National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for h2 hydrogen hungary

  1. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey This H2FIRST...

  2. Upcoming H2USA Workshop: Hydrogen Fueling Station Component Listings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    H2USA will host an online workshop about hydrogen fueling station component listings on April 22 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This workshop will focus on the need for components for hydrogen fueling stations to be listed by Nationally Recognized Testing Laboratories (NRTLs).

  3. Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) Presentation slides from the February 8,...

  4. H2FIRST: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FCTO directly in support of H2USA, a public-private partnership co-launched by DOE and industry in 2013. H2FIRST Project Objective The H2FIRST objective is to ensure that fuel...

  5. H2 and You: The Hydrogen Education Foundation's Outreach Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Hydrogen Education Foundation's Public Outreach Program Summary Presentation, January 2008. The Foundation aims to build awareness and understanding for Hydrogen....

  6. Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2007-05-15

    This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

  7. Overview of the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST); NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, Marc; Bush, Brian; Penev, Michael

    2015-05-12

    This presentation provides an introduction to the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST) and includes an overview of each of the three versions of H2FAST: the Web tool, the Excel spreadsheet version, and the beta version of the H2FAST Business Case Scenario tool.

  8. Retrieval of global hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) profiles using ENVISAT-MIPAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    Retrieval of global hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) profiles using ENVISAT-MIPAS E. Papandrea,1,2 A2O2. We demonstrate the feasibility of profile retrievals in the range 6­35 km and obtain zonal mean), Retrieval of global hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) profiles using ENVISAT-MIPAS, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L14809

  9. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    published in April 2015, describes the current commercial state of the art in contamination detection and identifies the technical requirements for implementing a hydrogen...

  10. Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Production Workshop held September 24-25, 2013, at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden, Colorado. bioh2workshopmckinlay.pdf More Documents &...

  11. H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An in-depth comparative analysis of promising infrastructure options for hydrogen delivery and distribution to refueling stations from central, semi-central, and distributed...

  12. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development for Hydrogen Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop a low cost, low power, durable, and reliable hydrogen safety sensor for a wide range of vehicle and infrastructure applications; (2) Continually advance test prototypes guided by materials selection, sensor design, electrochemical R&D investigation, fabrication, and rigorous life testing; (3) Disseminate packaged sensor prototypes and control systems to DOE Laboratories and commercial parties interested in testing and fielding advanced prototypes for cross-validation; (4) Evaluate manufacturing approaches for commercialization; and (5) Engage an industrial partner and execute technology transfer. Recent developments in the search for sustainable and renewable energy coupled with the advancements in fuel cell powered vehicles (FCVs) have augmented the demand for hydrogen safety sensors. There are several sensor technologies that have been developed to detect hydrogen, including deployed systems to detect leaks in manned space systems and hydrogen safety sensors for laboratory and industrial usage. Among the several sensing methods electrochemical devices that utilize high temperature-based ceramic electrolytes are largely unaffected by changes in humidity and are more resilient to electrode or electrolyte poisoning. The desired sensing technique should meet a detection threshold of 1% (10,000 ppm) H{sub 2} and response time of {approx_equal}1 min, which is a target for infrastructure and vehicular uses. Further, a review of electrochemical hydrogen sensors by Korotcenkov et.al and the report by Glass et.al suggest the need for inexpensive, low power, and compact sensors with long-term stability, minimal cross-sensitivity, and fast response. This view has been largely validated and supported by the fuel cell and hydrogen infrastructure industries by the NREL/DOE Hydrogen Sensor Workshop held on June 8, 2011. Many of the issues preventing widespread adoption of best-available hydrogen sensing technologies available today outside of cost, derive from excessive false positives and false negatives arising from signal drift and unstable sensor baseline; both of these problems necessitate the need for unacceptable frequent calibration.

  13. H2FIRST: A partnership to advance hydrogen fueling station technology driving an optimal consumer experience.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moen, Christopher D.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Pratt, Joseph William; Balfour, Bruce; Noma, Edwin Yoichi; Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; K. Wipke; J. Kurtz; D. Terlip; K. Harrison; S. Sprik

    2014-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) is establishing the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) partnership, led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). FCTO is establishing this partnership and the associated capabilities in support of H2USA, the public/private partnership launched in 2013. The H2FIRST partnership provides the research and technology acceleration support to enable the widespread deployment of hydrogen infrastructure for the robust fueling of light-duty fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). H2FIRST will focus on improving private-sector economics, safety, availability and reliability, and consumer confidence for hydrogen fueling. This whitepaper outlines the goals, scope, activities associated with the H2FIRST partnership.

  14. Analyzing the Levelized Cost of Centralized and Distributed Hydrogen Production Using the H2A Production Model, Version 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.; Steward, D.; Zuboy, J.

    2009-09-01

    Analysis of the levelized cost of producing hydrogen via different pathways using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's H2A Hydrogen Production Model, Version 2.

  15. Webinar: Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text version and video recording of the webinar titled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project," originally presented on November 18, 2014.

  16. Webinar: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00...

  17. Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein Khalil HusseinH2FAST National Renewable Energy

  18. Hydrogen effects on materials for CNG/H2 blends.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farese, David (Air Products, USA); Keller, Jay O.; Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-09-01

    No concerns for Hydrogen-Enriched Compressed Natural gas (HCNG) in steel storage tanks if material strength is < 950 MPa. Recommend evaluating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in higher strength steels at H{sub 2} partial pressure in blend. Limited fatigue testing on higher strength steel cylinders in H{sub 2} shows promising results. Impurities in Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) (e.g., CO) may provide extrinsic mechanism for mitigating H{sub 2}-assisted fatigue cracking in steel tanks.

  19. H2 Hydrogen Hungary Ltd aka Integral Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERCInformation 3.1 - Amendments to6E -

  20. H2 formation on PAHs in photodissociation regions: a high-temperature pathway to molecular hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschman, Leon; Spaans, Marco; Hoekstra, Ronnie; Schlathölter, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in the Universe. It is thought that a large portion of H2 forms by association of hydrogen atoms to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). We model the influence of PAHs on total H2 formation rates in photodissociation regions (PDRs) and assess the effect of these formation rates on the total cloud structure. We set up a chemical kinetic model at steady state in a PDR environment and included adiative transfer to calculate the chemistry at different depths in the PDR. This model includes known dust grain chemistry for the formation of H2 and a H2 formation mechanism on PAHs. Since H2 formation on PAHs is impeded by thermal barriers, this pathway is only efficient at higher temperatures (T > 200 K). At these temperatures the conventional route of H2 formation via H atoms physisorbed on dust grains is no longer feasible, so the PAH mechanism enlarges the region where H2 formation is possible. We find that PAHs have a significant influence on the structure of PD...

  1. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF HYDROGEN ENERGY STATION CONCEPTS: ARE 'Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are “the concept of the “hydrogen energy station”(H 2 E-Station).

  2. IEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miscellaneous Gasification Processes.................................................... 11 Biomass-0246, Oslo, Norway. Included in this report are references to the thermal gasification of biomassIEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass State of the Art and Research Challenges Thomas A. Milne

  3. A 5-step reduced mechanism for combustion of CO/H2/H2O/CH4/CO2 mixtures with low hydrogen/methane and high H2O content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolaou, Z. M.; Chen, J. Y.; Swaminathan, N.

    2012-10-17

    In this study a 5-step reduced chemical kinetic mechanism involving 9 species is developed for combustion of Blast Furnace Gas (BFG), a multi-component fuel containing CO/H2/CH4/CO2, typically with low hydrogen, methane and high water fractions...

  4. Interested in Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies? Help Shape the H2 Refuel H-Prize Competition

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Find out how you can help improve the H-Prize H2 Refuel competition, which involves designing a small-scale hydrogen refueler system for homes, community centers, or businesses.

  5. Webinar November 18: An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled "An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" on Tuesday, November 18, from 12:00 to 1:00 Eastern Standard Time (EST).

  6. Ground State Calculations of Confined Hydrogen Molecule H_2 Using Variational Monte Carlo Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doma, S B; Amer, A A

    2015-01-01

    The variational Monte Carlo method is used to evaluate the ground-state energy of the confined hydrogen molecule, H_2. Accordingly, we considered the case of hydrogen molecule confined by a hard prolate spheroidal cavity when the nuclear positions are clamped at the foci (on-focus case). Also, the case of off-focus nuclei in which the two nuclei are not clamped to the foci is studied. This case provides flexibility for the treatment of the molecular properties by selecting an arbitrary size and shape of the confining spheroidal box. An accurate trial wave function depending on many variational parameters is used for this purpose. The obtained results are in good agreement with the most recent results.

  7. Distance-dependent radiation chemistry: Oxidation versus hydrogenation of CO in electron-irradiated H2O/CO/H2O ices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Monckton, Rhiannon J.; Koehler, Sven; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2014-11-26

    Electron-stimulated oxidation of CO in layered H2O/CO/H2O ices was investigated with infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) as function of the distance of the CO layer from the water/vacuum interface. The results show that while both oxidation and reduction reactions occur within the irradiated water films, there are distinct regions where either oxidation or reduction reactions are dominant. At depths less than ~ 15 ML, CO oxidation dominates over the sequential hydrogenation of CO to methanol (CH3OH), and CO2 is the major product of CO oxidation, consistent with previous observations. At its highest yield, CO2 accounts for ~45% of all the reacted CO. Another oxidation product is identified as the formate anion (HCO2-). In contrast, for CO buried more than ~ 35 ML below the water/vacuum interface, the CO-to-methanol conversion efficiency is close to 100%. Production of CO2 and formate are not observed for the more deeply buried CO layers, where hydrogenation dominates. Experiments with CO dosed on pre-irradiated ASW samples suggest that OH radicals are primarily responsible for the oxidation reactions. Possible mechanisms of CO oxidation, involving primary and secondary processes of water radiolysis at low temperature, are discussed. The observed distance-dependent radiation chemistry results from the higher mobility of hydrogen atoms that are created by the interaction of the 100 eV electrons with the water films. These hydrogen atoms, which are primarily created at or near the water/vacuum interface, can desorb from or diffuse into the water films, while the less-mobile OH radicals remain in the near-surface zone resulting in preferential oxidation reactions there. The diffusing hydrogen atoms are responsible for the hydrogenation reactions that are dominant for the more deeply buried CO layers.

  8. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    focus is on modeling of hydrogen production and distributionto centralized hydrogen production. One key question thatCalifornia, Davis Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam

  9. Electron-stimulated reactions in layered CO/H2O films: Hydrogen atom diffusion and the sequential hydrogenation of CO to methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Monckton, Rhiannon J.; Koehler, Sven; Kimmel, Gregory A.

    2014-05-28

    Low-energy (100 eV) electron-stimulated reactions in layered H2O/CO/H2O ices are investigated. For CO trapped within approximately 50 ML of the vacuum interface in the amorphous solid water (ASW) films, both oxidation and reduction reactions are observed. However for CO buried more deeply in the film, only the reduction of CO to methanol is observed. Experiments with layered films of H2O and D2O show that the hydrogen atoms participating in the reduction of the buried CO originate in region from ~10 – 40 ML below the surface of the ASW films and subsequently diffuse through the film. For deeply buried CO layers, the CO reduction reactions quickly increase with temperature above ~60 K. We present a simple chemical kinetic model that treats the diffusion of hydrogen atoms in the ASW and sequential hydrogenation of the CO to methanol that accounts for the observations.

  10. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    gasification, coal gasification, natural gas reforming, andgasification and then coal gasification with carbon captureproduction of H2 via coal gasification with CCS C-SMR, C-

  11. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    C/kg H2 for SMR, coal gasification and biomass gasification,SMR, electrolysis and biomass gasification, respectively C-including biomass gasification, coal gasification, natural

  12. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  13. Improved Hydrogen Storage Performance of MgH2-LiAlH4 Composite by Addition of MnFe2O4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Improved Hydrogen Storage Performance of MgH2-LiAlH4 Composite by Addition of MnFe2O4 Qi Wan, Ping storage properties of MgH2-LiAlH4, prepared by ball milling, are studied for the first time. The hydrogen/L) densities are extremely eager for on-board hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles according to the U.S. DOE

  14. H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solar Geothermal Wind Water Transportation Transportation Home Vehicles Bioenergy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells About Us About Us Home News & Blog News & Blog Home News News Home...

  15. Analyzing Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Infrastructure - Optimizing Transitions from Distributed to Centralized H2 Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher; Ogden, Joan M

    2005-01-01

    17. Parker, N. , Using Natural Gas Transmission PipelineANALYZING NATURAL GAS BASED HYDROGEN INFRASTRUCTURE –distribution infrastructure (natural gas and electricity)

  16. Final Technical Report: Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education (H2E3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, Peter A.; Cashman, Eileen; Lipman, Timothy; Engel, Richard A.

    2011-09-15

    Schatz Energy Research Center's Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education curriculum development project delivered hydrogen energy and fuel cell learning experiences to over 1,000 undergraduate engineering students at five California universities, provided follow-on internships for students at a fuel cell company; and developed commercializable hydrogen teaching tools including a fuel cell test station and a fuel cell/electrolyzer experiment kit. Monitoring and evaluation tracked student learning and faculty and student opinions of the curriculum, showing that use of the curriculum did advance student comprehension of hydrogen fundamentals. The project web site (hydrogencurriculum.org) provides more information.

  17. US DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology - Composites in H2 Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PhD Representing: U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office 4 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Overview Mission: Enable widespread commercialization of a portfolio of...

  18. H2 and You: The Hydrogen Education Foundation's Outreach Program (Presentation)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2

  19. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terlip, Danny; Ainscough, Chris; Buttner, William; McWhorter, Scott

    2015-04-20

    The rollout of hydrogen fueling stations, and the fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV) they support, requires the assurance of high quality hydrogen at the dispensing point. Automotive fuel cells are sensitive to a number of chemicals that can be introduced into the dispensed fuel at multiple points. Quality assurance and quality control methods are employed by the industry to ensure product quality, but they are not completely comprehensive and can fail at various points in the hydrogen pathway from production to dispensing. This reality leaves open the possibility of a station unknowingly dispensing harmful contaminants to a FCEV which, depending on the contaminant, may not be discovered until the FCEV is irreparably damaged. This situation is unacceptable. A hydrogen contaminant detector (HCD), defined as a combination of a gas analyzer and the components necessary for fuel stream integration, installed at hydrogen stations is one method for preventing poor quality gas from reaching an FCEV. This document identifies the characteristics required of such a device by industry and compares those requirements with the current state of commercially available gas analysis technology.

  20. H2 Educate! Hydrogen Education for Middle Schools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank Farm Waste3H2Educate!

  1. H2L3: Hydrogen Learning for Local Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |Reference Station Design Task ProjectH2L3:

  2. Hydrogen bond relaxation dynamics and the associated vibronic and volumetric anomalies of H2O upon frozen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Zhang; Xiaojian Fu; Yu Wen; Jer-lai Kuo; Zexiang Shen; Ji Zhou; Chang Q. Sun

    2011-10-02

    A combination of the extended Ice Rule of Pauling, Raman spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics calculations has enabled us to clarify the bonding origin of the anomalous volume expansion, Raman phonon relaxation, and the stiffness and fragility of H2O upon frozen. We found that the initially shorter-and-stronger intramolecular "H+/p-O2-" bond follows the regular rule of cooling-contraction while the initially longer-and-weaker intermolecular "O2- : H+/p" nonbond turns to be even longer yet stiffer in the "O2- : H+/p-O2-" hydrogen-bond of H2O upon frozen, as a consequence of the polarization and Coulomb repulsion between the unevenly-bounded bonding and nonbonding electron pairs. The elongation of the nonbond and the polarization of the nonbonding lone pair are responsible, respectively, for the volume expansion and the stiffness and the fragility of ice. Findings should form important impact to the understanding of the physical anomalies of H2O under other stimuli such as pressure and confinement.

  3. Evaluation of Metal Halide, Plasma, and LED Lighting Technologies for a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Mobile Light (H 2 LT)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miller, L. B.; Donohoe, S. P.; Jones, M. H.; White, W. A.; Klebanoff, L. E.; Velinsky, S. A.

    2015-04-22

    This article reports on the testing and comparison of a prototype hydrogen fuel cell light tower (H2LT) and a conventional diesel-powered metal halide light trailer for use in road maintenance and construction activities. The prototype was originally outfitted with plasma lights and then with light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires. Light output and distribution, lighting energy efficiency (i.e., efficacy), power source thermal efficiency, and fuel costs are compared. The metal halide luminaires have 2.2 and 3.1 times more light output than the plasma and LED luminaires, respectively, but they require more power/lumen to provide that output. The LED luminaires have 1.6 timesmore »better light efficacy than either the metal halide or plasma luminaires. The light uniformity ratios produced by the plasma and LED towers are acceptable. The fuel cell thermal efficiency at the power required to operate the plasma lights is 48%, significantly higher than the diesel generator efficiency of 23% when operating the metal halide lights. Due to the increased efficiency of the fuel cell and the LED lighting, the fuel cost per lumen-hour of the H2LT is 62% of the metal halide diesel light tower assuming a kilogram of hydrogen is twice the cost of a gallon of diesel fuel.« less

  4. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of aLiBH4/CaH2Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilizedLiBH4/CaH2system ball-milled withTiCl3,TiF3, andTiO2additives have been investigated. It is found that the system withTiCl3additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount ofTiCl3is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of theLiBH4/CaH2system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% ofTiCl3are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts ofTiCl3are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures.

  5. Effects of Ti-Based Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of a L i B H 4 / C a H 2 Destabilized System

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Hongwei; Ibikunle, Adeola; Goudy, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen storage properties of a destabilized LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system ball-milled with TiCl 3 , TiF 3 , and TiO 2 additives have been investigated. It is found that the system with TiCl 3 additive has a lower dehydrogenation temperature than the ones with other additives. Further study shows that a higher amount of TiCl 3 is more effective in reducing the desorption temperature of the more »LiBH 4 / CaH 2 system, since it leads to a lower activation energy of dehydrogenation. The activations energies for mixtures containing 4, 10, and 25?mol% of TiCl 3 are 141, 126, and 110?kJ/mol, respectively. However, the benefits of higher amounts of TiCl 3 are offset by a larger reduction in hydrogen capacity of the mixtures. « less

  6. Insight into methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Cu(111): Complex reaction network and the effects of H2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Yafan; Yang, Yong; Mims, Charles A.; Peden, Charles HF; Li, Jun; Mei, Donghai

    2011-05-31

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on supported Cu catalysts is of considerable importance in the chemical and energy industries. Although extensive experimental and theoretical efforts have been carried out in the past decades, the most fundamental questions such as the reaction mechanisms and the key reaction intermediates are still in debate. In the present work, a comprehensive reaction network for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol on Cu(111) was studied using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. All of the elementary reaction steps in the reaction network were identified in an unbiased way with the dimer method. Our calculation results show that methanol synthesis from direct hydrogenation of formate on Cu(111) is not feasible due to the high activation barriers for some of the elementary steps. Instead, we find that CO2 hydrogenation to hydrocarboxyl (trans-COOH) is kinetically more favorable than formate in the presence of H2O via a unique proton transfer mechanism. The trans-COOH is then converted into hydroxymethylidyne (COH) via dihydroxycarbene (COHOH) intermediates, followed by three consecutive hydrogenation steps to form hydroxymethylene (HCOH), hydroxymethyl (H2COH), and methanol. This is consistent with recent experimental observations [1], which indicate that direct hydrogenation of formate will not produce methanol under dry hydrogen conditions. Thus, both experiment and computational modeling clearly demonstrate the important role of trace amounts of water in methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Cu catalysts. The proposed methanol synthesis route on Cu(111) not only provides new insights into methanol synthesis chemistry, but also demonstrates again that spectroscopically observed surface species are often not critical reaction intermediates but rather spectator species. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  7. H2 Educate Student Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This H2 Educate Student Guide provides information about hydrogen energy and was developed by the National Energy Education Development (NEED) Project for the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen Program.

  8. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    A KEY LINK TO A HYDROGEN FUEL CELL VEHICLE INFRASTRUCTURE?"a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?is assessed based on neat hydrogen fuel input rather than

  9. Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gay, Timothy J.

    Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation.1088/0953-4075/44/4/045201 Production of excited atomic hydrogen and deuterium from H2, HD and D2 photodissociation J R Machacek1,2, V M 28 January 2011 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysB/44/045201 Abstract We have measured the production

  10. H2 Educate! Teacher Guide

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    H2 Educate! Teacher and Student Guides - These new guides were developed by the National Energy Education Development (NEED) Project's Teacher Advisory Board for the DOE Hydrogen Program. Sentech, Inc

  11. H2 Educate! Student Guide

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    H2 Educate! Teacher and Student Guides - These new guides were developed by the National Energy Education Development (NEED) Project's Teacher Advisory Board for the DOE Hydrogen Program. Sentech, Inc

  12. Energy ForesightNordic H2 Building the Nordic Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H2 Energy ForesightNordic H2 Building the Nordic Research and Innovation Area in Hydrogen Summary Report January 2005 #12;#12;Energy ForesightNordic H2 Building the Nordic Research and Innovation Area Region 7 Competitiveness of Nordic Countries 7 Research and Development in New Energy Technologies 8

  13. High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat & H2 from Biogas High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas Success story about using waste water treatment gas for hydrogen production at UC...

  14. PEM Electrolysis H2A Production Case Study Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Brian; Colella, Whitney; Moton, Jennie; Saur, G.; Ramsden, T.

    2013-12-31

    This report documents the development of four DOE Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) case studies for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolysis. The four cases characterize PEM electrolyzer technology for two hydrogen production plant sizes (Forecourt and Central) and for two technology development time horizons (Current and Future).

  15. hydrogen

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    3%2A en Cheaper catalyst may lower fuel costs for hydrogen-powered cars http:www.nnsa.energy.govblogcheaper-catalyst-may-lower-fuel-costs-hydrogen-powered-cars

  16. Hydrogen Production & Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Current Conversion Price of H 2 kg delivered furanone Cost of Hydrogen From Bio-oil Conversion (Relative to 2012 Target of 3.80kg H 2 ) Ongoing Focus: * Acetic acid in...

  17. EERE-SBIR technology transfer opportunity. H2 Safety Sensors for H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Mariann R.

    2015-12-01

    The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s Fuel Cell Technologies Office (FCTO) works in partnership with industry (including small businesses), academia, and DOE's national laboratories to establish fuel cell and hydrogen energy technologies as economically competitive contributors to U.S. transportation needs. The work that is envisioned between the SBIR/STTR grantee and Los Alamos National Laboratory would involve Technical Transfer of Los Alamos Intellectual Property (IP) on Thin-film Mixed Potential Sensor (U.S. Patent 7,264,700) and associated know-how for H2 sensor manufacturing and packaging.

  18. Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Partners Best Practices - LANL, SNL, NREL, NASA, Hydrogen Safety Panel, and IEA HIA Tasks 19 and 22 Incident Reporting - NASA and Hydrogen Safety Panel 3 Objectives H2...

  19. Webinar: Overview of Station Analysis Tools Developed in Support of H2USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar will provide a basic introduction to the Hydrogen Refueling Stations Analysis Model (HRSAM) and the Hydrogen Financial Analysis Scenario Tool (H2FAST), developed by Argonne National Laboratory and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, respectively, to address key technical and financial barriers to hydrogen fueling infrastructure deployment.

  20. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    An Overview of the Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology (H2FIRST) Project" held on November 18, 2014. Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and...

  1. Renewable Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hydrogen Production from Biological Systems Matthew Posewitz Colorado School of Mines DOE Biological Hydrogen Production Workshop September 24 th , 2013 H 2 production PSIIPSI...

  2. H2A Production Model, Version 2 User Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Ramsden, T.; Zuboy, J.

    2008-09-01

    The H2A Production Model analyzes the technical and economic aspects of central and forecourt hydrogen production technologies. Using a standard discounted cash flow rate of return methodology, it determines the minimum hydrogen selling price, including a specified after-tax internal rate of return from the production technology. Users have the option of accepting default technology input values--such as capital costs, operating costs, and capacity factor--from established H2A production technology cases or entering custom values. Users can also modify the model's financial inputs. This new version of the H2A Production Model features enhanced usability and functionality. Input fields are consolidated and simplified. New capabilities include performing sensitivity analyses and scaling analyses to various plant sizes. This User Guide helps users already familiar with the basic tenets of H2A hydrogen production cost analysis get started using the new version of the model. It introduces the basic elements of the model then describes the function and use of each of its worksheets.

  3. H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1 to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. Learn all about the 1 million H2 Refuel 2014-2016 H-Prize competition, which challenges America's innovators to deploy an on-site hydrogen...

  4. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reports on the status of mass production cost estimation for direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell systems. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for...

  5. Producing and quantifying enriched para-H2 Brian A. Tom,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCall, Benjamin J.

    January 2009 The production of enriched para-H2 is useful for many scientific applications resonance tech- niques that exploit the signal-enhancing para-H2 effect,1 the production of solid hydrogen of temperatures with the high enrichments accessible when using liquid helium as a cryogen. It was optimized

  6. Lithium-Doped Metal-Organic Frameworks for Reversible H2 Storage at Ambient Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    major strategies being pursued toward hydrogen storage for fuel cell applications are dissociative the H atoms to desorb H2 for input to the fuel cell. In contrast AA binds the H2 as a molecule, reducing of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 Received April 13, 2007; E-mail: wag@wag.caltech.edu The use

  7. Evaluation of Protected Metal Hydride Slurries in a H2 Mini-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    risk and cost compared to distributed reformate-FCPS (see Energy Station Concept discussion) Fuel cell,600 psi) PSA w/ cH2 (100 psi) Fl MH (dry) Fl MH (slurry) Volume,m3 Storage Purification 760 Primary Energy_PT_DOE_D0021_H2&FC_MERIT_REVIEW_MAY2003 1 Introduction Energy Station Concept The hydrogen "Energy Station

  8. AOI [3] High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 and - H2S Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perepezko, John; Lu-Steffes, Otto

    2014-08-31

    The emissions from coal-fired power plants remain a significant concern for air quality. This environmental challenge must be overcome by controlling the emission of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) throughout the entire coal combustion process. One of the processes which could specifically benefit from robust, low cost, and high temperature compatible gas sensors is the coal gasification process which converts coal and/or biomass into syngas. Hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO) and sulfur compounds make up 33%, 43% and 2% of syngas, respectively. Therefore, development of a high temperature (>500°C) chemical sensor for in-situ monitoring of H2, H2S and SO2 levels during coal gasification is strongly desired. The selective detection of SO2/H2S in the presence of H2, is a formidable task for a sensor designer. In order to ensure effective operation of these chemical sensors, the sensor system must inexpensively function within harsh temperature and chemical environment. Currently available sensing approaches, which are based on gas chromatography, electrochemistry, and IR-spectroscopy, do not satisfy the required cost and performance targets. This work focused on the development microsensors that can be applied to this application. In order to develop the high- temperature compatible microsensor, this work addressed various issues related to sensor stability, selectivity, and miniaturization. In the research project entitled “High-Temperature Nano-Derived Micro-H2 and -H2S Sensors”, the team worked to develop micro-scale, chemical sensors and sensor arrays composed of nano-derived, metal-oxide composite materials to detect gases like H2, SO2, and H2S within high-temperature environments (>500?C). The research was completed in collaboration with NexTech Materials, Ltd. (Lewis Center, Ohio). NexTech assisted in the testing of the sensors in syngas with contaminate levels of H2S. The idea of including nanomaterials as the sensing material within resistive-type chemical sensor platforms was to increase the sensitivity (as shown for room temperature applications). Unfortunately, nanomaterials are not stable at high temperatures due to sintering and coarsening processes that are driven by their high surface to volume ratio. Therefore, new hydrogen and sulfur selective nanomaterial systems with high selectivity and stability properties in the proposed harsh environment were investigated. Different nano-morphologies of zirconate, molybdate, and tungstate compounds were investigated. The fabrication of the microsensors consisted of the deposition of the selective nanomaterial systems over metal based interconnects on an inert substrate. This work utilized the chemi-resistive (resistive- type) microsensor architecture where the chemically and structurally stable, high temperature compatible electrodes were sputtered onto a ceramic substrate. The nanomaterial sensing systems were deposited over the electrodes using a lost mold method patterned by conventional optical lithography. The microsensor configuration with optimized nanomaterial system was tested and compared to a millimeter-size sensor e outcomes of this research will contribute to the economical application of sensor arrays for simultaneous sensing of H2, H2S, and SO2.

  9. A nanosized hydrogen generator | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygen in H2O to produce free hydrogen. The commercial separation process uses natural gas to react with superheated steam to strip away hydrogen atoms producing hydrogen fuel,...

  10. WASTE/BY-PRODUCT HYDROGEN DOE/DOD Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; 6 Waste/Byproduct HydrogenWaste/By product Hydrogen Waste H2 sources include: Waste biomass: biogas Waste/Byproduct Hydrogen Waste/By product Hydrogen Fuel FlexibilityFuel Flexibility Biogas: generated

  11. Hungary: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,Magazine JumpEnergy ServicesHungary: Energy

  12. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TDL * Physical Sciences Inc.-TDL * HORIBA International Corporation-NDIR * Tiger Optics-CW CRDS * Aeris Technologies, Inc.-TDLcompact multipass optical cell. Overall the...

  13. NASA Perspectives on Cryo H2 DOE Hydrogen Storage Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -space, MMOD protection) -Vapor/cryocooler cooled shields - Sun shades - Low conductivity/ cooled support propellant - Inventory (Bookkeeping) - Pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) - High accuracy low-g techniques;7 NASA Cryogenic Technology Objectives · To develop storage and distribution technologies for cryogens

  14. Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,Fuel CellHydrodynamicAnalysis

  15. Hydrogen Analysis (H2A) Production Component Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartment ofPower OutagesWouldHydraulic InstituteAnalysis

  16. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing ToolSustainable Buildings & Campuses »Climate

  17. Material Testing Priorities for Hydrogen (H2) Infrastructure | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarine &Massachusetts StateFacilitiesOverviewof

  18. H2 and You: The Hydrogen Education Foundation's Outreach Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping STD-1128-2013levelGUIDE TO|Gustave E.

