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  1. Guyana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guyana Population 747,884 GDP 2,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GY 3-letter ISO code GUY Numeric ISO...

  2. From nGy to MGy - New dosimetry with LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescence detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obryk, Barbara

    2013-05-06

    One of the well known advantages of thermoluminescence (TL) detectors made of lithium fluoride doped with magnesium, copper and phosphorus (LiF:Mg,Cu,P) is their very high sensitivity to ionizing radiation. LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors enable measurements of radiation doses from tens of nanograys up to a few kilograys, when the total saturation of the signal of the so-called main dosimetric peak occurs. Only recently, unprecedented high-temperature emission of LiF detectors heated to temperatures up to 600 Degree-Sign C, was observed after exposures to radiation doses ranging from 1 kGy to 1 MGy. For quantification of the glow-curve shape changes of LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors in this range of doses and determination of the absorbed dose, the Ultra-High Temperature Ratio coefficient (UHTR) was defined. This newly established dosimetric method was tested in a range of radiation qualities, such as gamma radiation, electron and proton beams, thermal neutron fields and high-energy mixed fields around the SPS and PS accelerators at CERN. The new method for ultra-high dose range monitoring with a single LiF:Mg,Cu,P detector, which is capable of covering at least twelve orders of magnitude of doses, can be used for dosimetry at high energy accelerators, thermonuclear fusion technology facilities and has great potential for accident dosimetry in particular. A number of dosimetric sets with LiF:Mg,Cu,P detectors are currently installed around the LHC at CERN.

  3. Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Workshop, Guidemanual Website http:unfccc.intfilesmethod Country Guyana UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation1...

  4. Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy AgencyCompany Organization: Guyana Office of...

  5. Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) AgencyCompany Organization Government of Norway, Government of Guyana...

  6. Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  7. Guyana-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana-Low Carbon Growth Planning Support AgencyCompany Organization ClimateWorks, Project...

  8. LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    \ LI g. / This document con&s of lf pages. No. 1 &of #copies, Series fl . .! ' \ ' > .b P .--r ' i ' ./' MJDIFICATION NO. k sUPPLEMENTALAMw24ENrto CONTRACT NO. A T (30-l)-1335 M O D IFICATION NO. 4 CONTRACTOR AND A D D m S : KIDIFICATION TO: -EINESTIEUTED CCSTOFWORKr TOTAT,ESTIIUTEDC~T OFWRKI INCREASEIN C O M K rSSI~ OBLlDATIONt NEMTOTALCOMMISSION OBLIOaTIONt PAYl%NTTDBEMADEBY: HORIZONS, INCORPOlZATED R-inceton, New Jersey AIBNDSCOPEOFK#tK,EXTENDTR?M AND OTflER CHANOES $&31,lbOO

  9. RenGyS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Product: RenGyS is an independent renewable energy developer focused on the Chinese energy market. Coordinates: 31.247709, 121.472618 Show Map Loading map......

  10. 07Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Q. 7Li deduced levels, branchings. 1970MEZS: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured σ. 1970SP02: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ, Iγ; deduced Q. 1972OP01: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ, Iγ. 1973JUZT, 1973JUZU: 6Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured σ(Eγ). 7Li deduced γ-branching. 1985KO47: 6Li(n, γ), E =

  11. 5Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1968TA11: 2H(, p), E 29.2 MeV; measured (Ep, E, ). 5Li deduced resonances. 1968VI03: 6Li(3He, p), E 2 MeV; 5Li; measured...

  12. 9Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1991LUZZ: 9Li(-); measured T12. 1992LI24: 9Li(-); measured NMR...

  13. 4Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 4Li Adopted value: 91 ± 9 ys (2003AU02) Measured Mass Excess for 4Li Adopted value: 25320 ± 210 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1960BR05: 4Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR10: 4Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR19: 4Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960RO11: 4Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1963WE10: 4Li; measured not

  14. 11Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li β--Decay Evaluated Data Measurements 1969KL08: 11Li; measured T1/2. 1974RO31: 11Li; measured Eγ, Iγ, T1/2, delayed neutrons, βγ-coin, Eβ. 1975TH08: 11Li; measured neutron binding energy, delayed neutron branching ratio, T1/2; deduced log ft. 1979ANZZ: 11Li; 11Li deduced evidence for β-delayed 2n emission. 1979AZ03: 11Li; measured β-delayed En, nn-coin. 11Be levels deduced 1n, 2n decay probabilities. 1979DEYX, 1980DE39, 1980DEZF: 11Li; measured Eγ, Iγ, Iβ, β-delayed En, In; deduced

  15. 08Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 7Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ; deduced Q. 1973JUZT, 1973JUZU: 7Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured σ(Eγ). 7Li deduced γ-branching. 1991LY01: 7Li(n, γ), E = thermal; measured Eγ, Iγ, capture σ. 1996BL10: 7Li(n, γ), E = 1.5-1340 eV; measured Eγ, Iγ, γ yield, absolute σ(E). 1997HEZW, 1998HE35: 7Li(n, γ), E ≈ 5 meV, 54 keV; measured σ. 1999ZHZM, 2000ZHZP: 7Li(n, γ), E = thermal; compiled, evaluated prompt γ-ray

  16. 10Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm(T1/2) for 10Li Adopted value: 2.0 ± 0.5 zs (2003AU02) Measured Mass Excess for 10Li Adopted value: 33051 ± 15 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1975WI26: 9Be(9Be, 8B), E = 121 MeV; measured σ(E(8B), θ); deduced Q. 10Li deduced mass excess. 1990AM05: 11B(π-, X), E at rest; measured inclusive p-, d-, t-spectra, X = 10Li production. 10Li deduced level, Γ. 1992AMZY: 11B(π-, X), E at rest; measured pion, deuteron, triton spectra. 10Li

  17. 8Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -asymmetry, NMR; deduced polarization. 1986WA01: 8Li(-); analyzed -delayed breakup -spectra; deduced intruder states role. 8Be deduced level, , Gamow-Teller matrix...

  18. Jennifer Li | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jennifer Li Jennifer Li Jennifer Li E-mail: jennifer.li

  19. F LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    >"- -- F LI c ------- RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE M IDDLESEX LANDFILL SITE RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE ~IDDLESEX LfiMDFI.LL S I:TE it%RCH 25 - AFRiL 4, 1374 ;)UNE 27, 1974 T.!BLE OF CONTENTS Introduction and Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Conclusions. . . . . . w . . . . . . , . . . , . . . . 2 Histohcal Background0 . . . . . . . . . . . . b (I . . 2 Description of Area Surveyed . . . . . . . . I . . . * 3 Survey Findings. * *,. a . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Surface

  20. 70 Gy Versus 80 Gy in Localized Prostate Cancer: 5-Year Results of GETUG 06 Randomized Trial;Prostate cancer; Dose escalation; Conformal radiotherapy; Randomized trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean-Marc; Bougnoux, Agnes; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdain, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean-Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal; Hay, Men; Dubray, Bernard; Lagrange, Jean-Leon; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To perform a randomized trial comparing 70 and 80 Gy radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Patients and Methods: A total of 306 patients with localized prostate cancer were randomized. No androgen deprivation was allowed. The primary endpoint was biochemical relapse according to the modified 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology and Phoenix definitions. Toxicity was graded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 1991 criteria and the late effects on normal tissues-subjective, objective, management, analytic scales (LENT-SOMA) scales. The patients' quality of life was scored using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire 30-item cancer-specific and 25-item prostate-specific modules. Results: The median follow-up was 61 months. According to the 1997-American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 39% and 28% in the 70- and 80-Gy arms, respectively (p = .036). Using the Phoenix definition, the 5-year biochemical relapse rate was 32% and 23.5%, respectively (p = .09). The subgroup analysis showed a better biochemical outcome for the higher dose group with an initial prostate-specific antigen level >15 ng/mL. At the last follow-up date, 26 patients had died, 10 of their disease and none of toxicity, with no differences between the two arms. According to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale, the Grade 2 or greater rectal toxicity rate was 14% and 19.5% for the 70- and 80-Gy arms (p = .22), respectively. The Grade 2 or greater urinary toxicity was 10% at 70 Gy and 17.5% at 80 Gy (p = .046). Similar results were observed using the LENT-SOMA scale. Bladder toxicity was more frequent at 80 Gy than at 70 Gy (p = .039). The quality-of-life questionnaire results before and 5 years after treatment were available for 103 patients with no differences found between the 70- and 80-Gy arms. Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy provided a

  1. MEMORANDUM GY

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AT SITE : 'I---...---... Control q AECtlED managed operations 3' Health Physics Protection . (3 Little or None G AECt-lED responsible for accountability ' , PAEC...

  2. 6Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 6Li is subdivided into the following categories: Ground State Properties of 6Li Special States Theoretical Shell Model Cluster Models Complex...

  3. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li(, '): emission yield 1.0 - 3.4 1 01182012 2011YA02 7Li(, ): elastic scattering differential 1.0 - 4.5 cm 170 07192011 7Li(, p): differential...

  4. Escalation of radiation dose beyond 30 Gy in 10 fractions for metastatic spinal cord compression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rades, Dirk . E-mail: Rades.Dirk@gmx.net; Karstens, Johann H.; Hoskin, Peter J.; Rudat, Volker; Veninga, Theo; Schild, Steven E.; Dunst, Juergen

    2007-02-01

    Purpose: In many centers worldwide, radiotherapy for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC) is performed with 30 Gy in 10 fractions. This study investigated the potential benefit of dose escalation. Methods and Materials: Data from 922 patients with carcinomas causing MSCC were retrospectively evaluated. The outcome of 345 patients treated with 10 fractions of 3 Gy in 2 weeks was compared with the outcomes of 577 patients treated with 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions within 3 weeks or 40 Gy in 20 fractions within 4 weeks. Additionally, 10 potential prognostic factors were investigated: age, gender, performance status, tumor type, interval between cancer diagnosis and MSCC, number of involved vertebrae, other bone and visceral metastases, ambulatory status, and the interval to the development of motor deficits before radiotherapy. Results: Motor function improved in 19% of patients after 30 Gy in 10 fractions and in 22% after greater doses (p = 0.31). The local control (p = 0.28) and survival (p = 0.85) rates were not significantly different with doses >30 Gy. Better functional outcome was associated with the absence of visceral metastases, an interval between tumor diagnosis and MSCC of >12 months, ambulatory status, and an interval to the development of motor deficits of >7 days. Improved local control was significantly associated with no visceral metastases, improved survival with favorable histologic features (breast or prostate cancer), no visceral metastases, ambulatory status, an interval between cancer diagnosis and MSCC of >12 months, and an interval to the development of motor deficits of >7days. Conclusion: Escalation of the radiation dose to >30 Gy in 10 fractions did not improve the outcomes in terms of motor function, local control, or survival but did increase the treatment time for these frequently debilitated patients. Therefore, doses >30 Gy in 10 fractions are not recommended.

  5. Thermoluminescence of Eu activated LiF nanophosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Satinder; Sharma, A. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-06-05

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at 8.00 pH value have been activated with Eu (0.01, 0.03, 0.07 and 0.1%nt;) as single dopants. The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction. Thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF: Eu nano-phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 100 Gy - 10 kGy have been further studied. There is only one main glow peak at around 122 deg. C; which shifts to higher temperature with an increase in doping concentration at all studied irradiation doses. However, the glow peak shifts to lower temperature with an increase in irradiation dose from 100 Gy to 10 kGy. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH and activated with 0.03%nt; Eu are found to have maximum TL sensitivity at studied gamma doses.

  6. Low-Dose Radiation Therapy (2 Gy 2) in the Treatment of Orbital Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fasola, Carolina E.; Jones, Jennifer C.; Huang, Derek D.; Le, Quynh-Thu; Hoppe, Richard T.; Donaldson, Sarah S.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: Low-dose radiation has become increasingly used in the management of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but has not been studied specifically for cases of ocular adnexal involvement. The objective of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of low-dose radiation in the treatment of NHL of the ocular adnexa. Methods and Materials: We reviewed the records of 20 NHL patients with 27 sites of ocular adnexal involvement treated with low-dose radiation consisting of 2 successive fractions of 2 Gy at our institution between 2005 and 2011. The primary endpoint of this study is freedom from local relapse (FFLR). Results: At a median follow-up time of 26 months (range 7-92), the overall response rate for the 27 treated sites was 96%, with a complete response (CR) rate of 85% (n=23) and a partial response rate of 11% (n=3). Among all treated sites with CR, the 2-year FFLR was 100%, with no in-treatment field relapses. The 2-year freedom from regional relapse rate was 96% with 1 case of relapse within the ipsilateral orbit (outside of the treatment field). This patient underwent additional treatment with low-dose radiation of 4 Gy to the area of relapse achieving a CR and no evidence of disease at an additional 42 months of follow-up. Orbital radiation was well tolerated with only mild acute side effects (dry eye, conjunctivitis, transient periorbital edema) in 30% of treated sites without any reports of long-term toxicity. Conclusions: Low-dose radiation with 2 Gy 2 is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of indolent NHL of the ocular adnexa with high response rates and durable local control with the option of reirradiation in the case of locoregional relapse.

  7. 5Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table for 5Li is subdivided into the folowing categories: Ground State Properties Cluster Model Shell Model Special States Model Calculations Model Discussions Complex...

