manning coefficient. This analysis, which included 32 scenarios, led to an empirical function relating recovery factor to slope and discharge. Sixty-nine percent of NHDPlus segments included in the theoretical resource estimate for the contiguous 48 states had an estimated recovery factor of zero. For Alaska, data on river slope was not readily available; hence, the recovery factor was estimated based on the flow rate alone. Segment-specific estimates of the theoretical resource were multiplied by the corresponding recovery factor to estimate

Jacobson, Paul T. [Electric Power Research Institute; Ravens, Thomas M. [University of Alaska Anchorage; Cunningham, Keith W. [University of Alaska Fairbanks; Scott, George [National Renewable Energy Laboratory

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Developing an Instrumentation Package for in-Water Testing of Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean-energy industry is still in its infancy and device developers have provided their own equipment and procedures for testing. Currently, no testing standards exist for ocean energy devices in the United States. Furthermore, as prototype devices move from the test tank to in-water testing, the logistical challenges and costs grow exponentially. Development of a common instrumentation package that can be moved from device to device is one means of reducing testing costs and providing normalized data to the industry as a whole. As a first step, the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has initiated an effort to develop an instrumentation package to provide a tool to allow common measurements across various ocean energy devices. The effort is summarized in this paper. First, we present the current status of ocean energy devices. We then review the experiences of the wind industry in its development of the instrumentation package and discuss how they can be applied in the ocean environment. Next, the challenges that will be addressed in the development of the ocean instrumentation package are discussed. For example, the instrument package must be highly adaptable to fit a large array of devices but still conduct common measurements. Finally, some possible system configurations are outlined followed by input from the industry regarding its measurement needs, lessons learned from prior testing, and other ideas.

Nelson, E.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Inflow Characterization for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices. FY-2010 Annual Progress Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Marine and Hydro Kinetic devices (MHK) are being widely studied as a source of renewable energy. The Marrowstone Island site is a potential location for installing MHK devices because the tidal currents observed that are sufficient for power generation. In order to quantify the effects of turbulence on MHK devices and the surrounding environment at this site, a prelimi- nary fluid flow field study was conducted here by the Pacific Northwest National Lab (PNNL) in collaboration with the Applied Physics Lab at the University of Washington (APL-UW). This study entailed continuous The Acoustic Doppler Velocimetry (ADV), Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and Conductivity, Temperature and Depth (CTD) measurements from May 4, 2010 to May 22, 2010, in order to obtain information about turbulence effects during different tidal conditions. The instruments used for collecting the above measurements were deployed at the Marrowstone site using a R/V Jack Robertson provided by the University of Washington (APL-UW). All the measurements were taken at the site with an average depth of 22 m below the sea surface. ADV acquired velocity data at 32 Hz sampling frequency at 4.6 m above the seabed, and ADCP acquired velocity profile data at a sampling frequency of 2 Hz, from a height of 2.6 m above the seabed to the surface with a bin resolution of 0.5 m. The ADV and ADCP measurements showed that the horizontal velocity had a turbulence intensity of 10%. Further- more, the spectral analysis from ADV measurements showed that the flow is fully turbulent with -5/3 slope in the inertial sub-range of the spectra. Moreover, the temporal-frequency analysis showed presence of ”eddies” at high frequencies. These preliminary studies provided initial flow field and site characteristics, showed the limitations of the instruments used and highlighted changes that need to be made in the experimental setup for deployment in FY-2011 studies.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

McKeever, J.W.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measurement of Effect of Chemical Reactions on the Hydrologic Properties of Fractured Glass Media Using a Tri-axial Flow and Transport Apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of sub-surface media is critical to many natural and engineered sub-surface systems. Methods and information for such characterization of fractured media are severely lacking. Influence of glass corrosion (precipitation and dissolution) reactions on fractured glass blocks HAN28 and LAWBP1, two candidate waste glass forms for a proposed immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) disposal facility at the Hanford, WA site, was investigated. Flow and tracer transport experiments were conducted in such randomly and multiply fractured ILAW glass blocks, before and after subjecting them to corrosion using Vapor Hydration Testing (VHT) at 200 oC temperature and 200 psig (1379 KPa) pressure, causing the precipitation of alteration products. A tri-axial fractured media flow and transport experimental apparatus, which allows the simultaneous measurement of flow and transport properties and their anisotropy, has been designed and built for this purpose. Such apparatus for fractured media characterization are being reported in the literature only recently. Hydraulic properties of fractured blocks were measured in different orientations and along different cardinal directions, before and after glass corrosion reactions. Miscible displacement experiments using a non-reactive dye were also conducted, before and after glass corrosion reactions, to study the tracer transport behavior through such media. Initial efforts to analyze breakthrough curve (BTC) data using a 1D Advection Dispersion Equation (ADE) solution revealed that a different fractured media transport model may be necessary for such interpretation. It was found that glass reactions can have a significant influence on the hydrologic properties of fractured ILAW glass media. The methods and results are unique and useful to better understand the effect of chemical reactions on the hydrologic properties of fractured geomedia in general and glass media in particular.

Saripalli, Kanaka P.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Meyer, Philip D.

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Patient radiation dose in prospectively gated axial CT coronary angiography and retrospectively gated helical technique with a 320-detector row CT scanner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate radiation dose to patients undergoing computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA) for prospectively gated axial (PGA) technique and retrospectively gated helical (RGH) technique. Methods: Radiation doses were measured for a 320-detector row CT scanner (Toshiba Aquilion ONE) using small sized silicon-photodiode dosimeters, which were implanted at various tissue and organ positions within an anthropomorphic phantom for a standard Japanese adult male. Output signals from photodiode dosimeters were read out on a personal computer, from which organ and effective doses were computed according to guidelines published in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 103. Results: Organs that received high doses were breast, followed by lung, esophagus, and liver. Breast doses obtained with PGA technique and a phase window width of 16% at a simulated heart rate of 60 beats per minute were 13 mGy compared to 53 mGy with RGH technique using electrocardiographically dependent dose modulation at the same phase window width as that in PGA technique. Effective doses obtained in this case were 4.7 and 20 mSv for the PGA and RGH techniques, respectively. Conversion factors of dose length product to the effective dose in PGA and RGH were 0.022 and 0.025 mSv mGy{sup -1} cm{sup -1} with a scan length of 140 mm. Conclusions: CTCA performed with PGA technique provided a substantial effective dose reduction, i.e., 70%-76%, compared to RGH technique using the dose modulation at the same phase windows as those in PGA technique. Though radiation doses in CTCA with RGH technique were the same level as, or some higher than, those in conventional coronary angiography (CCA), the use of PGA technique reduced organ and effective doses to levels less than CCA except for breast dose.

Seguchi, Shigenobu; Aoyama, Takahiko; Koyama, Shuji; Fujii, Keisuke; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo [Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan) and Department of Medical Technology, Nagoya Daini Red Cross Hospital, Myouken-chou, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8650 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan); Section of Radiological Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya University, Daikominami, Higashi-ku, Nagoya 461-8673 (Japan)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Phase II CRADA ORNL99-0568 Report : Developing Transmission-Less Inverter Drive Systems for Axial-Gap Permanent magnet Accessory and Traction Motors and Generators  

SciTech Connect

Researchers of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNLs) Power Electronics and Electric Machine Research Center (PEEMRC) collaborated with Visual Computing Systems (VCS) to develop an electric axial-gap permanent magnet (PM) motor controlled by a self-sensing inverter for driving vehicle accessories such as power steering, air conditioning, and brakes. VCS designed an 8 kW motor based on their Segmented Electromagnetic Array (SEMA) technology. ORNL designed a 10 kW inverter to fit within the volume of a housing, which had been integrated with the motor. This modular design was pursued so that multiple modules could be used for higher power applications. ORNL built the first inverter under the cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) ORNL 98-0514 and drove a refurbished Delta motor with no load during the Merit Review at ORNL on Monday, May 17, 1999. Inverter circuitry and instructions for assembling the inverters were sent to VCS. A report was prepared and delivered during the Future Car Congress in April 2000, at Arlington, Virginia. Collaboration continued under CRADA ORNL 99-0568 as VCS designed and built a SEMA motor with a dual coil platter to be the traction motor for an electric truck. VCS and ORNL assembled two 45 kW inverters. Each inverter drove one coil, which was designed to deliver 15 kW continuous power and 45 kW peak power for 90 s. The vehicle was road tested as part of the Future Truck Competition. A report was prepared and delivered during the PCIM in October 2000, at Boston, Massachusetts.