  19. Hydrogen (H2) Production by Anoxygenic Purple Nonsulfur Bacteria |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure& FuelDepartment

  20. Hydrogen (H2) Production by Oxygenic Phototrophs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure&

  1. H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-TankDepartment

  2. H2USA Accomplishments Push Hydrogen Infrastructure Forward | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |Reference Station Design Task

  3. H2FIRST: Hydrogen Fueling Infrastructure Research and Station Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting Oversight CommitteeandEnergyPub.

  4. Thermochemistry of (H2 A DFT Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Fangqun

    enthalpies, entropies, and Gibbs free energies of (H2 SO4 )m (H2 O)n (NH3 )k (n = 1,2; m = 1­5; k = 0 appropriate, presumably larger, basis set is necessary. In this paper, the structure, thermochemical

  5. Panel 2, H2 Grid Integration: Tools and Analyses

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGEN ENERGY H 2 Grid

  6. Hydrogen Production & Delivery | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation H2 and Fuel Cells Plenary " h2pn01dillichpd2011o.pdf More...

  7. I.. , .., I.., .. i i H2, H2O ii i i SiO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the adsorbtion of H2, H2O and uranyl ions on the SiO2 surface I.V. Stasyuk,T.S.Mysakovych, I.R.Dulepa, V.O.Krasnov Abstract. Using the quantum chemical calculations the adsorption of H2, H2O and uranyl ions on the SiO2 into atoms take place at the adsorption. The adsorption of the uranyl ions on the SiO2 surface was the object

  8. CATALYST CATALYSTADSORBENT ADSORBENT HCS + H2O H2 + CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    - CO2 Adsorbent Effect of Membrane Properties On HAMR performance 3.190.3883--H2O --54.30.0248Ar --67 CATALYST CATALYSTADSORBENT ADSORBENT C O 2CO2 CO2 CO2 HCS + H2O H2 + CO2 Mork Family Department of Chemical using hydrotalcite-type CO2 adsorbents and nanoporous H2-selective carbon molecular sieve membranes (CMS

  9. IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION · Conventional Natural Gas Steam Reforming CH4 + H2O 3H2 + CO Endothermic (EnergyCO + (n+1)H2 + n2e - Liquid Hydrocarbons iii) 2C + H2 O + O 2- 2 CO + H2 + 2e- Coal i) CH4 + O 2- CO + 2H2 Side 1/2O2 +2e- O2- Natural Gas ii) Cn H2n+2 + nO 2- nCO + (n+1)H2 + n2e - Liquid Hydrocarbons iii) 2C

  10. Distributed Hydrogen Production from Natural Gas: Independent...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    information concerning the technologies needed for forecourts producing 150 kgday of hydrogen from natural gas. 40382.pdf More Documents & Publications H2A Delivery: Miscellaneous...

  11. Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in public transportation Finally Optimization and Operation Research methods for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balázs, Bánhelyi

    Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in public Innovation Problems #12;Research Support in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in Hungary Machine scheduling LED public lighting Microsimulation in public transportation Finally The word

  12. Testing the Early Mars H2-CO2 Greenhouse Hypothesis with a 1-D Photochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batalha, Natasha; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James

    2015-01-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (2014) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ~1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere...

  13. Webinar May 14: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The technical testing specifications are now available for the Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, a two-year competition administered by the Hydrogen Education Foundation that challenges America's engineers and entrepreneurs to develop systems for small-scale hydrogen fueling. The Energy Department will present a webinar on May 14, 2015, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time to go over the specifications and testing plans and answer questions.

  14. Webinar: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a webinar on May 14, 2015, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time about the technical testing specifications for the Energy Department's Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, a two-year competition administered by the Hydrogen Education Foundation that challenges America's engineers and entrepreneurs to develop affordable systems for small-scale hydrogen fueling.

  15. VOLUME 83, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 5 JULY 1999 Two-Dimensional Quantum Rotation of Adsorbed H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    and density functional calculations, which provide evidence of hydrogen adsorbed as a confined rotor of para- hydrogen ( p-H2) and orthohydrogen (o-H2) at energies close to the values expected for an ideal 2. Substrate surface properties and subsequent hydrogen adsorption were monitored by low- energy electron

  16. Economics, technology, and environment in Hungary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerekes, S. (Budapest Univ. of Economic Sciences (Hungary))

    1993-01-01

    While Western economies were making a transition away from high-polluting industries in the 1970s, Eastern European countries were making investments in industries and in mass-production technologies that are environmentally harmful and, besides, are not internationally competitive in an age of high energy and raw material costs. Recent improvements in the environment in Hungary are mostly due to the closing of these plants for purely economics reasons. As trade with the West grows, there is some danger that it will be based largely on environmentally harmful industries. In the present transition from a centrally planned economy with captive markets to a market-oriented economy, long-term investments in environmental protection must compete with more obvious and compelling short-term investments needed to counter the painful aspects of liberalization (unemployment, bankruptcy, heavy debt, etc.). Too much emphasis on environmental protection could fatally retard the transition, and too little attention to high revenue-high growth areas, such as tourism, could result in long-term environmental damage that would also defeat the process and goals of liberalization. The proposed path calls for steady, practical reforms to create the proper incentives, carried out under government supervision and with aid from external investors, lenders, and development agencies. 10 refs.

  17. Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

    2007-01-01

    Chemicals, Inc. , Stuart Energy, H2Gen). All cost data areJournal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 – 4100 2.4.1.Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 4089 – 4100 Annualized

  18. Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Ard

    Chapter 3 Metallization of Fluid Hydrogen 3.1 Introduction to Metallic Hydrogen 3.1.1 Some background on dense hydrogen Hydrogen, out of it the Universe evolved, every atom and leaf, marine iguana and apricot­smelling chanterelle. But my, my, what alchemy: nondescript H 2 --Diane Ackerman 1 -- Hydrogen

  19. Structure and vibrational spectra of H ,,H2O...8: Is the excess proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Structure and vibrational spectra of H¿ ,,H2O...8: Is the excess proton in a symmetrical hydrogen environment of the excess proton sometimes resembles a symmetric H5O2 structure and sometimes H3O , but many to which the excess proton resembles H5O2 or H3O . Other bond lengths and, perhaps most useful

  20. Passive load follow analysis of the STAR-LM and STAR-H2 systems. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moisseytsev, Anton

    2004-09-30

    cooled reactor on natural circulation and the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle. The STAR-H2 system uses the same reactor which is coupled to the hydrogen production plant, the Brayton cycle, and the water desalination plant. The Brayton cycle...

  1. Molecular Hydrogen in Infrared Cirrus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristen Gillmon; J. Michael Shull

    2005-07-25

    We combine data from our recent FUSE survey of interstellar molecular hydrogen absorption toward 50 high-latitude AGN with COBE-corrected IRAS 100 micron emission maps to study the correlation of infrared cirrus with H2. A plot of the H2 column density vs. IR cirrus intensity shows the same transition in molecular fraction, f_H2, as seen with total hydrogen column density, N_H. This transition is usually attributed to H2 self-shielding, and it suggests that many diffuse cirrus clouds contain H2 in significant fractions, f_H2 = 1-30%. These clouds cover approximately 50% of the northern sky at latitudes b > 30 degrees, at temperature-corrected 100 micron intensities D_100 > 1.5 MJy/sr. The sheetlike cirrus clouds, with hydrogen densities n_H > 30 cm^-3, may be compressed by dynamical processes at the disk-halo interface, and they are conducive to H2 formation on grain surfaces. Exploiting the correlation between N(H2) and 100 micron intensity, we estimate that cirrus clouds at b > 30 contain approximately 3000 M_sun in H2. Extrapolated over the inner Milky Way, the cirrus may contain 10^7 M_sun of H2 and 10^8 M_sun in total gas mass. If elevated to 100 pc, their gravitational potential energy is ~10^53 erg.

  2. June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 -Szeged, Hungary 1 Recognizing Design Patterns in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferenc, Rudolf

    June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 1 Recognizing Design Patterns in C++ programs of Helsinki #12;June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 2 Introduction Experiments with two software of abstraction ­ Visualization of software architectures #12;June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 3

  3. June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 -Szeged, Hungary 1 Columbus -Tool for Reverse Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferenc, Rudolf

    June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 1 Columbus - Tool for Reverse Engineering Large;June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 2 Introduction · Software systems are rapidly growing" [Chikofsky et al.] #12;June 15-16, 2001 SPLST 2001 - Szeged, Hungary 3 Assessment of RE tools · Analysis

  4. Hydrogen Production & Delivery Sara Dillich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). 15% solar-to-chemical energy efficiency by microalgae Biomass Gasification Hydrogen Production Cost Electrolysis (Solar) 2015-2020Today-2015 2020-2030 Coal Gasification (No Carbon Capture) Electrolysis Water · Blue Ribbon Panel (planned) H2A Analysis Tool Required Selling Price of H2 ($/kg) Plant Designs

  5. Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

    2010-01-01

    CNG, diesel, FT50, methanol, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid,diesel, ethanol, hydrogen and grid electricity ICE, hybrid,diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline, electricity, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid,

  6. H2A Biomethane Model Documentation and a Case Study for Biogas From Dairy Farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saur, G.; Jalalzadeh, A.

    2010-12-01

    The new H2A Biomethane model was developed to estimate the levelized cost of biomethane by using the framework of the vetted original H2A models for hydrogen production and delivery. For biomethane production, biogas from sources such as dairy farms and landfills is upgraded by a cleanup process. The model also estimates the cost to compress and transport the product gas via the pipeline to export it to the natural gas grid or any other potential end-use site. Inputs include feed biogas composition and cost, required biomethane quality, cleanup equipment capital and operations and maintenance costs, process electricity usage and costs, and pipeline delivery specifications.

  7. H2 ICE Combustion | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low WeUpdate JonGuided 8/12/15GuyH2 ICE Combustion

  8. H2USA | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting Oversight CommitteeandEnergyPub.USA H2USA

  9. H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: SI-Based Plant; HTE-Based Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matt Richards; A.S. Shenoy; L.C. Brown; R.T. Buckingham; E.A. Harvego; K.L. Peddicord; S.M.M. Reza; J.P. Coupey

    2006-04-19

    Hydrogen and electricity are expected to dominate the world energy system in the long term. The world currently consumes about 50 million metric tons of hydrogen per year, with the bulk of it being consumed by the chemical and refining industries. The demand for hydrogen is expected to increase, especially if the U.S. and other countries shift their energy usage towards a hydrogen economy, with hydrogen consumed as an energy commodity by the transportation, residential, and commercial sectors. However, there is strong motivation to not use fossil fuels in the future as a feedstock for hydrogen production, because the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide is a byproduct and fossil fuel prices are expected to increase significantly. For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For electricity production, the MHR operates with an outlet helium temperature of 850 C to drive a direct, Brayton-cycle power-conversion system (PCS) with a thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 48 percent. This concept is referred to as the Gas Turbine MHR (GT-MHR). For hydrogen production, the process heat from the MHR is used to produce hydrogen. This concept is referred to as the H2-MHR.

  10. Niobate Nanosheets as Catalysts for Photochemical Water Splitting into Hydrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterloh, Frank

    Niobate Nanosheets as Catalysts for Photochemical Water Splitting into Hydrogen and Hydrogen of water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide under UV irradiation. The peroxide forms on the surface, indicating that the peroxide species is formed from water. Room-temperature storage of the nanosheets in H2

  11. One-pot synthesis of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Pt nanoparticle composite and its application to electrochemical H2O2 sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Li-Chi; Wu, Huan-Nung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Lai, Yi-Hsuan; Hu, Chih-Wei; Ho, Kuo-Chuan

    2012-06-20

    Abstract Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-Pt nanoparticle composite was synthesized in one-pot fashion using a photo-assisted chemical method, and its electrocatalytic properties toward hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated. Under UV irradiation...

  12. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and industry partners to promote advancing hydrogen infrastructure to support more transportation energy options for consumers. Through H2USA, industry and government partners will...

  13. H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2 H2FIRST Reference Station Design Task: Project Deliverable 2-2 This H2FIRST project report, published in April 2015, presents...

  14. Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 -- Washington D.C. ace009wallner2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance, Efficiency, and Emissions H2...

  15. Why Hydrogen and Fuel Cells are Needed to Support California Climate Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Joshua M; Gronich, Sig; Nicholas, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    as soon as possible. Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (H2-FCVs),the timely commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles.a federal tax credit for hydrogen fuel sales that could help

  16. Roadmap for H2 in the Nordic Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roadmap for H2 in the Nordic Countries Per Dannemand Andersen, Ole Greve, Stefan Krüger Nielsen: Per Dannemand Andersen, Ole Greve, Stefan Krûger Niel- sen Title: Roadmaps for H2 in the Nordic char.): This report reports on a roadmap workshop held in Roskilde in 2004 as a part of the Nordic H2

  17. The effect of continuous H2S exposure on the performance of thick palladium-copper alloy membranes (book chapter)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, B.H.; Cugini, A.V.; Killmeyer, R.P.; Morreale, B.D.; Enick, R.M.

    2007-03-01

    Membranes fabricated from Pd-Cu alloys containing 80, 60, and 53wt%Pd, as well as pure Pd, were exposed to flowing 1000 ppm H2S in H2 over the temperature range of 350 to 900°C using three approaches to verify NETL's previously reported transient H2S exposure results. 100 um thick braze-mounted foils failed prior to 600°C due to apparent sulfur attack at the braze. 1000 um thick welded membranes demonstrated similar trends as found using the transient method in that hydrogen flux through the Pd-Cu alloys with fcc structure was not significantly degraded by H2S exposure. However, both of these experimental methods suffered from possible disadvantages. The transient method had limited H2S availability and limited exposure duration, and in the 1000 um steady-state test, bulk diffusion limitations could mask effects resulting from H2S exposure. Preliminary results obtained using an alternative membrane mounting method and test protocol for steady-state testing of 100 um thick Pd and 80wt%Pd-Cu foils at 350°C showed that significant flux losses occurred on exposure to flowing 1000 ppm H2S in H2, contrary to the earlier studies. Characterization showed that relatively thick sulfide layers had developed on the membrane surfaces during the 120 hours of exposure.

  18. The Hydrogen Laboratory and The Brazilian Reference Center for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    platform for hydrogen FCVs: VEGA I: Stationary H2 ICE + batteries + PV (1996) VEGA II: Hydrogen PEMFC + batteries (2005) VEGA I in Braslia VEGA II at the LH2 Power System...

  19. Electrochemically Assisted Microbial Production of Hydrogen from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Introduction The global interest in a hydrogen economy has been stimulated by the promise of clean energy at an energy cost equivalent to 1.2 mol H2/mol glucose. Production of hydrogen by this anaerobic MFC process). The greatest hydrogen yield theoretically possible using microorganisms (without an external source of energy

  20. A proposal for climate stability on H2-greenhouse planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbot, Dorian S

    2015-01-01

    A terrestrial planet in an orbit far outside of the standard habitable zone could maintain surface liquid water as a result of H2-H2 collision-induced absorption by a thick H2 atmosphere. Without a stabilizing climate feedback, however, habitability would be accidental and likely brief. In this letter I propose stabilizing climate feedbacks for such a planet that require only that biological functions have an optimal temperature and operate less efficiently at other temperatures. For example, on a planet with a net source of H2 from its interior, H2-consuming life (such as methanogens) could establish a stable climate. If a positive perturbation is added to the equilibrium temperature, H2 consumption by life will increase (cooling the planet) until the equilibrium climate is reestablished. The potential existence of such feedbacks makes H2-warmed planets more attractive astrobiological targets.

  1. Journal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509­516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells George H. Mileya,e,, Nie online 5 December 2006 Abstract A fuel cell (FC) using liquid fuel and oxidizer is under investigation. H Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Fuel cell; Hydrogen peroxide; Regenerative fuel cell; Sodium

  2. A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 at the cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    31.08.2009 1 A calorimetric analysis of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell and the production of H2O2 fuel cell that is operated on hydrogen and oxygen at 50 °C and 1 bar. The cell had a SolviCore Catalyst 1. INTRODUCTION The energy that is dissipated as heat in fuel cells is interesting for several

  3. Microchannel Reactor System Design & Demonstration For On-Site H2O2 Production by Controlled H2/O2 Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeniyi Lawal

    2008-12-09

    We successfully demonstrated an innovative hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production concept which involved the development of flame- and explosion-resistant microchannel reactor system for energy efficient, cost-saving, on-site H2O2 production. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for controlled direct combination of H2 and O2 in all proportions including explosive regime, at a low pressure and a low temperature to produce about 1.5 wt% H2O2 as proposed. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we demonstrated our H2O2 production approach by ‘numbering up’ the channels in a multi-channel microreactor-based pilot plant to produce 1 kg/h of H2O2 at 1.5 wt% as demanded by end-users of the developed technology. To our knowledge, we are the first group to accomplish this significant milestone. We identified the reaction pathways that comprise the process, and implemented rigorous mechanistic kinetic studies to obtain the kinetics of the three main dominant reactions. We are not aware of any such comprehensive kinetic studies for the direct combination process, either in a microreactor or any other reactor system. We showed that the mass transfer parameter in our microreactor system is several orders of magnitude higher than what obtains in the macroreactor, attesting to the superior performance of microreactor. A one-dimensional reactor model incorporating the kinetics information enabled us to clarify certain important aspects of the chemistry of the direct combination process as detailed in section 5 of this report. Also, through mathematical modeling and simulation using sophisticated and robust commercial software packages, we were able to elucidate the hydrodynamics of the complex multiphase flows that take place in the microchannel. In conjunction with the kinetics information, we were able to validate the experimental data. If fully implemented across the whole industry as a result of our technology demonstration, our production concept is expected to save >5 trillion Btu/year of steam usage and >3 trillion Btu/year in electric power consumption. Our analysis also indicates >50 % reduction in waste disposal cost and ~10% reduction in feedstock energy. These savings translate to ~30% reduction in overall production and transportation costs for the $1B annual H2O2 market.

  4. Modeling H2 adsorption in carbon-based structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamonte, Kevin Anthony

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen storage has been identified as a primary bottleneck in the large-scale implementation of a hydrogen-based economy. Many research efforts are underway to both improve the capacity of existing hydrogen storage systems and develop new systems...

  5. Sandia National Laboratories: Taking on H2 storage challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Taking on the hydrogen storage challenge By Patti Koning Photography By Dino Vournas Thursday, October 15, 2015 The Hydrogen Materials-Advanced Research Consortium (HyMARC) will...

  6. DOE H2A Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    including biomass, coal, natural gas, nuclear, windelectrolysis, ethanol, and methanol. FCTO Home About the Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen...

  7. Photoelectrochemical Water Systems for H2 Production (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J. A.; Deutsch, T.; Head, J.; Vallett, P.

    2007-05-17

    This Photoelectrochemical Water Systems for Hydrogen Production presentation by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's John Turner was given at the DOE Hydrogen Program's 2007 Annual Merit Review.

  8. Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barthelat, Francois

    Biological Hydrogen Production Using Synthetic Wastewater Conclusion ·Biotin and glutamic acid are not required for biological hydrogen production. ·MgSO4 .7H2O is a required nutrient, but hydrogen production work should focus on minimizing the lag time in biological hydrogen production, by varying nutrient

  9. Independent verification of the saturation hydrogen uptake in MOF-177 and establishment of a benchmark for hydrogen adsorption in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    prior to evaluating H2 storage capacities. Reproducibility of hydrogen adsorption experiments for hydrogen storage applications.1­8 This is due to the availability of a large number of well the targets for on-board hydrogen storage systems set by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for use of hydrogen

  10. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L.

    2012-07-10

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  11. Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Basics August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely...

  12. LLNL input to FY94 hydrogen annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, R.N.; Smith, J.R.; Rambach, G.; Pekala, R.W.; Westbrook, C.K.; Richardson, J.H.

    1994-12-16

    This report summarizes the FY 1994 progress made in hydrogen research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Research programs covered include: Technical and Economic Assessment of the Transport and Storage of Hydrogen; Research and Development of an Optimized Hydrogen-Fueled Internal Combustion Engine; Hydrogen Storage in Engineered Microspheres; Synthesis, Characterization and Modeling of Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage; Chemical Kinetic Modeling of H2 Applications; and, Municipal Solid Waste to Hydrogen.

  13. 2H2O O2 + 4H+ + 4e b H2O OH + H+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendry, Andrew

    2 R2 R2 Ruthenium 'blue dimer' + Figure 1 | Catalytic water oxidation. Photosynthesis is fuelled by the conversion of water into oxygen and hydrogen. a, In the first part of this process, known as water oxidation, water is converted into oxygen, four protons (H+ ) and four electrons (e­ ). b, Oxidation by the removal

  14. H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance" held on August 6, 2015.

  15. H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) Presentation by Matthew Hooks of TIAX at the...

  16. Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: A Transition Strategy through 2017

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogden, J; Cunningham, Joshua M; Nicholas, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    new partnerships? H2-FCV Roadmap Report - FINAL December 21,Roadmap for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Vehicles in California: ACalifornia, Davis H2-FCV Roadmap Report - FINAL December 21,

  17. Evidence of Catalytic Production of Hot Atomic Hydrogen in RF Generated Hydrogen/Helium Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Phillips; Chun-Ku Chen; Toshi Shiina

    2005-09-14

    A study of the line shapes of hydrogen Balmer series lines in RF generated low pressure H2/He plasmas produced results suggesting a catalytic process between helium and hydrogen species results in the generation of 'hot' (ca. 28 eV) atomic hydrogen. Even far from the electrodes 'hot' atomic hydrogen was predominant in H2/He plasmas. Line shapes, relative line areas of cold and hot atomic hydrogen (hot/cold>2.5), were very similar for areas between the electrodes and far from the electrodes for these plasmas. In contrast, in H2/Xe only 'warm' (hydrogen (warm/coldhydrogen away from the electrodes. Earlier postulates that preferential hydrogen line broadening in plasmas results from the acceleration of ionic hydrogen in the vicinity of electrodes, and the special charge exchange characteristics of Ar/H2+ are clearly belied by the present results that show atomic hydrogen line shape are similar for H2/He plasmas throughout the relatively large cylindrical (14 cm ID x 36 cm length) cavity.

  18. Rensselaer Experiment Finds Water Molecules Are Always H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    formula from H2O to H1.5O. The effect was revealed through a strong neutron scattering anomaly, which the scattering of neutrons from light water molecules (H2O) and heavy water molecules (D2O). Researchers found that the scattering of neutrons behaved normally and they did not detect any deficiency in the effective number

  19. H2O subduction beyond arcs Bradley R. Hacker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    H2O subduction beyond arcs Bradley R. Hacker Department of Earth Science, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93109-9630, USA (hacker@geol.ucsb.edu) [1] The amount of H2O subducted). Received 31 May 2007; Revised 26 October 2007; Accepted 7 December 2007; Published 5 March 2008. Hacker, B

  20. Kinematics of charge transfer: Ar^++H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hierl, Peter M.; Pacak, V.; Herman, Z.

    1977-01-01

    Product angular and velocity vector distributions have been measured in a crossed beam experiment for the charge transfer process Ar++H2?Ar+H2 + at relative collision energies of 0.13, 0.48, and 3.44 eV. Charge transfer was found to occur by two...

  1. Improved Photobiological H2 Production in Engineered Green Algal Cells*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improved Photobiological H2 Production in Engineered Green Algal Cells* Received for publication Cell Physiology, University Bielefeld, 33501 Bielefeld, Germany, UPR 1261-CNRS Institut de Biologie of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms use solar energy to split water (H2O

  2. Photocatalytic Formic Acid Conversion on CdS Nanocrystals with Controllable Selectivity for H_2 or CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuehnel, Moritz F.; Wakerley, David W.; Orchard, Katherine L.; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-07-13

    economy. Hydrogen holds promise as a secondary energy vector for use in fuel cells but its safe storage and transport remain the subject of intense research.[1] Formic acid (HCO2H, FA) has received considerable attention as a potential renewable fuel... for optimization details). Only traces of CO were detected in the headspace gas (670±146 ppm absolute, 0.614±0.065% with respect to H2). When the full solar spectrum was used for irradiation, the rate increased to 218±22 mmol H2 gcat?1 h?1 (Fig. S3), showing...

  3. Modeling of durability of polyelectrolyte membrane of O2/H2 fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atrazhev, Vadim V

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss critical aspects of the mechanisms and features of polymer proton exchange membrane (PEM) degradation in low-temperature H2/O2 fuel cell. In this paper, we focused on chemical mechanism of OH radical generation and their distribution in operational fuel cell. According to the current concept, free radicals are generated from hydrogen and oxygen crossover gases at the surface of Pt particles that precipitated in the membrane. We explicitly calculate Pt precipitation rate and electrochemical potential distribution in the membrane that controls it. Based on radical generation rate and Pt distribution we calculate degradation rate of the membrane taking advantage of simple kinetics equations.

  4. Ab initio molecular dynamics studies of the photodissociation of formaldehyde, H2CO\\H2CO: Direct classical trajectory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Ab initio molecular dynamics studies of the photodissociation of formaldehyde, H2CO\\H2¿CO: Direct The photodissociation of formaldehyde has been studied extensively, both experimentally1­13 and theoretically.14­29 Excitation of formaldehyde to the S1 state is followed by rapid internal conversion to the S0 state

  5. Assessment of existing H2/O2 chemical reaction mechanisms at reheat gas turbine conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weydahl, Torleif; Seljeskog, Morten; Haugen, Nils Erland L

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides detailed comparisons of chemical reaction mechanisms of H2 applicable at high preheat temperatures and pressures relevant to gas turbine and particularly Alstom's reheat gas turbine conditions. It is shown that the available reaction mechanisms exhibit large differences in several important elementary reaction coefficients. The reaction mechanisms are assessed by comparing ignition delay and laminar flame speed results obtained from CHEMKIN with available data, however, the amount of data at these conditions is scarce and a recommended candidate among the mechanisms can presently not be selected. Generally, the results with the GRI-Mech and Leeds mechanisms deviate from the Davis, Li, O'Conaire, Konnov and San Diego mechanisms, but there are also significant deviations between the latter five mechanisms that altogether are better adapted to hydrogen. The differences in ignition delay times between the dedicated hydrogen mechanisms (O'Conaire, Li and Konnov) range from approximately a maxim...

  6. MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS OF SMALL H2SO4-H2O CLUSTERS* B.N. HALE AND S.M. KATHMANN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hale, Barbara N.

    nucleation of sulfuric acid and water proceed via a series of clustering reactions between SO3, H2SO4, HSO4 - , SO4 - - , H3O+ , and several water molecules: SO3 + H2O H2SO4 H2SO4 + H2O HSO4 - + H3O

  7. The Role of H2 Molecules in Cosmological Structure Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Abel; Zoltan Haiman

    2000-02-08

    We review the relevance of H2 molecules for structure formation in cosmology. Molecules are important at high redshifts, when the first collapsed structures appear with typical temperatures of a few hundred Kelvin. In these chemically pristine clouds, radiative cooling is dominated H2 molecules. As a result, H2 ``astro-chemistry'' is likely to determine the epoch when the first astrophysical objects appear. We summarize results of recent three-dimensional simulations. A discussion of the effects of feedback, and implications for the reionization of the universe is also given.

  8. Dissolved hydrogen and nitrogen fixation in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, ST; del Valle, DA; Robidart, JC; Zehr, JP; Karl, DM

    2014-01-01

    Seiler, W. (1983) Production and consumption of hydrogen inthe balance between production and consumption processes. As1). Estimation of the production and consumption of H 2

  9. Heavy-duty H2-Diesel Dual Fuel Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Brake thermal efficiency can be improved with the addition of a large amount of hydrogen at medium to high loads

  10. Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gille, Sarah T.

    Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam Reforming Revised February 2001 February 2001 · NREL/TP-570-27637 Life Cycle Assessment of Hydrogen Production via Natural Gas Steam particulates benzene Airemissions,excludingCO2(g/kgofH2) EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A life cycle assessment (LCA

  11. Le projet H2M : Hbergement Mutualis Montpellier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Tiggelen, Bart

    Le projet H2M : Hébergement Mutualisé à Montpellier Formation Datacentres écoinfo à Cargèse Le 30): certains de nos datacentres sont saturés, et ne peuvent plus accueillir de nouvelles baies (une solution

  12. H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements Webinar Slides" held on May 14, 2015.

  13. H2 Internal Combustion Engine Research | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Bethesda, Maryland. merit08wallner.pdf More Documents & Publications High-Efficiency, Ultra-Low Emission Combustion in a Heavy-Duty Engine via Fuel Reactivity Control H2...

  14. A Survey of Extended H$_2$ Emission from Massive YSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarete, Felipe; Barbosa, Cassio L; Blum, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    We present the results from a survey, designed to investigate the accretion process of massive young stellar objects (MYSOs) through near infrared narrow band imaging using the H$_2$ $\

  15. Webinar: H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance" on Thursday, August 6, from 1 to 2 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time.

  16. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    CO2. The onset of CO2 displacement by H2O occurs between 65 and 75 K. Authors: Smith, R. Scott ; Li, Zhenjun ; Dohnalek, Zdenek ; Kay, Bruce D. Publication Date:...

  17. H2 Internal Combustion Engine Research Towards 45% efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Internal Combustion Engine Research Towards 45% efficiency and Tier2-Bin5 emissions H2 Internal Combustion Engine Research Towards 45% efficiency and Tier2-Bin5 emissions 2009 DOE...

  18. PKS B1718-649: an HI and H2 perspective on the birth of a compact radio source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccagni, F M; Morganti, R; Oosterloo, T A; Oonk, J B R; Emonts, B H C

    2015-01-01

    We present neutral hydrogen (HI) and warm molecular hydrogen (H2) observations of the young (10^2 years) radio galaxy PKS B1718-649. We study the morphology and the kinematics of both gas components, focusing, in particular, on their properties in relation to the triggering of the radio activity. The regular kinematics of the large scale HI disk, seen in emission, suggests that an interaction event occurred too long ago to be responsible for the recent triggering of the radio activity. In absorption, we detect two absorption lines along the narrow line of sight of the compact (rHI and of the stellar ...