  8. 7Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 7Li is subdivided into the following categories: Reviews Ground State Properties Shell Model Cluster Model Other Theoretical Work Model Calculations Photodisintegration Polarization Fission and Fusion Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Projectile Fragmentation and Multifragmentation Astrophysical Hyperfine Structure b-decay Muons Hypernuclei and Mesons Hypernuclei and Baryons Pion, Kaon and Eta-Mesons Other Work Applications

  9. 8Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Tables The General Table for 8Li is subdivided into the following categories: Reviews Ground State Properties Shell Model Cluster Model Other Models Photodissociation Fusion and Fission Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Fragmentation Reactions Astrophysical b Decay Hypernuclei Pions, Kaons and h-mesons

  10. 9Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 9Li is subdivided into the following categories: Shell Model Cluster Model Theoretical Ground State Properties Special States Other Model Calculations Complex Reactions Beta-Decay Pions Muons Photodisintegration Elastic and Inelastic Scattering Electromagnetic Transitions Astrophysical

  11. Presence of Li clusters in molten LiCl-Li

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Merwin, Augustus; Phillips, William C.; Williamson, Mark A.; Willit, James L.; Motsegood, Perry N.; Chidambaram, Dev

    2016-05-05

    Molten mixtures of lithium chloride and metallic lithium are of significant interest in various metal oxide reduction processes. These solutions have been reported to exhibit seemingly anomalous physical characteristics that lack a comprehensive explanation. ln the current work, the physical chemistry of molten solutions of lithium chloride and metallic lithium, with and without lithium oxide, was investigated using in situ Raman spectroscopy. The Raman spectra obtained from these solutions were in agreement with the previously reported spectrum of the lithium cluster, Li8. Furthermore, this observation is indicative of a nanofluid type colloidal suspension of Li8, in a molten salt matrix.more » It is suggested that the formation and suspension of lithium clusters in lithium chloride is the cause of various phenomena exhibited by these solutions that were previously unexplainable.« less

  12. Pure LiF nanophosphors for high exposures of gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A. K.; Kumar, Satinder; Dogra, R.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2012-06-05

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0 and 10.00). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Thermoluminescence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses of 10 Gy - 70 kGy have been further studied. The analysis of TL glow curve revealed the existence of three well resolved glow peaks, first low temperature peak at around 82 deg. C, second at 125 deg. C and third one at higher temperature around 303 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH with maximum TL sensitivity at studied gamma doses ranging from threshold to high exposures are potential candidate for dosimetry applications.

  13. Thermoluminescence Characteristics of Nanocrystalline LiF Phosphors Synthesized at Different pH Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A. K.; Dogra, R.; Kumar, Shalendra; Mishra, S. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2011-07-15

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses have been studied. The analysis of TL glow curve has revealed the existence of two well resolved glow peaks, one low temperature peak at around 145 deg. C and other one at higher temperature around 375 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH have been found to show maximum TL intensity at studied gamma doses (0.1 Gy-15 Gy).

  14. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C.E.; Amory-Mazaudier, C.; Barry, B.; Chukwuma; Cottrell, R.L.; Kalim, U.; Mebrahtu, A.; Petitdidier, M.; Rabiu, B.; Reeves, C.; /Earthworks bv, Delft

    2010-06-16

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffers some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs - National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide - either as a direct policy

  15. eGY-Africa: Addressing the Digital Divide for Science in Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, C. E.

    2010-05-25

    Adoption of information and communication technologies and access to the Internet is expanding in Africa, but because of the rapid growth elsewhere, a Digital Divide between Africa and the rest of the world exists, and the gap is growing. In many sub-Saharan African countries, education and research sector suffer some of the worst deficiencies in access to the Internet, despite progress in development of NRENs National Research and Education (cyber) Networks. By contrast, it is widely acknowledged in policy statements from the African Union, the UN, and others that strength in this very sector provides the key to meeting and sustaining Millennium Development Goals. Developed countries with effective cyber-capabilities proclaim the benefits to rich and poor alike arising from the Information Revolution. This is but a dream for many scientists in African institutions. As the world of science becomes increasingly Internet-dependent, so they become increasingly isolated. eGY-Africa is a bottom-up initiative by African scientists and their collaborators to try to reduce this Digital Divide by a campaign of advocacy for better institutional facilities. Four approaches are being taken. The present status of Internet services, problems, and plans are being mapped via a combination of direct measurement of Internet performance (the PingER Project) and a questionnaire-based survey. Information is being gathered on policy statements and initiatives aimed at reducing the Digital Divide, which can be used for arguing the case for better Internet facilities. Groups of concerned scientists are being formed at the national, regional levels in Africa, building on existing networks as much as possible. Opinion in the international science community is being mobilized. Finally, and perhaps most important of all, eGY-Africa is seeking to engage with the many other programs, initiatives, and bodies that share the goal of reducing the Digital Divide either as a direct policy objective

  16. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  17. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03012016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, ): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from ...

  18. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12162015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, ): total , S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 - ...

  19. Li-Z

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Cloud Spectral Radiance/Irradiance at the Surface and Top-of-the-Atmosphere from Modeling and Observations Z. Li and A. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada M. Cribb Intermap Technologies Ltd. Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction In view of some reported discrepancies concerning cloud parameter retrievals and cloud absorption (Stephens and Tsay 1990; Li et al. 1999; Rossow and Schiffer 1999) it is useful to compare cloud spectral signatures derived

  20. 10Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 10Li is subdivided into the following categories: Reviews Theoretical Ground State Properties Shell Model Cluster Model Other Models Special States Astrophysical Electromagnetic Transitions Hypernuclei Photodisintegration Light-Ion and Neutron Induced Reactions These General Tables correspond to the 2003 preliminary evaluation of ``Energy Levels of Light Nuclei, A = 10''. The prepublication version of A = 10 is available on this website in PDF format: A =

  1. Li Tec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drezden, Germany Product: Based in Kamez, near Dresden, Li-Tec produces components for lithium-ion batteries. References: Li-Tec1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  2. Phase 2 Trial of Accelerated, Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation of 39 Gy in 13 Fractions Followed by a Tumor Bed Boost Sequentially Delivering 9 Gy in 3 Fractions in Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Ja Young; Jung, So-Youn; Lee, Seeyoun; Kang, Han-Sung; Lee, Eun Sook; Park, In Hae; Lee, Keun Seok; Ro, Jungsil; Lee, Nam Kwon; Shin, Kyung Hwan

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To report a phase 2 trial of accelerated, hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (AH-WBI) delivered as a daily dose of 3 Gy to the whole breast followed by a tumor bed boost. Methods and Materials: Two hundred seventy-six patients diagnosed with breast cancer (pT1-2 and pN0-1a) who had undergone breast-conserving surgery in which the operative margins were negative were treated with AH-WBI delivered as 39 Gy in 13 fractions of 3 Gy to the whole breast once daily over 5 consecutive working days, and 9 Gy in 3 sequential fractions of 3 Gy to a lumpectomy cavity, all within 3.2 weeks. Results: After a median follow-up period of 57 months (range: 27-75 months), the rate of 5-year locoregional recurrence was 1.4% (n=4), whereas that of disease-free survival was 97.4%. No grade 3 skin toxicity was reported during the follow-up period. Qualitative physician cosmetic assessments of good or excellent were noted in 82% of the patients at 2 months after the completion of AH-WBI. The global cosmetic outcome did not worsen over time, and a good or excellent cosmetic outcome was reported in 82% of the patients at 3 years. The mean pretreatment percentage breast retraction assessment was 12.00 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11.14-12.86). The mean value of percentage breast retraction assessment increased to 13.99 (95% CI: 12.17-15.96) after 1 year and decreased to 13.54 (95% CI: 11.84-15.46) after 3 years but was not significant (P>.05). Conclusions: AH-WBI consisting of 39 Gy in 13 fractions followed by a tumor bed boost sequentially delivering 9 Gy in 3 fractions can be delivered with excellent disease control and tolerable skin toxicity in patients with early-stage breast cancer after breast-conserving surgery.

  3. I!' L;I)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ".>;jy i.~jp.~[~~ i,Zz>-c C,+;) ir,i:%J :' 0 p 'd-i I /) f) ic.c iq -.I ,'c i - * w. 3'2 , phi ': r-t;, ; *.i .; I!' L;I) --, -II s;.,yE;J-~,~;~* I' ;, f: >,p.yg ,p ' .L (3 i!>;' !i.3 y/y!-; x>:-y rJgbf;..qp: \' :sF*:l,' 5-".13, -9 _ ..-;~c~-' ~;Li;-~~~~;, 3h' ;[;i-y ; c; ' 1' 1.b y&k' 2 1 , . ..l =i. 1; G.1 ;Tr.; .j. i-:. I qr:i.gky, M,C. Jp, 2.1 F... ii, Ross CENTRAL F ILES ~"CTIVE OF TXIP m --w- The 0' 0 jet% ive Of this trip xas to evaluate tkie !- .zalth

  4. Thermoluminescence (TL) Analysis and Fading Studies of Naturally Occurring Salt Irradiated by 500 mGy Gamma Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiwari, Ramesh Chandra; Pau, Kham Suan

    2011-10-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential of the naturally occurring salt for the dosimetry purposes, using TL. The fine powder samples (20 mg) were irradiated by {gamma}- rays from 500 mGy to 2500 mGy by using Theratron-780C Cobalt-60 source, however, this paper discusses about 500 mGy only. The TL glow curve peak parameters were studied by using Chen's peak shape equation. TL glow curves were compared with fitted curves using glow curve deconvolution (GCD) method by using Kitis expression. The kinetic parameter values (E, b and s) so calculated, are in good agreement with those available in literature. The calculated energy values were also verified by using various heating rate (VHR) method. {chi}{sup 2} test and figure of merit (FOM) calculation was done to accept the goodness of fit between the curves. Fading studies of the sample showed a good fitting between the curves. The analysis suggests that natural salt should be considered for dosimetry purposes.

  5. 7Li MRI of Li batteries reveals location of microstructural lithium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: 7Li MRI of Li batteries reveals location of microstructural lithium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 7Li MRI of Li ...

  6. UJ LiJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    o >- tD o UJ :> LiJ o W ~ Central Nevada-23 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225 ANALYSIS OF HYDRAULIC TESTS IN HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA June 1970 Open-file report Prepared Under Contract AT(29-2)-474 for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission USGS-474-82 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor

  7. A=11Li (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E(11Li) 246 MeVA, analysis of a complete three-body kinematical measurement of 11Li breakup on a 12C target indicates the reaction mechanism is 11Li inelastic scattering to...

  8. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  9. Lithium salts for advanced lithium batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M.; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-06-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions andmore » conditions within such cells. Furthermore, this review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.« less

  10. Lithium Salts for Advanced Lithium Batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-01-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. This review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  11. Recovery of Li from alloys of Al- Li and Li- Al using engineered scavenger compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, W. D.; Jong, B. W.; Collins, W. K.; Gerdemann, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing lithium of high purity from lithium aluminum alloys using an engineered scavenger compound, comprising: I) preparing an engineered scavenger compound by: a) mixing and heating compounds of TiO2 and Li2CO3 at a temperature sufficient to dry the compounds and convert Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to Li.sub.2 O; and b) mixing and heating the compounds at a temperature sufficient to produce a scavenger Li.sub.2 O.3TiO.sub.2 compound; II) loading the scavenger into one of two electrode baskets in a three electrode cell reactor and placing an Al-Li alloy in a second electrode basket of the three electrode cell reactor; III) heating the cell to a temperature sufficient to enable a mixture of KCl-LiCl contained in a crucible in the cell to reach its melting point and become a molten bath; IV) immersing the baskets in the bath until an electrical connection is made between the baskets to charge the scavenger compound with Li until there is an initial current and voltage followed by a fall off ending current and voltage; and V) making a connection between the basket electrode containing engineered scavenger compound and a steel rod electrode disposed between the basket electrodes and applying a current to cause Li to leave the scavenger compound and become electrodeposited on the steel rod electrode.

  12. Standard (60 Gy) or Short-Course (40 Gy) Irradiation Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma: A Propensity-Matched Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Terrenato, Irene; Esposito, Vincenzo; Arcella, Antonella; Pace, Andrea; Giangaspero, Felice; Bozzao, Alessandro; Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate 2 specific radiation schedules, each combined with temozolomide (TMZ), assessing their efficacy and safety in patients aged ≥65 years with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: Patients aged ≥65 years with Karnofsky performance status (KPS) ≥60 who received either standard (60 Gy) or short-course (40 Gy) radiation therapy (RT) with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ between June 2004 and October 2013 were retrospectively analyzed. A propensity score analysis was executed for a balanced comparison of treatment outcomes. Results: A total of 127 patients received standard RT-TMZ, whereas 116 patients underwent short-course RT-TMZ. Median overall survival and progression-free survival times were similar: 12 months and 5.6 months for the standard RT-TMZ group and 12.5 months and 6.7 months for the short-course RT-TMZ group, respectively. Radiation schedule was associated with similar survival outcomes in either unadjusted or adjusted analysis. O{sup 6}-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase promoter methylation was the most favorable prognostic factor (P=.0001). Standard RT-TMZ therapy was associated with a significant rise in grade 2 and 3 neurologic toxicity (P=.01), lowering of KPS scores during the study (P=.01), and higher posttreatment dosing of corticosteroid (P=.02). Conclusions: In older adults with GBM, survival outcomes of standard and short-course RT-TMZ were similar. An abbreviated course of RT plus TMZ may represent a reasonable therapeutic approach for these patients, without loss of survival benefit and acceptable toxicity.

  13. A=14Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV: see (1981AJ01). 14Li is then particle unstable with respect to decay into 13Li + n and 12Li + 2n by 3.88 and 3.22 MeV, respectively

  14. A=15Li (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed: its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV. It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). See also 13Li

  15. Microsoft Word - li_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will be served at 3:30 pm A few new issues regarding the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy Professor Bao-An Li Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M ...

