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  1. Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation: Developing Capacities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Workshop, Guidemanual Website http:unfccc.intfilesmethod Country Guyana UN Region Latin America and the Caribbean References Preparing Guyana's REDD+ Participation1...

  2. Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana REDD+ Investment Fund (GRIF) AgencyCompany Organization Government of Norway, Government of Guyana...

  3. Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Guyana's Low Carbon Development Strategy AgencyCompany Organization: Guyana Office of...

  4. Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and Strategy Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana-Caribbean Community (CARICOM) Sustainable Energy Roadmap and...

  5. Guyana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Guyana Population 747,884 GDP 2,788,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.02 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code GY 3-letter ISO code GUY Numeric ISO...

  6. Liberia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Country Profile Name Liberia Population 3,476,608 GDP 1,735,000,000 Energy Consumption 0.01 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code LR 3-letter ISO code LBR Numeric ISO...

  7. Guyana-ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Jump to: navigation, search Name Guyana-Low Carbon Growth Planning Support AgencyCompany Organization ClimateWorks, Project...

  8. Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization...

  9. LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    \ LI g. / This document con&s of lf pages. No. 1 &of #copies, Series fl . .! ' \ ' > .b P .--r ' i ' ./' MJDIFICATION NO. k sUPPLEMENTALAMw24ENrto CONTRACT NO. A T (30-l)-1335 M O D IFICATION NO. 4 CONTRACTOR AND A D D m S : KIDIFICATION TO: -EINESTIEUTED CCSTOFWORKr TOTAT,ESTIIUTEDC~T OFWRKI INCREASEIN C O M K rSSI~ OBLlDATIONt NEMTOTALCOMMISSION OBLIOaTIONt PAYl%NTTDBEMADEBY: HORIZONS, INCORPOlZATED R-inceton, New Jersey AIBNDSCOPEOFK#tK,EXTENDTR?M AND OTflER CHANOES $&31,lbOO

  10. Assessment of Biomass Resources in Liberia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.

    2009-04-01

    Biomass resources meet about 99.5% of the Liberian population?s energy needs so they are vital to basic welfare and economic activity. Already, traditional biomass products like firewood and charcoal are the primary energy source used for domestic cooking and heating. However, other more efficient biomass technologies are available that could open opportunities for agriculture and rural development, and provide other socio-economic and environmental benefits.The main objective of this study is to estimate the biomass resources currently and potentially available in the country and evaluate their contribution for power generation and the production of transportation fuels. It intends to inform policy makers and industry developers of the biomass resource availability in Liberia, identify areas with high potential, and serve as a base for further, more detailed site-specific assessments.

  11. 07Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 6Li(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1968SP01: 6Li(n, ), E thermal; measured E, I; deduced Q....

  12. 08Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Neutron Capture Evaluated Data Measurements 1967RA24: 7Li(n, ), E thermal; measured E; deduced Q. 1973JUZT, 1973JUZU: 7Li(n, ), E thermal; measured (E). 7Li...

  13. 9Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1991LUZZ: 9Li(-); measured T12. 1992LI24: 9Li(-); measured NMR...

  14. 5Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li Ground-State Decay Evaluated Data Measured Ground-State Γcm for 5Li Adopted value: 1.23 MeV (2002TI10) Measured Mass Excess for 5Li Adopted value: 11680 ± 50 keV (2003AU02) Measurements 1960BA45: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR10: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960BR19: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960HA14: 5Li; measured not abstracted; deduced nuclear properties. 1960PE14: 5Li; measured not

  15. 11Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deduced log ft, Gamow-Teller transition strength, level width, di-neutron, neutron halo roles. 1992LI24: 11Li(-); measured NMR asymmetry; deduced quadrupole moment ratio....

  16. 10Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    measured proton spectra, (). 10Li deduced spectroscopic factors. 2007SI24: C(11Li, nx), E 264 MeVnucleon; measured neutron energies and yields, as a function of...

  17. 4Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vs relative E(3He, n), E(3He, p); deduced . 4Li deduced levels, . 1996ED02: 4He(p, nX), E 100, 200 MeV; measured inclusive (, En). 4Li deduced evidence for narrow...

  18. 8Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    -asymmetry, NMR; deduced polarization. 1986WA01: 8Li(-); analyzed -delayed breakup -spectra; deduced intruder states role. 8Be deduced level, , Gamow-Teller matrix...