  19. Ground State Calculations of the Confined Molecular Ions H2+ and HeH++ Using Variational Monte Carlo Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doma, S B; Amer, A A

    2015-01-01

    The ground state energy of hydrogen molecular ion H2+ confined by a hard prolate spheroidal cavity is calculated. The case in which the nuclear positions are clamped at the foci is considered. Our calculations are based on using the variational Monte Carlo method with an accurate trial wave function depending on many variational parameters. The calculations were extended also to include the HeH++ molecular ion. The obtained results are in good agreement with the recent results.

  20. Significantly improved dehydrogenation of ball-milled MgH2 doped with CoFe2O4 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL 33620, USA h i g h l i g h t s CoFe2O4 has strong 2014 Keywords: Cobalt ferrite Hydrogen storage Magnesium hydride Dehydrogenation temperature a b s t r a c t CoFe2O4 nanoparticles are added to magnesium hydride (MgH2) by high-energy ball milling in order

  1. BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    Hydrogen Peroxide Formation Rates in a PEMFC Anode and Cathode Effect of Humidity and Temperature Hydrogen peroxide H2O2 formation rates in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell PEMFC anode and cathode were, has the capability to be the structural and fundamental unit of an impending hydrogen economy. Two

  3. MODELING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING INFRASTRUCTURE FOR A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM WITH CO2 SEQUESTRATION Joan M. Ogden demand centers and CO2 sequestration sites. MODEL OF A FOSSIL HYDROGEN ENERGY SYSTEM WITH CO2 Production of hydrogen (H2) from fossil fuels with capture and sequestration of CO2 offers a route toward

  4. Author's personal copy Enhanced hydrogen generation using a saline catholyte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cl) produced the highest current density of 131 Æ 12 A/m3 , hydrogen yield of 3.2 Æ 0.3 mol H2/mol acetateH control. Copyright ª 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights cathode generating hydrogen gas on the cathode as long as additional energy is applied to the circuit

  5. Impact of Hydrogen Production onImpact of Hydrogen Production on U.S. Energy MarketsU.S. Energy Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prices. · Evaluate impacts on U.S. energy markets including price and consumption changes for coal demands for hydrogen as a fuel, and impacts on feedstock price and supplies under alternative at ½ level of gasoline. H2IOSTE - H2IOSTE + H2 FCV assumed to be 3.0 times as efficient as gasoline ICE

  6. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with luggage. By collecting fuel use data for the two H2ICE buses, with both written driver logs and onboard telemetry devices, and for two conventional propane-gasoline powered buses in the same service, comparisons of operating efficiency and maintenance requirements were completed. Public opinion about the concept of hydrogen fuel was sampled with a rider survey throughout the demonstration. The demonstration was very effective in adding to the understanding of the application of hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The two 9 passenger H2ICE buses accumulated nearly 50,000 miles and carried 14,285 passengers. Data indicated the H2ICE bus fuel economy to be 9.4 miles/ gallon of gasoline equivalent (m/GGE) compared to the 10 passenger propane-gasoline bus average of 9.8 m/GGE over 32,400 miles. The 23- passenger bus averaged 7.4 m/GGE over 40,700 miles. Rider feedback from 1050 on-board survey cards was overwhelmingly positive with 99.6% indicating they would ride again on a hydrogen powered vehicle. Minimal maintenance was required for theses buses during the demonstration project, but a longer duration demonstration would be required to more adequately assess this aspect of the concept.

  7. CO diffusion into amorphous H2O ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauck, Trish; Shulenberger, Katherine; Rajappan, Mahesh; Oberg, Karin I; Cuppen, Herma M

    2015-01-01

    The mobility of atoms, molecules and radicals in icy grain mantles regulate ice restructuring, desorption, and chemistry in astrophysical environments. Interstellar ices are dominated by H2O, and diffusion on external and internal (pore) surfaces of H2O-rich ices is therefore a key process to constrain. This study aims to quantify the diffusion kinetics and barrier of the abundant ice constituent CO into H2O dominated ices at low temperatures (15-23 K), by measuring the mixing rate of initially layered H2O(:CO2)/CO ices. The mixed fraction of CO as a function of time is determined by monitoring the shape of the infrared CO stretching band. Mixing is observed at all investigated temperatures on minute time scales, and can be ascribed to CO diffusion in H2O ice pores. The diffusion coefficient and final mixed fraction depend on ice temperature, porosity, thickness and composition. The experiments are analyzed by applying Fick's diffusion equation under the assumption that mixing is due to CO diffusion into an i...

  8. Optimization of Direct-Injection H2 Combustion Engine Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ace009wallner2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Optimization...

  9. Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH4 and C2H2 interconversion in hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures during microwave plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    Quantum cascade laser investigations of CH4 and C2H2 interconversion in hydrocarbon/H2 gas mixtures, Russia Received 31 July 2008; accepted 19 June 2009; published online 5 August 2009 CH4 and C2H2 molecules and their interconversion in hydrocarbon/rare gas/H2 gas mixtures in a microwave reactor used

  10. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety monitoring at any facility engaged in transport, handling and use of hydrogen. Development of High Efficiency Low Cost Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Production and PEM Fuel Cell Applications ? M. Rodgers, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to decrease platinum usage in fuel cells by conducting experiments to improve catalyst activity while lowering platinum loading through pulse electrodeposition. Optimum values of several variables during electrodeposition were selected to achieve the highest electrode performance, which was related to catalyst morphology. Understanding Mechanical and Chemical Durability of Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assemblies ? D. Slattery, Florida Solar Energy Center The objective of this project was to increase the knowledge base of the degradation mechanisms for membranes used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The results show the addition of ceria (cerium oxide) has given durability improvements by reducing fluoride emissions by an order of magnitude during an accelerated durability test. Production of Low-Cost Hydrogen from Biowaste (HyBrTec?) ? R. Parker, SRT Group, Inc., Miami, FL This project developed a hydrogen bromide (HyBrTec?) process which produces hydrogen bromide from wet-cellulosic waste and co-produces carbon dioxide. Eelectrolysis dissociates hydrogen bromide producing recyclable bromine and hydrogen. A demonstration reactor and electrolysis vessel was designed, built and operated. Development of a Low-Cost and High-Efficiency 500 W Portable PEMFC System ? J. Zheng, Florida State University, H. Chen, Bing Energy, Inc. The objectives of this project were to develop a new catalyst structures comprised of highly conductive buckypaper and Pt catalyst nanoparticles coated on its surface and to demonstrate fuel cell efficiency improvement and durability and cell cost reductions in the buckypaper based electrodes. Development of an Interdisciplinary Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Academic Program ? J. Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cel

  11. $\\mathrm H_2^+$ in a weak magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Héctor Medel Cobaxin; Alexander Alijah; Juan Carlos López Vieyra; Alexander V. Turbiner

    2014-09-22

    The electronic energy of $\\mathrm H_2^+$ in magnetic fields of up to $B=0.2B_0$ (or 4.7 $\\times 10^4$ Tesla) is investigated. Numerical values of the magnetic susceptibility for both the diamagnetic and paramagnetic contributions are reported for arbitrary orientations of the molecule in the magnetic field. It is shown that both diamagnetic and paramagnetic susceptibilities grow with inclination, while paramagnetic susceptibility is systematically much smaller than the diamagnetic one. Accurate two-dimensional Born-Oppenheimer surfaces are obtained with special trial functions. Using these surfaces, vibrational and rotational states are computed and analysed for the isotopologues $\\mathrm H_2^+$ and $\\mathrm D_2^+$.

  12. Water Research 39 (2005) 38193826 Increased biological hydrogen production with reduced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-01-01

    Water Research 39 (2005) 3819­3826 Increased biological hydrogen production with reduced organic to understand the effect of organic loading on H2 production in chemostat reactors. In order to vary the glucose is produced with acetate as a product (4 mol-H2/mol-acetate) than with butyrate (2 mol-H2/mol

  13. Carbon Nitride-TiO2 Hybrid Modified with Hydrogenase for Visible Light Driven Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Christine A.; Wang, Lidong; Beranek, Radim; Reisner, Erwin

    2015-06-29

    5.8 × 105 mol H2 (mol H2ase)–1 after 72 h in a sacrificial electron donor solution at pH 6 during solar AM 1.5G irradiation. An external quantum efficiency up to 4.8 % for photon to hydrogen conversion was achieved. The CNx-TiO2-H2ase construct...

  14. Zn1-xCdxS Solid Solutions with Controlled Bandgap and Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic H2Production Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jian Ru

    . KEYWORDS: Zn1-xCdxS solid solution, thermolysis, theory calculation, visible light, hydrogen production 1Zn1-xCdxS Solid Solutions with Controlled Bandgap and Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic H2, * State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Materials Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University

  15. TpPtMe(H)2: Why Is There H/D Scrambling of the Methyl Group but Not Methane Loss?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Ehud

    TpPtMe(H)2: Why Is There H/D Scrambling of the Methyl Group but Not Methane Loss? Mark A. Iron, H ) hydrido-tris(pyrazolyl)borate) was investigated. This complex is remarkably resistant to methane loss; heating it in methanol at 55 °C does not lead to either methane or hydrogen loss. When CD3OD is used

  16. International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 22962304 www.elsevier.com/locate/ijhydene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    International Journal of Hydrogen Energy 32 (2007) 2296­2304 www Engineering, USA bThe Penn State Hydrogen Energy (H2E) Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University efficiencies to increase the overall hydrogen yield. 2007 International Association for Hydrogen Energy

  17. The UWISH2 extended H2 source catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froebrich, D; Davis, C J; Gledhill, T M; Kim, Y; Koo, B -C; Rowles, J; Eislöffel, J; Nicholas, J; Lee, J J; Williamson, J; Buckner, A S M

    2015-01-01

    We present the extended source catalogue for the UKIRT Widefield Infrared Survey for H2 (UWISH2). The survey is unbiased along the inner Galactic Plane from l \\approx 357deg to l \\approx 65deg and |b| < 1.5deg and covers 209 square degrees. A further 42.0 and 35.5 square degrees of high dust column density regions have been targeted in Cygnus and Auriga. We have identified 33200 individual extended H2 features. They have been classified to be associated with about 700 groups of jets and outflows, 284 individual (candidate) Planetary Nebulae, 30 Supernova Remnants and about 1300 Photo-Dissociation Regions. We find a clear decline of star formation activity (traced by H2 emission from jets and photo-dissociation regions) with increasing distance from the Galactic Centre. More than 60% of the detected candidate Planetary Nebulae have no known counterpart and 25% of all Supernova Remnants have detectable H2 emission associated with them.

  18. Hydrogen Technology Research at SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, E.

    2011-02-13

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

  19. Webinar October 13: Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    titled "Reference Designs for Hydrogen Fueling Stations" on Tuesday, October 13, from 12 to 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time (EDT). The goal of the H2FIRST Reference Station Design...

  20. Palladium Nanoparticle-Based Surface Acoustic Wave Hydrogen Devika Sil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    stations, H2 powered cars, petrochemical and metallurgical plants, nuclear power stations, coal mines INTRODUCTION Hydrogen is a carbon-free fuel with important applications, but there are serious risks involved

  1. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    including biomass gasification, coal gasification, naturalSMR, electrolysis and biomass gasification, respectively C-coal gasification and biomass gasification, respectively [2

  2. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    production technologies including biomass gasification,coal gasification, natural gas reforming, and waterby biomass central gasification and then coal gasification

  3. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: The Least-Cost Hydrogen for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Chen, Chien-Wei; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M.

    2008-01-01

    Dooley, et al. A CO2 Storage Cost Curve for North America.by technology 1 , CO2 pipeline diameter and costs are aof liquefaction electricity. Costs of CO2 pipeline are

  4. Reaction of formaldehyde cation with molecular hydrogen: Effects of collision energy and H2CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Scott L.

    from 0.1 to 2.3 eV. Electronic structure and Rice­ Ramsperger­Kassel­Marcus calculations were usedV, consistent with a transition state found in the electronic structure calculations. A precursor complex on the reaction probabil- ity should provide insight into the barrier crossing dynamics. We are able to probe

  5. US DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology - Composites in H2 Storage and Delivery

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department of Correctiveof DeliverablesNovember 1, URTAC

  6. Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power,5Energyof Energyn t li b a f

  7. JOBS Models: JOBS FC (Fuel Cells) and JOBS H2 (Hydrogen)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartment ofEnergy Introduction SCADAPlanIs the18,16, 2013Models

  8. National Energy Modeling System with Hydrogen Model (NEMS-H2)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the BillDepartmentSites KDF SocialAdministratorNSIDCNatModeling System with

  9. Microbial Electrolysis Cells (MECs) for High Yield Hydrogen (H2) Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial ReportProposal toDepartment ofEnergy Michigan3 BALLARDfrom

  10. Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas8 AUDITAprilDepartment ofCritical

  11. Webinar: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 - Employers139 Weatherization Works|2012)Energyv3) |

  12. Hydrogen Energy in Engineering Education (H2E3) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., A

  13. Hydrogen Transition Sensitivity Studies using H2Sim | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOEPRODUCTIONM M aSensitivity

  14. H2A Hydrogen Production Analysis Tool (Presentation) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-TankDepartmentProduction

  15. H2FIRST Hydrogen Contaminant Detector Task: Requirements Document and Market Survey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs |

  16. H2 Refuel H-Prize Aims to Make Fueling Hydrogen Powered Vehicles Easier

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContracting Oversight CommitteeandEnergyPub. L.

  17. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011 This third issue describes hazard analysis in H2 facility design and operations. h2snapshotv2i2.pdf More Documents &...

  18. Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model Overview of H2A stationary model concept,...

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Adsorption of Hydrogen Sulfide onto Activated Carbon Fibers: Effect of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borguet, Eric

    about 95-97% of the hydrogen sulfide, emissions from Claus units are now becoming a source of H2S with other gases such as COS, CS2, and CO2 at various concentrations. Now Claus plants are required to reduce H2S emissions from the tail gas (7). Adsorption/oxidation by carbonaceous surfaces

  1. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  2. Water Deuteration and Ortho-to-Para Nuclear Spin Ratio of H2 in Molecular Clouds Formed via Accumulation of HI Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, K; Hincelin, U; Hassel, G E; Bergin, E A; Vasyunin, A I; Herbst, Eric

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the water deuteration ratio and ortho-to-para nuclear spin ratio of H2 (OPR(H2)) during the formation and early evolution of a molecular cloud, following the scenario that accretion flows sweep and accumulate HI gas to form molecular clouds. We follow the physical evolution of post-shock materials using a one-dimensional shock model, with post-processing gas-ice chemistry simulations. This approach allows us to study the evolution of the OPR(H2) and water deuteration ratio without an arbitrary assumption concerning the initial molecular abundances, including the initial OPR(H2). When the conversion of hydrogen into H2 is almost complete, the OPR(H2) is already much smaller than the statistical value of three due to the spin conversion in the gas phase. As the gas accumulates, the OPR(H2) decreases in a non-equilibrium manner. We find that water ice can be deuterium-poor at the end of its main formation stage in the cloud, compared to water vapor observed in the vicinity of low-mass protostars w...

  3. Role of the H$_2^+$ channel in the primordial star formation under strong radiation field and the critical intensity for the supermassive star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugimura, Kazuyuki; Omukai, Kazuyuki; Galli, Daniele; Palla, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of the H_2^+ channel on H_2 molecule formation during the collapse of primordial gas clouds immersed in strong radiation fields which are assumed to have the shape of a diluted black-body spectra with temperature T_rad. Since the photodissociation rate of H_2^+ depends on its level population, we take full account of the vibrationally-resolved H_2^+ kinetics. We find that in clouds under soft but intense radiation fields with spectral temperature T_rad 7000 K, the H^- channel takes over H_2^+ in the production of molecular hydrogen. We calculate the critical radiation intensity needed for supermassive star formation by direct collapse and examine its dependence on the H_2^+ level population. Under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) level population, the critical intensity is underestimated by a factor of a few for soft spectra with T_rad < 7000 K. For harder spectra, the value of the critical intensity is not affected by the level population of H_2^+. This resu...

  4. Effects of CO2 on H2O band profiles and band strengths in mixed H2O:CO2 ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karin I. Oberg; Helen J. Fraser; A. C. Adwin Boogert; Suzanne E. Bisschop; Guido W. Fuchs; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Harold Linnartz

    2006-10-25

    H2O is the most abundant component of astrophysical ices. In most lines of sight it is not possible to fit both the H2O 3 um stretching, the 6 um bending and the 13 um libration band intensities with a single pure H2O spectrum. Recent Spitzer observations have revealed CO2 ice in high abundances and it has been suggested that CO2 mixed into H2O ice can affect relative strengths of the 3 um and 6 um bands. We used laboratory infrared transmission spectroscopy of H2O:CO2 ice mixtures to investigate the effects of CO2 on H2O ice spectral features at 15-135 K. We find that the H2O peak profiles and band strengths are significantly different in H2O:CO2 ice mixtures compared to pure H2O ice. In all H2O:CO2 mixtures, a strong free-OH stretching band appears around 2.73 um, which can be used to put an upper limit on the CO2 concentration in the H2O ice. The H2O bending mode profile also changes drastically with CO2 concentration; the broad pure H2O band gives way to two narrow bands as the CO2 concentration is increased. This makes it crucial to constrain the environment of H2O ice to enable correct assignments of other species contributing to the interstellar 6 um absorption band. The amount of CO2 present in the H2O ice of B5:IRS1 is estimated by simultaneously comparing the H2O stretching and bending regions and the CO2 bending mode to laboratory spectra of H2O, CO2, H2O:CO2 and HCOOH.

  5. HIGH-TEMPERATURE CO-ELECTROLYSIS OF H2O AND CO2 FOR SYNGAS PRODUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoots, C.M.

    2006-11-01

    Worldwide, the demand for light hydrocarbon fuels like gasoline and diesel oil is increasing. To satisfy this demand, oil companies have begun to utilize oil deposits of lower hydrogen content (an example is the Athabasca Oil Sands). Additionally, the higher contents of sulfur and nitrogen of these resources requires processes such as hydrotreating to meet environmental requirements. In the mean time, with the price of oil currently over $50 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. South Africa has used synfuels to power a significant number of their buses, trucks, and taxicabs. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to investigate the feasibility of producing syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. The syngas can then be used for synthetic fuel production. This program is a combination of experimental and computational activities. Since the solid oxide electrolyte material is a conductor of oxygen ions, CO can be produced by electrolyzing CO2 sequestered from some greenhouse gas-emitting process. Under certain conditions, however, CO can further electrolyze to produce carbon, which can then deposit on cell surfaces and reduce cell performance. The understanding of the co-electrolysis of steam and CO2 is also complicated by the competing water-gas shift reaction. Results of experiments and calculations to date of CO2 and CO2/H2O electrolysis will be presented and discussed. These will include electrolysis performance at various temperatures, gas mixtures, and electrical settings. Product gas compositions, as measured via a gas analyser, and their relationship to conversion efficiencies will be presented. These measurements will be compared to predictions obtained from chemical equilibrium computer codes. Better understanding of the feasibility of producing syngas using high-temperature electrolysis will initiate the systematic investigation of nuclear-powered synfuel production as a bridge to the future hydrogen economy and ultimate independence from foreign energy resources.

  6. Zero-point energy, tunneling, and vibrational adiabaticity in the Mu + H2 reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Fleming, Donald G.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-01-09

    Abstract: Isotopic substitution of muonium for hydrogen provides an unparalleled opportunity to deepen our understanding of quantum mass effects on chemical reactions. A recent topical review [Aldegunde et al., Mol. Phys. 111, 3169 (2013)] of the thermal and vibrationally-stateselected reaction of Mu with H2 raises a number of issues that are addressed here. We show that some earlier quantum mechanical calculations of the Mu + H2 reaction, which are highlighted in this review and which have been used to benchmark approximate methods, are in error by as much as 19% in the low-temperature limit. We demonstrate that an approximate treatment of the Born–Oppenheimer diagonal correction that was used in some recent studies is not valid for treating the vibrationally-state-selected reaction. We also discuss why vibrationally adiabatic potentials that neglect bend zero-point energy are not a useful analytical tool for understanding reaction rates and why vibrationally nonadiabatic transitions cannot be understood by considering tunneling through vibrationally adiabatic potentials. Finally, we present calculations on a hierarchical family of potential energy surfaces to assess the sensitivity of rate constants to the quality of the potential surface.

  7. New sulfur adsorbents derived from layered double hydroxides: II. DRIFTS study of COS and H2S adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Crocker, Mark [University of Kentucky

    2008-01-01

    H2S and COS adsorption were studied on two calcined layered double hydroxides (LDHs), Mg0.75Al0.25(OH)2(CO3)0.125 and Mg0.65Al0.35(OH)2(CO3)0.175, using Diffuse Reflectance Infrared Fourier Transform Spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and a chemisorption apparatus. Both demonstrated the ability to irreversibly adsorb H2S, corresponding to uptakes of 1.54 and 1.76 mol/m2 respectively, but Mg0.75Al0.25 had a significantly larger capacity for COS, 1.62 mol/m2 compared to 0.80 mol/m2 for Mg0.65Al0.35. Analysis of the DRIFT spectra suggests the adsorption of H2S proceeds via the substitution of lattice oxygen with sulfur, resulting in the formation of H2O on the surface. COS adsorption is more complicated, although it appears that a similar substitution of lattice oxygen with sulfur occurs. This results in the formation of CO2 and subsequently bicarbonates and carbonates. The formation of hydrogen thiocarbonate is also involved, although this form is generally only observed in the later stages of adsorption and appears to form at the expense of bicarbonate. The Mg0.75Al0.25 LDH retained its ability to adsorb COS in the presence of propene.

  8. Final Technical Report for the Period September 2002 through September 2005; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: SI-Based Plant; H2-MHR Pre-Conceptual Design Report: HTE-Based Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Richards; A. Shenoy; L. Brown; R. Buckingham; E. Harvego; K. Peddicord; M. Reza; J. Coupey

    2006-04-19

    For electricity and hydrogen production, an advanced reactor technology receiving considerable international interest is a modular, passively-safe version of the high-temperature, gas-cooled reactor, known in the U.S. as the Modular Helium Reactor (MHR), which operates at a power level of 600 MW(t). For electricity production, the MHR operates with an outlet helium temperature of 850 C to drive a direct, Brayton-cycle power-conversion system with a thermal-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 48 percent. This concept is referred to as the Gas Turbine MHR (GT-MHR). For hydrogen production, both electricity and process heat from the MHR are used to produce hydrogen. This concept is referred to as the H2-MHR. This report provides pre-conceptual design descriptions of full-scale, nth-of-a-kind H2 MHR plants based on thermochemical water splitting using the Sulfur-Iodine process and High-Temperature Electrolysis.

  9. H2 Educate Teacher Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank Farm Waste3H2

  10. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 1, Nov. 2010

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2 Refuel

  11. PVTx properties of the CO2H2O and CO2H2ONaCl systems below 647 K: Assessment of experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    PVTx properties of the CO2­H2O and CO2­H2O­NaCl systems below 647 K: Assessment of experimental-composition (PVTx) properties for the CO2­H2O and CO2­H2O­NaCl systems. This paper presents a comprehensive review. Keywords: CO2 sequestration; PVTx properties; Volume; Density; Thermodynamic modeling 1. Introduction CO2­H

  12. Development of Molecular Electrocatalysts for CO2 Reduction and H2 Production/Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski DuBois, Mary; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2009-12-15

    The conversion of solar energy to fuels in both natural and artificial photosynthesis requires components for both light harvesting and catalysis. The light-harvesting component generates the electrochemical potentials required to drive fuel-generating reactions that would otherwise be thermodynamically uphill. This review focuses on work from our laboratories on developing molecular electrocatalysts for CO2 reduction and for hydrogen production. A true analog of natural photosynthesis will require the ability to capture CO2 from the atmosphere and reduce it to a useful fuel. Work in our laboratories has focused on both aspects of this problem. Organic compounds such as quinones and inorganic metal complexes can serve as redox active CO2 carriers for concentrating CO2. Catalysts for CO2 reduction to form CO have also been developed based on a [Pd(triphosphine)(solvent)]2+ platform. A required feature for catalytic activity is the presence of a weakly coordinating solvent molecule that can dissociate during the catalytic cycle and provide a vacant coordination site for binding water and assisting C-O bond cleavage. Participation of a second metal in CO2 binding also appears to be required for achieving very active catalysts as suggested by structures of [NiFe] CO dehydrogenase enzymes and the results of studies on complexes containing two [Pd(triphosphine)(solvent)]2+ units. Molecular electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on [Ni(diphosphine)2]2+ complexes are also described. These catalysts require the optimization of both first and second coordination spheres similar to that of the palladium CO2 reduction catalysts. In this case, structural features of the first coordination sphere can be used to optimize the hydride acceptor ability of nickel needed to achieve heterolytic cleavage of H2. The second coordination sphere can be used to incorporate pendant bases that assist in a number of important functions including H2 binding, H2 cleavage, and the transfer of protons between nickel and solution. These pendant bases or proton relays are likely to be important in the design of catalysts for a wide range of fuel production and fuel utilization reactions involving multiple electron and proton transfer steps. The work described in this review has been supported by the Chemical Sciences program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences of the Department of Energy. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. Management of Disused Sealed Sources in Hungary - 13077

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kapitany, Sandor

    2013-07-01

    Since 1976 the spent and disused radioactive sources arisen in Hungary are stored in a central storage facility called Radioactive Waste Treatment and Disposal Facility operated by Public Limited Company for Radioactive Waste Management. The Facility is responsible for the record keeping, the waste acceptance procedure, the shipment and the storage or disposal (whether a certain source meets the waste acceptance criteria for disposal or not) of sources. Based on the more than 35 year old operation of the facility many experiences have been gathered regarding the technology for long-term storage of sources, the attitude of the users of sources, the evolution of the legislation and the national record keeping system. Recently a new legislation for the security of radioactive materials (including sources) was introduced, first in Central-Europe. It requires special security arrangements from the facility for transport and for storage. Due to the ongoing retrieval of radioactive waste formerly disposed of, partly containing sealed sources, there is a new challenge in the physical inventory control of historical waste. The paper would show the effect of the changes in the legislation system of record keeping or security on the users' attitude for discard of sources and on the management of the sources in the facility. The facility has a unique storage technology (shallow boreholes) in the narrow region. The sealed sources are placed into vertical pipes sunk into the surface. In the beginning, each of the sources were dropped into the pipe directly, recently they are placed in a metal tube first ensuring the retrieval. The lessons learned will be presented. There were several issues to introduce the new security arrangements (partly financially supported by US DOE) for storage and for transportation of sealed sources. These issues are addressed. In the past part of the sealed sources were disposed together with solid radioactive waste packaged in plastic bags. A waste retrieval campaign was fulfilled in 2008 to retrieve the sealed sources. The paper demonstrates the conditions of sealed sources after twenty-year disposal period. As a summary, the paper will share the main experiences of a 35-year old facility, managing radioactive sealed sources in Central Europe. (authors)

  14. Condensed Lecture Notes (Part 3) Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. It is a transparent gas under normal conditions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hydrogen storage via M + H2 MH2. · Groups 13-17 form molecular hydrides, many of which are gases. Hydrogen18 Condensed Lecture Notes (Part 3) Hydrogen Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe. (Endoergic by 400 kJ/mol) TiO2 catalysis Chemistry of Hydrogen Forms hydrides with every other element

  15. Shock-Tube Time-History Measurements of H2O in the H2/O2 System Using IR Laser Absorption Spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mulvihill, Clayton

    2015-05-04

    H2O time-histories were studied within the H2/O2 system using a tunable diode laser system and a pressure-driven shock tube. Stoichiometric H2/O2 mixtures were prepared in high amounts of argon dilution. The mixtures were heated using a shock tube...

  16. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br2/H2 redox flow cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Nguyen, Trung V.

    2014-10-01

    The Br2/H2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (?) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (?) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm?2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm?2. Maximum energymore »efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br? reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (?) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br? coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.« less

  17. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br2/H2 redox flow cell

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Cho, Kyu Taek; Weber, Adam Z.; Lin, Guangyu; Nguyen, Trung V.

    2014-10-01

    The Br2/H2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (?) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (?) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm?2 and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm?2. Maximum energy efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br? reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (?) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br? coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  18. Optimization of electrode characteristics for the Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, MC; Cho, KT; Weber, AZ; Lin, GY; Nguyen, TV

    2014-10-17

    The Br-2/H-2 redox flow cell shows promise as a high-power, low-cost energy storage device. The effect of various aspects of material selection, processing, and assembly of electrodes on the operation, performance, and efficiency of the system is determined. In particular, (+) electrode thickness, cell compression, hydrogen pressure, and (-) electrode architecture are investigated. Increasing hydrogen pressure and depositing the (-) catalyst layer on the membrane instead of on the carbon paper backing layers have a large positive impact on performance, enabling a limiting current density above 2 A cm(-2) and a peak power density of 1.4 W cm(-2). Maximum energy efficiency of 79 % is achieved. In addition, the root cause of limiting-current behavior in this system is elucidated, where it is found that Br- reversibly adsorbs at the Pt (-) electrode for potentials exceeding a critical value, and the extent of Br- coverage is potential-dependent. This phenomenon limits maximum cell current density and must be addressed in system modeling and design. These findings are expected to lower system cost and enable higher efficiency.