McKeever, J.W.

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

320

Activity Report for Hanford WTP LAW Melter HA Development, July...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LMP) system. The primary purpose of this HSS field activity, conducted from July 31 to August 5, 2013, was to observe and understand the evolving approach used by Bechtel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NIST OpenHaRT'13 Evaluation: Overview and Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Evaluation Workshop Omni Shoreham Hotel, Washington DC ... Manage the evaluations – Provide evaluation utilities and infrastructure for ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ha Le's Home Page - CECM - Simon Fraser University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 1995: Bachelor degree in Computer Science, Honours, Co-op at the University of Waterloo. May 1999: Master degree, Department of Computer Science, ...

323

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Models - About...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine & Hydrokinetic Power Model The Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) Marine and Hydrokinetic (MHK) model allows users to estimate economic development impacts from...

324

PowerPoint Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Tidal Stream Energy Conversion Devices * Ocean Energy - HydroKinetic Energy - Marine Energy Terminology 4 Terminology: HydroKinetic * Hydro Greek word for water (hydor) *...

325

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms – Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

SciTech Connect

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® Databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects of marine renewable energy devices on marine mammals and seabirds were examined to begin the search process (e.g., Boehlert et al. 2008; Thompson et al. 2008; Simas et al. 2009). From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Searches were conducted with reference to the potential effects of offshore wind farms and MHK devices on marine mammals, seabirds, and fish. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that often the potential effects were offered as hypotheses that often were not supported by the presentation of appropriate documentation. Therefore, the search was refined and focused on trying to obtain the necessary information to support or challenge a proposed potential effect to a specific concern. One of the expressed concerns regarding MHK devices is that placing wave parks in coastal waters could compromise the migration patterns of whales. Disruption of the annual migration of the gray whale (Eschrichtius robustus), which swims at least 30,000 km on its round trip from breeding grounds in Baja California to feeding areas in the Bering Sea, is of particular concern. Among the hypothesized effects on the migrating gray whales are increased predation risk by constricting migration corridor to between array and shore or by forcing the whales to swim into deeper waters, increased metabolic energy costs and delays in reaching the destinations, and interrupting feeding by blocking access to benthic areas under arrays. The literature search focused on identifying published studies that could provide information to evaluate these concerns. The results were developed into a case study that evaluated the potential effects of the placement of wave parks in coastal waters along the migration route of the gray whale. Wave parks and other MHK arrays may have additional effects on gray whales and other marine mammals, including entanglement in mooring lines and interference with communications among other effects, that were not included in this case study. The case study results were rewritten into a simpler form that would be suitable for placement on a web blog

Kropp, Roy K.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

MHK Technologies/Hydroomel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydroomel Hydroomel < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Eco cinetic Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Hydroomel r composed of little modules that perfectly fits into natural and urban environments and on existing structures where it could be located Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 59:09.7 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Hydroomel&oldid=680955" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

327

Sudden freeze-out vs continuous emission: duality in hydro-kinetic approach to A+A collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of spectra formation in hydrodynamic approach to A+A collisions is discussed. It is analyzed in terms of the two different objects: distribution and emission functions. We show that though the process of particle liberation, described by the emission function, is, usually, continuous in time, the observable spectra can be also expressed by means of the Landau/Cooper-Frye prescription. We argue that such an approximate duality results from some symmetry properties that systems in A+A collisions reach to the end of hydrodynamic evolution and reduction of the collision rate at post hydrodynamic stage

S. V. Akkelin; M. S. Borysova; Yu. M. Sinyukov

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Hearing and Tissues - Draft Final Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snohomish Public Utility District No.1 plans to deploy two 6 meter OpenHydro tidal turbines in Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, under a FERC pilot permitting process. Regulators and stakeholders have raised questions about the potential effect of noise from the turbines on marine life. Noise in the aquatic environment is known to be a stressor to many types of aquatic life, including marine mammals, fish and birds. Marine mammals and birds are exceptionally difficult to work with for technical and regulatory reasons. Fish have been used as surrogates for other aquatic organisms as they have similar auditory structures. This project was funded under the FY09 Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to Snohomish PUD, in partnership with the University of Washington - Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, the Sea Mammal Research Unit, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The results of this study will inform the larger research project outcomes. Proposed tidal turbine deployments in coastal waters are likely to propagate noise into nearby waters, potentially causing stress to native organisms. For this set of experiments, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) were used as the experimental model. Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m diameter OpenHydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/Chinook/CKPUG.cfm); the fish used in this experiment were hatchery raised and their populations are not in danger of depletion. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Experimental results indicate that non-lethal, low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Development of Open Water-lubricated Polycrystalline Diamond (PCD) Thrust Bearings for Use in Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) Energy Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrstalline diamond (PCD) bearings were designed, fabricated and tested for marine-hydro-kinetic (MHK) application. Bearing efficiency and life were evaluated using the US Synthetic bearing test facility. Three iterations of design, build and test were conducted to arrive at the best bearing design. In addition life testing that simulated the starting and stopping and the loading of real MHK applications were performed. Results showed polycrystalline diamond bearings are well suited for MHK applications and that diamond bearing technology is TRL4 ready. Based on life tests results bearing life is estimated to be at least 11.5 years. A calculation method for evaluating the performance of diamond bearings of round geometry was also investigated and developed. Finally, as part of this effort test bearings were supplied free of charge to the University of Alaska for further evaluation. The University of Alaska test program will subject the diamond bearings to sediment laden lubricating fluid.

Cooley, Craig, H.; Khonsari, Michael,, M; Lingwall, Brent

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Preliminary aerothermal design of axial compressors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The research work disclosed in this publication is partially funded by the Strategic Educational Pathways Scholarship Scheme (Malta). The scholarship is part-financed by the European… (more)

Piscopo, Giovanni

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Soft beams: when capillarity induces axial compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition of the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfy the classical Young-Dupr\\'e relation.

Sébastien, Neukirch; Jean-Jacques, Marigo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Soft beams: when capillarity induces axial compression  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the interaction of an elastic beam with a liquid drop in the case where bending and extensional effects are both present. We use a variational approach to derive equilibrium equations and constitutive relation for the beam. This relation is shown to include a term due to surface energy in addition of the classical Young's modulus term, leading to a modification of Hooke's law. At the triple point where solid, liquid, and vapor phases meet we find that the external force applied on the beam is parallel to the liquid-vapor interface. Moreover, in the case where solid-vapor and solid-liquid interface energies do not depend on the extension state of the beam, we show that the extension in the beam is continuous at the triple point and that the wetting angle satisfy the classical Young-Dupr\\'e relation.

Neukirch Sébastien; Antkowiak Arnaud; Marigo Jean-Jacques

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

333

Rapid-quench axially staged combustor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustor cooperating with a compressor in driving a gas turbine includes a cylindrical outer combustor casing. A combustion liner, having an upstream rich section, a quench section and a downstream lean section, is disposed within the outer combustor casing defining a combustion chamber having at least a core quench region and an outer quench region. A first plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a first diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the core region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. A second plurality of quench holes are disposed within the liner at the quench section having a second diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to the outer region of the quench section of the combustion chamber. In an alternative embodiment, the combustion chamber quench section further includes at least one middle region and at least a third plurality of quench holes disposed within the liner at the quench section having a third diameter to provide cooling jet penetration to at least one middle region of the quench section of the combustion chamber.