  19. LI I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LI I (I LI 1 m r - m " P pr II II I I c - 81-r J-7 . ba OAK RCEIGE MBTSC3NAL liJM!DRAT~F-zY OPERATED OY OPERATED OY MAflTlN MAHlETTA @El&Y ?Z!SEMS, HE. MAflTlN MAHlETTA @El&Y ?Z!SEMS, HE. FOR THE UNfTEfl STATES FOR THE UNfTEfl STATES ORNL/RASA-88/59 RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY AT DIEBOLD SAFE COMPANY, 1550 GRAND BOULEVARD, HAMILTON, OHIO (HOOol) R. D. Foley L. M. Floyd OEPARTMENT Of ENERGY This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE

  20. C: LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    C: LI c1 T - P- LI m m m c I C F II c( L e3 I 7 ,' r,L .zpl I-' . "* IL.8 -1 p @ z> Cerfification Docket for the Remedid Action Performed at the G ranite City Site in G ranite City, Illinois, June 7993 Department of Energy Former Sites Restoration Division Oak Ridge Operations O ffice September 7994 613 Printed on recycledhcydable paper. 4.1514023.6 .- CERTIFICATION DOCKET FOR THE REMEDIAL ACTION PERFORMED AT THE GRANITE CITY SITE IN GRANITE CITY, ILLINOIS, JUNE 1993 SEPTEMBER 1994

  1. F LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    >"- -- F LI c ------- RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE M IDDLESEX LANDFILL SITE RADIATION SURVEY REPORT OF THE ~IDDLESEX LfiMDFI.LL S I:TE it%RCH 25 - AFRiL 4, 1374 ;)UNE 27, 1974 T.!BLE OF CONTENTS Introduction and Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Conclusions. . . . . . w . . . . . . , . . . , . . . . 2 Histohcal Background0 . . . . . . . . . . . . b (I . . 2 Description of Area Surveyed . . . . . . . . I . . . * 3 Survey Findings. * *,. a . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Surface

  2. 6Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 6Li is subdivided into the following categories: Ground State Properties of 6Li Special States Theoretical Shell Model Cluster Models Complex...

  3. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li(, '): emission yield 1.0 - 3.4 1 01182012 2011YA02 7Li(, ): elastic scattering differential 1.0 - 4.5 cm 170 07192011 7Li(, p): differential...

  4. 5Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table for 5Li is subdivided into the folowing categories: Ground State Properties Cluster Model Shell Model Special States Model Calculations Model Discussions Complex...

  5. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  6. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12152015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, ): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from...

  7. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12162015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, ): total , S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 -...

  8. 10Li General Tables

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li General Table The General Table for 10Li is subdivided into the following categories: Reviews Theoretical Ground State Properties Shell Model Cluster Model Other Models Special States Astrophysical Electromagnetic Transitions Hypernuclei Photodisintegration Light-Ion and Neutron Induced Reactions These General Tables correspond to the 2003 preliminary evaluation of ``Energy Levels of Light Nuclei, A = 10''. The prepublication version of A = 10 is available on this website in PDF format: A =

  9. Jennifer Li | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jennifer Li Jennifer Li Jennifer Li E-mail: jennifer.li@wustl.edu Website: Washington University Undergraduate student enrolled in the PARC/I-CARES Certificate of Accomplishment in Renewable Energy & the Environment. Undergraduate

  10. C LI CI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LI CI - - 11 C LI I I Mb II II OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY UPERml BY M A R T IN M A R IETTA ENERGY S Y S T E M S , INC. FOR THE UNfTEG STATES OEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLITM-10007 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE PERIMETER FENCE LINE OF THE FORMER COTTER SITE, HAZELWOOD, M ISSOURI (LM002) R. F. Carrier W . D. Cottrell FILE COPY This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the UnitedStatesGovernment. NeithertheUnitedStatesGovernment noranyagency thereof, nor any of their

  11. Li Tec | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drezden, Germany Product: Based in Kamez, near Dresden, Li-Tec produces components for lithium-ion batteries. References: Li-Tec1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. I!' L;I)

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ".>;jy i.~jp.~[~~ i,Zz>-c C,+;) ir,i:%J :' 0 p 'd-i I /) f) ic.c iq -.I ,'c i - * w. 3'2 , phi ': r-t;, ; *.i .; I!' L;I) --, -II s;.,yE;J-~,~;~* I' ;, f: >,p.yg ,p ' .L (3 i!>;' !i.3 y/y!-; x>:-y rJgbf;..qp: \' :sF*:l,' 5-".13, -9 _ ..-;~c~-' ~;Li;-~~~~;, 3h' ;[;i-y ; c; ' 1' 1.b y&k' 2 1 , . ..l =i. 1; G.1 ;Tr.; .j. i-:. I qr:i.gky, M,C. Jp, 2.1 F... ii, Ross CENTRAL F ILES ~"CTIVE OF TXIP m --w- The 0' 0 jet% ive Of this trip xas to evaluate tkie !- .zalth

  13. 7Li MRI of Li batteries reveals location of microstructural lithium...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: 7Li MRI of Li batteries reveals location of microstructural lithium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: 7Li MRI of Li ...