  19. The structure of the Calix[4]arene-(H2O) Cluster: The World’s Smallest Cup of Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hontama, Naoya; Inokuchi, Yoshiya; Ebata, Takayuki; Dedonder-Lardeau, Claude; Jouvet, Christophe; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2010-03-11

    The structure of the calix[4]arene(C4A)-(H2O) cluster formed in a supersonic beam has been investigated by mass-selected resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy, IR-UV double resonance spectroscopy, IR photodissociation (IRPD) spectroscopy and by high level quantum chemical calculations. The IR-UV double resonance spectrum of C4A-(H2O) exhibits a broad and strong hydrogen-bonded OH stretching band at 3160 cm-1 and a weak asymmetric OH stretching band at 3700 cm-1. The IRPD measurement of the cluster produced a value of 3140 cm-1 for the C4A-(H2O) ? C4A + H2O dissociation energy. High level electronic structure calculations at the MP2 level of theory with basis sets up to quadruple zeta quality suggest that the endo-isomer (water inside the C4A cavity) is ~1100 cm-1 more stable than the exo-isomer (water hydrogen bonded to the rim of C4A). The endo-isomer has a best-computed (at the MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ level) value of 3127 cm-1 for the binding energy, just ~15 cm-1 shy of the experimentally determined threshold and an IR spectrum in excellent agreement with the experimentally observed one. In contrast, the B3LYP density functional fails to even predict a stable structure for the endo-isomer demonstrating the inability of that level of theory to describe the delicate balance between structures exhibiting cumulative OH-? H-bonding and dipole-dipole interactions (endo-isomer) when compared to the ones emanating from maximizing the cooperative effects associated with the formation of hydrogen bonded homodromic networks (exo-isomer). The comparison of the experimental results with the ones from high level electronic structure calculations therefore unambiguously assign the endo-isomer as the global minimum of the C4A-(H2O) cluster, world’s smallest cup of water. Part of this work is supported by the Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy. Battelle operates the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. This research was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  20. Correlated chemostratigraphy of Mn-carbonate microbialites (rkt, Hungary) Mrta Polgri a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    ) microbialites at the Úrkút black shale-hosted manganese carbonate ore body (central Hungary) is described microbialites mostly behaved as an open system during deposition of black shale under early diagenetic reduction under an oxic water column; more equant types occur at the contact zone of black shale and Mn

  1. Cesium-137 concentration of soils in Pest County, Hungary Katalin Zsuzsanna Szab a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    Cesium-137 concentration of soils in Pest County, Hungary Katalin Zsuzsanna Szabó a , Beatrix Received in revised form 20 January 2012 Accepted 23 January 2012 Available online xxx Keywords: Cesium-137 Distribution Migration Cesium map Chernobyl accident a b s t r a c t This paper presents the results

  2. Mapping the geogenic radon potential: methodology and spatial analysis for central Hungary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horváth, Ákos

    Mapping the geogenic radon potential: methodology and spatial analysis for central Hungary Katalin 2013 Available online Keywords: Hungarian geogenic radon potential Soil gas radon Soil gas permeability Spatial modeling a b s t r a c t A detailed geogenic radon potential (GRP) mapping based on field soil gas

  3. EUROSTEEL 2011, August 31 -September 2, 2011, Budapest, Hungary CAPACITY DESIGN IN SEISMIC RESISTANT STEEL BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    EUROSTEEL 2011, August 31 - September 2, 2011, Budapest, Hungary CAPACITY DESIGN IN SEISMIC. In seismic resistant structural steel buildings, so-called "deformation controlled" or "fuse" components are designed to yield and dissipate energy, and in the process to shield other "force controlled" or "non

  4. txH2O: Volume 5, Number 3 (Complete) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas Water Resources Institute

    2010-01-01

    is funded in part by the U.S. Geological Survey and authorized by the Water Resources Research Act. To subscribe to txH2O or New Waves, TWRI?s monthly e-mail newsletter, visit http://twri.tamu.edu. 2 I This is your stream. This is your stream on drugs... and understood by ECLOX-using personnel, after the completion of this year?s cities? protocols, that will be 36 cities that have the tools to maintain secure drinking water.? *Some information from a TEEX news release A big production is under- way in Texas...

  5. H2FIRST Frequently Asked Questions | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill Financing ToolSustainable Buildings & Campuses »Climate !H2FIRST

  6. Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT OFER-B-00-020 DOEProgramNEMS-H2, Version 1.0

  7. H2 Educate (9 activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank Farm Waste3H2 Educate

  8. H2 Safety Snapshot - Vol. 2, Issue 2, July 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2 Refuel2, July

  9. H2A Delivery Models and Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2DeliveryModels

  10. Pressure-driven confinement of hydrogen molecules between graphene sheets in the regime of van der Waals repulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    Storage of hydrogen in carbon materials,1,2 with its poten- tial application in hydrogen in the interactions between H2 and hosts in solid lattices,2,3 although mechanism for hydrogen storage in car- bonPressure-driven confinement of hydrogen molecules between graphene sheets in the regime of van der

  11. H2 R&D Activities in the Nordic Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the R&D efforts. At Nordic level through the Nordic Energy Research a number of R&D projects are also's own reg. no.: 1220037 Sponsorship: Nordic Innovation Centre Nordic Energy Research Cover : Pages R&D as much relevant research is not described under the heading of hydrogen energy but integrated

  12. Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under Physiologically Relevant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Kent. S.

    Generation of DNA-Damaging Reactive Oxygen Species via the Autoxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide under found that micromolar concentrations of H2S generated single-strand DNA cleavage. Mechanistic studies indicate that this process involved autoxidation of H2S to generate superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and

  13. Wave Packet Simulations of Antiproton Scattering on Molecular Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stegeby, Henrik; Piszczatowski, Konrad; Karlsson, Hans O

    2015-01-01

    The problem of antiproton scattering on the molecular Hydrogen is investigated by means of wave packet dynamics. The electronically potential energy surfaces of the antiproton H2 system are presented within this work. Excitation and dissociation probabilities of the molecular Hydrogen for collision energies in the ultra low energy regime below 10 eV are computed.

  14. Wave Packet Simulations of Antiproton Scattering on Molecular Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrik Stegeby; Markus Kowalewski; Konrad Piszczatowski; Hans O. Karlsson

    2015-07-30

    The problem of antiproton scattering on the molecular Hydrogen is investigated by means of wave packet dynamics. The electronically potential energy surfaces of the antiproton H2 system are presented within this work. Excitation and dissociation probabilities of the molecular Hydrogen for collision energies in the ultra low energy regime below 10 eV are computed.

  15. Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801488

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paik Suh, Myunghyun

    Hydrogen Storage DOI: 10.1002/anie.200801488 A Comparison of the H2 Sorption Capacities MOFs with accessible metal sites (AMSs) should have a higher hydrogen storage capacity than those be accommodated are of particular interest because they can be applied in gas storage[1­4] and separation,[4

  16. Hydrogen Safety

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet, intended for a non-technical audience, explains the basic properties of hydrogen and provides an overview of issues related to the safe use of hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  17. Hydrogen Storage

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well a

  18. Hydrogen Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation on Hydrogen Analysis to the DOE Systems Analysis Workshop held in Washington, D.C. July 28-29, 2004 to discuss and define role of systems analysis in DOE Hydrogen Program.

  19. Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  20. Collisional kinetics of non-uniform electric field, low-pressure, direct-current discharges in H$_{2}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phelps, A V

    2010-01-01

    A model of the collisional kinetics of energetic hydrogen atoms, molecules, and ions in pure H$_2$ discharges is used to predict H$_\\alpha$ emission profiles and spatial distributions of emission from the cathode regions of low-pressure, weakly-ionized discharges for comparison with a wide variety of experiments. Positive and negative ion energy distributions are also predicted. The model developed for spatially uniform electric fields and current densities less than $10^{-3}$ A/m$^2$ is extended to non-uniform electric fields, current densities of $10^{3}$ A/m$^2$, and electric field to gas density ratios $E/N = 1.3$ MTd at 0.002 to 5 Torr pressure. (1 Td = $10^{-21}$ V m$^2$ and 1 Torr = 133 Pa) The observed far-wing Doppler broadening and spatial distribution of the H$_\\alpha$ emission is consistent with reactions among H$^+$, H$_2^+$, H$_3^+$, and H$^-H$ ions, fast H atoms, and fast H$_2$ molecules, and with reflection, excitation, and attachment to fast H atoms at surfaces. The H$_\\alpha$ excitation and ...

  1. HYDROGEN SULFIDE KINETICS ON PEM FUEL CELL ELECTRODES V. A. Sethuramana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethuraman, Vijay A.

    HYDROGEN SULFIDE KINETICS ON PEM FUEL CELL ELECTRODES V. A. Sethuramana , L. A. Wiseb , S for the poisoning kinetics of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on composite solid polymer electrolyte Pt (SPE-Pt) electrode, total recovery with neat hydrogen was not possible and a partial recovery was possible by a potential

  2. Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James B.

    Potential energy surface for the hydrogen-iodine reaction James B. Anderson Department of Chemistry of the hydrogen-iodine reaction, H2+I,-*HI +HI. He reported rate measurementsof the forward and reverse reactions of existing iodine atoms with hydrogen would have to be looked (at): 21+Hz-+2HI... ." ' It is now be- lieved

  3. Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    Site-Dependent Activity of Atomic Ti Catalysts in Al-Based Hydrogen Storage Materials Abdullah Al storage processes. Here we analyze the role of atomic Ti catalysts in the hydrogenation of Al-based hydrogen storage materials. We show that Ti atoms near the Al surface activate gas-phase H2, a key step

  4. Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cafarella, Michael J.

    Theoretical Limits of Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks: Opportunities and Trade predict the hydrogen storage properties of these compounds. Approximately 20 000 candidate compounds were excess H2 uptake and surface area, we predict the theoretical total hydrogen storage capacity

  5. Ni-dispersed fullerenes: Hydrogen storage and desorption properties Weon Ho Shin and Seong Ho Yang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Ni-dispersed fullerenes: Hydrogen storage and desorption properties Weon Ho Shin and Seong Ho Yang could be viable alternatives to reversible hydrogen storage. It is demonstrated that a single Ni coated-dispersed fullerenes are considered to be the novel hydrogen storage media capable of storing 6.8 wt % H2, thus

  6. Amineborane Based Chemical Hydrogen Storage - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneddon, Larry G.

    2011-04-21

    The development of efficient and safe methods for hydrogen storage is a major hurdle that must be overcome to enable the use of hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier. The objectives of this project in the DOE Center of Excellence in Chemical Hydride Storage were both to develop new methods for on-demand, low temperature hydrogen release from chemical hydrides and to design high-conversion off-board methods for chemical hydride regeneration. Because of their reactive protic (N-H) and hydridic (B-H) hydrogens and high hydrogen contents, amineboranes such as ammonia borane, NH3BH3 (AB), 19.6-wt% H2, and ammonia triborane NH3B3H7 (AT), 17.7-wt% H2, were initially identified by the Center as promising, high-capacity chemical hydrogen storage materials with the potential to store and deliver molecular hydrogen through dehydrogenation and hydrolysis reactions. In collaboration with other Center partners, the Penn project focused both on new methods to induce amineborane H2-release and on new strategies for the regeneration the amineborane spent-fuel materials. The Penn approach to improving amineborane H2-release focused on the use of ionic liquids, base additives and metal catalysts to activate AB dehydrogenation and these studies successfully demonstrated that in ionic liquids the AB induction period that had been observed in the solid-state was eliminated and both the rate and extent of AB H2-release were significantly increased. These results have clearly shown that, while improvements are still necessary, many of these systems have the potential to achieve DOE hydrogen-storage goals. The high extent of their H2­-release, the tunability of both their H2 materials weight-percents and release rates, and their product control that is attained by either trapping or suppressing unwanted volatile side products, such as borazine, continue to make AB/ionic­-liquid based systems attractive candidates for chemical hydrogen storage applications. These studies also demonstrated that H2-­release from chemical hydrides can occur by a number of different mechanistic pathways and strongly suggest that optimal chemical ­hydride based H2­release systems may require the use of synergistic dehydrogenation methods to induce H2­-loss from chemically different intermediates formed during release reactions. The efficient regeneration of ammonia borane from BNHx spent fuel is one of the most challenging problems that will have to be overcome in order to utilize AB-based hydrogen storage. Three Center partners, LANL, PNNL and Penn, each took different complimentary approaches to AB regeneration. The Penn approach focused on a strategy involving spent-fuel digestion with superacidic acids to produce boron-halides (BX3) that could then be converted to AB by coordination/reduction/displacement processes. While the Penn boron-halide reduction studies successfully demonstrated that a dialkylsulfide-based coordination/reduction/displacement process gave quantitative conversions of BBr3 to ammonia borane with efficient and safe product separations, the fact that AB spent-fuels could not be digested in good yields to BX3 halides led to a No-Go decision on this overall AB-regeneration strategy.

  7. Collision-induced infrared spectra of H2-He pairs at temperatures from 18 to 7000 K. II. Overtone and hot bands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, A.; Frommhold, L.; Texas Univ., Austin )

    1989-06-01

    The three lowest spectral moments of the collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of H2-He pairs have been computed from first principles for temperatures T from 18 to 7000 K for a number of hydrogen overtone and hot bands involving vibrational quantum numbers nu = 0, 1, 2, 3 yields nu-prime = 0, 1, 2, 3. The data are given in a form suitable for the computation of CIA spectra of H2-He as function of frequency and temperature, using simple computer codes and model line shapes. The work is of interest for the spectroscopy of the atmospheres of the outer planets and of stars that contain neutral molecular hydrogen and helium (late stars, white dwarfs, and Population II stars) in the infrared and visible region of the spectrum. 13 refs.

  8. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

  9. Hydrogenation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedman, J.; Oberg, C. L.; Russell, L. H.

    1981-06-23

    Hydrogenation reaction apparatus is described comprising a housing having walls which define a reaction zone and conduits for introducing streams of hydrogen and oxygen into the reaction zone, the oxygen being introduced into a central portion of the hydrogen stream to maintain a boundary layer of hydrogen along the walls of the reaction zone. A portion of the hydrogen and all of the oxygen react to produce a heated gas stream having a temperature within the range of from 1,100 to 1,900 C, while the boundary layer of hydrogen maintains the wall temperature at a substantially lower temperature. The heated gas stream is introduced into a hydrogenation reaction zone and provides the source of heat and hydrogen for a hydrogenation reaction. There also is provided means for quenching the products of the hydrogenation reaction. The present invention is particularly suitable for the hydrogenation of low-value solid carbonaceous materials to provide high yields of more valuable liquid and gaseous products. 2 figs.

  10. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2-H2 pairs in the fundamental band at temperatures from 20 to 300 K. [Planetary atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borysow, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The 20-300 K free-free rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2-H2 pairs are presently obtained by a numerical method which, in addition to closely matching known CIA spectra of H2-H2, can reproduce the results of the quantum-mechanical computations to within a few percent. Since the spectral lineshape parameters are derivable by these means from the lowest three quantum-mechanical spectral moments, these outer-planet atmosphere-pertinent model spectra may be computed on even small computers. 35 refs.

  11. Recommended Best Practices for the Characterization of Storage Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials- Section 6 Thermal Properties of Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report, written by H2 Technology Consulting, provides an introduction to and overview of the recommended best practices in making measurements of the hydrogen storage properties of materials.

  12. H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Guidance H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance August 6, 2015 1:00PM to 2:00PM EDT The Fuel Cell Technologies Office will present a live webinar entitled "H2 Refuel H-Prize...

  13. DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of...

  14. A THEORETICAL INVESTIGATION OF RADIOLYTIC H2 GENERATION FROM SOLIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, M.; Sindelar, R.; Fisher, D.

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen generation from materials in nuclear materials storage is of critical interest due to the potential for pressurization and/or flammability issues. Studies have focused on aqueous systems or those with minor amounts of physisorbed water, since conventional knowledge identifies the radiolytic decomposition of water as the source of H{sub 2} gas. Furthermore, the approach to characterize gas generation is typically strictly empirical, relying on determination of G-values from which production in systems is estimated. Interestingly, exploratory work at SRNL1 on gamma exposure to fully-dried solids with chemically-bound water that are typical of those produced on aluminium-clad nuclear fuel in reactor and post-discharge storage has shown a profound production of hydrogen (as the sole gaseous species) from fully dried boehmite ({gamma}-AlOOH or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O) powders and no observable hydrogen from gibbsite ({gamma}-Al(OH){sub 3} or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O) under gamma irradiation from cobalt-60. This observation is significant in that gibbsite is known to thermally decompose at 80 C whereas boehmite is stable to 400 C. Radiation damage can have various effects on solids, including heating, bond breaking, and rearrangements in the bonding structure. For example, a molecule can be ionized resulting in the generation of free electrons which can, in turn, ionize another molecule. Alternately, reactive radical species such as {lg_bullet}OH or cation species may be formed, which can go on to change bonding structures.

  15. Hydrogen Production by Water Biophotolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghirardi, Maria L.; King, Paul W.; Mulder, David W.; Eckert, Carrie; Dubini, Alexandra; Maness, Pin-Ching; Yu, Jianping

    2014-01-22

    The use of microalgae for production of hydrogen gas from water photolysis has been studied for many years, but its commercialization is still limited by multiple challenges. Most of the barriers to commercialization are attributed to the existence of biological regulatory mechanisms that, under anaerobic conditions, quench the absorbed light energy, down-regulate linear electron transfer, inactivate the H2-producing enzyme, and compete for electrons with the hydrogenase. Consequently, the conversion efficiency of absorbed photons into H2 is significantly lower than its estimated potential of 12–13 %. However, extensive research continues towards addressing these barriers by either trying to understand and circumvent intracellular regulatory mechanisms at the enzyme and metabolic level or by developing biological systems that achieve prolonged H2 production albeit under lower than 12–13 % solar conversion efficiency. This chapter describes the metabolic pathways involved in biological H2 photoproduction from water photolysis, the attributes of the two hydrogenases, [FeFe] and [NiFe], that catalyze biological H2 production, and highlights research related to addressing the barriers described above. These highlights include: (a) recent advances in improving our understanding of the O2 inactivation mechanism in different classes of hydrogenases; (b) progress made in preventing competitive pathways from diverting electrons from H2 photoproduction; and (c) new developments in bypassing the non-dissipated proton gradient from down-regulating photosynthetic electron transfer. As an example of a major success story, we mention the generation of truncated-antenna mutants in Chlamydomonas and Synechocystis that address the inherent low-light saturation of photosynthesis. In addition, we highlight the rationale and progress towards coupling biological hydrogenases to non-biological, photochemical charge-separation as a means to bypass the barriers of photobiological systems.

  16. Solar-thermal Water Splitting Using the Sodium Manganese Oxide Process & Preliminary H2A Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd M. Francis, Paul R. Lichty, Christopher Perkins, Melinda Tucker, Peter B. Kreider, Hans H. Funke, Allan Lewandowski, and Alan W. Weimer

    2012-10-24

    There are three primary reactions in the sodium manganese oxide high temperature water splitting cycle. In the first reaction, Mn2O3 is decomposed to MnO at 1,500°C and 50 psig. This reaction occurs in a high temperature solar reactor and has a heat of reaction of 173,212 J/mol. Hydrogen is produced in the next step of this cycle. This step occurs at 700°C and 1 atm in the presence of sodium hydroxide. Finally, water is added in the hydrolysis step, which removes NaOH and regenerates the original reactant, Mn2O3. The high temperature solar�driven step for decomposing Mn2O3 to MnO can be carried out to high conversion without major complication in an inert environment. The second step to produce H2 in the presence of sodium hydroxide is also straightforward and can be completed. The third step, the low temperature step to recover the sodium hydroxide is the most difficult. The amount of energy required to essentially distill water to recover sodium hydroxide is prohibitive and too costly. Methods must be found for lower cost recovery. This report provides information on the use of ZnO as an additive to improve the recovery of sodium hydroxide.

  17. Detection of Hydrogen Spillover in Palladium-Modified Activated Carbon Fibers During Hydrogen Adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, Cristian I; Brown, Craig; Liu, Yun; Bhat, Vinay V; Gallego, Nidia C

    2009-01-01

    Palladium-modified activated carbon fibers (Pd-ACF) are being evaluated for adsorptive hydrogen storage at near-ambient conditions because of their enhanced hydrogen uptake in comparison to Pd-free activated carbon fibers (ACF). The net uptake enhancement (at room temperature and 20 bar) is in excess of the amount corresponding to formation of Pd hydride, and is usually attributed to hydrogen spillover. In this paper, inelastic neutron scattering was used to demonstrate the formation of new C-H bonds in Pd-containing activated carbon fibers after exposure to hydrogen at 20 oC and 1.6 MPa, at the expense of physisorbed H2. This finding is a post-factum proof of the atomic nature of H species formed in presence of a Pd catalyst, and of their subsequent spillover and binding to the carbon support. Chemisorption of hydrogen may explain the reduction in hydrogen uptake from first to second adsorption cycle.

  18. Effects of macroH2A and H2A.Z on nucleosome structure and dynamics as elucidated by molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowerman, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotes tune the transcriptional activity of their genome by altering the nucleosome core particle through multiple chemical processes. In particular, replacement of the canonical H2A histone with the variants macroH2A and H2A.Z has been shown to affect DNA accessibility and nucleosome stability; however, the processes by which this occurs remain poorly understood. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these variants with an extensive molecular dynamics study of the canonical nucleosome along with three variant-containing structures: H2A.Z, macroH2A, and an H2A mutant with macroH2A-like L1 loops. Simulation results show that variant L1 loops play a pivotal role in stabilizing DNA binding to the octamer through direct interactions, core structural rearrangements, and altered allosteric networks in the nucleosome. All variants influence dynamics; however, macroH2A-like systems have the largest effect on energetics. In addition, we provide a comprehensive analysis of allosteric networks in the nucleo...

  19. The mechanism of H-bond rupture: the vibrational pre-dissociation of C2H2HCl and C2H2DCl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisler, Hanna

    The mechanism of H-bond rupture: the vibrational pre-dissociation of C2H2­HCl and C2H2­DCl Marisian.1039/b710967a Pair correlated fragment rovibrational distributions are presented following vibrational and angular momentum between fragment vibration, rotation and recoil. Deposition of the largest portion

  20. H2S removal with ZnO during fuel processing for PEM fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2006-09-15

    The possibility of using ZnO as a H2S absorbent to protect catalysts in the gasoline and diesel fuel processor for PEM fuel cell applications was studied. It is possible to use commercial ZnO absorbent as a guard bed to protect the PROX catalyst and PEM fuel cell. However, it is not feasible to use ZnO to protect high and low temperature WGS catalysts, most likely due to COS formation via reactions CO + H2S = COS + H2 and CO2 + H2S = COS + H2O.

  1. Method for forming H2-permselective oxide membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gavalas, G.R.; Nam, S.W.; Tsapatsis, M.; Kim, S.

    1995-09-26

    Methods are disclosed for forming permselective oxide membranes that are highly selective to permeation of hydrogen by chemical deposition of reactants in the pore of porous tubes, such as Vycor{trademark} glass or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} tubes. The porous tubes have pores extending through the tube wall. The process involves forming a stream containing a first reactant of the formula RX{sub n}, wherein R is silicon, titanium, boron or aluminum, X is chlorine, bromine or iodine, and n is a number which is equal to the valence of R; and forming another stream containing water vapor as the second reactant. Both of the reactant streams are passed along either the outside or the inside surface of a porous tube and the streams react in the pores of the porous tube to form a nonporous layer of R-oxide in the pores. The membranes are formed by the hydrolysis of the respective halides. In another embodiment, the first reactant stream contains a first reactant having the formula SiH{sub n}Cl{sub 4{minus}n} where n is 1, 2 or 3; and the second reactant stream contains water vapor and oxygen. In still another embodiment the first reactant stream containing a first reactant selected from the group consisting of Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 3}, Cl{sub 3}SiOSiCl{sub 2}OSiCl{sub 3}, and mixtures thereof and the second reactant stream contains water vapor. In still another embodiment, membrane formation is carried out by an alternating flow deposition method. This involves a sequence of cycles, each cycle comprising introduction of the halide-containing stream and allowance of a specific time for reaction followed by purge and flow of the water vapor containing stream for a specific length of time. In all embodiments the nonporous layers formed are selectively permeable to hydrogen. 11 figs.

  2. Polyaniline nanowires-gold nanoparticles hybrid network based chemiresistive hydrogen sulfide sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.3070237 Hydrogen sulfide H2S is a toxic, corrosive, and inflam- mable gas produced in sewage, coal mines, oil, the nanofibrous film showed better sensing performance compared to thin film because of the increased surface area

  3. The shock-excitation of molecular hydrogen in the interstellar medium 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Michael Graham

    This dissertation presents a study of shock-excited molecular hydrogen (H2) in the interstellar medium. The aims of this thesis are to understand the shock-excitation process and to understand the global role of shocks in ...

  4. Hydrogen Bond Rearrangements in Water Probed with Temperature-Dependent 2D IR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicodemus, Rebecca A.

    We use temperature-dependent two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy (2D IR) of dilute HOD in H2O to investigate hydrogen bond rearrangements in water. The OD stretching frequency is sensitive to its environment, and loss ...

  5. MODELING AND EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES TO OPTIMIZE THE PERFORMANCE OF A HYDROGEN – BROMINE FUEL CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    2015-08-31

    The regenerative Hydrogen-Bromine (H2-Br2) fuel cells are considered to be one of the viable systems for large scale energy storage because of their high energy conversion efficiency, flexible operation, highly reversible reactions and low capital...

  6. Electrochemical hydrogenation of aromatic compounds chemisorbed at polycrystalline and single-crystal Pd surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanabria-Chinchilla, Jean

    2009-06-02

    The chemisorption and electrochemical hydrogenation of hydroquinone (H2Q) at polycrystalline (pc) Pd, well-ordered Pd(100), and Pd-modified Au(hkl) electrodes were studied using a combination of ultra-high vacuum (UHV) surface spectroscopy...

  7. Knock behavior of a lean-burn hydrogen-enhanced engine concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topinka, Jennifer A. (Jennifer Ann), 1977-

    2003-01-01

    Experiments to identify the knock trends of lean gasoline-air mixtures, and such mixtures enhanced with hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO), were performed on a single-cylinder research engine with boosting capability. ...

  8. Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Production of Hydrogen and Electricity from Coal with CO2 Capture Princeton University: Tom Group: · Investigating the H2/Electricity Economy Activities: · H2/electricity production from fossil interest because it is: · Plentiful. Resource ~ 500 years (vs. gas/oil: ~100 years). · Inexpensive. 1

  9. Dynamic viscosity estimation of hydrogen sulfide using a predictive scheme based on molecular dynamics.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    natural gases containing hydrogen sulfide H2S and/or carbon dioxide CO2) are often encountered properties are very scarce because of the very high toxicity of H2S which leads to very complicated safety procedures for the experimentalists. This is especially true for the high pressures and temperatures

  10. Membranes for H2 generation from nuclear powered thermochemical cycles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nenoff, Tina Maria; Ambrosini, Andrea; Garino, Terry J.; Gelbard, Fred; Leung, Kevin; Navrotsky, Alexandra (University of California, Davis, CA); Iyer, Ratnasabapathy G. (University of California, Davis, CA); Axness, Marlene

    2006-11-01

    In an effort to produce hydrogen without the unwanted greenhouse gas byproducts, high-temperature thermochemical cycles driven by heat from solar energy or next-generation nuclear power plants are being explored. The process being developed is the thermochemical production of Hydrogen. The Sulfur-Iodide (SI) cycle was deemed to be one of the most promising cycles to explore. The first step of the SI cycle involves the decomposition of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} into O{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O at temperatures around 850 C. In-situ removal of O{sub 2} from this reaction pushes the equilibrium towards dissociation, thus increasing the overall efficiency of the decomposition reaction. A membrane is required for this oxygen separation step that is capable of withstanding the high temperatures and corrosive conditions inherent in this process. Mixed ionic-electronic perovskites and perovskite-related structures are potential materials for oxygen separation membranes owing to their robustness, ability to form dense ceramics, capacity to stabilize oxygen nonstoichiometry, and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Two oxide families with promising results were studied: the double-substituted perovskite A{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}B{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (A=La, Y; B=Cr-Ni), in particular the family La{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}Co{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCM), and doped La{sub 2}Ni{sub 1-x}M{sub x}O{sub 4} (M = Cu, Zn). Materials and membranes were synthesized by solid state methods and characterized by X-ray and neutron diffraction, SEM, thermal analyses, calorimetry and conductivity. Furthermore, we were able to leverage our program with a DOE/NE sponsored H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition reactor study (at Sandia), in which our membranes were tested in the actual H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} decomposition step.

  11. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  12. Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification: Independent Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-10-01

    This independent review is the conclusion arrived at from data collection, document reviews, interviews and deliberation from December 2010 through April 2011 and the technical potential of Hydrogen Production Cost Estimate Using Biomass Gasification. The Panel reviewed the current H2A case (Version 2.12, Case 01D) for hydrogen production via biomass gasification and identified four principal components of hydrogen levelized cost: CapEx; feedstock costs; project financing structure; efficiency/hydrogen yield. The panel reexamined the assumptions around these components and arrived at new estimates and approaches that better reflect the current technology and business environments.

  13. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macrì; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

    2007-08-28

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  14. Neutron scattering studies of the H2a-H2b and (H3-H4)/sub 2/ histone complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron scattering experiments have shown that both the (H3-H4)/sub 2/ and H2a-H2b histone complexes are quite asymmetric in solution. The (H3-H4)/sub 2/ tetramer is an oblate or flattened structure, with a radius of gyration almost as large as that of the core octamer. If the tetramer is primarily globular, it must have an axial ratio of about 1:5. It is more likely, however, that this asymmetry results in part from N-terminal arms that extend outward approximately within the major plane of the particle. If this is the case, less asymmetric models for the globular part of the tetramer, including a dislocated disk, can be made consistent with the scattering data. The H2a-H2b dimer, on the other hand, is an elongated structure. 48 references, 12 figures, 1 table.

  15. Energy Department Launches H2 Refuel H-Prize Competition for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and entrepreneurs to develop affordable systems for small-scale, non-commercial hydrogen fueling. These projects will continue to deploy hydrogen infrastructure across the...