Feitelberg, Alan S. (Niskayuna, NY); Schmidt, Mark Christopher (Niskayuna, NY); Goebel, Steven George (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts’ Workshop September 27th – 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland  

SciTech Connect

An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th – 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth – WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: • Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences • Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. • The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. • Although the idea of cases representing the “best practices” was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as “cases”. There was also discomfort at the implication that “best practices” implied “lesser practices”; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. • Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Idaho National Laboratory - Hydropower Program: Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aspects General Environmental Research Hydrokinetic & Wave Technologies Hydropower Facts Research and Development Resource Assessment Technology Transfer Virtual...

336

Malassezia furfur invasiveness in a keratinocyte cell line (HaCat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catterall MD, Ward ME, Jacobs P (1978) A reappraisal of the role of Pityrosporum orbiculare in pityriasis versicolor and the significance of extracellular lipase.

337

Why Lean ?y ( QC TQC 5-7 KPI Competency HA-SHA KM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) #12;Doing More With Less Lean Lean (Toyota Production System-TPS ) ( ) ( ) #12;TOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEMTOYOTA PRODUCTION SYSTEM ( TPS ) 1930( TPS ) 1930s Lean Management (1990 : (Standard Work- CPG) 2. / Toyota y / waste value 3. (time, human effort, materials

Laksanacharoen, Sathaporn

338

Les lHa srin sde brgyad et le probleme de leur categorisation - Une interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reconnaître éventuellement la présence ou l’absence detelle ou telle entité “ lha srin ” dans un rituel, sont préalablement définies, àla fois par les enquêteurs ethnologues et par les usagers, à travers un lan-gage naturel dont les propriétés conventionnelles... solides ” ou entrelacs de fils destinésà figurer des entités terribles (formes de Mahakala ou mgon po), insistent surle choix de matériaux sélectionnés en fonction de leurs propriétés : fils decoton entrelacés car l’entrelacs doit laisser passer la lumière...

Steinmann, Brigitte

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sur la Tendance aux Metaphores Visuelles: aller voir lHa bstun chen po au Sikkim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: that of the encounter between the Tibetan guru and the indigenous shaman who share a world of practice and belief spanning the extent of the territory they've conquered. « routes les J1/(hlilaliolls se rencontrent sur un nU?J1le terrain qllelle que soil la solution... 'orties pendant leurs retraites. Autour de ce personnage central du bouddhisme sikkimais, introducteur de la doctrine du rDzogs chenJ, se deroule une fois tous les trois ans I'un des rituels les plus secrets du Sikkim, le sKam zhed (lepcha kochenlo) ou...

Steinmann, Brigitte

340

Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air source heat pump water heaters (ASHPWH) are becoming increasingly popular for saving energy, protecting the environment and security purposes. The water temperature distribution in the tank is an important parameter for an ASHPWH. This paper presented a mathematic model for a cylindrical water tank with a cylindrical condenser as its heat source. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, FLUENT, was used to study hot water temperature distribution in the tank of the ASHPWH. In addition, the effects of tank dimension and the type of condenser coil on water temperature distribution were discussed. The work of this paper could be used for the optimization of tank and condenser coil designs.

Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Tactile Sensation Imaging for Artificial Palpation Jong-Ha Lee1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, each of these techniques has limitations, including the exposure to radiation, excessive costs University, Philadelphia, PA 19040, USA {jong,cwon}@temple.edu 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas, transparent waveguide and the total internal reflection principle. The developed sensor is used to detect

Won, Chang-Hee

342

Artificial Tactile Sensation Imaging for Healthcare Application Jong-Ha Lee1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

limitations, including the exposure to radiation, excessive costs, and complexity of machinery. Artificial, Philadelphia, PA 19122, USA 2 Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital-layer optical waveguide as a sensing probe. In our device, total internal reflection principle is utilized

Won, Chang-Hee

343

AFRL-RV-HA-TR-2008-1039 History of Space-Based Infrared Astronomy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Sloan, Gregory C.

344

The Dean's RepoRT | 20092010 haRvaRD MeDical school  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in key areas for UW TechTransfer. UW researchers, faculty and staff reported 335 innovations, which TechTransfer programs like the Technology Gap Innovation Fund and LaunchPad continue to demonstrate and dedication of an exceptional team assembled at UW TechTransfer. This past year we have added staff in key

Lahav, Galit

345

2 SABER n 9 -Julio 2000 La Universidad ha emprendido el  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chairman of the Compensation Committee, Solera Holdings, Inc. All sessions will take place at Northwestern

Escolano, Francisco

346

MHK Technologies/Osprey | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Osprey Osprey < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Osprey.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Osprey is a vertical axis turbine mounted to the bottom of a 30 aluminium catamaran test rig float Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 57:37.3 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Osprey&oldid=681630" Category: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link

347

Role of tip clearance flow on axial compressor stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An examination of the fluid dynamic phenomena that link tip clearance flow to the formation of short length-scale (spike) rotating stall disturbances has been carried out. It is found that the onset of growth in tip clearance ...

Vo, Huu Duc, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Final report on PCRV thermal cylinder axial tendon failures  

SciTech Connect

The post-test examination of the failed tendons from the PCRV thermal cylinder experiment has been concluded. Failures in the wires are attributed to stress-corrosion cracking. The cause of tendon failures has not been unequivocably established, but they may have been due to nitrates in the duct. The wires employed in the manufacture of the tendons will crack in less than 72 hr in a 0.2 M solution of ammonium nitrate at 70$sup 0$C. The quality of the wires is poor, and surface cracks were detected. These could have acted as concentrating sites for both stress and the deleterious contaminants. It is believed that the factors that led to the failures in the thermal cylinder experiment were unique. An improper formulation of the epoxy resin did not provide the tendon anchor plate seal that was desired; indeed, the improper formulation is responsible for the high level of nitrogen in the ducts of the failed tendons. (auth)

Canonico, D.A.; Griess, J.C.; Robinson, G.C.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Coanda injection system for axially staged low emission combustors  

SciTech Connect

The low emission combustor includes a combustor housing defining a combustion chamber having a plurality of combustion zones. A liner sleeve is disposed in the combustion housing with a gap formed between the liner sleeve and the combustor housing. A secondary nozzle is disposed along a centerline of the combustion chamber and configured to inject a first fluid comprising air, at least one diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to a downstream side of a first combustion zone among the plurality of combustion zones. A plurality of primary fuel nozzles is disposed proximate to an upstream side of the combustion chamber and located around the secondary nozzle and configured to inject a second fluid comprising air and fuel to an upstream side of the first combustion zone. The combustor also includes a plurality of tertiary coanda nozzles. Each tertiary coanda nozzle is coupled to a respective dilution hole. The tertiary coanda nozzles are configured to inject a third fluid comprising air, at least one other diluent, fuel, or combinations thereof to one or more remaining combustion zones among the plurality of combustion zones.

Evulet, Andrei Tristan (Clifton Park, NY); Varatharajan, Balachandar (Cincinnati, OH); Kraemer, Gilbert Otto (Greer, SC); ElKady, Ahmed Mostafa (Niskayuna, NY); Lacy, Benjamin Paul (Greer, SC)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices exhibit a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

Sorin, Fabien

351

Resolving optical illumination distributions along an axially symmetric photodetecting fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photodetecting fibers of arbitrary length with internal metal, semiconductor and insulator domains have recently been demonstrated. These semiconductor devices display a continuous translational symmetry which presents ...