  14. UJ LiJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    o >- tD o UJ :> LiJ o W ~ Central Nevada-23 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Federal Center, Denver, Colorado 80225 ANALYSIS OF HYDRAULIC TESTS IN HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA June 1970 Open-file report Prepared Under Contract AT(29-2)-474 for the Nevada Operations Office U.S. Atomic Energy Commission USGS-474-82 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor

  15. Li2ikk+

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Li2ikk+ 0/-/.3~+ ' Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 m 19 1999 Mr. William R. Augustine Deputy Chief Programs Management Division U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Depanment of the Army Washington. D.C. 203 14-1000 Dear Mr. Augustine: I am writing to you as a follow-up to discussions our staffs have had regarding two former Department of the Army facilities in the Formerly Used Defense Sites (FUDS) program where the former Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) also conducted activities. These sites

  16. A=11Li (2012KE01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E(11Li) 246 MeVA, analysis of a complete three-body kinematical measurement of 11Li breakup on a 12C target indicates the reaction mechanism is 11Li inelastic scattering to...

  17. Liang Li | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liang Li Postdoctoral Appointee (Supervisor, Maria Chan) Current research focuses on ab-initio theoretical studies on hybrid lithium-ion/lithium-oxygen battery materials and photocatalytic reduction of CO2. Telephone 630.252.2788 Fax 630.252.4646 E-mail liangli@anl.gov CV/Resume PDF icon Liang_Li

  18. Lithium Salts for Advanced Lithium Batteries: Li-metal, Li-O2, and Li-S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younesi, Reza; Veith, Gabriel M; Johansson, Patrik; Edstrom, Kristina; Vegge, Tejs

    2015-01-01

    Presently lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6) is the dominant Li-salt used in commercial rechargeable lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) based on a graphite anode and a 3-4 V cathode material. While LiPF6 is not the ideal Li-salt for every important electrolyte property, it has a uniquely suitable combination of properties (temperature range, passivation, conductivity, etc.) rendering it the overall best Li-salt for LIBs. However, this may not necessarily be true for other types of Li-based batteries. Indeed, next generation batteries, for example lithium-metal (Li-metal), lithium-oxygen (Li-O2), and lithium sulphur (Li-S), require a re-evaluation of Li-salts due to the different electrochemical and chemical reactions and conditions within such cells. This review explores the critical role Li-salts play in ensuring in these batteries viability.

  19. Recovery of Li from alloys of Al- Li and Li- Al using engineered scavenger compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, W. D. (Albany, OR); Jong, B. W. (Corvallis, OR); Collins, W. K. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, S. J. (Albany, OR)

    1994-01-01

    A method of producing lithium of high purity from lithium aluminum alloys using an engineered scavenger compound, comprising: I) preparing an engineered scavenger compound by: a) mixing and heating compounds of TiO2 and Li2CO3 at a temperature sufficient to dry the compounds and convert Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3 to Li.sub.2 O; and b) mixing and heating the compounds at a temperature sufficient to produce a scavenger Li.sub.2 O.3TiO.sub.2 compound; II) loading the scavenger into one of two electrode baskets in a three electrode cell reactor and placing an Al-Li alloy in a second electrode basket of the three electrode cell reactor; III) heating the cell to a temperature sufficient to enable a mixture of KCl-LiCl contained in a crucible in the cell to reach its melting point and become a molten bath; IV) immersing the baskets in the bath until an electrical connection is made between the baskets to charge the scavenger compound with Li until there is an initial current and voltage followed by a fall off ending current and voltage; and V) making a connection between the basket electrode containing engineered scavenger compound and a steel rod electrode disposed between the basket electrodes and applying a current to cause Li to leave the scavenger compound and become electrodeposited on the steel rod electrode.