  16. Women @ Energy: Yan Li | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yan Li Women @ Energy: Yan Li March 12, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Her work is mainly focused on developing and applying advanced computational tools to investigate material properties

  17. Liang Li | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liang Li Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Maria Chan) Current research focuses on ab-initio theoretical studies on hybrid lithium-ion/lithium-oxygen battery materials and photocatalytic reduction of CO2. News Visualizing Redox Dynamics of a Single Ag/AgCl Heterogeneous Nanocatalyst at Atomic Resolution Telephone 630.252.2788 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail liangli@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Liang_Li

  18. Anion Coordination Interactions in Solvates with the Lithium Salts LiDCTA and LiTDI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McOwen, Dennis W.; Delp, Samuel A.; Paillard, Elie; Herriot, Cristelle; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Sommer, Roger D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-04-17

    Lithium 4,5-dicyano-1,2,3-triazolate (LiDCTA) and lithium 2-trifluoromethyl-4,5-dicyanoimidazole (LiTDI) are two salts proposed for lithium battery electrolyte applications, but little is known about the manner in which the DCTA- and TDI- anions coordinate Li+ cations. To explore this in-depth, crystal structures are reported here for two solvates with LiDCTA: (G2)1:LiDCTA and (G1)1:LiDCTA with diglyme and monoglyme, respectively, and seven solvates with LiTDI: (G1)2:LiTDI, (G2)2:LiTDI, (G3)1:LiTDI, (THF)1:LiTDI, (EC)1:LiTDI, (PC)1:LiTDI and (DMC)1/2:LiTDI with monoglyme, diglyme, triglyme, tetrahydrofuran, ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, respectively. These latter solvate structures are compared with the previously reported acetonitrile (AN)2:LiTDI structure. The solvates indicate that the LiTDI salt is much less associated than the LiDCTA salt and that the ions in LiTDI, when aggregated in solvates, have a very similar TDI-...Li+ cation mode of coordination through both the anion ring and cyano nitrogen atoms. Such coordination facilitates the formation of polymeric ion aggregates, instead of dimers. Insight into such ion speciation is instrumental for understanding the electrolyte properties of aprotic solvent mixtures with these salts.

  19. A=12Li (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable (1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is therefore > 49.0 MeV. (1974TH01) calculate the mass excess of 12Li to be 52.92 MeV. 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.9, 3.68 and 3.74 MeV, respectively. See also (1972TH13, 1973BO30, 1974IR04

  20. A=12Li (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable. The calculated value of its mass excess is 52.93 MeV [see (1980AJ01)]: 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n ,10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 4.01, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. The ground state of 12Li is predicted to have Jπ = 2- (1988POZS, 1985PO10; theor.). See also (1980AJ01

  1. A=4Li (1992TI02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1992TI02) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 4Li) GENERAL: The stability of 8B against particle decay (1988AJ01), in particular against decay into 4He + 4Li, sets an upper limit of 1.7 MeV on the separation energy of 4Li into p + 3He (1952SH44). The instability of 4H against particle decay (see 4H, GENERAL section) makes the particle stability of 4Li very unlikely, since the Coulomb energy of 4Li is approximately 1.7 MeV larger than that of 4H (1963WE10), and the nuclear energies should be

  2. Multidose Stereotactic Radiosurgery (9 Gy × 3) of the Postoperative Resection Cavity for Treatment of Large Brain Metastases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minniti, Giuseppe; Esposito, Vincenzo; Clarke, Enrico; Scaringi, Claudia; Lanzetta, Gaetano; Salvati, Maurizio; Raco, Antonino; Bozzao, Alessandro; Maurizi Enrici, Riccardo

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical outcomes with linear accelerator-based multidose stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to large postoperative resection cavities in patients with large brain metastases. Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 to May 2012, 101 patients with a single brain metastasis were treated with surgery and multidose SRS (9 Gy × 3) for large resection cavities (>3 cm). The target volume was the resection cavity with the inclusion of a 2-mm margin. The median cavity volume was 17.5 cm{sup 3} (range, 12.6-35.7 cm{sup 3}). The primary endpoint was local control. Secondary endpoints were survival and distant failure rates, cause of death, performance measurements, and toxicity of treatment. Results: With a median follow-up of 16 months (range, 6-44 months), the 1-year and 2-year actuarial survival rates were 69% and 34%, respectively. The 1-year and 2-year local control rates were 93% and 84%, with respective incidences of new distant brain metastases of 50% and 66%. Local control was similar for radiosensitive (non-small cell lung cancer and breast cancer) and radioresistant (melanoma and renal cell cancer) brain metastases. On multivariate Cox analysis stable extracranial disease, breast cancer histology, and Karnofsky performance status >70 were associated with significant survival benefit. Brain radionecrosis occurred in 9 patients (9%), being symptomatic in 5 patients (5%). Conclusions: Adjuvant multidose SRS to resection cavity represents an effective treatment option that achieves excellent local control and defers the use of whole-brain radiation therapy in selected patients with large brain metastases.

  3. A=11Li (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been observed in the bombardment of iridium by 24 GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). The cross section for its formation is ~ 50 μb (1976TH1A). 11Li is bound: Eb for break up into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 158 ± 80 and 960 ± 250 keV, respectively [see (1979AJ01) for discussions of the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. The half-life of 11Li is 8.5 ± 0.2 msec (1974RO31): it decays to neutron unstable states of 11Be [Pn =

  4. A=10Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  5. Construction Consultants, L.I., Inc.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mr. Eric Baumack Senior Project Manager Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. 36 East 2 nd ... worker employed by a subcontractor to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. (CCLI) at the ...

  6. A=18Li (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1995TI07) (Not illustrated) 18Li has not been observed. Shell model calculations described in (1988POZS) predict the ground-state magentic dipole moment and charge and matter radii.

  7. A=20Li (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1998TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX).

  8. A=14Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed: it is calculated to be particle unstable with a binding energy of -2.66 MeV for decay into 13Li + n and of -3.23 MeV for decay into 12Li + 2n. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV (1974TH01)

  9. A=15Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed: its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV. It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, respectively (1974TH01)

  10. A=15Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed. Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV: see (1981AJ01). It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, repsectively

  11. A=11Li (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.9 0.1 MeV (1973KL1C). 11Li is bound: Eb for breakup into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 0.2 and 0.3 MeV, respectively see (1974AJ01) for a...

  12. A=13Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13Li is predicted to have an atomic mass excess of 61.56 MeV: it is then unstable for breakup into 12Li + n and 11Li + 2n by 0.6 and 4.5 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). The modified...

  13. A=13Li (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13Li is predicted to have an atomic mass excess of 61.56 MeV: it is then unstable for breakup into 12Li + n and 11Li + 2n by 0.6 and 4.5 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). The modified...

  14. A=8Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p)8Li Qm 0.80079 Angular distributions have been obtained at Et 23 MeV for the proton groups to 8Li*(0, 0.98, 2.26, 6.54 0.03); cm for 8Li*(2.26, 6.54) are 35 10 and 35...

  15. A=8Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the geometric value, supports the hypothesis that 7Li may be described as an ( + t) cluster (RO62C). See also (AL63N, BA63O, BR63M, VA64G). 9. 7Li(d, p)8Li Qm -0.192...

  16. Recovery of Li from alloys of Al-Li and Li-Al using engineered scavenger compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W.D.; Jong, B.W.; Collins, W.K.; Gerdemann, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for obtaining Li metal selectively recovered from Li-Al or Al-Li alloy scrap by: (1) removing Li from aluminum-lithium alloys at temperatures between about 400 C-750 C in a molten salt bath of KC1-LiCl using lithium titanate (Li2O.3TiO2) as an engineered scavenger compound (ESC); and (2) electrodepositing of Li from the loaded ESC to a stainless steel electrode. By use of the second step, the ESC is prepared for reuse. A molten salt bath is required in the invention because of the inability of molten aluminum alloys to wet the ESC.

  17. A=12Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle-unstable. The calculated value of its mass excess is 52.93 MeV [see (1980AJ01)]: 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.92, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. See also (1980AJ01) and (1982KA1D, 1983ANZQ, 1984VA06

  18. A=13Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (Not illustrated) 13Li has not been observed. The calculated value of its mass excess is 60.34 MeV [see (1981AJ01)]: 13Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + 2n by 3.26 MeV. (1980BO31) have not observed 13Li in the bombardment of 124Sn by 6.7 GeV protons but state that the statistics were poor in the region of interest and that it is not excluded that 13Li may be stable. See also (1983ANZQ

  19. A=11Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) GENERAL: The mass excess of 11Li is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). [(A.H. Wapstra, private communication) suggests 40.91 ± 0.11 MeV.] Using the value reported by (1975TH08) 11Li is bound with respect to 9Li + 2n by 156 ± 80 keV and with respect to 10Li + n by 966 ± 260 keV [see (1984AJ01) for the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. Systematics suggest Jπ = 1/2- for 11Lig.s.. See also (1979AZ03, 1980AZ01, 1980BO31, 1981BO1X, 1982BO1Y, 1982OG02), (1981HA2C),

  20. A=9Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Mass of 9Li: From the threshold for 9Be(d, 2p)9Li, Ed = 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C), the mass excess of 9Li is determined as M - A = 28.1 ± 1 MeV. 1. 9Li(β-)9Be* --> 8Be + n Qm = 12.4 9Li decays to excited states of 9Be which decay by neutron emission. The mean of the reported half-lives is 0.169 ± 0.003 sec (GA51C, HO52B). See also (SH52, FR53A, BE55D, FL56, TA58B). 2. 9Be(d, 2p)9Li Qm = -15.5 The threshold is 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C). 3. 11B(γ, 2p)9Li Qm = -31.4 See (SH52,

  1. A=9Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See (GR64C). See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value for 7Li(t, p)9Li: Q = -2.397 ± 0.020 MeV, the mass excess of 9Li is 24.965 ± 0.020 MeV (MI64E, MA65A). 1. 9Li(β-)9Be Qm = 13.615 9Li decays to the ground state (25 ± 15 %) and to the 2.43 MeV, neutron-unstable state of 9Be (75 ± 15 %). The β-endpoints are 13.5 ± 0.3 MeV and 11.0 ± 0.4 MeV; log ft = 5.5 ± 0.2 and 4.7 ± 0.2,

  2. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budach, Volker; Stromberger, Carmen; Poettgen, Christoph; Baumann, Michael; Budach, Wilfried; Grabenbauer, Gerhard; Marnitz, Simone; Olze, Heidi; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Ghadjar, Pirus

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  3. li(1)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 Radiative Forcing by Smoke Aerosols Determined from Satellite and Surface Measurements Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada L. Kou Intermap Technologies Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction As a potential offsetting agent to the greenhouse effect, aerosols are receiving increasing attention in the atmospheric science community. Notwithstanding, our knowledge of the impact of aerosols on radiation and climate is rather poor and falls well behind that of the greenhouse

  4. li(1)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consistency Check of Cloud Optical Properties Derived from Satellite and Surface Observations Z. Li, A. P. Trishchenko, and F.-L. Chang Canada Center for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environmental Service Downsview, Canada W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Introduction Much work has been done to retrieve both cloud and radiative variables using space-borne observations. Several recent studies also attempted to retrieve cloud optical depth using

  5. li(2)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Measurements Regarding Cloud Absorption Z. Li and A. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Downsview, Ontario, Canada G. L. Stephens and P. Partain Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado P. Minnis NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction In an attempt to resolve the recent debate over the cloud absorption anomaly, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a

  6. A=12Li (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable. Its atomic mass excess would then be > 49.0 MeV. (1974TH01) calculate the mass excess of 12Li to be 52.92 MeV, while (1975JE02) calculate 52.94 MeV. Taking the average of these two values, 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.92, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. See also (1975AJ02) and (1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  7. A=14Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV: see (1981AJ01). 14Li is then particle unstable with respect to decay into 13Li + n and 12Li + 2n by 3.9 and 3.2 MeV, respectively [see, however, 13Li]. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 14Li at 0, 0.75, 1.22 and 1.48 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 2-, 4-, 3- and 1-. See also (1986AL09, 1989OG1B) and (1988POZS; theor.)

  8. SU-E-I-09: Application of LiF:Mg,Cu (TLD-100H) Dosimeters for in Diagnostic Radiology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sina, S; Zeinali, B; Karimipourfard, M; Lotfalizadeh, F; Sadeghi, M; Faghihi, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Accurate dosimetery is very essential in diagnostic radiology. The goal of this study is to verify the application of LiF:Mg,Cu,P (TLD100H) in obtaining the Entrance skin dose (ESD) of patients undergoing diagnostic radiology. The results of dosimetry performed by TLD-100H, were compared with those obtained by TLD100, which is a common dosimeter in diagnostic radiology. Methods: In this study the ESD values were measured using two types of Thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD-100, and TLD-100H) for 16 patients undergoing diagnostic radiology (lumbar spine imaging). The ESD values were also obtained by putting the two types of TLDs at the surface of Rando phantom for different imaging techniques and different views (AP, and lateral). The TLD chips were annealed with a standard procedure, and the ECC values for each TLD was obtained by exposing the chips to equal amount of radiation. Each time three TLD chips were covered by thin dark plastic covers, and were put at the surface of the phantom or the patient. The average reading of the three chips was used for obtaining the dose. Results: The results show a close agreement between the dose measuered by the two dosimeters.According to the results of this study, the TLD-100H dosimeters have higher sensitivities (i.e.signal(nc)/dose) than TLD-100.The ESD values varied between 2.71 mGy and 26.29 mGy with the average of 11.89 mGy for TLD-100, and between 2.55 mGy and 27.41 mGy with the average of 12.32 mGy for measurements. Conclusion: The TLD-100H dosimeters are suggested as effective dosimeters for dosimetry in low dose fields because of their higher sensitivities.