Lestoquoy, Guillaume

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

An analytically solvable, axially non-homogeneous reactor model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approximation has been investigated numerically (Yasinski and Henry, 1965; Ott and Meneley, 1969; Bell and Glasstone,1970) and analytically in 1-D noise problems (KosaÃ? ly et al., 1977). The general conclusion

Pázsit, Imre

353

Deformation Behavior of Steel Alloys under Combined Axial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Using hollow cylinder samples with suitable geometry obtained from round bar stock and flat dog-bone samples from sheets, the deformation ...

354

Active control of tip clearance flow in axial compressors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of compressor tip clearance flows is explored in a linear cascade using three types of fluidic actuators; Normal Synthetic Jet (NSJ; unsteady jet normal to the mean flow with zero net mass flux), Directed Synthetic ...

Bae, Jinwoo W

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Measurements of Axial Pressures in Tornado-like Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a series of measurements of centerline pressure deficit in tornado-like vortices are described. These measurements were undertaken for the purpose of determining 1) how the magnitude of the central pressure deficit in a columnar ...

Christopher R. Church; John T. Snow

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The axial behaviour of piled foundations in liquefiable soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, John, Mark, Kristian for making the experimental “bits” I needed, drilling holes everywhere, “questioning the wisdom” of some designs and finally flying 12 (mostly) successful missions on the centrifuge, Alistair and his team for making a pile group... 4.4.3 Implications for modelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 4.4.4 Effect of bearing layer hydraulic conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . 96 4.4.5 Effect of pore fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 4...

Stringer, Mark

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Hydro-FAST Axial Flow Simulation Code Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

strategy Summary of work to date * HydroTurbSim (turbulence) * MAP (mooring) * HydroFAST (hydro-servo-elastic) Path forward Aquantis Verdant NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY...

358

Denial-of-Service Attacks on Battery-powered Mobile Computers Thomas Martin, Michael Hsiao, Dong Ha, Jayan Krishnaswami  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inoperable by draining the battery more quickly than it would be under normal usage. In a typical mobile be applicable if the encryption algorithms and protocols are evaluated for their energy usage Research in low design is typically assumed to be to lower the energy per operation of the device, which is a measure

Ha, Dong S.

359

Evolution of the Subtropical Marine Boundary Layer: Comparison of Soundings over the Eastern Pacific from FIRE and HaRP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean time rates of change of temperature, total water mixing ratio and ozone along airflow trajectories in the lower troposphere over the eastern Pacific are inferred by comparing aircraft soundings from the First ISCCP Regional Experiment (...

I. R. Paluch; D. H. Lenschow; S. Siems; G. L. Kok; R. D. Schillawski; S. McKeen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

HA R V A R D UN I V E R S I T Y UNIVERSITY OPERATIONS SERVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to announce the installation of several new solar powered Pay & Display Multi-Space Parking Meters. Two for Sustainability", the meters are solar powered. Please forward any question to parking@harvard.edu or call 617 Services "PAY & DISPLAY" Multi-Space Parking Meter Technology Initiative Transportation Services is pleased

Needleman, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Designing and prepositioning humanitarian assistance pack-up kits (HA PUKs) to support Pacific fleet emergency relief operations .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The 2006 Quadrennial Defense Review has emphasized the role of humanitarian assistance missions in winning the Global War on Terror. U.S. Pacific Fleet operates in… (more)

McCall, Valerie M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Tipos de becas Se ha convocado, para el curso acadmico 2011/12, un concurso por oposicin para la adjudicacin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Via Balbi, 5 ­ 16126 GENOVA- Italia, antes de la última e improrrogable fecha del 30/6/2011. En la

Genova, Università degli Studi di

363

The ,:.,ubrnitted <.nu:.cript ha; ~~~red by a contractor of the U. S. Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a "hockey stick" shaped copper absorber blade. The first photon shutter serves as the traditional shutter shutter is used exclusively by the experimenters and, as such, is very frequently actuated. The hockey

Kemner, Ken

364

Maryland | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit (Personal) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid...

365

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tax Credit (Corporate) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid...

366

Interproject Service AB | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interproject Service AB Jump to: navigation, search Name Interproject Service AB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.ips-ab.com Region Sweden LinkedIn Connections...

367

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

368

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Personal)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass...

369

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Subject: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Technology: Finding the Path to Commercialization By: Jacques Beaudry-Losique, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Renewable Energy

370

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02042013...

371

Wave Dragon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overtopping Wave Devices Wave Dragon ApSLtd HWETTEI - Workshop October 26-28, 2005, Washington, DC Hydrokinetic Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop the Wave...

372

Alison Labonte | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alison Labonte About Us Alison Labonte - Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Manager Most Recent Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22...

373

Green Energy Industries Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Industries Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Energy Industries Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.gecorpusa.co Region United States...

374

Green Cat Renewables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Cat Renewables Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Cat Renewables Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greencatrene Region Scotland LinkedIn...

375

Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Wave Energy Corp GWEC Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:greenwaveenergyc Region United States...

376

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

377

Green Heat Solutions Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Solutions Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Heat Solutions Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenheating Region Scotland LinkedIn...

378

CFC Photo Gallery | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Energy 101: Concentrating Solar Power Science Lecture: Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela Energy 101: Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Energy 101:...

379

Renewable Portfolio Standard (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or waste from agricultural crops, food or vegetative material, energy crops, algae, biogas, liquid biofuels;** marine or hydrokinetic energy; and geothermal energy....

380

Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydraulic Generators Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Address 14 Thislesboon Drive Place Mumbles Zip SA3 4HY Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

382

CX-000900: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-000900: Categorical Exclusion Determination An Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Cost for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power in the...

383

Solar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources....

384

Microsoft PowerPoint - Sale at SWPA workshop June-09 v3mjs.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to reestablish a water power program: - EPAct 2005 addressed both conventional hydro (CH) plus marine and hydrokinetic technologies (MHK) - EISA 2007 emphasizing MHK * 10...

385

Marine Hydroelectric Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marine Hydroelectric Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Marine Hydroelectric Company Address 24040 Camino Del Avion A 107 Place Monarch Beach Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic...

386

Offshore Islands Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Islands Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Offshore Islands Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.offshoreisla Region United States LinkedIn Connections...

387

Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrastructure Associates Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Offshore Infrastructure Associates Inc Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.offinf.com Region...

388

Uppsala University Division for Electricity | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Division for Electricity Jump to: navigation, search Name Uppsala University Division for Electricity Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.el.angstrom.uu.sef Region...

389

Norwegian University of Science and Technology CONWEC AS | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Norwegian University of Science and Technology CONWEC AS Address Department of Physics Realfagbygget Place Trondheim Zip N-7491 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website...

390

RECIPIENT:Dehlsen Associates STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STATE: CA PROJECT TITLE: Marine & Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device Funding Opportunity Announcement...

391

Category:Sectors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biomass Buildings C Carbon E Efficiency G Geothermal energy H Hydro Hydrogen M Marine and Hydrokinetic O Ocean R Renewable Energy S Services Solar V Vehicles W...

392

Atlantisstrom | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Atlantisstrom Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.atlantisstro Region Germany LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

393

Modeling options for Current Energy Convertor Systems and Associated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Associated Challenges Marine and Hydrokinetic Instrumentation, Measurement & Computer Modeling Workshop Allie Cribbs Ocean Engineer Ecomerit Technologies, LLC July 10 th ,...

394

Congeneration Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Congeneration Technologies Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.cogeneration.net Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

395

Teamwork Technology See Tocardo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Jump to: navigation, search Name Teamwork Technology See Tocardo Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.tocardo.com Region...

396

Chevron Technology Ventures LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Chevron Technology Ventures LLC Address 3901 Briarpark Drive Place Houston Zip 77042 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic...

397

Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New hydrokinetic energy technologies that generate electricity by harnessing the energy from ocean waves, tides, and river currents are advancing toward commercial ...