  20. A=14Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV: see (1981AJ01). 14Li is then particle unstable with respect to decay into 13Li + n and 12Li + 2n by 3.88 and 3.22 MeV, respectively

  1. A=15Li (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed: its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV. It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). See also 13Li

  2. A=9Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See (GR64C). See also Table 9.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value for 7Li(t, p)9Li: Q ...

  3. Women @ Energy: Yan Li | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yan Li Women @ Energy: Yan Li March 12, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Her work is mainly focused on developing and applying advanced computational tools to investigate material properties

  4. Women @ Energy: Yan Li | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Yan Li Women @ Energy: Yan Li March 12, 2013 - 9:23am Addthis Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Yan Li is a Computational Physicist at the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Her work is mainly focused on developing and applying advanced computational tools to investigate material properties

  5. Anion Coordination Interactions in Solvates with the Lithium Salts LiDCTA and LiTDI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McOwen, Dennis W.; Delp, Samuel A.; Paillard, Elie; Herriot, Cristelle; Han, Sang D.; Boyle, Paul D.; Sommer, Roger D.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-04-17

    Lithium 4,5-dicyano-1,2,3-triazolate (LiDCTA) and lithium 2-trifluoromethyl-4,5-dicyanoimidazole (LiTDI) are two salts proposed for lithium battery electrolyte applications, but little is known about the manner in which the DCTA- and TDI- anions coordinate Li+ cations. To explore this in-depth, crystal structures are reported here for two solvates with LiDCTA: (G2)1:LiDCTA and (G1)1:LiDCTA with diglyme and monoglyme, respectively, and seven solvates with LiTDI: (G1)2:LiTDI, (G2)2:LiTDI, (G3)1:LiTDI, (THF)1:LiTDI, (EC)1:LiTDI, (PC)1:LiTDI and (DMC)1/2:LiTDI with monoglyme, diglyme, triglyme, tetrahydrofuran, ethylene carbonate, propylene carbonate and dimethyl carbonate, respectively. These latter solvate structures are compared with the previously reported acetonitrile (AN)2:LiTDI structure. The solvates indicate that the LiTDI salt is much less associated than the LiDCTA salt and that the ions in LiTDI, when aggregated in solvates, have a very similar TDI-...Li+ cation mode of coordination through both the anion ring and cyano nitrogen atoms. Such coordination facilitates the formation of polymeric ion aggregates, instead of dimers. Insight into such ion speciation is instrumental for understanding the electrolyte properties of aprotic solvent mixtures with these salts.

  6. Thermal Stability of LiPF 6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes Containing LiPF

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermal Stability of LiPF 6 Salt and Li-ion Battery Electrolytes Containing LiPF 6 Hui Yang a, *, Guorong V. Zhuang b, * ,z and Philip N. Ross, Jr. b, * Environmental Energy Technologies Division a and Materials Sciences Division b Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract The thermal stability of the neat LiPF 6 salt and of 1 molal solutions of LiPF 6 in prototypical Li-ion battery solvents was studied with thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and

  7. A=12Li (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    75AJ02) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable (1974BO05). Its atomic mass excess is therefore > 49.0 MeV. (1974TH01) calculate the mass excess of 12Li to be 52.92 MeV. 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.9, 3.68 and 3.74 MeV, respectively. See also (1972TH13, 1973BO30, 1974IR04

  8. A=12Li (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    90AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable. The calculated value of its mass excess is 52.93 MeV [see (1980AJ01)]: 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n ,10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 4.01, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. The ground state of 12Li is predicted to have Jπ = 2- (1988POZS, 1985PO10; theor.). See also (1980AJ01

  9. Ying Li | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ying Li Margaret Butler Postdoctoral Fellow Ying Li Argonne National Laboratory 9700 S. Cass Avenue Building 240 / Wkstn. 1D21 Argonne, IL 60439 630-252-3394 yingli

  10. A=11Li (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    80AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been observed in the bombardment of iridium by 24 GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). The cross section for its formation is ~ 50 μb (1976TH1A). 11Li is bound: Eb for break up into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 158 ± 80 and 960 ± 250 keV, respectively [see (1979AJ01) for discussions of the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. The half-life of 11Li is 8.5 ± 0.2 msec (1974RO31): it decays to neutron unstable states of 11Be [Pn =

  11. A=18Li (1995TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1995TI07) (Not illustrated) 18Li has not been observed. Shell model calculations described in (1988POZS) predict the ground-state magentic dipole moment and charge and matter...

  12. A=10Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 10Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 10Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  13. A=5Li (2002TI10)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2002TI10) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 5Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  14. A=9Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: References to articles on general properties of 9Li published since the previous review (1988AJ01) are grouped into...