  9. Local field effects at Li K edges in electron energy-loss spectra of Li, Li{sub 2}O and LiF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mauchamp, V.; Moreau, P.; Ouvrard, G.; Boucher, F.

    2008-01-15

    Local field effects (LFEs) in low-losses of electron energy-loss spectra of Li, Li{sub 2}O, and LiF were calculated using the density functional theory under the generalized gradient approximation. By including the lithium 1s semicore state in the pseudopotentials, the amplitude of LFE was assessed all the way up to the Li K edge (from 0 to 80 eV). They are found to be much larger for semicore levels (2s of oxygen, 2s of fluorine, and 1s of lithium) than for the valence electron energy-loss region. LFEs at the Li K edge are studied in detail. In particular, for q=0 they are shown to increase with the inhomogeneities of the compounds (from Li to LiF). The influence of the magnitude and the direction of q is also presented. Both parameters have negligible effect in the case of Li metal but changes are quite substantial for Li{sub 2}O and LiF. This is in agreement with the isotropy and the delocalization of the metallic bonding as compared to the ionic one. LFEs at the Li K edge are, however, whatever the compound, much smaller than those observed at transition metal M{sub 2,3} edges situated at similar energy positions. This result can be accounted for by considering the wave functions associated with the initial and final states involved in both edges. For lithium battery materials, most often presenting a transition metal edge close to the Li K edge, these findings imply significant consequences with respect to the interpretation of their electron energy-loss spectroscopy spectra. In particular, LFE can be expected to be stronger in positive electrodes than in negative ones.

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - Electrolytic T Extraction in Molten Li-LiT_2.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electrolytic Tritium Extraction in Molten Li-LiT Luke Olson Brenda L. García-Díaz Hector Colon-Mercado Joe Teprovich Dave Babineau Savannah River National Laboratory Fall 2015 Tritium Focus Group Meeting November 3-5, 2015 SRNL-STI-2015-00605 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information LiT Electrolysis Options LiT Electrolysis Maroni Process (Baseline Option) Improve Liquid-Liquid Extraction & Electrolysis Process Intensification

  11. Li-rich anti-perovskite Li3OCl films with enhanced ionic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, XJ; Wu, G; Howard, JW; Chen, AP; Zhao, YS; Daemen, LL; Jia, QX

    2014-08-13

    Anti-perovskite solid electrolyte films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition, and their room-temperature ionic conductivity can be improved by more than an order of magnitude in comparison with its bulk counterpart. The cyclability of Li3OCl films in contact with lithium was evaluated using a Li/Li3OCl/Li symmetric cell, showing self-stabilization during cycling test.

  12. A=16Li (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1993TI07) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed. Shell model studies (1988POZS) are used to predict J and the magnetic dipole moment....

  13. A=5Li (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 5Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 5Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/5li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 5.3 preview 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also the A = 5 introductory discussion titled A = 5 resonance

  14. A=9Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and listed, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 9Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/nucldata/General_Tables/9li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 9.1 preview 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state properties: μ = 3.4391 ± 0.0006 μN (1983CO11). See

  15. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  16. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyrobek, A. J.; Manohar, C. F.; Nelson, D. O.; Furtado, M. R.; Bhattacharya, M. S.; Marchetti, F.; Coleman, M.A.

    2011-04-18

    We investigated the low dose dependency of the transcriptional response of human cells to characterize the shape and biological functions associated with the dose response curve and to identify common and conserved functions of low dose expressed genes across cells and tissues. Human lymphoblastoid (HL) cells from two unrelated individuals were exposed to graded doses of radiation spanning the range of 1-10 cGy were analyzed by transcriptome profiling, qPCR and bioinformatics, in comparison to sham irradiated samples. A set of {approx}80 genes showed consistent responses in both cell lines; these genes were associated with homeostasis mechanisms (e.g., membrane signaling, molecule transport), subcellular locations (e.g., Golgi, and endoplasmic reticulum), and involved diverse signal transduction pathways. The majority of radiation-modulated genes had plateau-like responses across 1-10 cGy, some with suggestive evidence that transcription was modulated at doses below 1 cGy. MYC, FOS and TP53 were the major network nodes of the low-dose response in HL cells. Comparison our low dose expression findings in HL cells with those of prior studies in mouse brain after whole body exposure, in human keratinocyte cultures, and in endothelial cells cultures, indicates that certain components of the low dose radiation response are broadly conserved across cell types and tissues, independent of proliferation status.

  17. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films ...

  18. Electrochemistry of LiCl-Li2O-H2O Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natalie J. Gese; Batric Pesic

    2013-03-01

    Uranium can be recovered from uranium oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the combination of the oxide reduction and electrorefining processes. During oxide reduction, the spent fuel is introduced to molten LiCl-Li2O salt at 650 degrees C and the UO2 is reduced to uranium metal via two routes: (1) electrochemically, and (2) chemically by lithium metal (Li0) that is produced electrochemically. However, the hygroscopic nature of both LiCl and Li2O leads to the formation of LiOH, contributing hydroxyl anions (OH-), the reduction of which interferes with the Li0 generation required for the chemical reduction of UO2. In order for the oxide reduction process to be an effective method for the treatment of uranium oxide fuel, the role of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O system must be understood. The behavior of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O molten salt system was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry, while reduction to hydrogen was confirmed with gas chromatography.

  19. A=11Li (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been identified in the 5.3 GeV proton bombardment of uranium. It is particle stable (PO66H). See also (GA66C, CO67A

  20. A=10Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10B: see (HA68V), the mass excess of 10Li, (M - A) 33.10 0.06 MeV (AB73D). The breakup energy into 9Li + n is then -0.06 0.06 MeV. Using the calculated values suggested...

  1. A=8Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    one event corresponding to the transition to an excited state at 0.7 0.2 MeV. 3. 7Li(n, )8Li Qm 2.035 The thermal capture cross section is 33 5 mb (HU47A), 42 10 mb...

  2. Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co Ang Li Tiansheng | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (Ang Li Tiansheng) Place: Zaozhuang, Shandong Province, China Product: Chinese PV cell and module maker. References: Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co (Ang Li...

  3. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  4. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Authors: Gao, Jie ; ...

  5. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery ...

  6. Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New Synthetic Approach ... multiple cycles which enables Li-ion batteries with exceptionally high-power.

    This ...

  7. A=9Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1966BA26). Special reactions: (1965DO13, 1966GA15, 1966KL1C, 1967AU1B, 1967CA1J, 1967HA10, 1968DO1C, 1972VO06, 1973KO1D, 1973MU12, 1973WI15). Other topics: (1972CA37, 1972PN1A, 1973JU2A). Ground state properties: (1966BA26, , 1969JA1M). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value of 18O(7Li, 16O)9Li, the atomic mass excess of 9Li is 24.9654 ± 0.005 MeV (1969NE1E; prelim.

  8. Li2Se as a Neutron Scintillator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-23

    We show that Li2Se:Te is a potential neutron scintillator material based on density functional calculations. Li2Se exhibits a number of properties favorable for efficient neutron detection, such as a high Li concentration for neutron absorption, a small effective atomic mass and a low density for reduced sensitivity to background gamma rays, and a small band gap for a high light yield. Our calculations show that Te doping should lead to the formation of deep acceptor complex VLi-TeSe, which can facilitate efficient light emission, similar to the emission activation in Te doped ZnSe.

  9. A=6Li (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 6He published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into categories and isted, along with brief descriptions of each item, in the General Tables for 6Li located on our website at (www.tunl.duke.edu/NuclData/General_Tables/6li.shtml). See also Table Prev. Table 6.4 preview 6.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground State Properties: μ = +0.8220473(6) nm, +0.8220567(3) nm:

  10. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lü, Xujie; Howard, John W.; Chen, Aiping; Zhu, Jinlong; Li, Shuai; Wu, Gang; Dowden, Paul; Xu, Hongwu; Zhao, Yusheng; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-02-02

    We prepared antiperovskite Li3OCl superionic conductor films via pulsed laser deposition using a composite target. A significantly enhanced ionic conductivity of 2.0 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature is achieved, and this value is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of its bulk counterpart. Moreover, the applicability of Li3OCl as a solid electrolyte for Li-ion batteries is demonstrated.

  11. A=13Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 13Li has not been observed: see (1986AJ01). The calculated value of its mass excess is 60.34 MeV [see (1981AJ01)]: 13Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + 2n by 3.34 MeV. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 13Li at 0, 1.42, 2.09 and 2.77 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 3/2-, 7/2-, 1/2-, 5/2-. See also (1987PE1C, 1989OG1B) and (1988POZS, 1988ZV1A

  12. A=15Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed. Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV: see (1981AJ01). It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.2 and 5.1 MeV, respectively. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 15Li at 0, 0.73, 2.39 and 2.77 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 3/2-, 1/2-, 7/2- and 5/2-. See also (1988POZS; theor.)

  13. Microsoft Word - li_z.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Cloud Liquid Water Path and Its Potential for Rain Detection Z. Li, R. Chen, and F-L Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland College Park,...

  14. A=11Li (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increase in matter radii with increasing A and do not support the idea of a neutron halo in 11Li (1988POZS; prelim.). See, however, (1988TA1A). Fragmentation cross sections of...

  15. A=8Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cross section, comparable to the geometric value, is understood in terms of the ( + t) cluster nature of 7Li (RO62C). Cross sections for this reaction have recently been...

  16. A=7Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 7Li) GENERAL: See also Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (AU55, DA55, LA55A, AB56, FE56, KU56, ME56, FE57C, FR57, LE57F, MA57E, MA57J, SO57, HA58D, SK58). 1. 3H(α, γ)7Li Qm = 2.465 For Eα = 0.5 to 1.9 MeV, capture radiation is observed to 7Li(0) and 7Li*(0.48), with intensity ratio 5 : 2. The smooth rise of the cross section suggests a direct capture process. The angular distribution is not isotropic, indicating l > 0

  17. Construction Consultants, L.I., Inc.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mr. Eric Baumack Senior Project Manager Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. 36 East 2 nd Street Riverhead, New York 11901 WEL-2015-05 Dear Mr. Baumack: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement has completed an investigation into an electrical shock incident involving a worker employed by a subcontractor to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. (CCLI) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). CCLI is a first-tier subcontractor to Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC (BSA),

  18. MFISH Measurements of Chromosomal Aberrations Individuals Exposed in Utero to Gamma-ray Doses from 5 to 20 cGy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenner, David J.

    2009-11-17

    Our plan was to identify and obtain blood from 36 individuals from the Mayak-in-utero exposed cohort who were exposed in utero only to gamma ray does doses fro 5 to 20 cGy. Our goal is to do mFISH and in a new development, single-arm mFISH on these samples to measure stable chromosome aberrations in these now adult individuals. The results were compared with matched control individuals (same age, same gender) available from the large control population which we are studying in the context of our plutonium worker study. The long term goal was to assess the results both in terms of the sensitivity of the developing embryo/fetus to low doses of ionizing radiation, and in terms of different potential mechanisms (expanded clonal origin vs. induced instability) for an increased risk.

  19. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; Moulder, John E.; Baker, John E.

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9 days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.

  20. Simvastatin mitigates increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease following 10 Gy total body irradiation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lenarczyk, Marek; Su, Jidong; Haworth, Steven T.; Komorowski, Richard; Fish, Brian L.; Migrino, Raymond Q.; Harmann, Leanne; Hopewell, John W.; Kronenberg, Amy; Patel, Shailendra; et al

    2015-06-01

    The ability of simvastatin to mitigate the increases in risk factors for and the occurrence of cardiac disease after 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) was determined. This radiation dose is relevant to conditioning for stem cell transplantation and threats from radiological terrorism. Male rats received single dose TBI of 10 Gy. Age-matched, sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Lipid profile, heart and liver morphology and cardiac mechanical function were determined for up to 120 days after irradiation. TBI resulted in a sustained increase in total- and LDL-cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol), and triglycerides. Simvastatin (10 mg/kg body weight/day) administered continuously from 9more » days after irradiation mitigated TBI-induced increases in total- and LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, as well as liver injury. TBI resulted in cellular peri-arterial fibrosis, whereas control hearts had less collagen and fibrosis. Simvastatin mitigated these morphological injuries. TBI resulted in cardiac mechanical dysfunction. Simvastatin mitigated cardiac mechanical dysfunction 20–120 days following TBI. To determine whether simvastatin affects the ability of the heart to withstand stress after TBI, injury from myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was determined in vitro. TBI increased the severity of an induced myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days after irradiation. Simvastatin mitigated the severity of this myocardial infarction at 20 and 80 days following TBI. It is concluded simvastatin mitigated the increases in risk factors for cardiac disease and the extent of cardiac disease following TBI. This statin may be developed as a medical countermeasure for the mitigation of radiation-induced cardiac disease.« less

  1. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  2. A=5Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1975KR1A). Special states: (1974GO13, 1974IR04, 1976IR1B). Astrophysical questions: (1974RA1C, 1978ME1C). Special reactions: (1975BR1A, 1976VA29, 1978ME1C). Reactions involving pions: (1973AR1B, 1974AM01). Applied topics: (1975HU1A). Other topics: (1974GO13, 1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1978GO1D). Ground state of 5Li: (1975BE31). 1. 3He(d, γ)5Li Qm =

  3. A=5Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 5Li) See Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). 1. 3H(3He, n)5Li Qm = 10.297 Not reported. 2. 3He(d, γ)5Li Qm = 16.555 The excitation curve measured from Ed = 0.2 to 2.85 MeV shows a broad maximum at Ed = 0.45 ± 0.04 MeV (Eγ = 16.6 ± 0.2, σ = 50 ± 10 μb, Γγ = 11 ± 2 eV). Above this maximum, non-resonant capture is indicated by a slow rise of the cross section. The radiation appears to be isotropic to ± 10% at Ed = 0.58 MeV,

  4. A=6Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1974KA11, 1975DI04, 1975GO1B, 1975VE01, 1976CE03, 1976GH1A). Collective, rotational and deformed models: (1974BO25). Cluster and α-particle models: (1972KR1A, 1973DO09, 1973LI23, 1974BA30, 1974GR24, 1974JA1K, 1974KA11, 1974NO03, 1974PA1B, 1974SH08, 1974WO1B, 1975BL1C, 1975GO08, 1975GR26, 1975HA48, 1975KR1A, 1975LE1A, 1975LI1C, 1975MI09, 1975NO03,

  5. Re-evaluation of the eutectic region of the LiBr-KBr-LiF system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redey, L.; Guidotti, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The separator pellet in a thermal battery consists of electrolyte immobilized by a binder (typically, MgO powder). The melting point of the electrolyte determines the effective operating window for its use in a thermal battery. The development of a two-hour thermal battery required the use of a molten salt that had a lower melting point and larger liquidus range than the LiCl-KCl eutectic which melts at 352 C. Several candidate eutectic electrolyte systems were evaluated for their suitability for this application. One was the LiCl-LiBr-KBr eutectic used at Argonne National Laboratories for high-temperature rechargeable batteries for electric-vehicle applications. Using a custom-designed high-temperature conductivity cell, the authors were able to readily determine the liquidus region for the various compositions studied around the original eutectic for the LiBr-KBr-LiF system. The actual eutectic composition was found to be 60.0 m/o LiBr-37.5 m/o KBr-2.5 m/o LiF with a melting point of 324 {+-} 0.5 C.