  16. Hydrogen Production

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

  17. HI-to-H2 transitions in the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bialy, Shmuel; Lee, Min-Young; Petit, Franck Le; Roueff, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    We apply the Sternberg et al. (2014) theoretical model to analyze HI and H2 observations in the Perseus molecular cloud. We constrain the physical properties of the HI shielding envelopes and the nature of the HI-to-H2 transitions. Our analysis (Bialy et al. 2015) implies that in addition to cold neutral gas (CNM), less dense thermally-unstable gas (UNM) significantly contributes to the shielding of the H2 cores in Perseus.

  18. ANSI X3H2-97-011 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-97-011 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE21 WG3 DBL MAD-146r2, ANSI X3H2-96-501r2. 3 Snodgrass, R. T., M. H. Bohlen, C. S. Jensen and A. Steiner. Adding Transaction Time to SQL Temporal. 1996. ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-147r2, ANSI X3H2

  19. ANSI X3H2-97-010 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-97-010 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE Temporal. 1996. ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-146r2, ANSI X3H2-96-501r2. 5 Snodgrass, R. T., M. H. Bohlen DBL MAD-147r2, ANSI X3H2-96-502r1. 6 Snodgrass, R.T., Addendum to Valid- and Transaction

  20. Formaldehyde Densitometry of Galactic Star-Forming Regions Using the H2CO 3(12)-3(13) and 4(13)-4(14) Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCauley, Patrick I; Wootten, Alwyn

    2011-01-01

    We present Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of the 3(12)-3(13) (29 GHz) and 4(13)-4(14) (48 GHz) transitions of the H2CO molecule toward a sample of 23 well-studied star-forming regions. Analysis of the relative intensities of these transitions can be used to reliably measure the densities of molecular cores. Adopting kinetic temperatures from the literature, we have employed a Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) model to derive the average hydrogen number density [n(H2)] within a 16 arcsecond beam toward each source. Densities in the range of 10^{5.5}--10^{6.5} cm^{-3} and ortho-formaldehyde column densities per unit line width between 10^{13.5} and 10^{14.5} cm^{-2} (km s^{-1})^{-1} are found for most objects, in general agreement with existing measurements. A detailed analysis of the advantages and limitations to this densitometry technique is also presented. We find that H2CO 3(12)-3(13)/4(13)-4(14) densitometry proves to be best suited to objects with T_K >~ 100 K, above which the H2CO LVG models become...

  1. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

    2008-01-01

    gasification, coal gasification, natural gas reforming, andgasification and then coal gasification with carbon captureproduction of H2 via coal gasification with CCS C-SMR, C-

  2. Webinar: Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Guidance for Filling Out a Detailed H2A Production Case Study, originally presented on July 9, 2013.

  3. KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Staged O2 Introduction and Selective H2 Combustion during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    KINETICS, CATALYSIS, AND REACTION ENGINEERING Staged O2 Introduction and Selective H2 Combustion2 increased the selectivity of propane conversion to aromatics o

  4. Closer Look Reveals New Insights on Enzymatic Catalysts for H2 Production (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    Researchers use spectroscopic tools to analyze H2 activation by [FeFe]-Hydrogenase HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  5. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

    2008-01-01

    C/kg H2 for SMR, coal gasification and biomass gasification,SMR, electrolysis and biomass gasification, respectively C-including biomass gasification, coal gasification, natural

  6. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2008 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

  7. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2007 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

  8. Evidence of the production of hot hydrogen atoms in RF plasmas by catalytic reactions between hydrogen and oxygen species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Phillips; Chun Ku Chen; Randell Mills

    2005-08-31

    Selective H-atom line broadening was found to be present throughout the volume (13.5 cm ID x 38 cm length) of RF generated H2O plasmas in a GEC cell. Notably, at low pressures (ca. hydrogen was 'hot' with energies greater than 40 eV with a pressure dependence, but only a weak power dependence. The degree of broadening was virtually independent of the position studied within the GEC cell, similar to the recent finding for He/H2 and Ar/H2 plasmas in the same GEC cell. In contrast to the atomic hydrogen lines, no broadening was observed in oxygen species lines at low pressures. Also, in control Xe/H2 plasmas run in the same cell at similar pressures and adsorbed power, no significant broadening of atomic hydrogen, Xe, or any other lines was observed. Stark broadening or acceleration of charged species due to high electric fields can not explain the results since (i) the electron density was insufficient by orders of magnitude, (ii) the RF field was essentially confined to the cathode fall region in contrast to the broadening that was independent of position, and (iii) only the atomic hydrogen lines were broadened. Rather, all of the data is consistent with a model that claims specific, predicted, species can act catalytically through a resonant energy transfer mechanism to create hot hydrogen atoms in plasmas.

  9. Hydrogen Isotope Exchange Properties of Porous Solids Containing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HEUNG, LEUNGK.

    2004-08-18

    Porous solids such as activated alumina, silica and molecular sieves generally contain significant amounts of hydrogen atoms in the form of H2O or OH even at high temperature and low humidity environment. A significant amount of this hydrogen is available for reversible isotopic exchange. This exchange reaction is slow under normal conditions and does not render itself to practical applications. But if the exchange kinetics is improved this reaction has the potential to be used for tritium removal from gas streams or for hydrogen isotopic separation.The use of catalysts to improve the exchange kinetics between hydrogen isotope in the gas phase and that in the solid phase was investigated. Granules of alumina, silica and molecular sieve were coated with platinum or palladium as the catalyst. The granules were packed in a 2-cm diameter column for isotope exchange tests. Gas streams containing different concentrations of deuterium in nitrogen or argon were fed through the protium saturated column. Isotope concentration in column effluent was monitored to generate isotope break-through curves. The curves were analyzed to produce information on the kinetics and capacity of the material. The results showed that all materials tested provided some extent of isotope exchange but some were superior both in kinetics and capacity. This paper will present the test results.

  10. A stochastic model and Monte Carlo algorithm for fluctuation-induced H$_2$ formation on the surface of interstellar dust grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabelfeld, Karl

    2015-01-01

    A stochastic algorithm for simulation of fluctuation-induced kinetics of H$_2$ formation on grain surfaces is suggested as a generalization of the technique developed in our recent studies where this method was developed to describe the annihilation of spatially separate electrons and holes in a disordered semiconductor. The stochastic model is based on the spatially inhomogeneous, nonlinear integro-differential Smoluchowski equations with random source term. In this paper we derive the general system of Smoluchowski type equations for the formation of H$_2$ from two hydrogen atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains with physisorption and chemisorption sites. We focus in this study on the spatial distribution, and numerically investigate the segregation in the case of a source with a continuous generation in time and randomly distributed in space. The stochastic particle method presented is based on a probabilistic interpretation of the underlying process as a stochastic Markov process of interacting ...

  11. Hydrogen Greenhouse Planets Beyond the Habitable Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    2011-01-01

    We show that collision-induced absorption allows molecular hydrogen to act as an incondensible greenhouse gas, and that bars or tens of bars of primordial H2-He mixtures can maintain surface temperatures above the freezing point of water well beyond the "classical" habitable zone defined for CO2 greenhouse atmospheres. Using a 1-D radiative-convective model we find that 40 bars of pure H2 on a 3 Earth-mass planet can maintain a surface temperature of 280K out to 1.5AU from an early-type M dwarf star and 10 AU from a G-type star. Neglecting the effects of clouds and of gaseous absorbers besides H2, the flux at the surface would be sufficient for photosynthesis by cyanobacteria (in the G star case) or anoxygenic phototrophs (in the M star case). We argue that primordial atmospheres of one to several hundred bars of H2-He are possible, and use a model of hydrogen escape to show that such atmospheres are likely to persist further than 1.5 AU from M stars, and 2 AU from G stars, assuming these planets have protect...

  12. Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop: Code for Hydrogen Pipelines Code for Hydrogen Piping and Pipelines. B31 Hydrogen...

  13. Hydrogen program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gronich, S.

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  14. Storing Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyun Jeong; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Autrey, Thomas; Chupas, Peter; Proffen, Thomas E.

    2010-05-31

    Researchers have been studying mesoporous materials for almost two decades with a view to using them as hosts for small molecules and scaffolds for molding organic compounds into new hybrid materials and nanoparticles. Their use as potential storage systems for large quantities of hydrogen has also been mooted. Such systems that might hold large quantities of hydrogen safely and in a very compact volume would have enormous potential for powering fuel cell vehicles, for instance. A sponge-like form of silicon dioxide, the stuff of sand particles and computer chips, can soak up and store other compounds including hydrogen. Studies carried out at the XOR/BESSRC 11-ID-B beamline at the APS have revealed that the nanoscopic properties of the hydrogenrich compound ammonia borane help it store hydrogen more efficiently than usual. The material may have potential for addressing the storage issues associated with a future hydrogen economy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  15. Functional analysis of the histone variant H2A.Z during lineage commitment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surface, Lauren E. (Lauren Elizabeth)

    2014-01-01

    remained enigmatic. In this thesis, we dissect the role of H2A.Z during lineage commitment. In particular, we focused on the Polycomb-mediated mono-ubiquitylation of H2A.Z. We found that this modification regulates the ...

  16. Gibbs Free Energy of Formation of Zircon from Measurement of Solubility in H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manning, Craig

    Gibbs Free Energy of Formation of Zircon from Measurement of Solubility in H2O Robert C. Newton, Illinois 60439 We exploited the large difference in the solubility of SiO2 and ZrO2 in H2O to constrain. However, its refractory character hinders precise de- termination of its Gibbs energy of formation,1,2 DG

  17. Photoelectron imaging spectroscopy of Cu (H2O)1,2 anion complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineberger, W. Carl

    structure calculations for the neutral, the adiabatic electron affinity is derived. Ó 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Recent experiments [1] and calculations [2,3] of the structure and rearrangement dynamics of CuH2O fol- lowing electron photodetachment from CuÀ H2O have afforded considerable

  18. Energy-transfer dynamics of high-pressure rovibrationally excited molecular H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustine, Mathew P.

    Energy-transfer dynamics of high-pressure rovibrationally excited molecular H2 David J. Saiki 2005; published online 14 September 2005 The energy-transfer dynamics of high-pressure molecular H2 gas energy transfer is described and used to fit the experimental Raman scattering results obtained

  19. Domain fracture and recovery process of metal phthalocyanine monolayers via NO2 and H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    Domain fracture and recovery process of metal phthalocyanine monolayers via NO2 and H2O Jun Hong. After dosing NO2 (10 ppm for 5 min) onto CuPc monolayers under ambient conditions, domain fracture with dissociative O adsorption between CuPc molecules and Au(111). Conversely, after exposing H2O onto a fractured

  20. Review of H2S Abatement in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory Scale Design of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    Review of H2S Abatement in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory Scale Design of Tray Plate Distillation Engineering ­ ISE December 2013 #12;ii Review of H2S Abatement Methods in Geothermal Plants and Laboratory having significantly lower emissions in comparison to traditional fossil fuel plants, geothermal power

  1. ANSI X3H2-96-582 INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-96-582 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION ORGANISATION INTERNATIONALE to Valid- and Transaction-time Proposals Source: ANSI Expert's Contribution Authors: Richard T. Snodgrass Snodgrass, R. T., M. H. Bohlen, C. S. Jensen and A. Steiner Adding Valid Time to SQL Temporal, ANSI X3H2

  2. CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAN HYDROGEN WIN?: EXPLORING SCENARIOS FOR HYDROGEN FUELLED VEHICLES by Katherine Aminta Muncaster of Research Project: Can Hydrogen Win?: Exploring Scenarios for Hydrogen Fuelled Vehicles Report No.: 459 explored the conditions under which hydrogen might succeed in Canada's transportation sector in a carbon

  3. Hydrogen Transition Infrastructure Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melendez, M.; Milbrandt, A.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation for the 2005 U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program review analyzes the hydrogen infrastructure needed to accommodate a transitional hydrogen fuel cell vehicle demand.

  4. Application of a Quantum Cascade Laser for Time-Resolved, in Situ Probing of CH4/H2 and C2H2/H2 Gas Mixtures during Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bristol, University of

    , for example, microwave (MW) or arc-jet plasmas, or the surface of a hot filament (HF). Activation leads Mixtures during Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition of Diamond A. Cheesman, J. A. Smith of the chemistry prevailing in microwave plasma activated hydrocarbon/Ar/H2 gas mixtures used for diamond thin film

  5. Hydrogen Production

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc.,1 DOE HydrogenProduction Hydrogen is

  6. Review problems on photosynthesis, carbon cycle. Julie Wright, HAS222d/253e 2007 1) Photosynthesis resembles the hydrogen fuel cell we studied in the lab. The following reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resembles the hydrogen fuel cell we studied in the lab. The following reactions were taken from the review) the overall reaction of photosynthesis is: H2O + CO2 ---> O2 + CH2O E'o = -1.24 Hydrogen fuel cell: 2H2O

  7. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 2. Kaersutitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 2 in kaersutite water contents (H2O=0.25­0.89 wt. %), decreases in Fe3+ /Fe (4­20%), and enrichments in hydrogen atmosphere led to increased water contents and reduced Fe. Fe reduction and water addition via the reaction

  8. ENERGY MATERIALS & THERMOELECTRICS Reduction of nickel oxide particles by hydrogen studied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    ENERGY MATERIALS & THERMOELECTRICS Reduction of nickel oxide particles by hydrogen studied oxide (NiO) particles is per- formed under 1.3 mbar of hydrogen gas (H2) in an envi- ronmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). Images, diffraction patterns and electron energy-loss spectra (EELS

  9. In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    In search of an alternative fuel: Bio-Solar Hydrogen Production from Arthrospira maxima Dariya of the Project · Description of Arthrospira maxima · Methods and Materials · Alternatives for increasing hydrogen- Carbohydrates, Amino Acids, Lipids ... Inorganic H+,C,N,S,P... Facts and Alternatives #12;PSII: 2H2O + sunlight

  10. Dirac-Fock calculation for H, H2+ and H2 in a strong magnetic field by the Hermitian basis of B-splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Deineka

    1999-09-14

    A two-dimensional, fully numerical approach to the solution of four-component Dirac-Fock equation using the moderately long Hermitian basis of B-splines is applied to H, H2+ and H2 in a strong magnetic field. The geometric parameters, including different behavior of wave-functions relativistic components are analyzed. The accuracy of the solutions as a function of the basis lenght is estimated. The relativistic corrections are calculated by transformation of the matrix equations to the equations for large relativistic components. Application of the finite-element method to solution of the Dirac-Fock equation without supplementary assumption about exchange in case of the H2 excited states is discussed. The maximum localization of the basis functions provides applicability of the quadrature formulae for five-dimensional two-electron integral calculations within reasonable period.

  11. SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 COVERING ISRAEL, THE MIDDLE EAST & THE JEWISH WORLD Ethiopian kids `not at our school!' Hungary's martyred poet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SEPTEMBER 29, 2009 COVERING ISRAEL, THE MIDDLE EAST & THE JEWISH WORLD Ethiopian kids ­ `not at our school!' · Hungary's martyred poet Brain Power Israeli researchers make waves Love affair with Kazakhstan scientists like Segev are an ambi- tious bunch. Cheerleading, or even playing on the support teams

  12. Quality and Sensory Attributes of Shell Eggs Sanitized with a Combination of Hydrogen Peroxide and Ultraviolet Light 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodring, Kristy Senise

    2011-10-21

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the combination of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet light (UV) as an alternative eggshell sanitization procedure for shell egg processing. In each experiment, two cases of eggs (720 total) were...

  13. C-H..O Hydrogen Bonds in Minor Groove of A-tracts in DNA Double Helices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bansal, Manju

    C-H..O Hydrogen Bonds in Minor Groove of A-tracts in DNA Double Helices Anirban Ghosh and Manju-pair as well as cross-strand C-H..O hydrogen bonds in the minor groove. The C2-H2..O2 hydrogen bonds within leads to a narrow minor groove in these regions. # 1999 Academic Press Keywords: C-H..O hydrogen bonds

  14. Significant Quantum Effects in Hydrogen Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyriakou, Georgios; Davidson, Erlend R.; Peng, Guowen; Roling, Luke T.; Singh, Suyash; Boucher, Matthew B.; Marcinkowski, Matthew D.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Michaelides, Angelos; Sykes, E. Charles H.

    2014-05-27

    Dissociation of molecular hydrogen is an important step in a wide variety of chemical, biological, and physical processes. Due to the light mass of hydrogen, it is recognized that quantum effects are often important to its reactivity. However, understanding how quantum effects impact the reactivity of hydrogen is still in its infancy. Here, we examine this issue using a well-defined Pd/Cu(111) alloy that allows the activation of hydrogen and deuterium molecules to be examined at individual Pd atom surface sites over a wide range of temperatures. Experiments comparing the uptake of hydrogen and deuterium as a function of temperature reveal completely different behavior of the two species. The rate of hydrogen activation increases at lower sample temperature, whereas deuterium activation slows as the temperature is lowered. Density functional theory simulations in which quantum nuclear effects are accounted for reveal that tunneling through the dissociation barrier is prevalent for H2 up to 190 K and for D2 up to 140 K. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the effective barrier to H2 dissociation is so low that hydrogen uptake on the surface is limited merely by thermodynamics, whereas the D2 dissociation process is controlled by kinetics. These data illustrate the complexity and inherent quantum nature of this ubiquitous and seemingly simple chemical process. Examining these effects in other systems with a similar range of approaches may uncover temperature regimes where quantum effects can be harnessed, yielding greater control of bond-breaking processes at surfaces and uncovering useful chemistries such as selective bond activation or isotope separation.

  15. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Experience with the German Hydrogen Fuel Project," HydrogenHydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles UCD-ITS-RR-92-14 September bycost than both. Solar-hydrogen fuel- cell vehicles would be

  16. Building the Nordic Research and Innovation Area in Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    euro). 6 Nordic Energy Research H2 and FC projects Nordic representation in EU FP projects Nordic, Icelandic New Energy, Sydkraft, VTT Wärtsilä and Det Norske Veritas FP5 (1999-2002): 40% of 70 projects FP6Building the Nordic Research and Innovation Area in Hydrogen Birte Holst Jørgensen Senior Scientist

  17. Laboratory Simulations of Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savin, Daniel Wolf

    Laboratory Simulations of Molecular Hydrogen Formation in the Early Universe: A Progress Report D Heidelberg, Germany Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Il-la-Neuve B-1348, Belgium Abstract. During the epoch of protogalaxy and first star formation, H2 is the main

  18. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen in Preparing for market launch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Fuel Cell Vehicles and Hydrogen in California Preparing for market launch Catherine Dunwoody June 27, 2012 #12;2 A fuel cell vehicle is electric! 2 · 300-400 mile range · Zero-tailpipe emissions · To launch market and build capacity #12;12 H2 stations and vehicle growth #12;13 California Fuel Cell

  19. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of metal hydride properties on the performance of hydrogen storage systems. Bob Bowman (JPL storage media. Finally, Matt Ringer (NREL) provided an update on the H2A delivery models that now also. The model was used to evaluate storage system designs. The model includes reaction kinetics, which limit

  20. Hydrogen and electricity: Parallels, interactions,and convergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    solid fuels (coal and biomass) to liquid fuels (gasoline andcoal gasi?cation for co-producing hydrogen, electricity and liquidcoal gasi?cation w/CCS Central biomass gasi?cation Central wind electrolysis H 2 distribution and refueling station Liquefaction Liquid

  1. Hydrogen Technology Validation

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This fact sheet provides a basic introduction to the DOE Hydrogen National Hydrogen Learning Demonstration for non-technical audiences.

  2. The Hype About Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2006-01-01

    another promising solution for hydrogen storage. However,storage and delivery, and there are safety issues as well with hydrogen

  3. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  4. 2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | DepartmentVery1, in: A.R. Gavaskar and A.S.C. Chen5,

  5. Effect of nuclear spin symmetry in cold and ultracold reactions: D + para/ortho-H$_2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Simbotin; R. Côté

    2015-05-12

    We report results for reaction and vibrational quenching of the collision D with para-H$_2$($v,j=0$) and ortho-H$_2$($v,j=1$) at cold and ultracold temperatures. We investigate the effect of nuclear spin symmetry for barrier dominated processes ($0\\le v\\le 4$) and for one barrierless case ($v=5$). We find resonant structures for energies in the range corresponding to 0.01--10 K, which depend on the nuclear spin of H$_2$, arising from contributions of specific partial waves. We discuss the implications on the results in this benchmark system for ultracold chemistry.

  6. The water abundance behind interstellar shocks: results from $Herschel$/PACS and $Spitzer$/IRS observations of H$_2$O, CO, and H$_2$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neufeld, David A; Güsten, Rolf; Herczeg, Greg J; Kristensen, Lars; Melnick, Gary J; Nisini, Brunella; Ossenkopf, Volker; Tafalla, Mario; van Dishoeck, Ewine F

    2013-01-01

    We have investigated the water abundance in shock-heated molecular gas, making use of $Herschel$ measurements of far-infrared CO and H$_2$O line emissions in combination with $Spitzer$ measurements of mid-IR H$_2$ rotational emissions. We present far-infrared line spectra obtained with $Herschel$'s PACS instrument in range spectroscopy mode towards two positions in the protostellar outflow NGC 2071 and one position each in the supernova remnants W28 and 3C391. These spectra provide unequivocal detections, at one or more positions, of 12 rotational lines of water, 14 rotational lines of CO, 8 rotational lines of OH (4 lambda doublets), and 7 fine-structure transitions of atoms or atomic ions. We first used a simultaneous fit to the CO line fluxes, along with H$_2$ rotational line fluxes measured previously by $Spitzer$, to constrain the temperature and density distribution within the emitting gas; and we then investigated the water abundances implied by the observed H$_2$O line fluxes. The water line fluxes ar...

  7. Optimized Pathways for Regional H2 Infrastructure Transitions: A Case Study for Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhenhong; Fan, Yueyue; Ogden, Joan M; Chen, Chien-Wei

    2008-01-01

    T. and A. Tarquin. Engineering economy. McGraw-Hill, Boston,Academy of Engineering. The Hydrogen Economy: Opportunities,

  8. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masud, Jahangir [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Nguyena, Trung V. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Singh, Nirala [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); McFarland, Eric [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Ikenberry, Myles [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Hohn, Keith [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States); Pan, Chun-Jern [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan); Hwang, Bing-Joe [National Taiwan University of Science & Technology, Tapei (Taiwan)

    2015-01-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchange current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.

  9. Hydrogen Fueling Station in Honolulu, Hawaii Feasibility Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter Hill; Michael Penev

    2014-08-01

    The Department of Energy Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Plan (September 2011) identifies the use of hydrogen for government and fleet electric vehicles as a key step for achieving “reduced greenhouse gas emissions; reduced oil consumption; expanded use of renewable power …; highly efficient energy conversion; fuel flexibility …; reduced air pollution; and highly reliable grid-support.” This report synthesizes several pieces of existing information that can inform a decision regarding the viability of deploying a hydrogen (H2) fueling station at the Fort Armstrong site in Honolulu, Hawaii.

  10. Hydrogen Cryomagnetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowacki, B. A.; Hanely, E.; Nuttall, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    induction of 2-3 Tesla made from MgB2 superconductors indirectly cooled by LH2, besides the energy efficiency, the new technique generates a homogeneous heat distribution within the metal, so that any local overheating is avoided. As an aside... SMES device in combination with Vanadium Redox-flow Batteries as a generation reserve to regulate variations of power generation demand [25]. The use of liquid hydrogen is capable of enabling the superconducting industry as it is facing resource...

  11. Overview of NEMS-H2, Version 1.0 Frances Wood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipeline Compr. H2 Truck Electrolysis Coal Gasification Biomass Gasification Small City Station Rural sequestration) · Coal Gasification (with and without sequestration) · Biomass Gasification · Electrolysis (grid Residential Renewables: Wind Biomass Solar Geothermal Uranium Commercial Industrial Transportation demands

  12. 3-Methyl-1,2-BN-Cyclopentane: A Promising H2 Storage Material?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Wei; Neiner, Doinita; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Parab, Kshitij; Garner, Edward B.; Dixon, David A.; Matson, Dean W.; Autrey, Thomas; Liu, Shih-Yuan

    2013-01-21

    We provide detailed characterization of properties for 3-methyl-1,2-BN-cyclopentane 1 that are relevant to H2 storage applications such as viscosity, thermal stability, H2 gas stream purity, and polarity. The viscosity of 1 at room temperature is 25±5 cP, about one fourth the viscosity of olive oil. TGA/MS analysis indicates that liquid carrier 1 is thermally stable at 30 °C but decomposes slowly at 50 °C. RGA data suggest that the H2 desorption from 1 is a clean process, producing relatively pure H2 gas. Compound 1 is a polar zwitterionic type liquid consistent with theoretical predictions and solvatochromic studies. "T.A. acknowledges support from the Fuel Cell Technology Program at U.S. DOE, Office of Energy Efficiency 65 and Renewable Energy. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle."

  13. Modeling Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H2S in CO2-Water Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2011-01-01

    Studies on the Transport of Benzene and H 2 S in CO 2 -WaterSolubility measurements of benzene and the alkylbenzenes inDeguchi, 1987. Solubility benzene-hydrocarbon binary mixture

  14. Hydroxyl and molecular H2O diffusivity in a haploandesitic melt Huaiwei Ni a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    Hydroxyl and molecular H2O diffusivity in a haploandesitic melt Huaiwei Ni a,b, , Zhengjiu Xu c) rather than hydroxyl group (OH), water diffusivity has been experimentally determined for a variety

  15. Retrofitting existing chemical scrubbers to biotrickling filters for H2S emission control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Retrofitting existing chemical scrubbers to biotrickling filters for H2S emission control David owned treatment works in the United States (1, 2) and probably 50,000 worldwide, and emission

  16. Overview of Station Analysis Tools Developed in Support of H2USA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Overview of Station Analysis Tools Developed in Support of H2USA" held on May 12, 2015.

  17. Molecular H2O as carrier for oxygen diffusion in hydrous silicate melts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    enriched water diffused into doubly polished rhyolitic glass wafers. H2O profiles were analyzed by infrared or melt, and 18 O diffuses into the condensed phase. After the experiment, the isotopic ratio R (18 O/(16

  18. ORIGINAL RESEARCH PAPER Gas phase H2S product recovery in a packed bed bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    of sulfate-laden wastewaters and bioremediation of acid mine drainage (Colleran et al. 1995; Hulshoff et al to the conversion of CH4 to H2 by steam reforming. In the treatment of acid mine drainage, dissolved heavy metals

  19. Subduction factory: 4. Depthdependent flux of H2O from subducting slabs worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Keken,1 Bradley R. Hacker,2 Ellen M. Syracuse,3 and Geoff A. Abers4 Received 9 August 2010; revised 19. Hacker, E. M. Syracuse, and G. A. Abers (2011), Subduction factory: 4. Depthdependent flux of H2O from

  20. H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Overview and Q&A" held on June 25, 2015.

  1. H2 Refuel H-Prize Updates and Q&A Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Access the recording and download the presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "H2 Refuel H-Prize Updates and Q&A" held on September 22, 2015.

  2. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive...

  3. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

  4. Kinematics and H_2 morphology of the multipolar Post-AGB star IRAS 16594-4656

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. C. Van de Steene; T. Ueta; P. A. M. van Hoof; M. Reyniers; A. G. Ginsburg

    2008-01-04

    context: The spectrum of IRAS 16594-4656 shows shock excited H_2 emission and collisionally excited emission lines such as[O I],[C I],and [Fe II]. aim: The goal is to determine the location of the H_2 and [Fe II] shock emission, to determine the shock velocities,and constrain the physical properties in the shock. methods: High resolution spectra of the H_2 1-0 S(1),H_2 2-1 S(1), [Fe II], and Pa$\\beta$ emission lines were obtained with the near infrared spectrograph Phoenix on Gemini South. results: The position-velocity diagrams of H_2 1-0 S(1), H_2 2-1 S(1), and [Fe II] are presented. The H_2 and [Fe II] emission is spatially extended. The collisionally excited [O I] and [C I] optical emission lines have a similar double peaked profile compared to the extracted H_2 profile and appear to be produced in the same shock. They all indicate an expansion velocity of ~8 km/s and the presence of a neutral, very high density region with $n_{\\rm e}$ about 3 x 10^6 to 5 x10^7 cm$^{-3}$. The [Fe II] emission however is single peaked. It has a gaussian FWHM of 30 km/s and a total width of 62 km/s at 1% of the peak. The Pa$\\beta$ profile is even wider with a gaussian FWHM of 48 km/s and a total width of 75 km/s at 1% of the peak. conclusions: The H$_2$ emission is excited in a slow 5 to 20 km/s shock into dense material at the edge of the lobes, caused by the interaction of the AGB ejecta and the post-AGB wind. The 3D representation of the H_2 data shows a hollow structure with less H_2 emission in the equatorial region. The [Fe II] emission is not present in the lobes, but originates close to the central star in fast shocks in the post-AGB wind or in a disk. The Pa$\\beta$ emission also appears to originate close to the star.

  5. Hydrogen Sensor Testing, Hydrogen Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-11-01

    Factsheet describing the hydrogen sensor testing laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  6. Reminder: Webinar May 14: H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Department will present a live webinar entitled “H2 Refuel H-Prize Technical Data Collection Requirements” on Thursday, May 14, at 1 p.m. Eastern Daylight Time. This webinar will go over the technical testing specifications and testing plans that are now available for the Fuel Cell Technologies Office's $1 million H2 Refuel H-Prize competition, as well as answer questions.

  7. Qualitative determination of H2S crossover rates in nation membranes using ion-probe techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L; Rockward, Tommy; Uribe, Francisco A; Garzon, Fernando H

    2008-01-01

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells are sensitive to impurities that may be present in either the oxidizer or fuel. H2S, even at the ppb level, will have a dramatic and adverse affect on fuel cell performance. The H2S permeability through dry and humidified Nafion PEMFC membranes was studied using ion probe techniques. A sulfide anti-oxidant buffer solution was used to trap and concentrate trace quantities of H2S that permeated through 50 cm2samples of Nafion 117 and 212 membranes using a partial pressure difference up to I030ppm at room temperature. Experiments were conducted for up to 24 hours in order to achieve sulfide ion concentrations high enough to be precisely determined by subsequent titration with Pb(N03)2. The rate of H2S crossover for dry 117 and 212 were identical at 1.2e-7 g/min. Humidification increased the crossover rate to 5.ge-7 glmin and 1.8e-6 glmin for 117 and 212 respectively. Although the data collected in this work show that the rate of H2S crossover increases with water content and reduced membrane thickness, an accurate determination of permeation constants from this work was not possible because the H2S partial pressure was not constant throughout the experiment.