  15. A=20Li (1998TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1998TI06) (Not observed) See (1977CE05, 1983ANZQ, 1986AN07, 1987SIZX).

  16. A=14Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed: it is calculated to be particle unstable with a binding energy of -2.66 MeV for decay into 13Li + n and of -3.23 MeV for decay into 12Li + 2n. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV (1974TH01)

  17. A=15Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76AJ04) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed: its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV. It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, respectively (1974TH01)

  18. A=15Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed. Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV: see (1981AJ01). It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.24 and 3.90 MeV, repsectively

  19. A=8Li (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p)8Li Qm 0.80079 Angular distributions have been obtained at Et 23 MeV for the proton groups to 8Li*(0, 0.98, 2.26, 6.54 0.03); cm for 8Li*(2.26, 6.54) are 35 10 and 35...

  20. A=8Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the geometric value, supports the hypothesis that 7Li may be described as an ( + t) cluster (RO62C). See also (AL63N, BA63O, BR63M, VA64G). 9. 7Li(d, p)8Li Qm -0.192...

  1. A=11Li (1975AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by GeV protons. Its mass excess is 40.9 0.1 MeV (1973KL1C). 11Li is bound: Eb for breakup into 9Li + 2n and 10Li + n are 0.2 and 0.3 MeV, respectively see (1974AJ01) for a...

  2. A=13Li (1976AJ04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13Li is predicted to have an atomic mass excess of 61.56 MeV: it is then unstable for breakup into 12Li + n and 11Li + 2n by 0.6 and 4.5 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). The modified...

  3. A=13Li (1981AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    13Li is predicted to have an atomic mass excess of 61.56 MeV: it is then unstable for breakup into 12Li + n and 11Li + 2n by 0.6 and 4.5 MeV, respectively (1974TH01). The modified...

  4. Recovery of Li from alloys of Al-Li and Li-Al using engineered scavenger compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, W.D.; Jong, B.W.; Collins, W.K.; Gerdemann, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for obtaining Li metal selectively recovered from Li-Al or Al-Li alloy scrap by: (1) removing Li from aluminum-lithium alloys at temperatures between about 400 C-750 C in a molten salt bath of KC1-LiCl using lithium titanate (Li2O.3TiO2) as an engineered scavenger compound (ESC); and (2) electrodepositing of Li from the loaded ESC to a stainless steel electrode. By use of the second step, the ESC is prepared for reuse. A molten salt bath is required in the invention because of the inability of molten aluminum alloys to wet the ESC.

  5. A=12Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle-unstable. The calculated value of its mass excess is 52.93 MeV [see (1980AJ01)]: 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.92, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. See also (1980AJ01) and (1982KA1D, 1983ANZQ, 1984VA06

  6. A=13Li (1986AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    86AJ01) (Not illustrated) 13Li has not been observed. The calculated value of its mass excess is 60.34 MeV [see (1981AJ01)]: 13Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + 2n by 3.26 MeV. (1980BO31) have not observed 13Li in the bombardment of 124Sn by 6.7 GeV protons but state that the statistics were poor in the region of interest and that it is not excluded that 13Li may be stable. See also (1983ANZQ

  7. A=11Li (1985AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) GENERAL: The mass excess of 11Li is 40.94 ± 0.08 MeV (1975TH08). [(A.H. Wapstra, private communication) suggests 40.91 ± 0.11 MeV.] Using the value reported by (1975TH08) 11Li is bound with respect to 9Li + 2n by 156 ± 80 keV and with respect to 10Li + n by 966 ± 260 keV [see (1984AJ01) for the masses of 9Li and 10Li]. Systematics suggest Jπ = 1/2- for 11Lig.s.. See also (1979AZ03, 1980AZ01, 1980BO31, 1981BO1X, 1982BO1Y, 1982OG02), (1981HA2C),

  8. A=9Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (Not illustrated) Mass of 9Li: From the threshold for 9Be(d, 2p)9Li, Ed = 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C), the mass excess of 9Li is determined as M - A = 28.1 ± 1 MeV. 1. 9Li(β-)9Be* --> 8Be + n Qm = 12.4 9Li decays to excited states of 9Be which decay by neutron emission. The mean of the reported half-lives is 0.169 ± 0.003 sec (GA51C, HO52B). See also (SH52, FR53A, BE55D, FL56, TA58B). 2. 9Be(d, 2p)9Li Qm = -15.5 The threshold is 19 ± 1 MeV (GA51C). 3. 11B(γ, 2p)9Li Qm = -31.4 See (SH52,