  6. Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators You are accessing a document from the ...

  7. Hydrogen storage in LiH: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banger, Suman Nayak, Vikas Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-24

    First principles calculations have been performed on the Lithium hydride (LiH) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory. We have extended our calculations for LiH+2H and LiH+6H in NaCl structure. The structural stability of three compounds have been studied. It is found that LiH with 6 added Hydrogen atoms is most stable. The obtained results for LiH are in good agreement with reported experimental data. Electronic structures of three compounds are also studied. Out of three the energy band gap in LiH is ∼3.0 eV and LiH+2H and LiH+6H are metallic.

  8. Shanghai Shen Li High Tech Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shen Li High Tech Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shanghai Shen-Li High Tech Co Ltd Place: Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 201400 Product: Focused on the...

  9. Predicting Reaction Sequences for Li-S Batteries - Joint Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    May 2, 2014, Research Highlights Predicting Reaction Sequences for Li-S Batteries Computed ... polysulfide species will be used to identify more stable electrolytes for Li-S batteries. ...

  10. Enforcement Letter, Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. Enforcement Letter, Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. December 4, 2015 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. On December 4, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued an Enforcement Letter (WEL-2015-05) to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc., relating to an electrical shock suffered by a subcontractor while working on a meteorological

  11. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Predictive models of Li-ion battery reliability must consider a multiplicity of electrochemical, thermal and mechanical degradation modes experienced by batteries in application environments. Complicating matters, Li-ion batteries can experience several path dependent degradation trajectories dependent on storage

  12. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO₄ for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ji-guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-05-18

    LiFePO4 is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO4 materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO4 cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding is of great importance for the design and improvement of new LiFePO4 cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  13. Thermal Stability of LiPF 6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In the presence of water (300 ppm) in the carrier gas, its decomposition onset temperature is lowered as a result of direct thermal reaction between LiPF 6 and water vapor to form ...

  14. 6Li foil thermal neutron detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Favalli, Andrea; Chung, Kiwhan; Macarthur, Duncan W

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design of a multilayer thermal neutron detector based on {sup 6}Li reactive foil and thin film plastic scintillators. The {sup 6}Li foils have about twice the intrinsic efficiency of {sup 10}B films and about four times higher light output due to a unique combination of high energy of reaction particles, low self absorption, and low ionization density of tritons. The design configuration provides for double sided readout of the lithium foil resulting in a doubling of the efficiency relative to a classical reactive film detector and generating a pulse height distribution with a valley between neutron and gamma signals similar to {sup 3}He tubes. The tens of microns thickness of plastic scintillator limits the energy deposited by gamma rays, which provides the necessary neutron/gamma discrimination. We used MCNPX to model a multilayer Li foil detector design and compared it with the standard HLNCC-II (18 {sup 3}He tubes operated at 4 atm). The preliminary results of the {sup 6}Li configuration show higher efficiency and one third of the die-away time. These properties, combined with the very short dead time of the plastic scintillator, offer the potential of a very high performance detector.

  15. A=10Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would then be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV: see (1979AJ01). See also (1986GI10, 1987AB15),...

  16. A=10Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    width of the ground state is 1.2 0.3 MeV. 10Lig.s. is unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). See also (1974BA15, 1974CE1A, 1974TH01,...

  17. A=10Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would the be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). However (1979AB11, 1980AB16), on the...

  18. Epitaxial thin film growth of LiH using a liquid-Li atomic template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Ohsawa, Takeo; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2014-11-24

    We report on the synthesis of lithium hydride (LiH) epitaxial thin films through the hydrogenation of a Li melt, forming abrupt LiH/MgO interface. Experimental and first-principles molecular dynamics studies reveal a comprehensive microscopic picture of the crystallization processes, which sheds light on the fundamental atomistic growth processes that have remained unknown in the vapor-liquid-solid method. We found that the periodic structure that formed, because of the liquid-Li atoms at the film/MgO-substrate interface, serves as an atomic template for the epitaxial growth of LiH crystals. In contrast, films grown on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates indicated polycrystalline films with a LiAlO{sub 2} secondary phase. These results and the proposed growth process provide insights into the preparation of other alkaline metal hydride thin films on oxides. Further, our investigations open the way to explore fundamental physics and chemistry of metal hydrides including possible phenomena that emerge at the heterointerfaces of metal hydrides.

  19. Correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in β-Li3PS4 fast Li+ conductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Yan; Cai, Lu; Liu, Zengcai; dela Cruz, Clarina R.; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-07-06

    Our letter reports the correlation of anisotropy and directional conduction in the fast Li+ conductor β-Li3PS4, one of the low-symmetry crystalline electrolyte candidates. The material has both high conductivity and good stability that serves well for the large-scale energy storage applications of all-solid-state lithium ion batteries. The anisotropic physical properties, demonstrated here by the thermal expansion coefficients, are crucial for compatibility in the solid-state system and battery performance. Neutron and X-ray powder diffraction measurements were done to determine the crystal structure and thermal stability. Moreover, the crystallographic b-axis was revealed as a fast expansion direction, while negligible thermal expansion wasmore » observed along the a-axis around the battery operating temperatures. The anisotropic behavior has its structural origin from the Li+ conduction channels with incomplete Li occupancy and a flexible connection of LiS4 and PS4 tetrahedra within the framework. This indicates a strong correlation in the direction of the ionic transport in the low-symmetry Li+ conductor.« less

  20. Making Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Park, Seh Kyu; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2013-02-25

    A Li-air battery could potentially provide three to five times higher energy density/specific energy than conventional batteries, thus enable the driving range of an electric vehicle comparable to a gasoline vehicle. However, making Li-air batteries rechargeable presents significant challenges, mostly related with materials. Herein, we discuss the key factors that influence the rechargeability of Li-air batteries with a focus on nonaqueous system. The status and materials challenges for nonaqueous rechargeable Li-air batteries are reviewed. These include electrolytes, cathode (electocatalysts), lithium metal anodes, and oxygen-selective membranes (oxygen supply from air). The perspective of rechargeable Li-air batteries is provided.

  1. Electrolyte effects in Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1994-10-01

    The most common electrochemical couple for thermally activated (``thermal``) batteries is the Li-alloy/FeS{sub 2} system. The most common Li-alloys used for anodes are 20% Li-80% Al and 44% Li-56% Si (by weight); liquid Li immobilized with iron powder has also been used. The standard electrolyte that has been used in thermal batteries over the years is the LiCl-KCl eutectic that melts at 352{degrees}C. The LiCl-LiBr-LiF eutectic had the best rate and power characteristics. This electrolyte melts at 436{degrees}C and shows very low polarization because of the absence of Li+ gradients common with the LiCl-KCl eutectic. The low-melting electrolytes examined included a KBr-LiBr-LiCl eutectic (melting at 321{degrees}C), a LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic (melting at 313{degrees}C), and a CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic (melting at 238{degrees}C). The CsBr-based salt had poor conductivity and was not studied further. The LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic outperformed the KBr-LiBr-LiCl eutectic and was selected for more extensive testing. Because of their lower melting points and larger liquidi relative to the LiCl-KCl eutectic, the low-melting electrolytes are prime candidates for long-life applications (i.e., for activated lives of one hour or more). This paper will detail the relative performance of the Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} couple using primarily the LiCl-KCl (standard) eutectic, the LiCl-LiBr-LiF (all-Li) eutectic, and the LiBr-KBr-LiF (low-melting) eutectic electrolytes. Most of the tests were conducted with 5-cell batteries; validation tests were also carried out with appropriate full-sized batteries.

  2. Solution-processable glass LiI-Li4SnS4 superionic conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kern Ho Park; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju -Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M.; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-12-22

    The new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10–4 S cm–1 at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. Furthermore, the solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in electrochemical performances of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes.

  3. A=5Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1978RE1A, 1979MA1J, 1980HA1M, 1981BE10, 1982FI13). Special states:(1981BE10, 1981KU1H, 1982EM1A, 1982FI13, 1982FR1D). Complex reactions involving 5Li:(1979BR02, 1979RU1B). Reactions involving pions:(1978BR1V, 1979SA1W, 1983AS02). Reactions involving antiprotons:(1981YA1B). Hypernuclei:(1980IW1A, 1981KO1V, 1981KU1H, 1983GI1C). Other

  4. A=5Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See Table 5.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also (BA59N, MI59B, PE60C, PH60A, VA61K, DI62B, IN62, KU63I, BA64HH, GR64C, SA64G, ST64). 1. 3He(d, γ)5Li Qm = 16.388 The excitation curve measured from Ed = 0.2 to 2.85 MeV shows a broad maximum at Ed = 0.45 ± 0.04 MeV (Eγ = 16.6 ± 0.2 MeV, σ = 50 ± 10 μb, Γγ = 11 ± 2 eV). Above this maximum, non-resonant capture is indicated by a slow rise of the cross section. The

  5. A=8Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Special states: (1980OK01). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1978BO1B, 1978DU1B, 1979BO22, 1979IV1A, 1980AN1T, 1980BO31, 1980GR10, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO35, 1982BO1Y, 1982GO1E, 1982GU1H, 1982MO1N). Muon and neutrino interactions: (1978BA1G). Reactions involving pions and other mesons: (1977VE1C, 1979BA16, 1980HA29, 1981JU1A, 1981NI03, 1982HA57).

  6. A=8Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 8.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Nuclear models: (1983KU17, 1983SH38, 1984MO1H, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1988WO04). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983KU17, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1986XU02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1983KU17). Astrophysics: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 8Li: (1983FR1A, 1983GU1A, 1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1984HI1A, 1984LA27, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MA13, 1985MO17, 1986AV1B,

  7. A=9Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1978DU1B, 1979AL22, 1979BO22, 1979JA1C, 1980BO31, 1980WI1L, 1981BO1X, 1981MO20, 1982BO1Y). Muon and neutrino capture and reactions: (1980MU1B). Reactions involving pions and other mesons (See also reaction 3.): (1978FU09, 1979BO21, 1979PE1C, 1979WI1E, 1980NI03, 1980ST15, 1981YA1A). Hypernuclei: (1978DA1A,

  8. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06). Special states: (1983KU17, 1984VA06). Electromagnetic interactions: (1983KU17). Astrophysical questions: (1987MA2C). Complex reactions involving 9Li: (1983OL1A, 1983WI1A, 1984GR08, 1985JA1B, 1985MA02, 1985MO17, 1986CS1A, 1986HA1B, 1986SA30, 1986WE1C, 1987BA38, 1987CH26, 1987JA06, 1987KO1Z, 1987SH1K, 1987TAZU, 1987WA09,

  9. FIRST_Research Perspective_Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Structure factor obtained from MD (a) and SAXS (b) at different temperatures: comparison of spatial heterogeneity from snapshots (c) of DILs (top) and MILs (bottom) FIRST Center Research Perspective: Nanoscale Heterogeneity and Dynamics of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Song Li Vanderbilt University Jianchang Guo, Kee Sung Han, Jose L. Bañuelos, Edward W. Hagaman, Robert W. Shaw Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Summary: An increase of the alkyl chain length of the cation of room

  10. Li2OHCl crystalline electrolyte for stable metallic lithium anodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hood, Zachary D.; Wang, Hui; Samuthira Pandian, Amaresh; Keum, Jong Kahk; Liang, Chengdu

    2016-01-22

    In a classic example of stability from instability, we show that Li2OHCl solid electrolyte forms a stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) with metallic lithium anode. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte can be readily achieved through simple mixing of air-stable LiOH and LiCl precursors with a mild processing temperature under 400 °C. Additionally, we show that continuous, dense Li2OHCl membranes can be fabricated at temperatures less than 400 °C, standing in great contrast to current processing temperatures of over 1600 °C for most oxide-based solid electrolytes. The ionic conductivity and Arrhenius activation energy were explored for the LiOH-LiCl system of crystalline solidmore » electrolytes where Li2OHCl with increased crystal defects was found to have the highest ionic conductivity and reasonable Arrhenius activation energy. The Li2OHCl solid electrolyte displays stability against metallic lithium, even in extreme conditions past the melting point of lithium metal. Furthermore, to understand this excellent stability, we show that SEI formation is critical in stabilizing the interface between metallic lithium and the Li2OHCl solid electrolyte.« less

  11. Predictive Materials Modeling for Li-Air Battery Systems | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility Predictive Materials Modeling for Li-Air Battery Systems PI Name: Larry Curtiss PI Email: curtiss@anl.gov Institution: Argonne National Laboratory Allocation Program: INCITE Allocation Hours at ALCF: 50 Million Year: 2015 Research Domain: Materials Science A rechargeable lithium-air (Li-air) battery can potentially store five to ten times the energy of a lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery of the same weight. Realizing this enormous potential presents a challenging

  12. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  13. Electrical conduction of LiF interlayers in organic diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Janssen, Ren A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Leeuw, Dago M. de

    2015-04-21

    An interlayer of LiF in between a metal and an organic semiconductor is commonly used to improve the electron injection. Here, we investigate the effect of moderate bias voltages on the electrical properties of Al/LiF/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes by systematically varying the thickness of the LiF layer (2-50?nm). Application of forward bias V below the bandgap of LiF (V?LiF/poly(spirofluorene) hetero-junction. Electrons are trapped on the poly(spirofluorene) side of the junction, while positively charged defects accumulate in the LiF with number densities as high as 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. Optoelectronic measurements confirm the built-up of aggregated, ionized F centres in the LiF as the positive trapped charges. The charged defects result in efficient transport of electrons from the polymer across the LiF, with current densities that are practically independent of the thickness of the LiF layer.