  8. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation The...

  9. CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior CNG, Hydrogen, CNG-Hydrogen Blends - Critical Fuel Properties and Behavior Presentation given by Jay...

  10. Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Safety and Regulatory Structure for CNG, CNG-Hydrogen, Hydrogen Vehicles and Fuels in China Presentation given by Jinyang Zheng of...

  11. Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Hydrogen permeability and Integrity of hydrogen transfer pipelines Presentation by 03-Babu for the DOE Hydrogen Pipeline...

  12. NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage & Transportation NREL Wind to Hydrogen Project: Renewable Hydrogen Production for Energy Storage &...

  13. Hydrogen Liquefaction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-Pac Inc., AEquipmentpDepartmentHydrogen: Over

  14. Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on pozzolan-amended Class H well cement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on pozzolan-amended Class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rate of H2S and CO2 attack on...

  15. A Covalent Organic Framework that Exceeds the DOE 2015 Volumetric Target for H2 Uptake at 298 K

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    A Covalent Organic Framework that Exceeds the DOE 2015 Volumetric Target for H2 Uptake at 298 K to H2 binding energies that are too weak (leading to volumetric capacity at 298 K of

  16. Mechanochemical hydrogenation of coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yang, Ralph T. (Tonawanda, NY); Smol, Robert (East Patchogue, NY); Farber, Gerald (Elmont, NY); Naphtali, Leonard M. (Washington, DC)

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenation of coal is improved through the use of a mechanical force to reduce the size of the particulate coal simultaneously with the introduction of gaseous hydrogen, or other hydrogen donor composition. Such hydrogen in the presence of elemental tin during this one-step size reduction-hydrogenation further improves the yield of the liquid hydrocarbon product.

  17. DETECTION OF A NEW INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR ION, H2 COH (PROTONATED FORMALDEHYDE) MASATOSHI OHISHI AND SHIN-ICHI ISHIKAWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    DETECTION OF A NEW INTERSTELLAR MOLECULAR ION, H2 COH (PROTONATED FORMALDEHYDE) MASATOSHI OHISHI; accepted 1996 August 21 ABSTRACT A new interstellar molecular ion, H2 COH (protonated formaldehyde), has headings: ISM: abundances -- ISM: molecules 1. INTRODUCTION Formaldehyde (H2 CO) was the first interstellar

  18. H2A.Z Acidic Patch Couples Chromatin Dynamics to Regulation of Gene Expression Programs during ESC Differentiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Vidya

    The histone H2A variant H2A.Z is essential for embryonic development and for proper control of developmental gene expression programs in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Divergent regions of amino acid sequence of H2A.Z likely ...

  19. High-bandwidth Modulation of H2/Syngas Fuel to Control Combustion Dynamics in Micro-Mixing Lean Premix Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Melzak; Tim Lieuwen; Adel Mansour

    2012-01-31

    The goal of this program was to develop and demonstrate fuel injection technologies that will facilitate the development of cost-effective turbine engines for Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plants, while improving efficiency and reducing emissions. The program involved developing a next-generation multi-point injector with enhanced stability performance for lean premix turbine systems that burn hydrogen (H2) or synthesis gas (syngas) fuels. A previously developed injector that demonstrated superior emissions performance was improved to enhance static flame stability through zone staging and pilot sheltering. In addition, piezo valve technology was implemented to investigate the potential for enhanced dynamic stability through high-bandwidth modulation of the fuel supply. Prototype injector and valve hardware were tested in an atmospheric combustion facility. The program was successful in meeting its objectives. Specifically, the following was accomplished: Demonstrated improvement of lean operability of the Parker multi-point injector through staging of fuel flow and primary zone sheltering; Developed a piezo valve capable of proportional and high-bandwidth modulation of gaseous fuel flow at frequencies as high as 500 Hz; The valve was shown to be capable of effecting changes to flame dynamics, heat release, and acoustic signature of an atmospheric combustor. The latter achievement indicates the viability of the Parker piezo valve technology for use in future adaptively controlled systems for the mitigation of combustion instabilities, particularly for attenuating combustion dynamics under ultra-lean conditions.

  20. HYDROGEN TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, E

    2009-03-02

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development laboratory located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. SRNL has over 50 years of experience in developing and applying hydrogen technology, both through its national defense activities as well as through its recent activities with the DOE Hydrogen Programs. The hydrogen technical staff at SRNL comprises over 90 scientists, engineers and technologists, and it is believed to be the largest such staff in the U.S. SRNL has ongoing R&D initiatives in a variety of hydrogen storage areas, including metal hydrides, complex hydrides, chemical hydrides and carbon nanotubes. SRNL has over 25 years of experience in metal hydrides and solid-state hydrogen storage research, development and demonstration. As part of its defense mission at SRS, SRNL developed, designed, demonstrated and provides ongoing technical support for the largest hydrogen processing facility in the world based on the integrated use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage, separation, and compression. The SRNL has been active in teaming with academic and industrial partners to advance hydrogen technology. A primary focus of SRNL's R&D has been hydrogen storage using metal and complex hydrides. SRNL and its Hydrogen Technology Research Laboratory have been very successful in leveraging their defense infrastructure, capabilities and investments to help solve this country's energy problems. SRNL has participated in projects to convert public transit and utility vehicles for operation using hydrogen fuel. Two major projects include the H2Fuel Bus and an Industrial Fuel Cell Vehicle (IFCV) also known as the GATOR{trademark}. Both of these projects were funded by DOE and cost shared by industry. These are discussed further in Section 3.0, Demonstration Projects. In addition to metal hydrides technology, the SRNL Hydrogen group has done extensive R&D in other hydrogen technologies, including membrane filters for H2 separation, doped carbon nanotubes, storage vessel design and optimization, chemical hydrides, hydrogen compressors and hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Several of these are discussed further in Section 2, SRNL Hydrogen Research and Development.

  1. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    shows a diagram of the The Clean Energy Technology Economicwhich we have named the Clean Energy Technology Economic and

  2. Economic Analysis of Hydrogen Energy Station Concepts: Are "H 2E-Stations" a Key Link to a Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicle Infrastructure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lipman, Timothy E.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Kammen, Daniel M.

    2002-01-01

    California location for the energy station concepts, and we include electricity and natural gas costs

  3. Liquid Hydrogen Bubble Chambers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Luis W.

    1956-01-01

    t No. W - 7 4 0 5 -eng-48 ,LIQUID HYDROGEN EUSBLE CHA,MBEEZSand 3erkeley to iind if liquid hydrogen could be used as thethat supezheated 'liquid hydrogen could be made to boil

  4. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delucchi, Mark

    1992-01-01

    1096 (1990). S. Furuhama, "Hydrogen Engine Systems for LandGelse, "The Mercedes-Benz Hydrogen Engine for Application inI do assume that the hydrogen engines would run ultra lean,

  5. Looking Ahead - Biofuels, H2, & Vehicles: 21st Industry Growth Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.

    2008-10-28

    This presentation on the future of biofuels, hydrogen, and hybrid vehicles was presented at NREL's 21st Industry Growth Forum in Denver, Colorado, on October 28, 2008.

  6. Exploring the activity of a novel Au/TiC(001) model catalyst towards CO and CO2 hydrogenation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asara, Gian Giacomo; Ricart, Josep M.; Rodriguez, Jose A.; Illas, Francesc

    2015-02-02

    Small metallic nanoparticles supported on transition metal carbides exhibit an unexpected high activity towards a series of chemical reactions. In particular, the Au/TiC system has proven to be an excellent catalyst for SO2 decomposition, thiophene hydrodesulfurization, O2 and H2 dissociation and the water gas shift reaction. Recent studies have shown that Au/TiC is a very good catalyst for the reverse water–gas shift (CO2 + H2 ? CO + H2O) and CO2 hydrogenation to methanol. The present work further expands the range of applicability of this novel type of systems by exploring the catalytic activity of Au/TiC towards the hydrogenation ofmore »CO or CO2 with periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations on model systems. Hydrogen dissociates easily on Au/TiC but direct hydrogenation of CO to methanol is hindered by very high activation barriers implying that, on this model catalyst, methanol production from CO2 involves the hydrogenation of a HOCO-like intermediate. Thus, when dealing with mixtures of syngas (CO/CO2/H2/H2O), CO could be transformed into CO2 through the water gas shift reaction with subsequent hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol.« less

  7. Hydrogen Program Overview

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to the DOE Hydrogen Program. It describes the program mission and answers the question: “Why Hydrogen

  8. Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

  9. Hydrogen Storage Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For transportation, the overarching technical challenge for hydrogen storage is how to store the amount of hydrogen required for a conventional driving range (>300 miles) within the vehicular...

  10. Hydrogen Safety Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or otherwise restricted information. Project ID: scs07weiner PNNL-SA-65397 2 IEA HIA Task 19 Working Group Hydrogen Safety Training Props Hydrogen Safety Panel Incident...

  11. State-Selected Reaction of Muonium with Vibrationally Excited H2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakule, Pavel; Fleming, Donald G.; Sukhorukov, Oleksandr; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Pratt, Francis; Momose, Takamasa; Torikai, Eiko; Mielke, Steven L.; Garrett, Bruce C.; Peterson, Kirk A.; Schatz, George C.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2012-10-04

    Muonium (Mu) is considered the lightest isotope of the H atom. We report the rate constant for the Mu + H2(vibrational quantum number n = 1) ? MuH + H reaction determined by measurements at 300 K and converged quantum mechanical calculations. The measurements are a sensitive probe of the high-curvature region in the entrance valley of the potential energy surface (PES), and thus provide a qualitatively different probe of the PES than that provided by any previous experiment. Comparisons are made with earlier results for D + H2(n = 1) and with the corresponding thermal reaction rates.

  12. Why Hydrogen? Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    from Diverse Domestic Resources Hydrogen from Diverse Domestic Resources Distributed Generation Transportation HIGH EFFICIENCY HIGH EFFICIENCY & RELIABILITY & RELIABILITY ZERONEAR...

  13. Star formation and molecular hydrogen in dwarf galaxies: a non-equilibrium view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Chia-Yu; Walch, Stefanie; Glover, Simon C O; Clark, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    We study the connection of star formation to atomic (HI) and molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) in isolated, low metallicity dwarf galaxies with high-resolution ($m_{\\rm gas}$ = 4 M$_\\odot$, $N_{\\rm ngb}$ = 100) SPH simulations. The model includes self-gravity, non-equilibrium cooling, shielding from an interstellar radiation field, the chemistry of H$_2$ formation, H$_2$-independent star formation, supernova feedback and metal enrichment. We find that the H$_2$ mass fraction is sensitive to the adopted dust-to-gas ratio and the strength of the interstellar radiation field, while the star formation rate is not. Star formation is regulated by stellar feedback, keeping the gas out of thermal equilibrium for densities $n HI, not H$_2...

  14. Hydrogen Storage in Metal-Organic Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omar M. Yaghi

    2012-04-26

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g L-1) densities to be achieved by 2015. Given that these are system goals, a practical material will need to have higher capacity when the weight of the tank and associated cooling or regeneration system is considered. The size and weight of these components will vary substantially depending on whether the material operates by a chemisorption or physisorption mechanism. In the latter case, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have recently been identified as promising adsorbents for hydrogen storage, although little data is available for their sorption behavior. This grant was focused on the study of MOFs with these specific objectives. (1) To examine the effects of functionalization, catenation, and variation of the metal oxide and organic linkers on the low-pressure hydrogen adsorption properties of MOFs. (2) To develop a strategy for producing MOFs with high surface area and porosity to reduce the dead space and increase the hydrogen storage capacity per unit volume. (3) To functionalize MOFs by post synthetic functionalization with metals to improve the adsorption enthalpy of hydrogen for the room temperature hydrogen storage. This effort demonstrated the importance of open metal sites to improve the adsorption enthalpy by the systematic study, and this is also the origin of the new strategy, which termed isoreticular functionalization and metalation. However, a large pore volume is still a prerequisite feature. Based on our principle to design highly porous MOFs, guest-free MOFs with ultrahigh porosity have been experimentally synthesized. MOF-210, whose BET surface area is 6240 m2 g-1 (the highest among porous solids), takes up 15 wt% of total H2 uptake at 80 bar and 77 K. More importantly, the total H2 uptake by MOF-210 was 2.7 wt% at 80 bar and 298 K, which is the highest number reported for physisorptive materials.

  15. Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas hydrogen, including nuclear, coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, solar, and biomass. Thus fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel

  16. Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

  17. Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Scott Staley

    2010-03-31

    This program was undertaken in response to the US Department of Energy Solicitation DE-PS30-03GO93010, resulting in this Cooperative Agreement with the Ford Motor Company and BP to demonstrate and evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and required fueling infrastructure. Ford initially placed 18 hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCV) in three geographic regions of the US (Sacramento, CA; Orlando, FL; and southeast Michigan). Subsequently, 8 advanced technology vehicles were developed and evaluated by the Ford engineering team in Michigan. BP is Ford's principal partner and co-applicant on this project and provided the hydrogen infrastructure to support the fuel cell vehicles. BP ultimately provided three new fueling stations. The Ford-BP program consists of two overlapping phases. The deliverables of this project, combined with those of other industry consortia, are to be used to provide critical input to hydrogen economy commercialization decisions by 2015. The program's goal is to support industry efforts of the US President's Hydrogen Fuel Initiative in developing a path to a hydrogen economy. This program was designed to seek complete systems solutions to address hydrogen infrastructure and vehicle development, and possible synergies between hydrogen fuel electricity generation and transportation applications. This project, in support of that national goal, was designed to gain real world experience with Hydrogen powered Fuel Cell Vehicles (H2FCV) 'on the road' used in everyday activities, and further, to begin the development of the required supporting H2 infrastructure. Implementation of a new hydrogen vehicle technology is, as expected, complex because of the need for parallel introduction of a viable, available fuel delivery system and sufficient numbers of vehicles to buy fuel to justify expansion of the fueling infrastructure. Viability of the fuel structure means widespread, affordable hydrogen which can return a reasonable profit to the fuel provider, while viability of the vehicle requires an expected level of cost, comfort, safety and operation, especially driving range, that consumers require. This presents a classic 'chicken and egg' problem, which Ford believes can be solved with thoughtful implementation plans. The eighteen Ford Focus FCV vehicles that were operated for this demonstration project provided the desired real world experience. Some things worked better than expected. Most notable was the robustness and life of the fuel cell. This is thought to be the result of the full hybrid configuration of the drive system where the battery helps to overcome the performance reduction associated with time related fuel cell degradation. In addition, customer satisfaction surveys indicated that people like the cars and the concept and operated them with little hesitation. Although the demonstrated range of the cars was near 200 miles, operators felt constrained because of the lack of a number of conveniently located fueling stations. Overcoming this major concern requires overcoming a key roadblock, fuel storage, in a manner that permits sufficient quantity of fuel without sacrificing passenger or cargo capability. Fueling infrastructure, on the other hand, has been problematic. Only three of a planned seven stations were opened. The difficulty in obtaining public approval and local government support for hydrogen fuel, based largely on the fear of hydrogen that grew from past disasters and atomic weaponry, has inhibited progress and presents a major roadblock to implementation. In addition the cost of hydrogen production, in any of the methodologies used in this program, does not show a rapid reduction to commercially viable rates. On the positive side of this issue was the demonstrated safety of the fueling station, equipment and process. In the Ford program, there were no reported safety incidents.

  18. Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    Dynamic isotope effect on the product energy partitioning in CH2OH ~CHO H2 Young Min Rheea March 1998; accepted 1 July 1998 The deuterium isotope effect on the product energy partitioning. Close inspection of the potential energy surface revealed that the isotope effect on KER and the product

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE -H2AX foci are increased in lymphocytes in vivo in young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    very low ionizing radiation exposure doses from CT exams can induce -H2AX formation in vivo in young children. Objective To test whether very low ionizing radiation doses from CT exams can induce lymphocytic low-dose X-irradiation: a pilot study Brunhild M. Halm & Adrian A. Franke & Jennifer F. Lai & Helen C

  20. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Low Permeation Liner for H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . "Conformable" Composite Tanks #12;Polymer Liners are Proposed for Composite H2 Tanks Examples: Nylon 6, XLPE "Conformable" Composite Tanks #12;INEEL's Active Electrochemical Diffusion Barrier Approach Electron-conductive polymer electrodes & proton-conductive electrolyte E = -G/nF = RT/nF {ln[ PH2 (ref) /PH2 (sub

  1. Formation of CO precursors during char gasification with O2, CO2 and H2O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Thanh N.

    Formation of CO precursors during char gasification with O2, CO2 and H2O Alejandro Montoya a are presented to get insight into an unified mechanism of uncatalyzed carbon gasification. D 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Gasification; Chemisorption; Molecular simulation; Surface

  2. H-2(p,n)2p Spin Transfer from 305 to 788 Mev 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNaughton, M. W.; Koch, K.; Supek, I.; Tanaka, N.; Ambrose, DA; Coffey, P.; Johnston, K.; McNaughton, K. H.; Riley, P. J.; Glass, G.; Hiebert, John C.; Northcliffe, L. C.; Simon, A. J.; Mercer, D. J.; Adams, D. L.; Spinka, H.; Jeppersen, R. H.; Tripard, G. E.; Woolverton, H.

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the spin-transfer parameter K(LL) for H-2(p, n)2p at 0-degrees to calibrate the neutron-beam polarization clarify a normalization discrepancy affecting np data at LAMPF. The new data are in good agreement with theoretical predictions....

  3. Electron-Nuclear Energy Sharing in Above-Threshold Multiphoton Dissociative Ionization of H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thumm, Uwe

    Electron-Nuclear Energy Sharing in Above-Threshold Multiphoton Dissociative Ionization of H2 J. Wu­4], where the photon energy is shared by the freed electrons and the nuclear fragments. For the molecular ionization [10­15], and the imaging of inter- nuclear distance using nuclear kinetic energy release spec- tra

  4. On the likelihood of decompression sickness during H2 biochemical decompression in pigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fahlman, Andreas

    dt, where Pamb is ambient pressure and is a time constant. The probability of DCS [P by influencing the gas kinetics. The measure of H2 metabolism was based on either the total microbial activity injected into the animals (Inj), or as the CH4 release rate (V CH4) from individual animals, assuming

  5. H_2 Absorption and Fluorescence for Gamma Ray Bursts in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Draine

    1999-07-16

    If a gamma ray burst with strong UV emission occurs in a molecular cloud, there will be observable consequences resulting from excitation of the surrounding H2. The UV pulse from the GRB will pump H2 into vibrationally-excited levels which produce strong absorption at wavelengths < 1650 A. As a result, both the prompt flash and later afterglow will exhibit strong absorption shortward of 1650 A, with specific spectroscopic features. Such a cutoff in the emission from GRB 980329 may already have been observed by Fruchter et al.; if so, GRB 980329 was at redshift 3.0 < z < 4.4 . BVRI photometry of GRB 990510 could also be explained by H2 absorption if GRB 990510 is at redshift 1.6 < z < 2.3. The fluorescence accompanying the UV pumping of the H2 will result in UV emission from the GRB which can extend over days or months, depending on parameters of the ambient medium and beaming of the GRB flash. The 7.5-13.6 eV fluorescent luminosity is \\sim 10^{41.7} erg/s for standard estimates of the parameters of the GRB and the ambient medium. Spectroscopy can distinguish this fluorescent emission from other possible sources of transient optical emission, such as a supernova.

  6. Conductivity measurements on H2O-bearing CO2-rich fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capobianco, Ryan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Rimstidt, J. Donald [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies report rapid corrosion of metals and carbonation of minerals in contact with carbon dioxide containing trace amounts of dissolved water. One explanation for this behavior is that addition of small amounts of H2O to CO2 leads to significant ionization within the fluid, thus promoting reactions at the fluid-solid interface analogous to corrosion associated with aqueous fluids. The extent of ionization in the bulk CO2 fluid was determined using a flow-through conductivity cell capable of detecting very low conductivities. Experiments were conducted from 298 to 473 K and 7.39 to 20 MPa with H2O concentrations up to ~1600 ppmw (xH2O 3.9 10-3), corresponding to the H2O solubility limit in liquid CO2 at ambient temperature. All solutions showed conductivities <10 nS/cm, indicating that the solutions were essentially ion-free. This observation suggests that the observed corrosion and carbonation reactions are not the result of ionization in CO2-rich bulk phase, but does not preclude ionization in the fluid at the fluid-solid interface.

  7. Feasibility Study of Hydrogen Production at Existing Nuclear Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey

    2009-07-01

    Cooperative Agreement DE-FC07-06ID14788 was executed between the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Transportation Applications, and Idaho National Laboratory to investigate the economics of producing hydrogen by electrolysis using electricity generated by nuclear power. The work under this agreement is divided into the following four tasks: Task 1 – Produce Data and Analyses Task 2 – Economic Analysis of Large-Scale Alkaline Electrolysis Task 3 – Commercial-Scale Hydrogen Production Task 4 – Disseminate Data and Analyses. Reports exist on the prospect that utility companies may benefit from having the option to produce electricity or produce hydrogen, depending on market conditions for both. This study advances that discussion in the affirmative by providing data and suggesting further areas of study. While some reports have identified issues related to licensing hydrogen plants with nuclear plants, this study provides more specifics and could be a resource guide for further study and clarifications. At the same time, this report identifies other area of risks and uncertainties associated with hydrogen production on this scale. Suggestions for further study in some of these topics, including water availability, are included in the report. The goals and objectives of the original project description have been met. Lack of industry design for proton exchange membrane electrolysis hydrogen production facilities of this magnitude was a roadblock for a significant period. However, recent design breakthroughs have made costing this facility much more accurate. In fact, the new design information on proton exchange membrane electrolyzers scaled to the 1 kg of hydrogen per second electrolyzer reduced the model costs from $500 to $100 million. Task 1 was delayed when the original electrolyzer failed at the end of its economic life. However, additional valuable information was obtained when the new electrolyzer was installed. Products developed during this study include a process model and a N2H2 economic assessment model (both developed by the Idaho National Laboratory). Both models are described in this report. The N2H2 model closely tracked and provided similar results as the H2A model and was instrumental in assessing the effects of plant availability on price when operated in the shoulder mode for electrical pricing. Differences between the H2A and N2H2 model are included in this report.

  8. Breaking Pseudo-Rotational Symmetry through ${\\bf H}^2_+$ Metric Deformation in the Eckart Potential Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehemias Leija-Martinez; David Edwin Alvarez-Castillo; Mariana Kirchbach

    2011-12-24

    The peculiarity of the Eckart potential problem on ${\\bf H}^2_+$ (the upper sheet of the two-sheeted two-dimensional hyperboloid), to preserve the $(2l+1)$-fold degeneracy of the states typical for the geodesic motion there, is usually explained in casting the respective Hamiltonian in terms of the Casimir invariant of an so(2,1) algebra, referred to as potential algebra. In general, there are many possible similarity transformations of the symmetry algebras of the free motions on curved surfaces towards potential algebras, which are not all necessarily unitary. In the literature, a transformation of the symmetry algebra of the geodesic motion on ${\\bf H}^2_+$ towards the potential algebra of Eckart's Hamiltonian has been constructed for the prime purpose to prove that the Eckart interaction belongs to the class of Natanzon potentials. We here take a different path and search for a transformation which connects the $(2l+1)$ dimensional representation space of the pseudo-rotational so(2,1) algebra, spanned by the rank-$l$ pseudo-spherical harmonics, to the representation space of equal dimension of the potential algebra and find a transformation of the scaling type. Our case is that in so doing one is producing a deformed isometry copy to ${\\bf H}^2_+$ such that the free motion on the copy is equivalent to a motion on ${\\bf H}^2_+$, perturbed by a $\\coth$ interaction. In this way, we link the so(2,1) potential algebra concept of the Eckart Hamiltonian to a subtle type of pseudo-rotational symmetry breaking through ${\\bf H}^2_+$ metric deformation.

  9. NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP NATIONAL HYDROGEN ENERGY ROADMAP . . Toward a More Secure and Cleaner Energy Future for America Based on the results of the National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop to make it a reality. This Roadmap provides a framework that can make a hydrogen economy a reality

  10. Safetygram #9- Liquid Hydrogen

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hydrogen is colorless as a liquid. Its vapors are colorless, odorless, tasteless, and highly flammable.

  11. Hydrogen delivery technology roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2005-11-15

    Document describing plan for research into and development of hydrogen delivery technology for transportation applications.

  12. Composition for absorbing hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.; Enz, G.L.

    1995-05-02

    A hydrogen absorbing composition is described. The composition comprises a porous glass matrix, made by a sol-gel process, having a hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed throughout the matrix. A sol, made from tetraethyl orthosilicate, is mixed with a hydrogen-absorbing material and solidified to form a porous glass matrix with the hydrogen-absorbing material dispersed uniformly throughout the matrix. The glass matrix has pores large enough to allow gases having hydrogen to pass through the matrix, yet small enough to hold the particles dispersed within the matrix so that the hydrogen-absorbing particles are not released during repeated hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles.

  13. Integrated Ceramic Membrane System for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Joseph; Lim, Hankwon; Drnevich, Raymond

    2010-08-05

    Phase I was a technoeconomic feasibility study that defined the process scheme for the integrated ceramic membrane system for hydrogen production and determined the plan for Phase II. The hydrogen production system is comprised of an oxygen transport membrane (OTM) and a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM). Two process options were evaluated: 1) Integrated OTM-HTM reactor – in this configuration, the HTM was a ceramic proton conductor operating at temperatures up to 900°C, and 2) Sequential OTM and HTM reactors – in this configuration, the HTM was assumed to be a Pd alloy operating at less than 600°C. The analysis suggested that there are no technical issues related to either system that cannot be managed. The process with the sequential reactors was found to be more efficient, less expensive, and more likely to be commercialized in a shorter time than the single reactor. Therefore, Phase II focused on the sequential reactor system, specifically, the second stage, or the HTM portion. Work on the OTM portion was conducted in a separate program. Phase IIA began in February 2003. Candidate substrate materials and alloys were identified and porous ceramic tubes were produced and coated with Pd. Much effort was made to develop porous substrates with reasonable pore sizes suitable for Pd alloy coating. The second generation of tubes showed some improvement in pore size control, but this was not enough to get a viable membrane. Further improvements were made to the porous ceramic tube manufacturing process. When a support tube was successfully coated, the membrane was tested to determine the hydrogen flux. The results from all these tests were used to update the technoeconomic analysis from Phase I to confirm that the sequential membrane reactor system can potentially be a low-cost hydrogen supply option when using an existing membrane on a larger scale. Phase IIB began in October 2004 and focused on demonstrating an integrated HTM/water gas shift (WGS) reactor to increase CO conversion and produce more hydrogen than a standard water gas shift reactor would. Substantial improvements in substrate and membrane performance were achieved in another DOE project (DE-FC26-07NT43054). These improved membranes were used for testing in a water gas shift environment in this program. The amount of net H2 generated (defined as the difference of hydrogen produced and fed) was greater than would be produced at equilibrium using conventional water gas shift reactors up to 75 psig because of the shift in equilibrium caused by continuous hydrogen removal. However, methanation happened at higher pressures, 100 and 125 psig, and resulted in less net H2 generated than would be expected by equilibrium conversion alone. An effort to avoid methanation by testing in more oxidizing conditions (by increasing CO2/CO ratio in a feed gas) was successful and net H2 generated was higher (40-60%) than a conventional reactor at equilibrium at all pressures tested (up to 125 psig). A model was developed to predict reactor performance in both cases with and without methanation. The required membrane area depends on conditions, but the required membrane area is about 10 ft2 to produce about 2000 scfh of hydrogen. The maximum amount of hydrogen that can be produced in a membrane reactor decreased significantly due to methanation from about 2600 scfh to about 2400 scfh. Therefore, it is critical to eliminate methanation to fully benefit from the use of a membrane in the reaction. Other modeling work showed that operating a membrane reactor at higher temperature provides an opportunity to make the reactor smaller and potentially provides a significant capital cost savings compared to a shift reactor/PSA combination.

  14. Hydrogen Confinement in Carbon Nanopores: Extreme Densification at Ambient Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallego, Nidia C [ORNL; He, Lilin [ORNL; Saha, Dipendu [ORNL; Contescu, Cristian I [ORNL; Melnichenko, Yuri B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    In-situ small angle neutron scattering (SANS) studies of hydrogen confined in small pores of polyfurfuryl alcohol-derived activated carbon (PFAC) at room-temperature provided for the first time its phase behavior in equilibrium with external H2 at pressures up to 200 bar. The data was used to evaluate the density of the adsorbed fluid, which appears to be a function of both pore size and pressure, and approaches the liquid hydrogen density in narrow nanopores at 200 bar. The surface-molecule interactions responsible for densification of hydrogen within the pores create internal pressures which exceed by a factor of up to ~ 60 the external gas pressures, confirming the benefits of adsorptive over compressive storage. These results can be utilized to guide the development of new carbon adsorbents tailored for maximum hydrogen storage capacities at near ambient temperatures.

  15. Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    2010-06-08

    of clean energy for use in fuel cells [5]. For these reasons, H2 is an important industrial gas with many existing and future applications. Mixtures of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, known as synthesis gas (or syngas), are critical intermediates... in the production of both fuel-cell quality hydrogen and ultra-clean liquid fuels (Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis), which are easier to transport and store than natural gas [6, 7]. The Fischer-Tropsch process has received significant attention in the quest to produce...