398

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005561: Categorical Exclusion Determination Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Support for Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Projects CX(s)...

399

Slide 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable 3. Near-isothermal 4. Liquid Air Energy Storage 5. Transportable CAES 6. Underwater CAES 7. Other: Adsorption Enhanced 8. Other: Hydrokinetic 9. Other: Vehicle...

400

Wavebob | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Wavebob Address H3 Maynooth Business Campus Place Maynooth Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +353 (0)1 651 0177 Website http:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Maryland | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic,...

402

Pelagic Power AS | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Pelagic Power AS Address LIV bygget Place Vanvikan Zip N-7125 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.pelagicpower.com Region Norway...

403

Aquaphile sarl Hydro Gen | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquaphile sarl Hydro Gen Jump to: navigation, search Name Aquaphile sarl Hydro Gen Address 210 Le Vrennic Place Landda Zip 29870 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number...

404

FEMP Renewable Energy Project Assistance Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

considered (select all that apply) Solar PV Solar (other) Wind Biomass Incremental Hydro Hydrokinetic Ocean Geothermal Waste-to-energy Other: ...

405

Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinates Region ABS Alaskan Inc Van Horn Rd Fairbanks Alaska Gateway Solar Wind energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Solar PV Solar thermal Wind Hydro Small scale wind turbine...

406

HYDROMATRIX? Product Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential and Known Environmental Concerns Low Impact Hydro at Existing Structures Presentation at Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues...

407

User:GregZiebold/Sector test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

types for Companies: Bioenergy Biofuels Biomass Buildings Carbon Efficiency Geothermal energy Hydro Hydrogen Marine and Hydrokinetic Ocean Renewable Energy Services Vehicles...

408

HYDROMATRIX? Product Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2005 VA TECH HYDRO Presentation at Hydrokinetic and Wave Energy Technologies Technical and Environmental Issues Workshop October 26-28, 2005 Alexander Bihlmayer Innovative...

409

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Jump to: navigation, search Name Voith Hydro Wavegen Limited Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wavegen.co.uk Region United Kingdom...

410

Effects of Tidal Turbine Noise on Fish Task 2.1.3.2: Effects on Aquatic Organisms: Acoustics/Noise - Fiscal Year 2011 - Progress Report - Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally spawning stocks of Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) that utilize Puget Sound are listed as threatened (http://www.nwr.noaa.gov/ESA-Salmon-Listings/Salmon-Populations/ Chinook/CKPUG.cfm). Plans exist for prototype tidal turbines to be deployed into their habitat. Noise is known to affect fish in many ways, such as causing a threshold shift in auditory sensitivity or tissue damage. The characteristics of noise, its spectra and level, are important factors that influence the potential for the noise to injure fish. For example, the frequency range of the tidal turbine noise includes the audiogram (frequency range of hearing) of most fish. This study (Effects on Aquatic Organisms, Subtask 2.1.3.2: Acoustics) was performed during FY 2011 to determine if noise generated by a 6-m-diameter open-hydro turbine might affect juvenile Chinook salmon hearing or cause barotrauma. After they were exposed to simulated tidal turbine noise, the hearing of juvenile Chinook salmon was measured and necropsies performed to check for tissue damage. Experimental groups were (1) noise exposed, (2) control (the same handling as treatment fish but without exposure to tidal turbine noise), and (3) baseline (never handled). Preliminary results indicate that low levels of tissue damage may have occurred but that there were no effects of noise exposure on the auditory systems of the test fish.

Halvorsen, Michele B.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Copping, Andrea E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Review of Recent Literature Relevant to the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Devices; Task 2.1.3: Effects on Aquatic Organisms - Fiscal Year 2012 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

A literature search was conducted by using the Web of Science® databases component of the ISI Web of KnowledgeSM to identify recent articles that would be useful to help assess the potential environmental effects of renewable energy development in the ocean, with emphasis on seabirds and fish. Several relatively recent general review articles that included possible effects on seabirds and fish were examined to begin the search process. From these articles, several general topics of potential environmental effects on seabirds and fish were derived. These topics were used as the primary search factors. Additional sources were identified by cross-checking the Web of Science databases for articles that cited the review articles. It also became clear that the potential effects frequently w

Kropp, Roy K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

NOTICE OF DECISION BY THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION To: California Resources Agency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 2012 Regular Session has requested LADOTD to study the effects of hydrokinetic turbines as hydrokinetic power, through the installation of turbines on riverbeds, bridge piers, or beneath barges there are about 82 permits to install such turbines in different locations in the United States with 43 of those

413

UEK Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UEK Corporation UEK Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name UEK Corporation Place Annapolis, Maryland Zip 21403 Sector Hydro, Ocean Product Annapolis-based developer & manufacturer of hydro-kinetic turbines to harness river, tidal and ocean currents. References UEK Corporation[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Chitokoloki Project Coal Creek Project Half Moon Cove Tidal Project Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project Luangwa Zambia Project Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration Old River Outflow Channel Project Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project

414

Name Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number Address Place Zip Sector Product Stock Symbol Year founded Number of employees Number of employees Telephone number Website Coordinates Region ABS Alaskan Inc Van Horn Rd Fairbanks Alaska Gateway Solar Wind energy Marine and Hydrokinetic Solar PV Solar thermal Wind Hydro Small scale wind turbine up to kW and solar systems distributor http www absak com United States AER NY Kinetics LLC PO Box Entrance Avenue Ogdensburg Marine and Hydrokinetic United States AW Energy Lars Sonckin kaari Espoo FI Marine and Hydrokinetic http www aw energy com Finland AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Redshank House Alness Point Business Park Alness Ross shire IV17 UP Marine and Hydrokinetic http www awsocean com United Kingdom Able Technologies Audubon Road Englewood Marine and Hydrokinetic http

415

MHK Technologies/THOR Ocean Current Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

THOR Ocean Current Turbine THOR Ocean Current Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage THOR Ocean Current Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The THOR ocean current turbine ROCT is a tethered fully submersible hydrokinetic device with a single horizontal axis rotor that operates at constant speed by varying the depth of operation using a patented power feedback control technology Rotor diameters can reach 60 meters for a 2 0MW class turbine and operations can be conducted as deep as 250 meters Arrays of THOR s ROCTs can be located in outer continental shelf areas 15 to 100 miles offshore in well established ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream or the Kuroshio and deliver electrical power to onshore load centers via submarine transmission line

416

MHK Technologies/HyPEG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HyPEG HyPEG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage HyPEG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydrokinetic Laboratory Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Their Hydro kinetically Powered Electrical Generators HyPEGs converts the unimpeded flow and the massive current of large deep rivers and ocean currents into useful electrical power on a large scale 4 to 8MW each This innovative system design approach is viable because of the unique power head cup design and location in which the unit is placed Unlike conventional turbine type or propeller type current generators being tested today HyPEGs can operate in fairly shallow rivers since they rotate in the horizontal plane rather than the vertical Turbine propeller type generators can only operate in water that is sufficiently deep that it is not a hazard to navigation worse they are greatly limited in power output due to a limited sized power head Once a suitable location is found a HyPEG can be made in any diameter and are limited only by their side to side clearance Additionally they need far less support structure than vertical generators

417

Fabrication and Characterization of Axially Doped Silicon Nanowire Tunnel Field-Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aaron L. Vallett, Sharis Minassian, Phil Kaszuba,§ Suman Datta, Joan M. Redwing,, and Theresa S. Mayer

Yener, Aylin

418

Shape Phase Transition of the Axially Symmetric States Between the U(5) and SU(3) Symmetries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shape phase structure and its transition of the nucleus in the transitional region between the U(5) and SU(3) symmetries is restudied within the framework of coherent-state theory with angular momentum projection in IBM-1. The certain angular momentum (or rotation-driven) effect on the nuclear shape is discussed. A coexistence of prolate and oblate shapes is found for the ground states of the transitional nuclei. A phase diagram in terms of the deformation parameter and angular momentum is given.