  14. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION...

  15. Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation Mechanisms in Li-Ion Battery Electrolytes Uncovered by In-Situ Scanning ... to evaluate stability and degradation in battery electrolytes Developed a rapid method ...

  16. Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Li, Policy Advisor...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12, 2016 Notices FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael Li, Policy Advisor, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, 1000 Independence Ave. ...

  17. Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High...

  18. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters Prev Next Title: Nanoscale ...

  19. Prediction of superconductivity in Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, G. Q.; Xing, Z. W.; Xing, D. Y.

    2015-03-16

    It is shown that bilayer phosphorene can be transformed from a direct-gap semiconductor to a BCS superconductor by intercalating Li atoms. For the Li-intercalated bilayer phosphorene, we find that the electron occupation of Li-derived band is small and superconductivity is intrinsic. With increasing the intercalation of Li atoms, both increased metallicity and strong electron-phonon coupling are favorable for the enhancement of superconductivity. The obtained electron-phonon coupling λ can be larger than 1 and the superconducting temperature T{sub c} can be increased up to 16.5 K, suggesting that phosphorene may be a good candidate for a nanoscale superconductor.

  20. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode ...

  1. Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegas, Nevada Zip: 89110 Sector: Vehicles Product: Las Vegas - based manufacturer of lithium-powered plug-in vehicles. References: Li-ion Motors Corp (formerly EV Innovations...

  2. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2005) Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  3. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2004) Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  4. Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User Program Success Stories Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: ...

  5. Measuring Li+ inventory losses in LiCoO2/graphite cells using Raman microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Snyder, Chelsea Marie; Apblett, Christopher A.; Grillet, Anne; Thomas Edwin Beechem; Duquette, David

    2016-03-25

    Here, the contribution from loss of Li+ inventory to capacity fade is described for slow rates (C/10) and long-term cycling (up to 80 cycles). It was found through electrochemical testing and ex-situ Raman analysis that at these slow rates, the entirety of capacity loss up to 80 cycles can be explained by loss of Li+ inventory in the cell. The Raman spectrum of LiCoO2 is sensitive to the state of lithiation and can therefore be leveraged to quantify the state of lithiation for individual particles. With these Raman derived estimates, the lithiation state of the cathode in the discharged statemore » is compared to electrochemical data as a function of cycle number. High correlation is found between Raman quantifications of cycleable lithium and the capacity fade. Additionally, the linear relationship between discharge capacity and cell overpotential suggests that the loss of capacity stems from an impedance rise of the electrodes, which based on Li inventory losses, is caused by SEI formation and repair.« less

  6. Predicted Structure, Thermo-Mechanical Properties and Li Ion Transport in LiAlF4 Glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stechert, T. R.; Rushton, M. J. D.; Grimes, R. W.; Dillon, A. C.

    2012-08-15

    Materials with the LiAlF{sub 4} composition are of interest as protective electrode coatings in Li ion battery applications due to their high cationic conductivity. Here classical molecular dynamics calculations are used to produce amorphous model structures by simulating a quench from the molten state. These are analysed in terms of their individual pair correlation functions and atomic coordination environments. This indicates that amorphous LiAlF{sub 4} is formed of a network of corner sharing AlF{sub 6} octahedra. Li ions are distributed within this network, primarily associated with non-bridging fluorine atoms. The nature of the octahedral network is further analysed through intra- and interpolyhedral bond angle distributions and the relative populations of bridging and non-bridging fluorine ions are calculated. Network topology is considered through the use of ring statistics, which indicates that, although topologically well connected, LiAlF{sub 4} contains an appreciable number of corner-linked branch-like AlF{sub 6} chains. Thermal expansion values are determined above and below the predicted glass transition temperature of 1340 K. Finally, movement of Li ions within the network is examined with predictions of the mean squared displacements, diffusion coefficients and Li ion activation energy. Different regimes for lithium ion movement are identified, with both diffusive and sessile Li ions observed. For migrating ions, a typical trajectory is illustrated and discussed in terms of a hopping mechanism for Li transport.

  7. Characterization of low-melting electrolytes for potential geothermal borehole power supplies: The LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-05-01

    The suitability of modified thermal-battery technology for use as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications is under investigation. As a first step, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/LiBr-KBr-LiF/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures of 350 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. Incorporation of a reference electrode allowed the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization to be determined. The results of single-cell tests are presented, along with preliminary data for cells based on a lower-melting CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic salt.

  8. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  9. A=3Li (2010PU04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2010PU04) GENERAL: The previous A = 3 evaluations (1975FI08, 1987TI07) identified reactions 1 through 4 below as possible candidates for the observation of a bound or resonant state of three protons. An additional possibility would be the double charge exchange reaction 3H(π+, π-)3Li. There is a report of this reaction (2001PA47), but the pion energy was high, 500 MeV, and the focus of the experiment was on the role of the Δ component in the 3H ground state, not on the possible presence of a

  10. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    MB) More Documents & Publications Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing

  11. Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li/(CFx)n and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n and LiFePO4 Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li...

  12. Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li/(CFx)n and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n and LiFePO4 Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n ...

  13. Predicting Chemical Pathways for Li-O2 Batteries - Joint Center...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 6, 2014, Research Highlights Predicting Chemical Pathways for Li-O2 Batteries ... figure) and (LiO2)6 (red curve, upper figure) to Li2O2 using quantum chemical theory. ...

  14. Selected test results from the LiFeBatt iron phosphate Li-ion battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

    2008-09-01

    In this paper the performance of the LiFeBatt Li-ion cell was measured using a number of tests including capacity measurements, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, high power partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycling, pulse power measurements, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the iron phosphate Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, and wind farm energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the LiFeBatt battery technology can function up to a 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h discharge rate (1C). The utility PSOC cycle test at up to the 4C{sub 1} pulse rate completed 8,394 PSOC pulsed cycles with a gradual loss in capacity of 10 to 15% depending on how the capacity loss is calculated. The majority of the capacity loss occurred during the initial 2,000 cycles, so it is projected that the LiFeBatt should PSOC cycle well beyond 8,394 cycles with less than 20% capacity loss. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were only very small changes after cycling. Finally, at a 1C charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test resulted in the cell venting electrolyte at 110 C after 30 minutes and then open-circuiting at 120 C with no sparks, fire, or voltage across the cell.

  15. A=07Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See (HU57D, BA59K, BA59N, BR59M, FE59E, MA59E, MA59H, KU60A, PE60E, PH60A, SH60C, TA60L, BA61H, BA61N, BL61C, CL61D, KH61, TA61G, TO61B, CL62E, CR62A, IN62, CH63, CL63C, KL63, SC63I, BE64H, GR64C, MA64HH, NE64C, OL64A, SA64G, BE65F, FA65A, JA65H, NE65, PR65). See also Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Ground state: Q = -45 ± 5 mb (KA61F, VA63F, WH64); μ = +3.2564 nm (FU65E). 1. 4He(t, γ)7Li Qm = 2.467 Excitation functions

  16. Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Title Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  17. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion ...

  18. Localization of vacancies and mobility of lithium ions in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as obtained by {sup 6,7}Li NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baklanova, Ya. V., E-mail: baklanovay@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Arapova, I. Yu.; Buzlukov, A.L.; Gerashenko, A.P.; Verkhovskii, S.V.; Mikhalev, K.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 Kovalevskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Denisova, T.A.; Shein, I.R.; Maksimova, L.G. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectra and the {sup 7}Li spinlattice relaxation rate were measured on polycrystalline samples of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, synthesized at 1050 K and 1300 K. The {sup 7}Li NMR lines were attributed to corresponding structural positions of lithium Li1 and Li2 by comparing the EFG components with those obtained in the first-principles calculations of the charge density in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. For both samples the line width of the central {sup 7}Li transition and the spinlattice relaxation time decrease abruptly at the temperature increasing above ?500 K, whereas the EFG parameters are averaged (??{sub Q}?=42 (5) kHz) owing to thermally activated diffusion of lithium ions. - Graphical abstract: Path of lithium ion hopping in lithium zirconate Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. - Highlights: Polycrystalline samples Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with monoclinic crystal structure synthesized at different temperatures were investigated by {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectroscopy. Two {sup 6,7}Li NMR lines were attributed to the specific structural positions Li1 and Li2. The distribution of vacancies was clarified for both lithium sites. The activation energy and pathways of lithium diffusion in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} were defined.

  19. Polymer electrolytes for a rechargeable li-Ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argade, S.D.; Saraswat, A.K.; Rao, B.M.L.; Lee, H.S.; Xiang, C.L.; McBreen, J.

    1996-10-01

    Lithium-ion polymer electrolyte battery technology is attractive for many consumer and military applications. A Li{sub x}C/Li{sub y}Mn{sub 2}O{sub 4} battery system incorporating a polymer electrolyte separator base on novel Li-imide salts is being developed under sponsorship of US Army Research Laboratory (Fort Monmouth NJ). This paper reports on work currently in progress on synthesis of Li-imide salts, polymer electrolyte films incorporating these salts, and development of electrodes and cells. A number of Li salts have been synthesized and characterized. These salts appear to have good voltaic stability. PVDF polymer gel electrolytes based on these salts have exhibited conductivities in the range 10{sup -4} to 10{sub -3} S/cm.

  20. Solution-processable glass LiI-Li4SnS4 superionic conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern Ho Park; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju -Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M.; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-12-22

    The new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10–4 S cm–1 at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. Furthermore, the solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in electrochemical performances of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes.

  1. Structure of neutron-rich Isotopes {sup 8}Li and {sup 9}Li and allowance for it in elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M. A.; Imambekov, O.; Sagindykov, Sh. Sh.

    2008-07-15

    The differential cross sections for elastic proton scattering on the unstable neutron-rich nuclei {sup 8}Li and {sup 9}Li at E = 700 and 60 MeV per nucleon were considered. The {sup 8}Li nucleus was treated on the basis of the three-body {alpha}-t-n model, while the {sup 9}Li nucleus was considered within the {alpha}-t-n and {sup 7}Li-n-n models. The cross sections in question were calculated within Glauber diffraction theory. A comparison of the results with available experimental data made it possible to draw conclusions on the quality of the wave functions and potential used in the calculations.

  2. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  3. Investigation of the Decomposition Mechanism of Lithium Bis(oxalate)borate (LiBOB) Salt in the Electrolyte of an Aprotic LiO2 Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Kah Chun; Lu, Jun; Low, John; Peng, Du; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M.; Al-Hady, D. Abd; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-04-01

    The stability of the lithium bis(oxalate) borate (LiBOB) salt against lithium peroxide (Li2O2) formation in an aprotic LiO2 (Liair) battery is investigated. From theoretical and experimental findings, we find that the chemical decomposition of LiBOB in electrolytes leads to the formation lithium oxalate during the discharge of a LiO2 cell. According to density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the formation of lithium oxalate as the reaction product is exothermic and therefore is thermodynamically feasible. This reaction seems to be independent of solvents used in the LiO2 cell, and therefore LiBOB is probably not suitable to be used as the salt in LiO2 cell electrolytes.

  4. New solid-state synthesis routine and mechanism for LiFePO{sub 4} using LiF as lithium precursor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Deyu; Li Hong; Wang Zhaoxiang; Wu Xiaodong; Sun Yucheng; Huang Xuejie; Chen Liquan . E-mail: lqchen@aphy.iphy.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and LiOH.H{sub 2}O are widely used as Li-precursors to prepare LiFePO{sub 4} in solid-phase reactions. However, impurities are often found in the final product unless the sintering temperature is increased to 800 deg. C. Here, we report that lithium fluoride (LiF) can also be used as Li-precursor for solid-phase synthesis of LiFePO{sub 4} and very pure olivine phase was obtained even with sintering at a relatively low temperature (600 deg. C). Consequently, the product has smaller particle size (about 500nm), which is beneficial for Li-extraction/insertion in view of kinetics. As for cathode material for Li-ion batteries, LiFePO{sub 4} obtained from LiF shows high Li-storage capacity of 151mAhg{sup -1} at small current density of 10mAg{sup -1} (1/15C) and maintains capacity of 54.8mAhg{sup -1} at 1500mAg{sup -1} (10C). The solid-state reaction mechanisms using LiF and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} precursors are compared based on XRD and TG-DSC.