  9. li(1)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 Radiative Forcing by Smoke Aerosols Determined from Satellite and Surface Measurements Z. Li Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada L. Kou Intermap Technologies Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction As a potential offsetting agent to the greenhouse effect, aerosols are receiving increasing attention in the atmospheric science community. Notwithstanding, our knowledge of the impact of aerosols on radiation and climate is rather poor and falls well behind that of the greenhouse

  10. li(1)-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consistency Check of Cloud Optical Properties Derived from Satellite and Surface Observations Z. Li, A. P. Trishchenko, and F.-L. Chang Canada Center for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environmental Service Downsview, Canada W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Introduction Much work has been done to retrieve both cloud and radiative variables using space-borne observations. Several recent studies also attempted to retrieve cloud optical depth using

  11. li(2)-98.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Measurements Regarding Cloud Absorption Z. Li and A. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada H. W. Barker Atmospheric Environment Service Downsview, Ontario, Canada G. L. Stephens and P. Partain Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado P. Minnis NASA-Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Introduction In an attempt to resolve the recent debate over the cloud absorption anomaly, the U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a

  12. A=12Li (1980AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0AJ01) (Not illustrated) 12Li is not observed in the 4.8 GeV proton bombardment of a uranium target: it is particle unstable. Its atomic mass excess would then be > 49.0 MeV. (1974TH01) calculate the mass excess of 12Li to be 52.92 MeV, while (1975JE02) calculate 52.94 MeV. Taking the average of these two values, 12Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + n, 10Li + 2n and 9Li + 3n by 3.92, 2.96 and 3.76 MeV, respectively. See also (1975AJ02) and (1975BE31, 1976IR1B

  13. A=14Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 14Li has not been observed. The calculated mass excess is 72.29 MeV: see (1981AJ01). 14Li is then particle unstable with respect to decay into 13Li + n and 12Li + 2n by 3.9 and 3.2 MeV, respectively [see, however, 13Li]. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 14Li at 0, 0.75, 1.22 and 1.48 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 2-, 4-, 3- and 1-. See also (1986AL09, 1989OG1B) and (1988POZS; theor.)

  14. Li-rich anti-perovskite Li3OCl films with enhanced ionic conductivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, XJ; Wu, G; Howard, JW; Chen, AP; Zhao, YS; Daemen, LL; Jia, QX

    2014-08-13

    Anti-perovskite solid electrolyte films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition, and their room-temperature ionic conductivity can be improved by more than an order of magnitude in comparison with its bulk counterpart. The cyclability of Li3OCl films in contact with lithium was evaluated using a Li/Li3OCl/Li symmetric cell, showing self-stabilization during cycling test.

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - Electrolytic T Extraction in Molten Li-LiT_2.pptx

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Electrolytic Tritium Extraction in Molten Li-LiT Luke Olson Brenda L. García-Díaz Hector Colon-Mercado Joe Teprovich Dave Babineau Savannah River National Laboratory Fall 2015 Tritium Focus Group Meeting November 3-5, 2015 SRNL-STI-2015-00605 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information LiT Electrolysis Options LiT Electrolysis Maroni Process (Baseline Option) Improve Liquid-Liquid Extraction & Electrolysis Process Intensification

  16. A=16Li (1993TI07)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Li (1993TI07) (Not illustrated) This nucleus has not been observed. Shell model studies (1988POZS) are used to predict J and the magnetic dipole moment....

  17. Nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 for High Rate Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaiswal, A.; Horne, C.R.; Chang, O.; Zhang, W.; Kong, W.; Wang, E.; Chern, T.; Doeff, M. M.

    2009-08-04

    The electrochemical performances of nanoscale LiFePO4 and Li4Ti5O12 materials are described in this communication. The nanomaterials were synthesized by pyrolysis of an aerosol precursor. Both compositions required moderate heat-treatment to become electrochemically active. LiFePO4 nanoparticles were coated with a uniform, 2-4 nm thick carbon-coating using an organic precursor in the heat treatment step and showed high tap density of 1.24 g/cm3, in spite of 50-100 nm particle size and 2.9 wtpercent carbon content. Li4Ti5O12 nanoparticles were between 50-200 nm in size and showed tap density of 0.8 g/cm3. The nanomaterials were tested both in half cell configurations against Li-metal and also in LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells. Nano-LiFePO4 showed high discharge rate capability with values of 150 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 charges. Nano-Li4Ti5O12 also showed high charge capability with values of 148 and 138 mAh/g at C/25 and 5C, respectively, after constant C/25 discharges; the discharge (lithiation) capability was comparatively slower. LiFePO4/Li4Ti5O12 full cells deliver charge/discharge capacity values of 150 and 122 mAh/g at C/5 and 5C, respectively.