Liang-zhu Mu; Yu-xin Liu

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Torques and the Related Meridional and Vertical Fluxes of Axial Angular Momentum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The budget equation of the zonally averaged angular momentum is analyzed by introducing belts of 1000-km width to cover the meridional plane from pole to pole up to an altitude of 28 km. Using ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA) data the fluxes of angular ...

Joseph Egger; Klaus-Peter Hoinka

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Electric cartridge-type heater for producing a given non-uniform axial power distribution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electric cartridge heater is provided to simulate a reactor fuel element for use in safety and thermal-hydraulic tests of model nuclear reactor systems. The electric heat-generating element of the cartridge heater consists of a specifically shaped strip of metal cut with variable width from a flat sheet of the element material. When spirally wrapped around a mandrel, the strip produces a coiled element of the desired length and diameter. The coiled element is particularly characterized by an electrical resistance that varies along its length due to variations in strip width. Thus, the cartridge heater is constructed such that it will produce a more realistic simulation of the actual nonuniform (approximately ''chopped'' cosine) power distribution of a reactor fuel element.

Clark, D.L.; Kress, T.S.

1975-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DETERMINATION OF THE AXIAL-VECTOR FORM FACTOR IN THE RADIATIVE DECAY OF THE PION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a l l o f the Pb-glass blocks were adjusted t o beThe blocks were 6 inch cubes of Bourns PEMG2 lead-glass w iglass counter. The t o t a l pulse height from a l l the blocks

Ortendahl, D.A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Blade tip clearance effect on the performance and flow field of a three stage axial turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of a 1.5 % blade tip clearance on a rotating three stage turbine under different operating points was investigated using radially and circumferentially traversed five hole pressure probes. The probes were used to obtain flow field total and static pressures, absolute and relative velocities and angles, as well as calculate the blade span distribution of total pressure loss coefficient. Total temperature thermocouple probes were traversed radially and circumferentially to obtain temperature profiles under running conditions. Results showed high discrepancies especially in the blade tip region which is due to high circulation flows occurring at the tip that produce an out of probe calibration range type flow. Engine efficiency and massflow rate was also measured using a venturi flow meter in order to discern the effect the blade tip clearance has on the engine efficiency and performance. Results have shown that the blade tip clearance losses appear to play a smaller role when compared to other losses such as exit losses. This was because the engine efficiency was slightly affected when run using a blade tip clearance.

Abdel-Fattah, Sharef Aly

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Comparison of heavy charged particles and x-rays for axial tomograpic scanning  

SciTech Connect

Heavy charged particles are applicable to the problem of 3- dimensional reconstruction of electron density distributions of biological samples. The transverse uncertainty in the path of a heavy charged particle due to multiple scattering can be reduced by measuring the entrance and exit positions and angles of the particle. Patient doses for He ions and 80 keV x rays are compared under conditions suitable for imaging the human head. (auth)

Huesman, R.H.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Solmitz, F.T.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

MIT extraction method for measuring average subchannel axial velocities in reactor assemblies  

SciTech Connect

The MIT extraction method for obtaining flow split data for individual subchannels is described in detail. An analysis of the method is presented which shows that isokinetic values of the subchannel flow rates are obtained directly even though the method is non-isokinetic. Time saving methods are discussed for obtaining the average value of the interior region flow split parameter. An analysis of the method at low bundle flow rates indicates that there is no inherent low flow rate limitation on the method and suggests a way to obtain laminar flow split data.

Hawley, J.T.; Chiu, C.; Todreas, N.E.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Design of low speed axial flux permanent magnet generators for marine current application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Thesis (M.Eng. – Memorial University of Newfoundland, 2010. Engineering and Applied Science The aim of this research work is to design, built and test low speed… (more)

Moury, Sanjida, 1983-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Neutron Diffraction Studies of the Tri-axial Stress Distribution in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Here neutron diffraction strain scanning, originally developed for residual stress measurements, is applied to the stress distribution in granular materials under a ...

427

BREAKING OF AXIAL AND REFLECTION SYMMETRIES IN SPONTANEOUS FISSION OF FERMIUM ISOTOPES  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear fission phenomenon is a magnificent example of a quantal collective motion during which the nucleus evolves in a multidimensional space representing shapes with different geometries. The triaxial degrees of freedom are usually important around the inner fission barrier, and reduce the fission barrier height by several MeV. Beyond the inner barrier, reflection-asymmetric shapes corresponding to asymmetric elongated fragments come into play. We discuss the interplay between different symmetry breaking mechanisms in the case of even-even fermium isotopes using the Skyrme HFB formalism.

Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University; Nazarewicz, Witold [ORNL; Baran, Andrzej K [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Modeling of FRP-jacketed RC columns subject to combined axial and lateral loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prisms Strengthened Using Carbon Fiber Reinforced PolymerStrengthening Effects with Carbon Fiber Sheet for ConcreteColumns with Continuous Carbon Fiber Jackets: Volume II,

Lee, Chung-Sheng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Design of an axial turbine and thermodynamic analysis and testing of a K03 turbocharger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel humidification dehumidification desalination system was developed at the Rohseneow Kendall Heat Transfer Laboratory. The HDH system runs by having different pressures in the humidifier and dehumidifier. One of the ...

Perez Zuñiga, Yoshio Samaizu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

On the axial dispersion induced by vibrations of a exible D. Brodaya,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dispersion of drugs in conduits of the cow's milk system is similar to gas dispersion in airways. Antibiotics that dispersion due to streaming eects in gas-®lled ¯exible tubes which vibrate in a long wave-length radial mode of enhancing dispersion in gas-®lled elastic tubes due to ¯ow induced by vibrations of the tube-walls. We

431

Speed and Temperature Effects in the Energy Absorption of Axially Crushed Composite Tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Time-Temperature Superposition 237 8.3.1 Thermally Activated Processes 237 8.3.2 Application to Tube Crushing 238 8.4 Crush Mode 241 8.4.1 Crush Zone Micrographs 241 8.4.2 Frond:Buckling Transition 254 8.4.3 Speed Sensitivity of the Crush Mode 256 8... -copy note i Abstract ii Contents v Symbols viii Superscript x Subscripts x Brackets xi Acknowledgements xii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Impact Energy Absorption 1 1.2 Current Methods 2 1.3 Composite Materials 2 1.4 Calculation of Specific Energy Absorption 3 2...

Fontana, Quentin, P V

1990-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

432

Error Sensor Placement for Active Control of an Axial Cooling Fan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent experimental achievements in active noise control (ANC) for cooling fans have used near-field error sensors whose locations are determined according to a theoretical condition… (more)

Shafer, Benjamin M 1979-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Reference (Axially Graded) Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Design for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the past five years, staff at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have studied the issue of whether the HFIR could be converted to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel without degrading the performance of the reactor. Using state-of-the-art reactor physics methods and behind-the-state-of-the-art thermal hydraulics methods, the staff have developed fuel plate designs (HFIR uses two types of fuel plates) that are believed to meet physics and thermal hydraulic criteria provided the reactor power is increased from 85 to 100 MW. The paper will present a defense of the results by explaining the design and validation process. A discussion of the requirements for showing applicability of analyses to approval for loading the fuel to HFIR lead test core irradiation currently scheduled for 2016 will be provided. Finally, the potential benefits of upgrading thermal hydraulics methods will be discussed.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

deformation behaviour of az80 subject to multi-axial tensile loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 20, 2012 ... If the price of this product displays as $0.00 for your customer category, you may download it for free. You must, however, add it to your cart and ...