  5. Material review of Li ion battery separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Christoph J. Geiger, Sigrid; Falusi, Sandra; Roth, Michael

    2014-06-16

    Separators for Li Ion batteries have a strong impact on cell production, cell performance, life, as well as reliability and safety. The separator market volume is about 500 million m{sup 2} mainly based on consumer applications. It is expected to grow strongly over the next decade for mobile and stationary applications using large cells. At present, the market is essentially served by polyolefine membranes. Such membranes have some technological limitations, such as wettability, porosity, penetration resistance, shrinkage and meltdown. The development of a cell failure due to internal short circuit is potentially closely related to separator material properties. Consequently, advanced separators became an intense area of worldwide research and development activity in academia and industry. New separator technologies are being developed especially to address safety and reliability related property improvements.

  6. A=5Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 5.5 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model calculations: (1966FR1B, 1968GO01, 1969GO1G, 1970RA1D, 1971RA15, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49). Cluster calculations: (1965NE1B, 1971HE05). Special levels: (1970HE1D, 1971HE05, 1971RA15, 1973JO1J). Electromagnetic transitions:(1973HA49). General reviews: (1966DE1E). Special reactions: (1971CH31). Other topics: (1968GO01, 1970RA1J, 1971CH50, 1971ZA1D, 1972CA37,

  7. A=5Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 5.3 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Model discussions: (1984ZW1A, 1985BA68, 1985FI1E, 1985KW02). Special states: (1982PO12, 1983FE07, 1984BE1B, 1984FI20, 1984GL1C, 1984VA1C, 1984ZW1A, 1985BA68, 1985FI1E, 1985PO18, 1985PO19, 1985WI1A, 1987SV1A, 1988BA86, 1988KW02). Electromagnetic transitions: (1985FI1E, 1987KR16). Astrophysical questions: (1984BA74, 1984SU1A, 1985BO1E, 1986HU1D). Complex reactions

  8. A=6Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1966BA26, 1966GA1E, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967CO32, 1967PI1B, 1967WO1B, 1968BO1N, 1968CO13, 1968GO01, 1968LO1C, 1968VA1H, 1969GU10, 1969RA1C, 1969SA1C, 1969VA1C, 1970LA1D, 1970SU13, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1971JA06, 1971LO03, 1971NO02, 1972LE1L, 1972LO1M, 1972VE07, 1973HA49, 1973JO1K, 1973KU03). Cluster and α-particle model:

  9. A=6Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978CH1D, 1978ST19, 1979CA06, 1980MA41, 1981BO1Y, 1982BA52, 1982FI13, 1982LO09). Cluster and α-particle models: (1978OS07, 1978PL1A, 1978RE1A, 1978SI14, 1979BE39, 1979CA06, 1979LU1A, 1979WI1B, 1980BA04, 1980KU1G, 1981BE1K, 1981HA1Y, 1981KR1J, 1981KU13, 1981VE04, 1981ZH1D, 1982AH09, 1982CH10, 1982GO1G, 1982JI1A, 1982KA24, 1982KR1B, 1982KR09, 1982KU05,

  10. A=6Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1983LE14, 1983VA31, 1984AS07, 1984PA08, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985ER06, 1985FI1E, 1985LO1A, 1986AV08, 1986LE21, 1987KI1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1982WE15, 1983CA13, 1983DZ1A, 1983FO03, 1983GA12, 1983GO17, 1983SA39, 1983SM04, 1984BE37, 1984CO08, 1984DU17, 1984GL02, 1984JO1A, 1984KH05, 1984KR10, 1984KU03, 1984LA33,

  11. A=6Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 6Li) GENERAL: See also Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (MO54F, AD55, AU55, BA55S, IR55, LA55, OT55, FE56, ME56, NE56D, FR57, LE57F, LY57, SO57, TA57, PI58, SK58). 1. (a) 3H(3He, d)4He Qm = 14.319 Eb = 15.790 (b) 3H(3He, p)5He Qm = 11.136 (c) 3H(3He, p)4He + n Qm = 12.093 The relative intensities (43 ± 2, 6 ± 2, 51 ± 2) of reactions (a), (b) and (c), do not vary for E(3He) = 225 to 600 keV. The deuterons are isotropic

  12. A=7Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1961KO1A, 1965CO25, 1965KU09, 1965VO1A, 1966BA26, 1966HA18, 1966WI1E, 1967BO1C, 1967BO22, 1967CO32, 1967FA1A, 1969GU03, 1969TA1H, 1969VA1C, 1970ZO1A, 1971CO28, 1972LE1L, 1973HA49, 1973KU03). Cluster model: (1965NE1B, 1968HA1G, 1968KU1B, 1969ME1C, 1969SM1A, 1969VE1B, 1969WI21, 1970BA1Q, 1972HA06, 1972HI16, 1972JA23, 1972KU12, 1972LE1L, 1973KU03, 1973KU12).

  13. A=7Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 7.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1974KA11, 1975DI04, 1977ST04, 1978BO31). Collective, rotational or deformed models: (1974BO25, 1976BR26). Cluster and α-particle models: (1973HO1A, 1974GR24, 1974KA11, 1975KU1H, 1975GR26, 1975MI09, 1975PA11, 1975RO1B, 1977BE50, 1977MI03, 1977SA22, 1978RA09). Astrophysical questions: (1973BA1H, 1973CA1B, 1973CO1B, 1973IB1A, 1973SM1A, 1973TI1A, 1973TR1B,

  14. A=7Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 7.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Shell model: (1978FU13, 1978MI13, 1979MA11, 1981BO1Y, 1982BA52, 1982FI13). Cluster and α-particle models: (1978MI13, 1979MA11, 1979VE08, 1980KA16, 1980SU04, 1981BE27, 1981EL06, 1981FI1A, 1981HA1Y, 1981KR1J, 1981RA1M, 1981SR01, 1982DE12, 1982FI13, 1982MU10, 1983DU1B, 1983KA1K). Special states: (1978MI13, 1979BU14, 1978DU1C, 1979KI10, 1980GO1Q, 1980SH1N, 1981BE27,

  15. A=7Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 7.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model: (1983BU1B, 1983KU17, 1983SH1D, 1983VA31, 1984CH24, 1984REZZ, 1984VA06, 1984ZW1A, 1985FI1E, 1985GO11, 1986AV08, 1987KA09, 1987KI1C, 1988WO04). Cluster and α-particle models: (1981PL1A, 1983FU1D, 1983HO22, 1983PA06, 1983SH1D, 1983SR1C, 1984BA53, 1984DA07, 1984DU13, 1984DU17, 1984JO1A, 1984KA06, 1984KA04, 1984LO09, 1984MI1F, 1984SH26, 1985FI1E, 1985FU01,

  16. A=8Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1975KH1A, 1977ST24). Special states: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1978KH03). Electromagnetic interactions: (1974KU06, 1976KU07). Special reactions: (1973SI38, 1974BA70, 1974BA1N, 1974BO08, 1975FE1A, 1975ZE01, 1976BE67, 1976BO08, 1976BU16, 1977FE1B, 1977PR05, 1977ST1J, 1977YA1B, 1978DI04). Muon and neutrino interactions: (1977BA1P). Pion and kaon reactions (See

  17. A=9Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1974IR04, 1976IR1B, 1977JA14). Special reactions: (1975AB1D, 1975ZE01, 1976AL1F, 1976BE67, 1976BU16, 1977YA1B). Pion and kaon reactions (See also reaction 3.): (1973CA1C, 1976TR1A, 1977BA1Q, 1977DO06, 1977SH1C). Other topics: (1970KA1A, 1973TO16, 1974IR04, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B). Ground state properties: (1975BE31). μ = 3.4359 ± 0.0010 nm (1976CO1L;

  18. Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Burton, Sarah D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Gross, Mark E.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-02-05

    It is well known that the stability of nonaqueous electrolyte is critical for the rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. Although stability of many solvents used in the electrolytes has been investigated, considerably less attention has been paid to the stability of electrolyte salt which is the second major component. Herein, we report the systematic investigation of the stability of seven common lithium salts in tetraglyme used as electrolytes for Li-O2 batteries. The discharge products of Li-O2 reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The performance of Li-O2 batteries was strongly affected by the salt used in the electrolyte. Lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) decompose and form LiF and lithium borates, respectively during the discharge of Li-O2 batteries. Several other salts, including lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (LiTFSI), lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf), lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6), lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) , and lithium bromide (LiBr) led to the discharge products which mainly consisted of Li2O2 and only minor signs of decomposition of LiTFSI, LiTf, LPF6 and LiClO4 were detected. LiBr showed the best stability during the discharge process. As for the cycling performance, LiTf and LiTFSI were the best among the studied salts. In addition to the instability of lithium salts, decomposition of tetraglyme solvent was a more significant factor contributing to the limited cycling stability. Thus a more stable nonaqueous electrolyte including organic solvent and lithium salt still need to be further developed to reach a fully reversible Li-O2 battery.

  19. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 and LiCaAlF.sub.6

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Christopher D.; Payne, Stephen A.; Krupke, William F.

    1996-01-01

    Ce.sup.3+ -doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF.sub.6 type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF.sub.6 and LiSrGaF.sub.6, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator.

  20. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} and LiCaAlF{sub 6}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

    1996-05-14

    Ce{sup 3+}-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF{sub 6} type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} and LiSrGaF{sub 6}, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator. 10 figs.

  1. Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Li2S through Hydrogen Binding for High

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Li-S Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research July 1, 2016, Research Highlights Ammonium Additives to Dissolve Li2S through Hydrogen Binding for High Energy Li-S Batteries (a) Solubility of Li2S in DMSO solvent with different amounts of NH4NO3 as additive. (b) 1H chemical shifts as a function of Li2S concentration in DMSO-d6 with NH4NO3 additive. (c) DFT-derived structure of Li2S-NH4-NO3-8DMSO system shows the dissolution process of Li2S is enhanced through hydrogen

  2. Electrochemical Investigation of Al–Li/LixFePO4 Cells in Oligo(ethylene glycol) Dimethyl Ether/LiPF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.J.; Zhou, Y.N.; Lee, H.S.; Nam, K.W.; Yang, X.Q.; Haas, O.

    2011-02-01

    1 M LiPF{sub 6} dissolved in oligo(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether with a molecular weight, 500 g mol{sup -1} (OEGDME500, 1 M LiPF{sub 6}), was investigated as an electrolyte in experimental Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells. More than 60 cycles were achieved using this electrolyte in a Li-ion cell with an Al-Li alloy as an anode sandwiched between two Li x FePO{sub 4} electrodes (cathodes). Charging efficiencies of 96-100% and energy efficiencies of 86-89% were maintained during 60 cycles at low current densities. A theoretical investigation revealed that the specific energy can be increased up to 15% if conventional LiC{sub 6} anodes are replaced by Al-Li alloy electrodes. The specific energy and the energy density were calculated as a function of the active mass per electrode surface (charge density). The results reveal that for a charge density of 4 mAh cm{sup -2} about 160 mWh g{sup -1} can be reached with Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} batteries. Power limiting diffusion processes are discussed, and the power capability of Al-Li/LiFePO{sub 4} cells was experimentally evaluated using conventional electrolytes.

  3. Batteries - Next-generation Li-ion batteries Breakout session

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to enable Li-metal * Inter-digitated electrodes for improved fast-charge capability * Nano-engineered electrode films to allow for thicker films Research Suggestions * See above ...

  4. Qiaojia River Power Co Ltd Li County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Changde City, Hainan Province, China Zip: 415500 Sector: Hydro Product: Hunan-based small hydro developer. References: Qiaojia River Power Co., Ltd, Li County1 This article is a...

  5. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the...

  6. Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators (Conference) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators Authors: Lee, Hye Young 1 ; Taddeucci, Terry N 1 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos ...

  7. Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipality, China Product: China-based technology company that research in zinc-air batteries (fuel cells). References: Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company1 This article is a...

  8. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To...

  9. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additive - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research April 25, 2015, Research Highlights Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Dendrite growth leads to low CE and safety issues of Li anode. Trace amount of water enables dendrite-free Li deposition. Scientific Achievement Residual water (H2O) present in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. However, dendrite-free Li film can be obtained

  10. Heteroclite electrochemical stability of an I based Li7P2S8I superionic conductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liu, Zengcai; Gobet, Mallory; Pilar, Kartik; Sahu, Gayatri; Greenbaum, Steve; Liang, Chengdu

    2015-01-01

    Stability from Instability: A Li7P2S8I solid state Li-ion conductor derived from -Li3PS4 and LiI demonstrates exceptional electrochemical stability. The oxidation instability of I is subverted nullified via its incorporation into the coordinated structure. The inclusion of I also creates stability with metallic Li anode while simultaneously improving the interfacial kinetics. Low temperature membrane processability enables facile fabrication of dense membranes, making it suitable for industrial adoption.