  16. High H2 Storage of Hexagonal Metal-Organic Frameworks from First-Principles-Based Grand Canonical Monte Carlo Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    High H2 Storage of Hexagonal Metal-Organic Frameworks from First-Principles-Based Grand Canonical IRMOF-2-60, which we calculate to bind 9.7 wt % H2 storage at 77 K and 70 bar, the highest known value even at ambient temperatures. For example, IRMOF-2-96-Li leads to 6.0 wt % H2 storage at 273 K and 100

  17. ANSI X3H2-97-010 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-245

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-97-010 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-245 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION and A. Steiner. Adding Valid Time to SQL Temporal. 1996. ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-146r2, ANSI X3H2 Temporal. 1996. ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-147r2, ANSI X3H2-96-502r1. 6 Snodgrass, R.T., Addendum

  18. Method and Pd/V2 O5 device for H2 detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Ping (San Diego, CA); Tracy, C. Edwin (Golden, CO); Pitts, J. Roland (Lakewood, CO); Smith, II, R. Davis (Golden, CO); Lee, Se-Hee (Lakewood, CO)

    2011-12-27

    Methods and Pd/V.sub.2O.sub.5 devices for hydrogen detection are disclosed. An exemplary method of preparing an improved sensor for chemochromic detection of hydrogen gas over a wide response range exhibits stability during repeated coloring/bleaching cycles upon exposure and removal of hydrogen gas. The method may include providing a substrate. The method may also include depositing a V.sub.20.sub.5 layer that functions as a H.sub.2 insertion host in a Pd/V.sub.20.sub.5 hydrogen sensor to be formed on said substrate. The method may also include depositing a Pd layer onto said V.sub.20.sub.5 layer; said Pd layer functioning as an optical modulator.

  19. Initial Operation of the uTCAP using H2 and D2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (LLE) Motivation * The primary tritium fuel supply is contaminated with 3% of hydrogen * The T:D ratio of the fuel supply has dropped from a 50:50 ratio to 38:59 * A major...

  20. Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems- Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen Delivery Technologies and Systems - Pipeline Transmission of Hydrogen. Design and operations standards and materials for hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  1. Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Hydrogen Permeability and Integrity of Hydrogen Delivery Pipelines Project Objectives: To gain basic understanding of...

  2. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen Program Review Hydrogen Fuel Cell Bus Evaluation: Report for the 2001 Hydrogen Program Review This paper, presented at the 2001 DOE...

  3. Hydrogen production by methanogens under low-hydrogen conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentine, DL; Valentine, DL; Blanton, DC; Reeburgh, WS

    2000-01-01

    greatly decreased hydrogen production. The addition ofThe lack of sustained hydrogen production by the cultures inMethanogens · Hydrogen production · Storage compounds ·

  4. A RhxSy/C Catalyst for the Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Evolution Reactions in HBr

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Masud, Jahangir; Nguyena, Trung V.; Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric; Ikenberry, Myles; Hohn, Keith; Pan, Chun-Jern; Hwang, Bing-Joe

    2015-02-01

    Rhodium sulfide (Rh2S3) on carbon support was synthesized by refluxing rhodium chloride with ammonium thiosulfate. Thermal treatment of Rh2S3 at high temperatures (600°C to 850°C) in presence of argon resulted in the transformation of Rh2S3 into Rh3S4, Rh17S15 and Rh which were characterized by TGA/DTA, XRD, EDX, and deconvolved XPS analyses. The catalyst particle size distribution ranged from 3 to 12 nm. Cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode measurements were used to evaluate the catalytic activity for hydrogen oxidation and evolution reactions in H2SO4 and HBr solutions. The thermally treated catalysts show high activity for the hydrogen reactions. The exchangemore »current densities (io) of the synthesized RhxSy catalysts in H2-saturated 1M H2SO4 and 1M HBr for HER and HOR were 0.9 mA/cm2 to 1.0 mA/cm2 and 0.8 to 0.9 mA/cm2, respectively. The lower io values obtained in 1M HBr solution compared to in H2SO4 might be due to the adsorption of Br- on the active surface. Stable electrochemical active surface area (ECSA) of RhxSy catalyst was obtained for CV scan limits between 0 V and 0.65 V vs. RHE. Scans with upper voltage limit beyond 0.65 V led to decreased and unreproducible ECSA measurements.« less

  5. The IsoDAR High Intensity H$_2^+$ Transport and Injection Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alonso, Jose; Calabretta, Luciano; Campo, Daniela; Celona, Luigi; Conrad, Janet M; Day, Alexandra; Castro, Giuseppe; Labrecque, Francis; Winklehner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This technical report reviews the tests performed at the Best Cyclotron Systems, Inc. facility in regards to developing a cost effective ion source, beam line transport system, and acceleration system capable of high H$_2^+$ current output for the IsoDAR (Isotope Decay At Rest) experiment. We begin by outlining the requirements for the IsoDAR experiment then provide overview of the Versatile Ion Source, Low Energy Beam Transport system, spiral inflector, and cyclotron. The experimental measurements are then discussed and the results are compared with a thorough set of simulation studies. Of particular importance we note that the Versatile Ion Source (VIS) proved to be a reliable ion source capable of generating a large amount of H$_2^+$ current. The results suggest that with further upgrades, the VIS could potentially be a suitable candidate for IsoDAR. The conclusion outlines the key results from our tests and introduces the forthcoming work this technical report has motivated.

  6. H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2Delivery

  7. Probing the Room Temperature Spatial Distribution of Hydrogen in Nanoporous Carbon by Use of Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsao, Cheng-Si [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Li, Mingda [ORNL; Zhang, Yang [ORNL; Leao, Juscelino B [ORNL; Chiang, Wei-Shan [ORNL; Chung, Tsui-Yun [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan; Tzeng, Yi-Ren [Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan; Chen, Sow-hsin H [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The spatial distribution of hydrogen physically adsorbed in a nanoporous carbon at room temperature (RT) as a function of H2 gas pressure is investigated for the first time using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). A hierarchical pore structure consisting of micropores and a fractal mesopore network of the used activated carbon is also studied to correlate the relationship between the spatial distribution of hydrogen and the pore confinement. The cylinder-like cluster of aggregated hydrogen is formed and is confined in the disklike micropore. The evolution of spatial structures of adsorbed hydrogen with hydrogen pressure is elucidated. A direct experimental observation of the spatial distribution and the behavior of hydrogen adsorbed in the porous materials at RT is still scarce to date. The analysis results obtained by SANS provide new information for the future investigations of the RT storage mechanism of hydrogen in the nanoporous materials developed for the purpose of on-board hydrogen storage.

  8. Rapid Responding Palladium-Silver Surface Modified Microsensor for Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, James; Hunter, Scott Robert; Sepaniak, Michael; Datskos, Panos G; Smith, Barton

    2010-01-01

    Most palladium thin film based hydrogen gas sensors have response and recovery times that are too long to make them useful in vehicular and stationary gas leak detection applications. In contrast, a palladium-silver thin film based microcantilever (MC) hydrogen gas microsensor is reported herein with near ideal response characteristics for use in these hydrogen economy related applications. Specifically, 3-10 second response and recovery times have been measured for these sensors in contrast to previous sensor response measurements of several to tens of minutes using Pd thin film and MC based sensing techniques. The much reduced response times observed in the present study are attributed to a wet chemical Pd-Ag thin film deposition technique and a gas conditioning protocol that produces a highly nanostructured, porous film that rapidly adsorbs and desorbs H2, allowing rapid equilibration with the H2 concentration in the surrounding air. The wet chemical process and gas phase conditioning offer a novel approach at creating highly structured surfaces that have not been reported for MC devices. Additionally, these sensors have very low H2 detection thresholds, wide dynamic range and very good selectivity relative to common interferents.

  9. Far infrared CO and H$_2$O emission in intermediate-mass protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matuszak, M; Kristensen, L E; Herczeg, G J; Tychoniec, L; van Kempen, T; Fuente, A

    2015-01-01

    Intermediate-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) provide a link to understand how feedback from shocks and UV radiation scales from low to high-mass star forming regions. Aims: Our aim is to analyze excitation of CO and H$_2$O in deeply-embedded intermediate-mass YSOs and compare with low-mass and high-mass YSOs. Methods: Herschel/PACS spectral maps are analyzed for 6 YSOs with bolometric luminosities of $L_\\mathrm{bol}\\sim10^2 - 10^3$ $L_\\odot$. The maps cover spatial scales of $\\sim 10^4$ AU in several CO and H$_2$O lines located in the $\\sim55-210$ $\\mu$m range. Results: Rotational diagrams of CO show two temperature components at $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim320$ K and $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim700-800$ K, comparable to low- and high-mass protostars probed at similar spatial scales. The diagrams for H$_2$O show a single component at $T_\\mathrm{rot}\\sim130$ K, as seen in low-mass protostars, and about $100$ K lower than in high-mass protostars. Since the uncertainties in $T_\\mathrm{rot}$ are of the same order as the differen...

  10. Hydrogen Storage - Current Technology | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Cell Technologies Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Basics Current Technology Gaseous and Liquid Hydrogen Storage Materials-Based Hydrogen...

  11. Liquid Hydrogen Absorber for MICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishimoto, S.

    2010-01-01

    REFERENCES Figure 5: Liquid hydrogen absorber and test6: Cooling time of liquid hydrogen absorber. Eight CernoxLIQUID HYDROGEN ABSORBER FOR MICE S. Ishimoto, S. Suzuki, M.

  12. Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2007-01-01

    the electronic level of hydrogen (thick red bar) was notdescribing the behavior of hydrogen atoms as impuritiesenergy of interstitial hydrogen as a function of Fermi level

  13. Hydrogen Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Hydrogen Resources Hydrogen can be produced from diverse, domestic resources. Currently, most hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels, specifically natural gas....

  14. Hydrogen Pipelines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Pipelines Hydrogen Pipelines Photo of a hydrogen pipeline. Gaseous hydrogen can be transported through pipelines much the way natural gas is today. Approximately 1,500 miles of...

  15. The Bumpy Road to Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Ogden, Joan M

    2006-01-01

    carbon emissions from a hydrogen fuel cell vehicle will beis threefold. First, hydrogen fuel cell vehicles appear tobecome competitive and if hydrogen fuel can be made widely

  16. Hydrogen dissociation on Mg(0001) studied via quantum Monte Carlo calculations M. Pozzo1,2 and D. Alf1,2,3,4,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfè, Dario

    of 76 kJ/mole.2 The kinetics of hydrogen intake by Mg is quite slow because of a relatively large energyHydrogen dissociation on Mg(0001) studied via quantum Monte Carlo calculations M. Pozzo1,2 and D have used diffusion Monte Carlo DMC simulations to calculate the energy barrier for H2 dissociation

  17. arXiv:cond-mat/0504696v126Apr2005 Adsorption and dissociation of hydrogen molecules on bare and functionalized carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildirim, Taner

    arXiv:cond-mat/0504696v126Apr2005 Adsorption and dissociation of hydrogen molecules on bare: April 26, 2005) We investigated interaction between hydrogen molecules and bare as well that the binding energy of the H2 physisorbed on the bare SWNT is very weak, and can be enhanced neither

  18. 9122 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992, I 14, 9122-9 130 or 1,2 hydrogen migration; however, these are higher energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9122 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1992, I 14, 9122-9 130 or 1,2 hydrogen migration; however, these are higher energy channels that lead to excited-state products. The H2CN intermediate can also participate in bimolecular reactions. Recombination with H and CH3are expected to be barrierless. Abstraction of a hydrogen

  19. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Integrated Hydrogen Production, Purification and Compression System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamhankar, Satish; Gulamhusein, Ali; Boyd, Tony; DaCosta, David; Golben, Mark

    2011-06-30

    The project was started in April 2005 with the objective to meet the DOE target of delivered hydrogen of <$1.50/gge, which was later revised by DOE to $2-$3/gge range for hydrogen to be competitive with gasoline as a fuel for vehicles. For small, on-site hydrogen plants being evaluated at the time for refueling stations (the 'forecourt'), it was determined that capital cost is the main contributor to the high cost of delivered hydrogen. The concept of this project was to reduce the cost by combining unit operations for the entire generation, purification, and compression system (refer to Figure 1). To accomplish this, the Fluid Bed Membrane Reactor (FBMR) developed by MRT was used. The FBMR has hydrogen selective, palladium-alloy membrane modules immersed in the reformer vessel, thereby directly producing high purity hydrogen in a single step. The continuous removal of pure hydrogen from the reformer pushes the equilibrium 'forward', thereby maximizing the productivity with an associated reduction in the cost of product hydrogen. Additional gains were envisaged by the integration of the novel Metal Hydride Hydrogen Compressor (MHC) developed by Ergenics, which compresses hydrogen from 0.5 bar (7 psia) to 350 bar (5,076 psia) or higher in a single unit using thermal energy. Excess energy from the reformer provides up to 25% of the power used for driving the hydride compressor so that system integration improved efficiency. Hydrogen from the membrane reformer is of very high, fuel cell vehicle (FCV) quality (purity over 99.99%), eliminating the need for a separate purification step. The hydride compressor maintains hydrogen purity because it does not have dynamic seals or lubricating oil. The project team set out to integrate the membrane reformer developed by MRT and the hydride compression system developed by Ergenics in a single package. This was expected to result in lower cost and higher efficiency compared to conventional hydrogen production technologies. The overall objective was to develop an integrated system to directly produce high pressure, high-purity hydrogen from a single unit, which can meet the DOE cost H2 cost target of $2 - $3/gge when mass produced. The project was divided into two phases with the following tasks and corresponding milestones, targets and decision points. Phase 1 - Task 1 - Verify feasibility of the concept, perform a detailed techno-economic analysis, and develop a test plan; and Task 2: Build and experimentally test a Proof of Concept (POC) integrated membrane reformer/metal hydride compressor system. Phase 2 - Task 3: Build an Advanced Prototype (AP) system with modifications based on POC learning and demonstrate at a commercial site; and Task 4: Complete final product design for mass manufacturing units capable of achieving DOE 2010 H2 cost and performance targets.

  20. Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Breakout- Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Targets, barriers and research and development priorities for gaseous delivery of hydrogen through hydrogen and natural gas pipelines.

  1. Hydrogen Storage- Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Storing enough hydrogen on-board a vehicle to achieve a driving range of greater than 300 miles is a significant challenge. On a weight basis, hydrogen has nearly three times the energy content of...

  2. Hydrogen transport membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  3. Feedback from Galaxy Formation: Production and Photodissociation of Primordial Molecular Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massimo Ricotti; Nickolay Y. Gnedin; J. Michael Shull

    2001-09-14

    We use one-dimensional radiative transfer simulations to study the evolution of H_2 gas-phase (H^- catalyzed) formation and photo-dissociation regions in the primordial universe. We find a new positive feedback mechanism capable of producing shells of H_2 in the intergalactic medium, which are optically thick in some Lyman-Werner bands. While these shells exist, this feedback effect is important in reducing the H_2 dissociating background flux and the size of photo-dissociation spheres around each luminous object. The maximum background opacity of the IGM in the H_2 Lyman-Werner bands is \\tau_{H_2} ~ 1-2 for a relic molecular fraction x_{H_2}=2 x 10^{-6}, about 6 times greater than found by Haiman, Abel & Rees. Therefore, the relic molecular hydrogen can decrease the photo-dissociation rate by about an order of magnitude. The problem is relevant to the formation of small primordial galaxies with masses M_{DM} hydrogen cooling to collapse. Alternatively, the universe may have remained dark for several hundred million years after the birth of the first stars, until galaxies with virial temperature T_{vir} > 10^4 K formed.

  4. Dynamics of NO reduction by H2 on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the N2 product

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibener, Steven

    examine the dynamics of the NO H2 reaction on the Rh 111 surface by measuring the velocity distribution. Product velocity distributions have been measured for a number of surface reactions, and show a wideDynamics of NO reduction by H2 on Rh(111): Velocity and angular distributions of the N2 product J

  5. ANSI X3H2-96-152r ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MCI-143

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-96-152r ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MCI-143 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Proposal Title: Adding Transaction Time to SQL Temporal Source: ANSI Expert's Contribution Authors: Richard Snodgrass, R. T., M. H. Bohlen, C. S. Jensen and A. Steiner Adding Valid Time to SQL Temporal, ANSI X3H2

  6. ANSI X3H2-96-152 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-96-152 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL ? I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR STANDARDIZATION: Adding Transaction Time to SQL Temporal Source: ANSI Expert's Contribution Authors: Richard T. Snodgrass. Bohlen, C. S. Jensen and A. Steiner Adding Valid Time to SQL Temporal, ANSI X3H2-96-151, March, 1996. 4

  7. H2-M polymorphism in mice susceptible to collagen-induced arthritis involves the peptide binding groove

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walter, W.; Loos, M.; Maeurer, M.J.

    1996-12-31

    The ability to develop type II collagen (CII)-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is associated with the major histocompatibility I-A gene and with as yet poorly defined regulatory molecules of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen processing and presentation pathway. H2-M molecules are thought to be involved in the loading of antigenic peptides into the MHC class II binding cleft. We sequenced H2-Ma, H2-Mb1, and H2-Mb2 genes from CIA-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains and identified four different Ma and Mb2 alleles, and three different Mb1 alleles defined by polymorphic residues within the predicted peptide binding groove. Most CIA-resistant mouse strains share common Ma, Mb1, and Mb2 alleles. In contrast, H2-M alleles designated Ma-III, Ma-IV, Mb1-III, and Mb2-IV could be exclusively identified in the CIA-susceptible H2{sup r} and H2{sup q} haplotypes, suggesting that allelic H2-M molecules may modulate the composition of different CII peptides loaded onto MHC class II molecules, presumably presenting {open_quotes}arthritogenic{close_quotes} epitopes to T lymphocytes. 42 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Webinar: Hydrogen Refueling Protocols

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Refueling Protocols, originally presented on February 22, 2013.

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rivkin, C.; Burgess, R.; Buttner, W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  10. Syntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial electrolysis cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) using ace- tate, making this technology a promising method for biohydrogen production even in very coldSyntrophic interactions drive the hydrogen production from glucose at low temperature in microbial, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s " H2 production from glucose

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 053410 (2015) Dipole and nondipole photoionization of molecular hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    2015-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 91, 053410 (2015) Dipole and nondipole photoionization of molecular hydrogen B. The theoretical formalism is presented and applied to photoionization of H2 over the 20- to 180-eV photon energy and large kinetic energies, and nondipole asymmetries were * Present address: Wolfram Research, Champaign

  12. ASU nitrogen sweep gas in hydrogen separation membrane for production of HRSG duct burner fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panuccio, Gregory J.; Raybold, Troy M.; Jamal, Agil; Drnevich, Raymond Francis

    2013-04-02

    The present invention relates to the use of low pressure N2 from an air separation unit (ASU) for use as a sweep gas in a hydrogen transport membrane (HTM) to increase syngas H2 recovery and make a near-atmospheric pressure (less than or equal to about 25 psia) fuel for supplemental firing in the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) duct burner.

  13. Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashley, Michael C. B.

    Discovery of molecular hydrogen line emission associated with methanol maser emission J.-K. Lee March 9 A B S T R AC T We report the discovery of H2 line emission associated with 6.67-GHz methanol emission was found associated with an ultracompact H II region IRAS 14567­5846 and isolated methanol maser

  14. Molecular simulations of hydrogen and methane permeation through pore mouth modified zeolite Sang Eun Jeea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    Molecular simulations of hydrogen and methane permeation through pore mouth modified zeolite]. Inorganic membranes have the potential to play an important role in these separations if membranes than CO2 or CH4, two typical gases present during H2 production. Experiments that have been performed

  15. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and compressed natural gas (CNG) and pure hydrogen to vehicles, and the co-production of electricity from, and operation of the refueling station. Overall Integration System Configuration NG H2 /CNG RTCRTCRTC Plug Power STORAGE COMPRESSION CNG REFUELING STATION CNG CLV & APCI CLV &CLV & APCIAPCI Figure 1: Overall Integration

  16. Metalloboranes from first-principles calculations: A candidate for high-density hydrogen storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akbarzadeh, A R; Tymczak, C J

    2015-01-01

    Using first principles calculations, we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of a new class of compounds, metalloboranes. Metalloboranes are transition metal (TM) and borane compounds that obey a novel-bonding scheme. We have found that the transition metal atoms can bind up to 10 H2 molecules.

  17. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Argonne National Laboratory DC Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on evaluating the performance of candidate materials using their well-characterized experimental test beds compared to the first prototype. Philip Parilla (NREL) described the approach of the carbon Center hydrogen binding energies. Matt Ringer (NREL) and Steve Lasher (TIAX) discussed the use of H2A methodology

  18. NREL's Hydrogen-Powered Bus Serves as Showcase for Advanced Vehicle Technologies (AVT) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-08-01

    Brochure describes the hydrogen-powered internal combustion engine (H2ICE) shuttle bus at NREL. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding the lease of the bus from Ford to demonstrate market-ready advanced technology vehicles to visitors at NREL.

  19. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  20. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1999-08-03

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system is described which uses passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor. 1 fig.

  1. Method for producing H2 using a rotating drum reactor with a pulse jet heat source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulson, L.E.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a method for producing hydrogen by an endothermic steam-carbon reaction using a rotating drum reactor and a pulse jet combustor. The pulse jet combustor uses coal dust as a fuel to provide reaction temperatures of 1300{degrees} to 1400{degrees}F. Low-rank coal, water, limestone and catalyst are fed into the drum reactor where they are heated, tumbled and reacted. Part of the reaction product from the rotating drum reactor is hydrogen which can be utilized in suitable devices.

  2. Excitation-energy dependence of the mechanism for two-photon ionization of liquid H2O and D2O from 8.3to12.4eV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elles, Christopher G.; Jailaubekov, Askat E.; Crowell, Robert A.; Bradforth, Stephen E.

    2006-07-28

    of hydrogen gas in radioactive waste storage tanks.1 Radiolysis and photolysis experiments pro- vide a window on the underlying chemistry in such systems by revealing information about the important reactions that occur following ionization in a controlled... environment. Each ionization event produces a hydroxyl radical, a hydronium ion, and a solvated electron within the first few picoseconds, as in the case of two-photon ionization. H2O?aq? + 2h?? OH?aq? + H3O ?aq? + + e ?aq? ? . ?1? Although the kinetics...

  3. The hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Casey; Miller, James; Gellman, Andrew; Morreale, Bryan

    2011-04-01

    Hydrogen permeates rapidly through pure Pd membranes, but H{sub 2}S, a common minor component in hydrogen-containing streams, produces a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that severely retards hydrogen permeation. Hydrogen still permeates through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd structure, indicating that the Pd{sub 4}S surface is active for H{sub 2} dissociation; the low hydrogen permeability of the Pd4S film is responsible for the decreased rate of hydrogen transport. In this work, the hydrogen permeability of Pd{sub 4}S was determined experimentally in the 623-773 K temperature range. Bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were produced by exposing pure Pd foils to H{sub 2}S. H{sub 2} fluxes through the bi-layered Pd{sub 4}S/Pd foils were measured during exposure to both pure H{sub 2} and a 1000 ppm H{sub 2}S in H{sub 2} gas mixture. Our results show that H{sub 2}S slows hydrogen permeation through Pd mainly by producing a Pd{sub 4}S film on the Pd surface that is roughly an order-of-magnitude less permeable to hydrogen (k{sub Pd{sub 4}S} = 10{sup ?7.5} exp(?0.22 eV/k{sub B}T) molH{sub 2}/m/s/Pa{sup 1/2}) than pure Pd. The presence of H{sub 2}S in the gas stream results in greater inhibition of hydrogen transport than can be explained by the very low permeability of Pd{sub 4}S. H{sub 2}S may block H2 dissociation sites at the Pd{sub 4}S surface.

  4. Hydrogen Delivery Liquefaction & Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are more capital efficient, it's hard to take the capital risk of building the plant too large. The process is very energy intensive Typical unit powers are on the order of 12.5 to 15 kWhe/kg The cost stack looks Refrigeration GN2 to N2 Liquefier To Feed H2 Flash Compressor H2 Recycle Compressor LN2 Add. To Storage/Fill #12

  5. Above- and below-ground Litter Manipulation: Effect on Retention and Release of DOC, DON and DIN in the Sikfokut Forest, Hungary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evetts, Elizabeth A.; Peterson, Jacqueline A.

    2009-09-30

    on the retention and release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), nitrate and ammonium in the soil profile at 0-5 and 5-15 cm depths. The soils were obtained from a Long Term Ecological Research site in the Sikfokut Forest in Hungary...

  6. Workshop on Magnetotactic Bacteria 9-11 June 2008, Balatonfred, Hungary The role of iron sulfide crystals in magnetotactic bacteria for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Workshop on Magnetotactic Bacteria 9-11 June 2008, Balatonfüred, Hungary The role of iron sulfide crystals in magnetotactic bacteria for magnetotaxis: A transmission electron microscopy study Takeshi, Denmark Magnetotactic bacteria comprise a number of aquatic species that orient and migrate along

  7. Hydrogen separation process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mundschau, Michael (Longmont, CO); Xie, Xiaobing (Foster City, CA); Evenson, IV, Carl (Lafayette, CO); Grimmer, Paul (Longmont, CO); Wright, Harold (Longmont, CO)

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  8. Anti-Hydrogen Jonny Martinez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Anti-Hydrogen Jonny Martinez University of California, Berkeley #12;OUTLINE WHAT IS ANTI-HYDROGEN? HISTORY IMPORTANCE THEORY HOW TO MAKE ANTI-HYDROGEN OTHER ANTI-MATTER EXPERIMENTS CONCLUSION #12;WHAT IS ANTI-HYDROGEN? Anti-hydrogen is composed of a Positron(anti-electron) and anti-Proton. Anti-Hydrogen

  9. Electronic spectra of linear HC$_5$H and cumulene carbene H$_2$C$_5$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steglich, M; Maity, S; Nagy, A; Maier, J P

    2015-01-01

    The $1 ^3\\Sigma_u^- \\leftarrow X^3\\Sigma_g^-$ transition of linear HC$_5$H (A) has been observed in a neon matrix and gas phase. The assignment is based on mass-selective experiments, extrapolation of previous results of the longer HC$_{2n+1}$H homologues, and density functional and multi-state CASPT2 theoretical methods. Another band system starting at 303 nm in neon is assigned as the $1 ^1 A_1 \\leftarrow X ^1 A_1$ transition of the cumulene carbene pentatetraenylidene H$_2$C$_5$ (B).

  10. High Current H2+ Cyclotrons for Neutrino Physics: The IsoDAR and DAE ?ALUS Projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose R. Alonso; for the DAE ?ALUS Collaboration

    2012-10-13

    Using H2+ ions is expected to mitigate the two major impediments to accelerating very high currents in cyclotrons, due to lower space charge at injection, and stripping extraction. Planning for peak currents of 10 particle milliamps at 800 MeV/amu, these cyclotrons can generate adequate neutrino fluxes for Decay-At-Rest (DAR) studies of neutrino oscillation and CP violation. The Injector Cyclotron, at 60 MeV/amu can also provide adequate fluxes of electron antineutrinos from 8Li decay for sterile neutrino searches in existing liquid scintillator detectors at KamLAND or SNO+. This paper outlines programs for designing and building these machines.

  11. The H2 Double-Slit Experiment: Where Quantum and Classical Physics Meet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week Day Year(active tab)Frustrated Magnets:The GrowthThe H2

  12. H2 Refuel H-Prize Guideline Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2 Refuel H-Prize

  13. H2 Safety Snapshot, Vol. 1, Issue 1, April 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIALH-Tank FarmH2 Refuel2,

  14. Final Solar and Wind H2 Report EPAct 812.doc | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9,UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT||Solar and Wind H2

  15. Webinar August 6: H2 Refuel H-Prize Safety Guidance | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'S FUTURE.Projects atWe Want It&Web6: H2 Refuel H-Prize

  16. Catalytic epoxidation of propene with H2OO2 reactants on Au/TiO2w Manuel Ojeda and Enrique Iglesia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    converts, however, to H2O via unproductive side reactions, and leads to low H2 utilization efficiencies (30­40%, defined as PO formed per H2 consumed) and unfavorable economics.2 H2O2 was recently detected during COO3, Alcoa) was treated in air at 923 K for 5 h and suspended in deionized H2O (120 cm3 ) at 353 K

  17. Development of a Turnkey Hydrogen Fueling Station Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Guro; Edward Kiczek; Kendral Gill; Othniel Brown

    2010-07-29

    The transition to hydrogen as a fuel source presents several challenges. One of the major hurdles is the cost-effective production of hydrogen in small quantities (less than 1MMscf/month). In the early demonstration phase, hydrogen can be provided by bulk distribution of liquid or compressed gas from central production plants; however, the next phase to fostering the hydrogen economy will likely include onsite generation and extensive pipeline networks to help effect a pervasive infrastructure. Providing inexpensive hydrogen at a fleet operator’s garage or local fueling station is a key enabling technology for direct hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs). The objective of this project was to develop a comprehensive, turnkey, stand-alone, commercial hydrogen fueling station for FCVs with state-of-the-art technology that is cost-competitive with current hydrocarbon fuels. Such a station would promote the advent of the hydrogen fuel economy for buses, fleet vehicles, and ultimately personal vehicles. Air Products, partnering with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Pennsylvania State University, Harvest Energy Technology, and QuestAir, developed a turnkey hydrogen fueling station on the Penn State campus. Air Products aimed at designing a station that would have 65% overall station efficiency, 82% PSA (pressure swing adsorption) efficiency, and the capability of producing hydrogen at $3.00/kg (gge) H2 at mass production rates. Air Products designed a fueling station at Penn State from the ground up. This project was implemented in three phases. The first phase evaluated the various technologies available in hydrogen generation, compression, storage, and gas dispensing. In the second phase, Air Products designed the components chosen from the technologies examined. Finally, phase three entailed a several-month period of data collection, full-scale operation, maintenance of the station, and optimization of system reliability and performance. Based on field data analysis, it was determined by a proprietary hydrogen-analysis model that hydrogen produced from the station at a rate of 1500 kg/day and when produced at 1000 stations per year would be able to deliver hydrogen at a price of $3.03/kg (gge) H2. The station’s efficiency was measured to be 65.1%, and the PSA was tested and ran at an efficiency of 82.1%, thus meeting the project targets. From the study, it was determined that more research was needed in the area of hydrogen fueling. The overall cost of the hydrogen energy station, when combined with the required plot size for scaled-up hydrogen demands, demonstrated that a station using steam methane reforming technology as a means to produce on–site hydrogen would have limited utility in the marketplace. Alternative hydrogen supplies, such as liquid or pipeline delivery to a refueling station, need to be included in the exploration of alternative energy site layouts. These avenues need to be explored before a definitive refueling station configuration and commercialization pathway can be determined.