  18. Microsoft Word - li_abstract

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2011 3:45 pm Refreshment will be served at 3:30 pm A few new issues regarding the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy Professor Bao-An Li Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University-Commerce Abstract: The density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy is rather poorly known at both sub-saturation and supra-saturation densities. However, it is very important for understanding many interesting properties/phenomena/processes in nuclear structure, heavy-ion reactions

  19. A=11Li (68AJ02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    68AJ02) (See the Isobar Diagram for 11Li) 11Li has been identified in the 5.3 GeV proton bombardment of uranium. It is particle stable (PO66H). See also (GA66C, CO67A

  20. A=8Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nuclear radius of 8Li is 2.36 0.02 fm (1985TA18) see also for derived nuclear matter, charge and neutron matter r.m.s. radii. 1. 8Li(-)8Be Qm 16.0039 The - decay is...

  1. A=9Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.3 2.9 keV for the second T 32 state in A 9 (1975KA18). 1. 9Li(-)9Be Qm 13.607 The half-life of 9Li is 178.3 0.4 msec (1976AL02). Other recent values are 175 1...

  2. A=10Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    10B: see (HA68V), the mass excess of 10Li, (M - A) 33.10 0.06 MeV (AB73D). The breakup energy into 9Li + n is then -0.06 0.06 MeV. Using the calculated values suggested...

  3. Electrochemistry of LiCl-Li2O-H2O Molten Salt Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natalie J. Gese; Batric Pesic

    2013-03-01

    Uranium can be recovered from uranium oxide (UO2) spent fuel through the combination of the oxide reduction and electrorefining processes. During oxide reduction, the spent fuel is introduced to molten LiCl-Li2O salt at 650 degrees C and the UO2 is reduced to uranium metal via two routes: (1) electrochemically, and (2) chemically by lithium metal (Li0) that is produced electrochemically. However, the hygroscopic nature of both LiCl and Li2O leads to the formation of LiOH, contributing hydroxyl anions (OH-), the reduction of which interferes with the Li0 generation required for the chemical reduction of UO2. In order for the oxide reduction process to be an effective method for the treatment of uranium oxide fuel, the role of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O system must be understood. The behavior of moisture in the LiCl-Li2O molten salt system was studied using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and chronoamperometry, while reduction to hydrogen was confirmed with gas chromatography.

  4. Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Title Enabling Future Li-Ion Battery Recycling Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2014 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract Presentation made...

  5. Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co Ang Li Tiansheng | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co (Ang Li Tiansheng) Place: Zaozhuang, Shandong Province, China Product: Chinese PV cell and module maker. References: Atsun Solar Electric Technology Co (Ang Li...

  6. A=8Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8Li (59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 8Li) GENERAL: See also Table 8.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (LA55A, KU56, FR57, KU57). 1. 8Li(β-)8Be Qm = 16.001 The weighted mean of half-lives reported in (55AJ61) is 0.848 ± 0.004 sec. A value of 0.873 ± 0.013 sec is given by (VE58A). See also (IM58). The decay is complex: see 8Be. 2. 6Li(t, p)8Li Qm = 0.803 Q0 = 0.790 ± 0.011 (AL54E). The ground state reaction has been observed by (MO52, PE52, AL54E, CU55B). (CU55B)

  7. Li2Se as a Neutron Scintillator

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Du, Mao-Hua; Shi, Hongliang; Singh, David J.

    2015-06-23

    We show that Li2Se:Te is a potential neutron scintillator material based on density functional calculations. Li2Se exhibits a number of properties favorable for efficient neutron detection, such as a high Li concentration for neutron absorption, a small effective atomic mass and a low density for reduced sensitivity to background gamma rays, and a small band gap for a high light yield. Our calculations show that Te doping should lead to the formation of deep acceptor complex VLi-TeSe, which can facilitate efficient light emission, similar to the emission activation in Te doped ZnSe.