  11. ARM - Campaign Instrument - twin-otter-li-prof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentstwin-otter-li-prof Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Twin Otter Lidar Profiles (TWIN-OTTER-LI-PROF) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties Campaigns Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered

  12. LiDAR Technology | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LiDAR Technology LiDAR Technology Enables the Location of Historic Energy Production Sites Understanding the impact that newly developed novel methods for extracting resources from the Earth has on our environment is important, but this requires baseline data against which potential changes can be measured. In Pennsylvania, as in other parts of the United States, commercial activity has already left environmental impacts that are not readily discernible. Charcoal from a completed burn (image

  13. Predictive Materials Modeling for Li-Air Battery Systems | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Leadership Computing Facility electron density obtained from a density functional theory Shown here is the electron density obtained from a density functional theory (DFT) calculation of lithium oxide (Li2O) performed with the GPAW code. This visualization was the result of a simulation run on Intrepid, a supercomputer at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility. Kah Chun Lau, Aaron Knoll and Larry A. Curtiss, Argonne National Laboratory Predictive Materials Modeling for Li-Air Battery

  14. Fluoro-Carbonate Solvents for Li-Ion Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NAGASUBRAMANIAN,GANESAN

    1999-09-17

    A number of fluoro-carbonate solvents were evaluated as electrolytes for Li-ion cells. These solvents are fluorine analogs of the conventional electrolyte solvents such as dimethyl carbonate, ethylene carbonate, diethyl carbonate in Li-ion cells. Conductivity of single and mixed fluoro carbonate electrolytes containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} was measured at different temperatures. These electrolytes did not freeze at -40 C. We are evaluating currently, the irreversible 1st cycle capacity loss in carbon anode in these electrolytes and the capacity loss will be compared to that in the conventional electrolytes. Voltage stability windows of the electrolytes were measured at room temperature and compared with that of the conventional electrolytes. The fluoro-carbon electrolytes appear to be more stable than the conventional electrolytes near Li voltage. Few preliminary electrochemical data of the fluoro-carbonate solvents in full cells are reported in the literature. For example, some of the fluorocarbonate solvents appear to have a wider voltage window than the conventional electrolyte solvents. For example, methyl 2,2,2 trifluoro ethyl carbonate containing 1 M LiPF{sub 6} electrolyte has a decomposition voltage exceeding 6 V vs. Li compared to <5 V for conventional electrolytes. The solvent also appears to be stable in contact with lithium at room temperature.

  15. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO{sub 4} for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chongmin; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zhang, Ji-guang

    2015-05-18

    LiFePO{sub 4} is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO{sub 4} materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO{sub 4} cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding can guide the design and improvement of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  16. THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF LI2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessinger, G.; Missimer, D.

    2009-11-13

    The ultimate purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a Li-Ca mixture for direct reduction of actinide oxides to actinide metals at temperatures below 1500 C. For such a process to be successful, the products of the reduction reaction, actinide metals, Li{sub 2}O, and CaO, must all be liquid at the reaction temperature so the resulting actinide metal can coalesce and be recovered as a monolith. Since the established melting temperature of Li{sub 2}O is in the range 1427-1700 C and the melting temperature of CaO is 2654 C, the Li{sub 2}O-CaO (lithium oxidecalcium oxide) pseudo-binary system was investigated in an attempt to identify the presence of low-melting eutectic compositions. The results of our investigation indicate that there is no evidence of ternary Li-Ca-O phases or solutions melting below 1200 C. In the 1200-1500 C range utilizing MgO crucibles, there is some evidence for the formation of a ternary phase; however, it was not possible to determine the phase composition. The results of experiments performed with ZrO{sub 2} crucibles in the same temperature range did not show the formation of the possible ternary phase seen in the earlier experiment involving MgO crucibles, so it was not possible to confirm the possibility that a ternary Li-Ca-O or Li-Mg-O phase was formed. It appears that the Li{sub 2}O-CaO materials reacted, to some extent, with all of the container materials, alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnesia (MgO), zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), and 95% Pt-5% Au; however, to clarify the situation additional experiments are required. In addition to the primary purpose of this study, the results of this investigation led to the conclusions that: (1) The melting temperature of Li{sub 2}O may be as low as 1250 C, which is considerably lower than the previously published values in the range 1427-1700 C; (2) Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) vaporizes congruently; (3) Lithium carbonate and Li2O react with 95% Pt-5% Au, and also reacts with pure Pt; and (4

  17. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  18. A=6Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See Table 6.4 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). See also (AU55, LA55, ME56, FR57, HU57D, LE57F, PI58, BA59K, BR59M, FE59E, SK59, UB59, AN60, JA60G, KO60E, PH60A, TA60L, WA60F, BA61N, KO61A, SH61B, TA61G, VA61, CO62B, CR62A, DI62B, FO62E, GA62C, IN62, IN62A, IN62B, JA62, ME62A, NA62C, SA62C, ST62B, WA62H, BO63B, BU63D, DA63D, EL63D, HA63K, JA63C, JO63B, KL63, KU63B, KU63I, MO63C, OL63B, SA63K, SC63E, SC63I, VL63A, WA63, GR64C, JI64,

  19. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of Pure LiFePO 4 and Nanocomposite C- LiFePO 4 Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure limore » thium iron phosphate ( LiFePO 4 ) and carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C- LiFePO 4 ) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating on LiFePO 4 particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C- LiFePO 4 at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms of LiFePO 4 and C- LiFePO 4 showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively for LiFePO 4 where as in case of C- LiFePO 4 that were 163, 144, 118, and 70 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pure LiFePO 4 was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C- LiFePO 4 was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.« less

  20. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of PureLiFePO4and Nanocomposite C-LiFePO4Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) and carbon-coatedLiFePO4(C-LiFePO4) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating onLiFePO4particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C-LiFePO4at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms ofLiFePO4and C-LiFePO4showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively forLiFePO4where as in case of C-LiFePO4that were 163, 144,more118, and 70?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pureLiFePO4was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C-LiFePO4was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.less

  1. Influence of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum electrocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Xing, YC

    2011-06-01

    A Li-air battery can provide a much higher theoretical energy density than a Li-ion battery. The use of aqueous acidic electrolytes may prevent lithium oxide deposition from aprotic electrolytes and lithium carbonate precipitation from alkaline electrolytes. The present communication reports a study on the effect of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulfuric acid electrolytes. It was found that the Li ions have negligible interactions with the active surface of Pt catalysts. However, significantly lower ORR activities were found when Li ions are present in the sulfuric acid. The intrinsic kinetic activities were found to decrease with the increase of Li ion concentrations, but level off when the Li ion concentrations are larger than 1.0 M. The low activities of Pt catalysts in Li ion containing electrolytes were attributed to a constraining effect of Li ions on the diffusion of oxygen in the electrolyte solution. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  3. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, Carla

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASI’s Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASI’s patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  4. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  5. Degradation Reactions in SONY-Type Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagasubramanian, G.; Roth, E. Peter

    1999-05-04

    Thermal instabilities were identified in SONY-type lithium-ion cells and correlated with interactions of cell constituents and reaction products. Three temperature regions of interaction were identified and associated with the state of charge (degree of Li intercalation) of the cell. Anodes were shown to undergo exothermic reactions as low as 100°C involving the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer and the LiPF6 salt in the electrolyte (EC: PC: DEC/LiPF6). These reactions could account for the thermal runaway observed in these cells beginning at 100°C. Exothermic reactions were also observed in the 200°C-300°C region between the intercalated lithium anodes, the LiPF6 salt and the PVDF. These reactions were followed by a high- temperature reaction region, 300°C-400°C, also involving the PVDF binder and the intercalated lithium anodes. The solvent was not directly involved in these reactions but served as a moderator and transport medhun. Cathode exotherrnic reactions with the PVDF binder were observed above 200oC and increased with the state of charge (decreasing Li content). This offers an explanation for the observed lower thermal runaway temperatures for charged cells.

  6. Operando NMR and XRD study of chemically synthesized LiCx oxidation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Operando NMR and XRD study of chemically synthesized LiCx oxidation in a dry room environment We test the stability of pre-lithiated graphite anodes for Li-ion batteries in ...

  7. Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co., Ltd. Place: Yunnan...

  8. Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ... Title: Dendrite-free Li deposition using trace-amounts of water as an electrolyte additive ...

  9. Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for ... Title: Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for ...

  10. Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion ...

  11. A Reactive Force Field study of Li/C Systems for Electrical Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A Reactive Force Field study of LiC Systems for Electrical Energy Storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Reactive Force Field study of LiC Systems for Electrical ...

  12. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  13. Digital Sofcell Shanghai ShenLi Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ShenLi Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint venture Jump to: navigation, search Name: Digital Sofcell - Shanghai ShenLi - Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint venture Place: China...

  14. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line ...

  15. LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    aerial Li-DAR survey flown over the project areas, securing over 177,000 square kilometers of <30cm accuracy digital elevation data. LiDAR data were analyzed to characterize...

  16. Molecular Design Leads to Record Performance for Li2S Cathodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Li2S and Li-S functional groups in PVP binder (left). Optical microscopy and visual images of the fine grain structure of cathode-PVP composite (top, right) and the coarse-grain ...

  17. Electrochemical Performances of LiMnPO4 Synthesized from Non...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Li1.1MnPO4 exhibits the most stable cycling ability probably because of the existence of a trace amount of Li3PO4 impurity that functions as a solid-state electrolyte on...

  18. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP...

  19. The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life-cycle energy and emissions and recycling's role in its reduction Title The significance of Li-ion batteries in...

  20. Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cyclability of Li...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation of Interfacial Layer and Long-Term Cyclability of Li-O2 Batteries Surface ... Identified key factors that affect the long term cycle life of Li-O2 batteries under full ...

  1. Effect of the Anion Activity on the Stability of Li Metal Anodes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Li Metal Anodes in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries The lithium metal anode (bottom) ... Significance and Impact Identified one reason behind Li-S batteries failing to hold a ...

  2. First-Principles Study of Redox End-Members in Li-Sulfur Batteries...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First-Principles Study of Redox End-Members in Li-Sulfur Batteries Images for Redox ... and surface characteristics of solid-phase redox end-members in Li-S batteries. ...

  3. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1–xTx)N (T = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1–xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane→easy axis→easy plane→easy axis when progressing from T = Mn → Fe → Co → Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.more » As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.« less

  4. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li 2 ( Li 1 - x T x ) N ( T = Mn , Fe , Co , and Ni )

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-01

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li?(Li1-xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreThe calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  5. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1xTx)N(T=Mn,Fe,Co,andNi)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreAs a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  6. Redox Mediators that Promote Three-Dimensional Growth of Li2S on Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Current Collectors in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research 21, 2015, Research Highlights Redox Mediators that Promote Three-Dimensional Growth of Li2S on Carbon Current Collectors in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries Controlling the electrodeposition of Li2S onto C using a redox mediator, BPI. With BPI, sulfur utilization improves in Li-S cells due to remote reduction of polysulfides to Li2S. Scientific Achievement Developed, from computation and experiment, redox

  7. Survival Fraction at 2 Gy and γH2AX Expression Kinetics in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes From Cancer Patients: Relationship With Acute Radiation-Induced Toxicities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouliliou, Stamatia E.; Dimitriou, Thespis; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Papazoglou, Dimitrios; Pappa, Aglaia; Pistevou, Kyriaki

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Predictive assays for acute radiation toxicities would be clinically relevant in radiation oncology. We prospectively examined the predictive role of the survival fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) and of γH2AX (double-strand break [DSB] DNA marker) expression kinetics in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from cancer patients before radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: SF2 was measured with Trypan Blue assay in the PBMCs from 89 cancer patients undergoing radiation therapy at 4 hours (SF2{sub [4h]}) and 24 hours (SF2{sub [24h]}) after ex vivo irradiation. Using Western blot analysis and band densitometry, we further assessed the expression of γH2AX in PBMC DNA at 0 hours, 30 minutes, and 4 hours (33 patients) and 0 hour, 4 hours, and 24 hours (56 patients), following ex vivo irradiation with 2 Gy. Appropriate ratios were used to characterize each patient, and these were retrospectively correlated with early radiation therapy toxicity grade. Results: The SF2{sub (4h)} was inversely correlated with the toxicity grade (P=.006). The γH2AX-ratio{sub (30min)} (band density of irradiated/non-irradiated cells at 30 minutes) revealed, similarly, a significant inverse association (P=.0001). The DSB DNA repair rate from 30 minutes to 4 hours, calculated as the relative RγH2AX-ratio (γH2AX-ratio{sub (4h)}/γH2AX-ratio{sub (30min)}) showed a significant direct association with high toxicity grade (P=.01). Conclusions: Our results suggest that SF2 is a significant radiation sensitivity index for patients undergoing radiation therapy. γH2AX Western blot densitometry analysis provided 2 important markers of normal tissue radiation sensitivity. Low γH2AX expression at 30 minutes was linked with high toxicity grade, suggesting that poor γH2AX repair activity within a time frame of 30 minutes after irradiation predicts for poor radiation tolerance. On the other hand, rapid γH2AX content restoration at 4 hours after irradiation, compatible with

  8. Anode Materials for Rechargeable Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fultz, B.

    2001-01-12

    This research is on materials for anodes and cathodes in electrochemical cells. The work is a mix of electrochemical measurements and analysis of the materials by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry. At present, our experimental work involves only materials for Li storage, but we have been writing papers from our previous work on hydrogen-storage materials.

  9. Performance of LiAlloy/Ag(2)CrO(4) Couples in Molten CsBr-LiBr-KBr Eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    The performance of Li-alloy/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} systems was studied over a temperature range of 250 C to 300 C, for possible use as a power source for geothermal borehole applications. Single cells were discharged at current densities of 15.8 and 32.6 mA/cm{sup 2} using Li-Si and Li-Al anodes. When tested in 5-cell batteries, the Li-Si/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} system exhibited thermal runaway. Thermal analytical tests showed that the Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cathode reacted exothermically with the electrolyte on activation. Consequently, this system would not be practical for the envisioned geothermal borehole applications.

  10. Effect of the Anion Activity on the Stability of Li Metal Anodes in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lithium-Sulfur Batteries - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research March 29, 2016, Research Highlights Effect of the Anion Activity on the Stability of Li Metal Anodes in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries The lithium metal anode (bottom) corrodes after just 35 cycles in the LiFSI electrolyte, while the lithium anode (top) stays relatively stable in the LiTFSI electrolyte after more than 200 cycles. Scientific Achievement Discovered why the salt LiTFSI - when added to the electrolyte of a Li-S