  18. Potential Energy Curves and Generalized Oscillator Strength for Doubly Excited States of Hydrogen Molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, Leonardo O; Nascimento, Rodrigo F; Faria, Nelson V de Castro; Jalbert, Ginette

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report calculations of potential energy curves in the $1.2 a.u.\\le R\\le100 a.u.$ range at Multireference Configuration Interaction (MRCI) level for doubly excited states of the H$_2$ molecule. We have focused on the $Q_2$ states which lie between the second and third ionization thresholds of H$_2^+$ molecular ion, i.e., $^2\\Sigma_u^+$ state in which lie the H(2l) + H(2l') dissociation channels. The MRCI approach allowed us to successfully identify for the first time the molecular state which dissociates into hydrogen atoms at 2s state. Further, Generalized Oscillator Strength as a function of transferred momentum for three doubly excited states is also presented. (Some figures in this article are in colour only in the electronic version)

  19. H2SOLV: Fortran solver for diatomic molecules in explicitly correlated exponential basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pachucki, Krzysztof

    Center for Advanced Studies, St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Polytekhnicheskaya 29, St-Wolniewicz) basis. The code provides a solution for the critical problem of an efficient and accurate evaluation of the hydrogen molecule and its isotopomers. Keywords: Schr¨odinger equation; explicitly correlated basis set

  20. System Analysis and Assessment of Technological Alternatives for Nordic H2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with renewable electricity, and biomass gasification for hydrogen production. For stationary applications, fuel. The competitiveness of biomass gasification is greatly affected by the biomass fuel price, which is a local energy cells and gas engines were selected for power and heat production. In our scenario calculations, biomass

  1. Breaking Pseudo-Rotational Symmetry through ${\\bf H}^2_+$ Metric Deformation in the Eckart Potential Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leija-Martinez, Nehemias; Kirchbach, Mariana; 10.3842/SIGMA.2011.113

    2011-01-01

    The peculiarity of the Eckart potential problem on ${\\bf H}^2_+$ (the upper sheet of the two-sheeted two-dimensional hyperboloid), to preserve the $(2l+1)$-fold degeneracy of the states typical for the geodesic motion there, is usually explained in casting the respective Hamiltonian in terms of the Casimir invariant of an so(2,1) algebra, referred to as potential algebra. In general, there are many possible similarity transformations of the symmetry algebras of the free motions on curved surfaces towards potential algebras, which are not all necessarily unitary. In the literature, a transformation of the symmetry algebra of the geodesic motion on ${\\bf H}^2_+$ towards the potential algebra of Eckart's Hamiltonian has been constructed for the prime purpose to prove that the Eckart interaction belongs to the class of Natanzon potentials. We here take a different path and search for a transformation which connects the $(2l+1)$ dimensional representation space of the pseudo-rotational so(2,1) algebra, spanned by ...

  2. Volumetric Properties and Fluid Phase Equilibria of CO2 + H2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capobianco, Ryan [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University; Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Bodnar, Robert [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

    2013-01-01

    The need for accurate modeling of fluid-mineral processes over wide ranges of temperature, pressure and composition highlighted considerable uncertainties of available property data and equations of state, even for the CO2 + H2O binary system. In particular, the solubility, activity, and ionic dissociation equilibrium data for the CO2-rich phase, which are essential for understanding dissolution/precipitation, fluid-matrix reactions, and solute transport, are uncertain or missing. In this paper we report the results of a new experimental study of volumetric and phase equilibrium properties of CO2 + H2O, to be followed by measurements for bulk and confined multicomponent fluid mixtures. Mixture densities were measured by vibrating tube densimetry (VTD) over the entire composition range at T = 200 and 250 C and P = 20, 40, 60, and 80 MPa. Initial analysis of the mutual solubilities, determined from volumetric data, shows good agreement with earlier results for the aqueous phase, but finds that the data of Takenouchi and Kennedy (1964) significantly overestimated the solubility of water in supercritical CO2 (by a factor of more than two at 200 C). Resolving this well-known discrepancy will have a direct impact on the accuracy of predictive modeling of CO2 injection in geothermal reservoirs and geological carbon sequestration through improved equations of state, needed for calibration of predictive molecular-scale models and large-scale reactive transport simulations.

  3. Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsapatsis, Michael; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Elyassi, Bahman; Lima, Fernando; Iyer, Aparna; Agrawal, Kumar; Sabnis, Sanket

    2014-09-30

    The objective of this project was to develop and evaluate an innovative membrane technology at process conditions that would be representative of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) advanced power generation with pre-combustion capture of carbon dioxide (CO2). This research focused on hydrogen (H2)-selective zeolite membranes that could be utilized to separate conditioned syngas into H2-rich and CO2-rich components. Both experiments and process design and optimization calculations were performed to evaluate the concept of ultra-thin membranes made from zeolites nanosheets. In this work, efforts in the laboratory were made to tackle two fundamental challenges in application of zeolite membranes in harsh industrial environments, namely, membrane thickness and membrane stability. Conventional zeolite membranes have thicknesses in the micron range, limiting their performance. In this research, we developed a method for fabrication of ultimately thin zeolite membranes based on zeolite nanosheets. A range of layered zeolites (MWW, RWR, NSI structure types) suitable for hydrogen separation was successfully exfoliated to their constituent nanosheets. Further, membranes were made from one of these zeolites, MWW, to demonstrate the potential of this group of materials. Moreover, long-term steam stability of these zeolites (up to 6 months) was investigated in high concentrations of steam (35 mol% and 95 mole%), high pressure (10 barg), and high temperatures (350 oC and 600 oC) relevant to conditions of water-gas-shift and steam methane reforming reactions. It was found that certain nanosheets are stable, and that stability depends on the concentration of structural defects. Additionally, models that represent a water-gas-shift (WGS) membrane reactor equipped with the zeolite membrane were developed for systems studies. These studies had the aim of analyzing the effect of the membrane reactor integration into IGCC plants in terms of performance and economic aspects of the plants. Specifically, simulation and design optimization studies were performed using the developed stand-alone membrane reactor models to identify the membrane selectivity and permeance characteristics necessary to achieve desired targets of CO2 capture and H2 recovery, as well as guide the selection of the optimal reactor design that minimizes the membrane cost as a function of its surface area required. The isothermal membrane reactor model was also integrated into IGCC system models using both the MATLAB and Aspen software platforms and techno-economic analyses of the integrated plants have been carried out to evaluate the feasibility of replacing current technologies for pre-combustion capture by the proposed novel approach in terms of satisfying stream constraints and achieving the DOE target goal of 90% CO2 capture. The results of the performed analyses based on present value of annuity calculations showed break even costs for the membrane reactor within the feasible range for membrane fabrication. However, the predicted membrane performance used in these simulations exceeded the performance achieved experimentally. Therefore, further work is required to improve membrane performance.

  4. Validation of an Integrated Hydrogen Energy Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward C. Heydorn

    2012-10-26

    This report presents the results of a 10-year project conducted by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) to determine the feasibility of coproducing hydrogen with electricity. The primary objective was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of a hydrogen energy station using a high-temperature fuel cell designed to produce power and hydrogen. This four-phase project had intermediate go/no-go decisions and the following specific goals: �¢���¢ Complete a technical assessment and economic analysis of the use of high-temperature fuel cells, including solid oxide and molten carbonate, for the co-production of power and hydrogen (energy park concept). �¢���¢ Build on the experience gained at the Las Vegas H2 Energy Station and compare/contrast the two approaches for co-production. �¢���¢ Determine the applicability of co-production from a high-temperature fuel cell for the existing merchant hydrogen market and for the emerging hydrogen economy. �¢���¢ Demonstrate the concept on natural gas for six months at a suitable site with demand for both hydrogen and electricity. �¢���¢ Maintain safety as the top priority in the system design and operation. �¢���¢ Obtain adequate operational data to provide the basis for future commercial activities, including hydrogen fueling stations. Work began with the execution of the cooperative agreement with DOE on 30 September 2001. During Phase 1, Air Products identified high-temperature fuel cells as having the potential to meet the coproduction targets, and the molten carbonate fuel cell system from FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FuelCell Energy) was selected by Air Products and DOE following the feasibility assessment performed during Phase 2. Detailed design, construction and shop validation testing of a system to produce 250 kW of electricity and 100 kilograms per day of hydrogen, along with site selection to include a renewable feedstock for the fuel cell, were completed in Phase 3. The system also completed six months of demonstration operation at the wastewater treatment facility operated by Orange County Sanitation District (OCSD, Fountain Valley, CA). As part of achieving the objective of operating on a renewable feedstock, Air Products secured additional funding via an award from the California Air Resources Board. The South Coast Air Quality Management District also provided cost share which supported the objectives of this project. System operation at OCSD confirmed the results from shop validation testing performed during Phase 3. Hydrogen was produced at rates and purity that met the targets from the system design basis, and coproduction efficiency exceeded the 50% target set in conjunction with input from the DOE. Hydrogen production economics, updated from the Phase 2 analysis, showed pricing of $5 to $6 per kilogram of hydrogen using current gas purification systems. Hydrogen costs under $3 per kilogram are achievable if next-generation electrochemical separation technologies become available.

  5. Methanol Synthesis from CO2 Hydrogenation over a Pd4/In2O3 Model Catalyst: A Combined DFT and Kinetic Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Jingyun; Liu, Changjun; Mei, Donghai; Ge, Qingfeng

    2014-08-01

    Methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation on Pd4/In2O3 has been investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and microkinetic modeling. In this study, three possible routes in the reaction network of CO2 + H2 ? CH3OH + H2O have been examined. Our DFT results show that the HCOO route competes with the RWGS route whereas a high activation barrier kinetically blocks the HCOOH route. DFT results also suggest that H2COO* + H* ? H2CO* +OH* and cis-COOH* + H* ?CO* + H2O* are the rate limiting steps in the HCOO route and the RWGS route, respectively. Microkinetic modeling results demonstrate that the HCOO route is the dominant reaction route for methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation. We found that the activation of H adatom on the small Pd cluster and the presence of H2O on the In2O3 substrate play important roles in promoting the methanol synthesis. The hydroxyl adsorbed at the interface of Pd4/In2O3 induces the transformation of the supported Pd4 cluster from a butterfly structure into a tetrahedron structure. This important structure change not only indicates the dynamical nature of the supported nanoparticle catalyst structure during the reaction but also shifts the final hydrogenation step from H2COH to CH3O.

  6. Hydrogen Filling Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen future. Project partners also conducted a workshop on hydrogen safety and permitting. This provided an opportunity for the various permitting agencies and end users to gather to share experiences and knowledge. As a result of this workshop, the permitting process for the hydrogen filling station on the Las Vegas Valley Water District’s land was done more efficiently and those who would be responsible for the operation were better educated on the safety and reliability of hydrogen production and storage. The lessons learned in permitting the filling station and conducting this workshop provided a basis for future hydrogen projects in the region. Continuing efforts to increase the working pressure of electrolysis and efficiency have been pursued. Research was also performed on improving the cost, efficiency and durability of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) hydrogen technology. Research elements focused upon PEM membranes, electrodes/catalysts, membrane-electrode assemblies, seals, bipolar plates, utilization of renewable power, reliability issues, scale, and advanced conversion topics. Additionally, direct solar-to-hydrogen conversion research to demonstrate stable and efficient photoelectrochemistry (PEC) hydrogen production systems based on a number of optional concepts was performed. Candidate PEC concepts included technical obstacles such as inefficient photocatalysis, inadequate photocurrent due to non-optimal material band gap energies, rapid electron-hole recombination, reduced hole mobility and diminished operational lifetimes of surface materials exposed to electrolytes. Project Objective 1: Design, build, operate hydrogen filling station Project Objective 2: Perform research and development for utilizing solar technologies on the hydrogen filling station and convert two utility vehicles for use by the station operators Project Objective 3: Increase capacity of hydrogen filling station; add additional vehicle; conduct safety workshop; develop a roadmap for hydrogen development; accelerate the development of photovoltaic components Project Objective 4:

  7. Ultrafine hydrogen storage powders

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Doylestown, PA); Pecharsky, Vitalij K. (Ames, IA); Ting, Jason (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert (Ames, IA); Bowman, Robert C. (La Mesa, CA); Witham, Charles K. (Pasadena, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA); Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Arcadia, CA)

    2000-06-13

    A method of making hydrogen storage powder resistant to fracture in service involves forming a melt having the appropriate composition for the hydrogen storage material, such, for example, LaNi.sub.5 and other AB.sub.5 type materials and AB.sub.5+x materials, where x is from about -2.5 to about +2.5, including x=0, and the melt is gas atomized under conditions of melt temperature and atomizing gas pressure to form generally spherical powder particles. The hydrogen storage powder exhibits improved chemcial homogeneity as a result of rapid solidfication from the melt and small particle size that is more resistant to microcracking during hydrogen absorption/desorption cycling. A hydrogen storage component, such as an electrode for a battery or electrochemical fuel cell, made from the gas atomized hydrogen storage material is resistant to hydrogen degradation upon hydrogen absorption/desorption that occurs for example, during charging/discharging of a battery. Such hydrogen storage components can be made by consolidating and optionally sintering the gas atomized hydrogen storage powder or alternately by shaping the gas atomized powder and a suitable binder to a desired configuration in a mold or die.

  8. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  9. Analysis of hydrogen isotope mixtures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa-Aleman, Eliel (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method for determining the concentrations of hydrogen isotopes in a sample. Hydrogen in the sample is separated from other elements using a filter selectively permeable to hydrogen. Then the hydrogen is condensed onto a cold finger or cryopump. The cold finger is rotated as pulsed laser energy vaporizes a portion of the condensed hydrogen, forming a packet of molecular hydrogen. The desorbed hydrogen is ionized and admitted into a mass spectrometer for analysis.

  10. Effects and Mechanisms of Mechanical Activation on Hydrogen Sorption/ Desorption of Nanoscale Lithium Nitrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Leon, L.; Yang, Gary, Z.; Crosby, Kyle; Wwan, Xufei. Zhong, Yang; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Osborn, William; Hu, Jianzhi; Kwak, Ja Hun

    2012-04-26

    The objective of this project is to investigate and develop novel, mechanically activated, nanoscale Li3N-based and LiBH4-based materials that are able to store and release {approx}10 wt% hydrogen at temperatures near 100 C with a plateau hydrogen pressure of less than 10 bar. Four (4) material systems have been investigated in the course of this project in order to achieve the project objective. These 4 systems are (i) LiNH2+LiH, (ii) LiNH2+MgH2, (iii) LiBH4, and (iv) LiBH4+MgH2. The key findings we have obtained from these 4 systems are summarized below. *The thermodynamic driving forces for LiNH2+LiH and LiBH4 systems are not adequate to enable H2 release at temperatures < 100 C. *Hydrogen release in the solid state for all of the four systems is controlled by diffusion, and thus is a slow process. *LiNH2+MgH2 and LiBH4+MgH2 systems, although possessing proper thermodynamic driving forces to allow for H2 release at temperatures < 100 C, have sluggish reaction kinetics because of their diffusion-controlled rate-limiting steps. *Reducing particles to the nanometer length scale (< 50 nm) can improve the thermodynamic driving force to enable H2 release at near ambient temperature, while simultaneously enhancing the reaction kinetics as well as changing the diffusion-controlled rate-limiting step to gas desorption-controlled rate-limiting step. This phenomenon has been demonstrated with LiBH4 and offers the hope that further work along this direction will make one of the material systems, i.e., LiBH4, LiBH4+MgH2 and LiNH2+MgH2, possess the desired thermodynamic properties and rapid H2 uptake/release kinetics for on-board applications. Many of the findings and knowledge gained from this project have been published in archival refereed journal articles [1-15] and are accessible by general public. Thus, to avoid a bulky final report, the key findings and knowledge gained from this project will be succinctly summarized, particularly for those findings and knowledge available in the public domain. However, for those findings and knowledge that have not been published yet, more detailed information will be provided. The report will be divided into 4 major sections based on the material systems investigated.

  11. Propane reacts with O2 and H2 on gold supported TS-1 to form oxygenates with high selectivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo Suarez, Juan J.

    2008-06-13

    Gold nanoparticles supported on a microporous titanosilicate (TS-1) were found to be highly selective (95%) towards the formation of acetone and isopropanol from propane, O2, and H2 at moderate temperatures (443 K)....

  12. H2A.Z landscapes and dual modifications in pluripotent and multipotent stem cells underlie complex genome regulatory functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Manching

    Abstract Background The histone variant H2A.Z has been implicated in nucleosome exchange, transcriptional activation and Polycomb repression. However, the relationships among these seemingly disparate functions remain ...

  13. H2A.Z landscapes and dual modifications in pluripotent and multipotent stem cells underlie complex genome regulatory functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ku, Manching

    Background: The histone variant H2A.Z has been implicated in nucleosome exchange, transcriptional activation and Polycomb repression. However, the relationships among these seemingly disparate functions remain obscure.

  14. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Ian M.; Johnson, Duane D.

    2014-06-21

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  15. Dispersion of Hydrogen Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael R. Swain; Eric S. Grilliot; Matthew N. Swain

    2000-06-30

    The following is the presentation of a simplification of the Hydrogen Risk Assessment Method previously developed at the University of Miami. It has been found that for simple enclosures, hydrogen leaks can be simulated with helium leaks to predict the concentrations of hydrogen gas produced. The highest concentrations of hydrogen occur near the ceiling after the initial transients disappear. For the geometries tested, hydrogen concentrations equal helium concentrations for the conditions of greatest concern (near the ceiling after transients disappear). The data supporting this conclusion is presented along with a comparison of hydrogen, LPG, and gasoline leakage from a vehicle parked in a single car garage. A short video was made from the vehicle fuel leakage data.

  16. Hydrogen Permeation Resistant Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KORINKO, PAUL; ADAMS, THAD; CREECH, GREGGORY

    2005-06-15

    As the National Hydrogen Economy continues to develop and evolve the need for structural materials that can resist hydrogen assisted degradation will become critical. To date austenitic stainless steel materials have been shown to be mildly susceptible to hydrogen attack which results in lower mechanical and fracture strengths. As a result, hydrogen permeation barrier coatings may be applied to these ferrous alloys to retard hydrogen ingress. Hydrogen is known to be very mobile in materials of construction. In this study, the permeation resistance of bare stainless steel samples and coated stainless steel samples was tested. The permeation resistance was measured using a modular permeation rig using a pressure rise technique. The coating microstructure and permeation results will be discussed in this document as will some additional testing.

  17. Energy Department Launches H2 Refuel H-Prize Competition for Small-Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy ofDepartment ofDepartment ofHydrogen Refueling

  18. Salt-Bridge Transition State for the Charge Separation 2+ f CoOH(H2O)2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Metz, Ricardo B.

    Salt-Bridge Transition State for the Charge Separation Co(H2O)4 2+ f CoOH(H2O)2 + + H3O+ Martin K centers form a Co2+ -OH- -H3O+ salt bridge, lowering the barrier for the reaction. The transition state that this reaction proceeds via a salt-bridge transition state.11 The barrier height is directly determined

  19. Studies of NafionRuO2xH2O Composite Membranes Catherine Lepiller,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    prepared by the recast method. The hydration level of RuO2·xH2O was varied by heat-dispersive X-ray analysis and scanning X-ray transmission microscopy that both show the presence of a thin layer 5 m of RuO2·xH2O on one side of the membrane. Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy also reveals

  20. Resveratrol induces cellular senescence with attenuated mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B in glioma cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhen; Xu, Michael S.; Barnett, Tamara L.; Xu, C. Wilson

    2011-04-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Resveratrol induces cellular senescence in glioma cell. {yields} Resveratrol inhibits mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120. {yields} Depletion of RNF20, phenocopies the inhibitory effects of resveratrol. {yields} Mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 is a novel target of resveratrol. {yields} RNF20 inhibits cellular senescence in proliferating glioma cells. -- Abstract: Resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a polyphenol naturally occurring in grapes and other plants, has cancer chemo-preventive effects and therapeutic potential. Although resveratrol modulates multiple pathways in tumor cells, how resveratrol or its affected pathways converge on chromatin to mediate its effects is not known. Using glioma cells as a model, we showed here that resveratrol inhibited cell proliferation and induced cellular hypertrophy by transforming spindle-shaped cells to enlarged, irregular and flatten-shaped ones. We further showed that resveratrol-induced hypertrophic cells expressed senescence-associated-{beta}-galactosidase, suggesting that resveratrol-induced cellular senescence in glioma cells. Consistent with these observations, we demonstrated that resveratrol inhibited clonogenic efficiencies in vitro and tumor growth in a xenograft model. Furthermore, we found that acute treatment of resveratrol inhibited mono-ubiquitination of histone H2B at K120 (uH2B) in breast, prostate, pancreatic, lung, brain tumor cells as well as primary human cells. Chronic treatment with low doses of resveratrol also inhibited uH2B in the resveratrol-induced senescent glioma cells. Moreover, we showed that depletion of RNF20, a ubiquitin ligase of histone H2B, inhibited uH2B and induced cellular senescence in glioma cells in vitro, thereby recapitulated the effects of resveratrol. Taken together, our results suggest that uH2B is a novel direct or indirect chromatin target of resveratrol and RNF20 plays an important role in inhibiting cellular senescence programs that are intact in glioma cells.

  1. ANSI X3H2-96-582 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-203

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-96-582 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL MAD-203 I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION: Change Proposal Title: Addendum to Valid- and Transaction-time Proposals Source: ANSI Expert. Steiner Adding Valid Time to SQL Temporal, ANSI X3H2-96-501r2, ISO IEC JTC 1 SC 21 WG 3 DBL-MAD-146r2

  2. ANSI X3H2-95-486 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL LHR-?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Richard T.

    ANSI X3H2-95-486 ISO IEC JTC1 SC21 WG3 DBL LHR-? I S O INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION Status: Change Proposal Title: Response to LHR-042, Possible problems in SQL T" Version: 1 Source: ANSI rules for datetimes LHR-046 9 Response to LHR-043 ANSI X3H2-95-487 10 The TSQL2 Temporal Query Language

  3. Sandia Energy - Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials Home Transportation Energy Hydrogen Materials & Components Compatibility Technical Reference for Hydrogen Compatibility...

  4. Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Processes Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis Hydrogen Production: Electrolysis Electrolysis is a promising option for hydrogen production from renewable resources. Electrolysis...

  5. Hydrogen powered bus

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-11-22

    Take a ride on a new type of bus, fueled by hydrogen. These hydrogen taxis are part of a Department of Energy-funded deployment of hydrogen powered vehicles and fueling infrastructure at nine federal facilities across the country to demonstrate this market-ready advanced technology. Produced and leased by Ford Motor Company , they consist of one 12- passenger bus and one nine-passenger bus. More information at: http://go.usa.gov/Tgr

  6. National hydrogen energy roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2002-11-01

    This report was unveiled by Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham in November 2002 and provides a blueprint for the coordinated, long-term, public and private efforts required for hydrogen energy development. Based on the results of the government-industry National Hydrogen Energy Roadmap Workshop, held in Washington, DC on April 2-3, 2002, it displays the development of a roadmap for America's clean energy future and outlines the key barriers and needs to achieve the hydrogen vision goals defined in

  7. Hydrogen Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    The fuel cell — an energy conversion device that can efficiently capture and use the power of hydrogen — is the key to making it happen.

  8. Hydrogen Industrial Trucks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slides from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop held November 4, 2010 in Livermore, CA.

  9. Hydrogen ion microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.; Deb, S.K.

    1990-10-02

    Disclosed is a hydrogen ion microlithography process for use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. The process comprises the steps of providing a single layer of either an amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon material. A pattern is recorded in a selected layer of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon materials by preferentially implanting hydrogen ions therein so as to permit the selected layer to serve as a mask-resist wafer suitable for subsequent development and device fabrication. The layer is developed to provide a surface pattern therein adaptable for subsequent use in microelectronic fabrication and semiconductor device processing. 6 figs.

  10. Hydrogen purification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golben, Peter Mark

    2010-06-15

    The present invention provides a system to purify hydrogen involving the use of a hydride compressor and catalytic converters combined with a process controller.

  11. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  12. Hydrogen permeation resistant barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGuire, J.C.; Brehm, W.F.

    1980-02-08

    A hydrogen permeation resistant barrier is formed by diffusing aluminum into an iron or nickel alloy and forming an intermetallic aluminide layer.

  13. Hydrogen Delivery and Fueling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-09

    This MP3 provides an overview of how hydrogen is delivered from the point of production to where it is used.

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Demonstration ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generator currently used to provide power for refrigerated containers on land and on transport barges. Hydrogenics Corp. is designing and manufacturing a containerized...

  15. Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-11-16

    Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

  16. Hydrogen production from switchgrass via a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Alex J; Ren, Shoujie; Ye, Philip; Kim, Pyoungchung; Labbe, Niki; Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    A new approach to hydrogen production using a hybrid pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process is described. The aqueous stream generated during pyrolysis of switchgrass was used as a substrate for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell, achieving a maximum hydrogen production rate of 4.3 L H2/L-day at a loading of 10 g COD/L-anode-day. Hydrogen yields ranged from 50 3.2% to76 0.5% while anode coulombic efficiency ranged from 54 6.5% to 96 0.21%, respectively. Significant conversion of furfural, organic acids and phenolic molecules was observed under both batch and continuous conditions. The electrical and overall energy efficiency ranged from 149-175% and 48-63%, respectively. The results demonstrate the potential of the pyrolysis-microbial electrolysis process as a sustainable and efficient route for production of renewable hydrogen with significant implications for hydrocarbon production from biomass.

  17. Analysis of combined hydrogen, heat, and power as a bridge to a hydrogen transition.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalik, M.; Stephan, C.

    2011-01-18

    Combined hydrogen, heat, and power (CHHP) technology is envisioned as a means to providing heat and electricity, generated on-site, to large end users, such as hospitals, hotels, and distribution centers, while simultaneously producing hydrogen as a by-product. The hydrogen can be stored for later conversion to electricity, used on-site (e.g., in forklifts), or dispensed to hydrogen-powered vehicles. Argonne has developed a complex-adaptive-system model, H2CAS, to simulate how vehicles and infrastructure can evolve in a transition to hydrogen. This study applies the H2CAS model to examine how CHHP technology can be used to aid the transition to hydrogen. It does not attempt to predict the future or provide one forecast of system development. Rather, the purpose of the model is to understand how the system works. The model uses a 50- by 100-mile rectangular grid of 1-square-mile cells centered on the Los Angeles metropolitan area. The major expressways are incorporated into the model, and local streets are considered to be ubiquitous, except where there are natural barriers. The model has two types of agents. Driver agents are characterized by a number of parameters: home and job locations, income, various types of 'personalities' reflective of marketing distinctions (e.g., innovators, early adopters), willingness to spend extra money on 'green' vehicles, etc. At the beginning of the simulations, almost all driver agents own conventional vehicles. They drive around the metropolitan area, commuting to and from work and traveling to various other destinations. As they do so, they observe the presence or absence of facilities selling hydrogen. If they find such facilities conveniently located along their routes, they are motivated to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle when it becomes time to replace their present vehicle. Conversely, if they find that they would be inconvenienced by having to purchase hydrogen earlier than necessary or if they become worried that they would run out of fuel before encountering a facility, their motivation to purchase a hydrogen-powered vehicle decreases. At vehicle purchase time, they weigh this experience, as well as other factors such as social influence by their peers, fuel cost, and capital cost of a hydrogen vehicle. Investor agents build full-service hydrogen fueling stations (HFSs) at different locations along the highway network. They base their decision to build or not build a station on their (imperfect) estimates of the sales the station would immediately generate (based on hydrogen-powered vehicle traffic past the location and other factors), as well as the growth in hydrogen sales they could expect throughout their investment horizon. The interaction between driver and investor agents provides the basis for growth in both the number of hydrogen vehicles and number of hydrogen stations. For the present report, we have added to this mix smaller, 'bare-bones' hydrogen dispensing facilities (HDFs) of the type that owners of CHHP facilities could provide to the public. The locations of these stations were chosen to match existing facilities that might reasonably incorporate CHHP plants in the future. Unlike the larger commercial stations, these facilities are built according to exogenously supplied timetables, and no attempt has been made to model the financial basis for the facilities. Rather, our objective is to understand how the presence of these additional stations might facilitate the petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. We discuss a base case in which the HDFs are not present, and then investigate the effects of introducing HDFs in various numbers; according to different timetables; with various production capacities; and with hydrogen selling at prices above, equal to, and below the commercial stations selling price. We conclude that HDFs can indeed be helpful in accelerating a petroleum-to-hydrogen transition. Placed in areas where investors might not be willing to install large for-profit HFSs, HDFs can serve as a bridge until demand for hydrogen increases to the point where l

  18. Novel Hydrogen Carriers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carriers Novel Hydrogen Carriers Hydrogen carriers store hydrogen in some other chemical state rather than as free hydrogen molecules. Additional research and analyses are...

  19. Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Gaseous Hydrogen Delivery Gaseous hydrogen is most commonly delivered either by trucks or through pipelines. Because gaseous hydrogen is typically...

  20. Sandia Energy - Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cell Project Home Transportation Energy Hydrogen Market Transformation Maritime Hydrogen & SF-BREEZE Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell Project Maritime Hydrogen Fuel Cell...