435

Quasi-static and Time-dependent Axial and Shear Response of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Wood-plastic Composites (WPCs) have been hailed as an environmentally friendly alternative to Wood-plastic Composites (WPCs) have been ...

436

Modeling of FRP-jacketed RC columns subject to combined axial and lateral loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Structural Engineering , ASCE, Vol. 114, No. 8, Decemberof the Murrah Building, ” ASCE , Journal of Performance ofComposites for Construction , ASCE , Vol. 3, No. 3, August

Lee, Chung-Sheng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

Gibby, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Lawrence, Leo A. (Kennewick, WA); Woodley, Robert E. (Richland, WA); Wilson, Charles N. (Richland, WA); Weber, Edward T. (Kennewick, WA); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Preliminary design of axial flow hydrocarbon turbine/generator set for geothermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report outlines the design of a 65 MW (e) gross turbine generator set in which a hydrocarbon gas mixture is used as the motive fluid. The turbine generator set is part of a geothermal binary cycle electric power plant proposed for the Heber site in the Imperial Valley, California. Aerodynamic design considerations and estimated unit performance for three hydrocarbon gas mixtures are presented. Real gas properties and equations of state are reviewed as they affect the turbine design and the thermodynamic cycle. The mechanical designs for the casing, rotor dynamics, shaft sealing and unit construction are detailed. Support systems such as the lube and seal supply system, turbine controls, etc., are reviewed. An extensive hydrocarbon turbine general specification is also included.

Barnes, B.; Samurin, N.A.; Shields, J.R.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

FF3, Growth and Applications of Silicon/Germanium Axial Nanowire ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

L6, PECVD-SiN, Si or Si/Al2O3-Capped ED-Mode AlN/GaN Inverters · Hide details for [

440

Laboratory Measurements of Axial Pressures in Two-Celled Tornado-like Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study of two-celled vortex flows was conducted in a Ward-type tornado vortex chamber (TVC). Time-averaged, stream-static pressure measurements on the vortex axis and observations of the visualized flow in two-celled vortices are ...

Randal L. Pauley

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EBQ CODE TRANSPORT OF SPACE-CHARGE BEAMS IN AXIALLY SYMMETRIC DEVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R E S T MASS I N ELECTRON VOLTS 0.511E6 CONST VOLTS * 3 5 8 6 * SCALE 4 X 1 Sequation and has units of volts/cm . This is related to the

Paul, A.C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling and Simulation of Hot Radial-axial Ring Rolling Process ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Advances in Hydroelectric Turbine Manufacturing and Repair. Presentation ...

443

Effects of Terrain Heights and Sizes on Island-Scale Circulations and Rainfall for the Island of Hawaii during HaRP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Islands in Hawaii have different sizes and terrain heights with notable differences in climate and weather. In this study, the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) land surface model (LSM) is used to conduct ...

Yang Yang; Yi-Leng Chen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

(c) 2008-2011. Minh Ha-Duong. Rodica Loisel. CIRED Reproduction allowed. share alike. attribution. Blue cells: Numerical assumptions defining the scenario  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

infrastructure such as injection wells and gathering systems, enabling more accurate assessment of CO2 storage MOUNTAINS PERMIAN BASIN JAF2010_031.XLS Source: Advanced Resources Int'l., based on Oil and Gas Journal

445

ow Jane E. Luckhardt 621 Capitol Moll, 18'" Floor iIuck ha ,dtlg1downey bro nd.com Sacramento, CA 95814  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) are working on future standards. Turbine Sound Power Measurement-scale wind turbine sound power levels is the International Electrotechnical Commission IEC 61400-11 StandardWind Turbine Acoustic Noise A white paper Prepared by the Renewable Energy Research Laboratory

446

RE SONANT PHO NON -A 8 8 IS TE D 6E NE HA TION. . . not observed, presumably because either the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,2' in the rotational position of the crystal. This separation agrees closely with the expected separation of & p of Vacancies and Rare-Gas Crystal Mixtures H. R. Glyde Chalk Riser +unclear «boratories, ~topi@ Energy of Canada Iimited, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada (Received 21 December 1970) The Gibbs-Bogolyubov variational

Glyde, Henry R.

447

bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3diamine]manganese(II) (1/2/1) In-Chul Hwang a and Kwang Ha b *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R factor = 0.045; wR factor = 0.116; data-to-parameter ratio = 16.6. There are three different Mn II complexes in the asymmetric unit of the title compound, [Mn(C15H16N4)(H2O)2]Br2-2{[MnBr(C15H16N4)(H2O)]Br} [MnBr2(C15H16N4)]. In the neutral complex, the Mn 2+ ion is six-coordinated in a distorted octahedral environment by four N atoms of the tetradentate ligand N,N0-bis(2-pyridylmethylene)propane-1,3-diamine (bppd) and two bromide ligands. In the two cationic complexes, the Mn 2+ ions are also six-coordinated in similar environments, but one Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd, one Br atom and one O atom of a coordinating water molecule, whereas the other Mn ion is coordinated by four N atoms of bppd and two O atoms of water ligands. The complexes with two coordinated Br atoms or two H2O ligands are disposed about a twofold axis through Mn and C atoms with the special positions ( 1 1 2, y, 0) and (0, y,

Monoclinic C

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

12-3-09_Beaudry-Losique_Final_testimony.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

JACQUES BEAUDRY-LOSIQUE DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE OF ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND RENEWABLE ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY SUBCOMMITTEE ON ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HEARING EXAMINING MARINE AND HYDROKINETIC ENERGY TECHNOLOGY: FINDING THE PATH TO COMMERCIALIZATION DECEMBER 3, 2009 Chairman Baird, Ranking Member Inglis, Members of the Committee, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program and its activities related to marine and hydrokinetic energy generation technologies. The global marine and hydrokinetic industry consists of energy extraction technologies

449

Assessment of Tidal Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Development of MHK Module and Analysis of Effects on Hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

In this report we describe (1) the development, test, and validation of the marine hydrokinetic energy scheme in a three-dimensional coastal ocean model (FVCOM); and (2) the sensitivity analysis of effects of marine hydrokinetic energy configurations on power extraction and volume flux in a coastal bay. Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics and Subtask 2.1.2.3, Screening Analysis, for fiscal year 2011 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

MHK Technologies/Underwater Electric Kite Turbines | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Underwater Electric Kite Turbines Underwater Electric Kite Turbines < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Underwater Electric Kite Turbines.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization UEK Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II *MHK Projects/Chitokoloki Project *MHK Projects/Coal Creek Project *MHK Projects/Half Moon Cove Tidal Project *MHK Projects/Indian River Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/Luangwa Zambia Project *MHK Projects/Minas Basin Bay of Fundy Commercial Scale Demonstration *MHK Projects/Passamaquoddy Tribe Hydrokinetic Project *MHK Projects/Piscataqua Tidal Hydrokinetic Energy Project *MHK Projects/UEK Yukon River Project Technology Resource

451

E3Tec service LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

E3Tec service LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name E3Tec service LLC Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.crrc.unh.edu Region United States LinkedIn Connections...

452

Motor Wave Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Motor Wave Group Place Hong Kong Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.motorwavegroup.com Region China LinkedIn Connections...

453

Brandl Motor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Motor Jump to: navigation, search Name Brandl Motor Address Calvinstr 24 Place Berlin Zip 10557 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +49 30 39 48 06 38 Website http:http:...

454

Poseidon Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology...

455

Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company LLC Address 505 Fifth Ave 800 Place Des Moines Zip 50309-2426 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2011 Phone number (515) 246-1500 Region United States...

456

Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.owwe.net Region Norway LinkedIn Connections...

457

Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Ltd Address 3 Casement Square Place Cobh Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 00353-21-4816779 Website http:www.oceanenergy.ie Region Ireland LinkedIn...

458

Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.ocees.com Region United States LinkedIn...

459

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

460

Aquantis Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquantis Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Aquantis Inc Address 6340 Via Real Suite 8 Place Carpinteria Zip 93013 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 805.679.3072...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy System Development of the Aquantis 2.5 Megawatt Ocean-Current Electricity Generation Device CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6...

462

Free Flow 69 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name Free Flow 69 Address Unit 9 Windmill Ind Est Windmill Place Fowey Zip PL23 1HB Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 01726 833337 Website...

463

Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Turbine Jump to: navigation, search Name Water Wall Turbine Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.wwturbine.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase...

464

Wind Waves and Sun | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waves and Sun Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Waves and Sun Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.windwavesandsun.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections...

465

CX-009160: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network for Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy Projects CX(s) Applied: B3.3 Date: 09/24/2012 Location(s): Maine Offices(s): Golden Field Office

466

Daedalus Informatics Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Hydrokinetic Phone number +30 210 9643 355 Website http:www.daedalus.gr Region Greece LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This...

467

Wave Energy Centre | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name Wave Energy Centre Address Wave Energy Centre Av Manuela da Maia 36 R C Dto Place Lisboa Zip 1000-201 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number (+351) 21...

468

FRI EL Sea Power S r l | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EL Sea Power S r l Jump to: navigation, search Name FRI EL Sea Power S r l Address Piazza del Grano 3 Place Bolzano Zip 39100 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +39 0471...

469

Renewable Energy Research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Energy Research Address 2113 C Boulevard St Regis Place Dollard des Ormeaux Zip H9B 2M9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year...

470

Sea for Life | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Life Jump to: navigation, search Name Sea for Life Address Travessa da Paraventa Place n 1 Gaeiras Zip 2510 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2007 Phone number (+ 351)...

471

Carmelo Vell n | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carmelo Vell n Jump to: navigation, search Name Carmelo Vell n Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Region Spain LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one...

472

Kinetic Wave Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kinetic Wave Power Jump to: navigation, search Name Kinetic Wave Power Address 2861 N Tupelo St Place Midland Zip 48642 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 989-839-9757...

473

CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Determination CX-010572: Categorical Exclusion Determination Brown University - Marine Hydro-Kinetic Energy Harvesting Using Cyber-Physical Systems CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 02...

474

Wave Energy Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Wave Energy Technologies Inc Address 270 Sandy Cove Rd Place Ketch Harbour Zip B3V 1K9 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:...

475

Estudo do desempenho de um compressor axial de vários estágios com injeção de água na sua entrada.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A simulação numérica de compressores axiais é de fundamental importância tanto na fase de projeto quanto na de desenvolvimento do compressor. A simulação numérica é… (more)

Luciano Porto Bontempo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Post-Irradiation Examination of a Failed GE12 Fuel Rod with a Long Axial Split from Forsmark 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) is co-sponsoring research with Vattenfall to perform post-irradiation examination (PIE) research, initiated and supported by Vattenfall, and making the results available to all FRP members.This particular study looks at a GE12 fuel rod that operated in Forsmark 1 for five annual cycles. During the fifth cycle (Cycle 21), an indication of fuel rod failure was observed by increased off-gas activity. ...

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

477

Use of additional fission sources or scattering sources to model inward axial leakages in fast-reactor analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When calculations of flux are done in less than three dimensions, bucklings are normally used to model leakages (flows) in the dimensions for which the flux is not calculated. If the net leakage for a given energy group is outward (positive), the buckling is positive, and buckling methods work well. However, if the new leakage for a given energy group is inward (negative), the buckling is negative and can lead to numerical instabilities (oscillations in the iterative flux calculation). This report discusses two equivalent nonbuckling methods to model inward leakages. One method (the chi/sub g/ method) models these incoming neutrons by additional fission sources. The other method (the ..sigma../sub s/(1 ..-->.. g) method) models them by increased downscatter sources. The derivation of the two methods is shown, and the flux spectra obtained by their use are compared with those obtained from two-dimensional (RZ) calculations.

Grimm, K.N.; Meneghetti, D.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

An algorithm for transferring 2D arbitrary hp-refined finite element axially symmetric meshes to three dimensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Petroleum Engineering, The University of Texas in Austin (3) Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, ICES, The University of Texas in Austin Abstract The 2D and 3D fully automatic hp adaptive Finite is solved on the coarse and on the fine mesh. The energy norm (H1 Sobolev space norm) difference between

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

479

Numerical and Experimental Analysis of Multi-Stage Axial Turbine Performance at Design and Off-Design Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics or CFD isan importanttool thatis used at various stages in the design of highly complex turbomachinery such as compressorand turbine stages that are used in land and air based power generation units. The ability of CFD to predict the performance characteristics of a specific blade design is challenged by the need to use various turbulence models to simulate turbulent flows as well as transition models to simulate laminar to turbulent transition that can be observed in various turbomachinery designs. Moreover, CFD is based on numerically solving highly complex differential equations, which through the use of a grid to discretize the geometry introduces numerical errors. Allthese factors combine to challenge CFD’s role as a predictor of blade performance. It has been generallyfound that CFD in its current state of the art is best used to compare between various design points and not as a pure predictor of performances. In this study the capability of CFD, and turbulence modeling, in turbomachinery based geometry is assessed.Three different blade designs are tested, that include an advanced two-stage turbine blade design, a three stage 2D or cylindrical design and finally a three stage bowed stator and rotor design. Allcases were experimentally tested at the Texas A&Muniversity Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory (TPFL).In all cases CFD provided good insights into fundamental turbomachinery flow physics, showing the expected improvement from using 2D cylindrical blades to 3D bowed blade designs in abating the secondary flow effects which are dominant loss generators.However, comparing experimentally measured performance results to numerically predicted shows a clear deficiency, where the CFD overpredicts performance when compared to experimentallyobtained data, largely underestimating the various loss mechanisms. In a relative sense, CFD as a tool allows the user to calculate the impact a new feature or change can have on a baseline design. CFD will also provide insight into what are the dominant physics that explain why a change can provide an increase or decrease in performance. Additionally,as part of this study, one of the main factors that affect the performance of modern turbomachinery is transition from laminar to turbulent flow.Transition is an influential phenomena especially in high pressure turbines, and is sensitive to factors such asupstream incidentwake frequency and turbulence intensity.A model experimentally developed, is implemented into a CFD solver and compared to various test results showing greater capability in modeling the effects of reduced frequency on the transition point and transitional flow physics. This model is compared to industry standard models showing favorable prediction performance due to its abilityto account for upstream wake effects which most current model are unable to account for.

Abdelfattah, Sherif Alykadry

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer With Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a new method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field T(x,r,t) is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r = a or r = 0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e., the boundary functions T{sub a}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=a,t) and/or T{sub 0}(x,t) {triple_bond} T(x,r=0,t). In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field T(x,r,t) can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady-state problem using the proposed method.

Zhijie Xu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ha hydrokinetic axial" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

A Reduced-Boundary-Function Method for Convective Heat Transfer with Axial Heat Conduction and Viscous Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a method of solution for the convective heat transfer under forced laminar flow that is confined by two parallel plates with a distance of 2a or by a circular tube with a radius of a. The advection-conduction equation is first mapped onto the boundary. The original problem of solving the unknown field is reduced to seek the solutions of T at the boundary (r=a or r=0, r is the distance from the centerline shown in Fig. 1), i.e. the boundary functions and/or . In this manner, the original problem is significantly simplified by reducing the problem dimensionality from 3 to 2. The unknown field can be eventually solved in terms of these boundary functions. The method is applied to the convective heat transfer with uniform wall temperature boundary condition and with heat exchange between flowing fluids and its surroundings that is relevant to the geothermal applications. Analytical solutions are presented and validated for the steady state problem using the proposed method.