  8. Antiperovskite Li 3 OCl superionic conductor films for solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lü, Xujie; Howard, John W.; Chen, Aiping; Zhu, Jinlong; Li, Shuai; Wu, Gang; Dowden, Paul; Xu, Hongwu; Zhao, Yusheng; Jia, Quanxi

    2016-02-02

    We prepared antiperovskite Li3OCl superionic conductor films via pulsed laser deposition using a composite target. A significantly enhanced ionic conductivity of 2.0 × 10-4 S cm-1 at room temperature is achieved, and this value is more than two orders of magnitude higher than that of its bulk counterpart. Moreover, the applicability of Li3OCl as a solid electrolyte for Li-ion batteries is demonstrated.

  9. A=13Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 13Li has not been observed: see (1986AJ01). The calculated value of its mass excess is 60.34 MeV [see (1981AJ01)]: 13Li would then be unstable with respect to 11Li + 2n by 3.34 MeV. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 13Li at 0, 1.42, 2.09 and 2.77 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 3/2-, 7/2-, 1/2-, 5/2-. See also (1987PE1C, 1989OG1B) and (1988POZS, 1988ZV1A

  10. A=15Li (1991AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    91AJ01) (Not illustrated) 15Li has not been observed. Its atomic mass excess is calculated to be 81.60 MeV: see (1981AJ01). It is then unstable with respect to decay into 14Li + n and 13Li + 2n by 1.2 and 5.1 MeV, respectively. (1985PO10) calculate [in a (0 + 1)ℏω model space] that the first four states of 15Li at 0, 0.73, 2.39 and 2.77 MeV have, respectively, Jπ = 3/2-, 1/2-, 7/2- and 5/2-. See also (1988POZS; theor.)

  11. A=7Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 7Li) GENERAL: See also Table 7.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (AU55, DA55, LA55A, AB56, FE56, KU56, ME56, FE57C, FR57, LE57F, MA57E, MA57J, SO57, HA58D, SK58). 1. 3H(α, γ)7Li Qm = 2.465 For Eα = 0.5 to 1.9 MeV, capture radiation is observed to 7Li(0) and 7Li*(0.48), with intensity ratio 5 : 2. The smooth rise of the cross section suggests a direct capture process. The angular distribution is not isotropic, indicating l > 0

  12. A=9Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 9.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1979LA06). Complex reactions...

  13. A=5Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    84AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 5.3 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations:(1978RE1A, 1979MA1J,...

  14. A=8Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1979AJ01) and Table 8.2 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Special states: (1980OK01). Complex reactions...

  15. A=5Li (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1966LA04) and Table 5.5 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Shell model calculations: (1966FR1B, 1968GO01,...

  16. A=5Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 5Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 5.3 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS) here. Model calculations: (1975KR1A). Special states:...

  17. A=9Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also (1984AJ01) and Table 9.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations: (1983KU17, 1984CH24, 1984VA06)....

  18. A=8Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    79AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 8Li) GENERAL: See also (1974AJ01) and Table 8.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Nuclear models: (1975KH1A, 1977ST24). Special...

  19. A=8Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cross section, comparable to the geometric value, is understood in terms of the ( + t) cluster nature of 7Li (RO62C). Cross sections for this reaction have recently been...

  20. A=4Li (1992TI02)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experiments (1990BR14, 1990BR17) that detect 4Li states in the particle spectra of breakup reactions. It may even be possible that these experiments are not detecting the 2-and...

  1. A=11Li (1990AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    increase in matter radii with increasing A and do not support the idea of a neutron halo in 11Li (1988POZS; prelim.). See, however, (1988TA1A). Fragmentation cross sections of...

  2. Construction Consultants, L.I., Inc.

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mr. Eric Baumack Senior Project Manager Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. 36 East 2 nd Street Riverhead, New York 11901 WEL-2015-05 Dear Mr. Baumack: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement has completed an investigation into an electrical shock incident involving a worker employed by a subcontractor to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. (CCLI) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). CCLI is a first-tier subcontractor to Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC (BSA),

  3. Excitation functions of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li reactions at low energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prepolec, L.; Soic, N.; Blagus, S.; Miljanic, D.; Siketic, Z.; Skukan, N.; Uroic, M.; Milin, M.

    2009-08-26

    Differential cross sections of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 7}Li nuclear reactions have been measured at forward angles (10 deg. and 20 deg.), using particle identification detector telescopes, over the energy range 2.75-10.00 MeV. Excitation functions have been obtained for low-lying residual-nucleus states. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) at beam energy about 8 MeV, first observed by Wyborny and Carlson in 1971 at 0 deg., has been observed at 10 deg., but is less evident at 20 deg. The cross section obtained for the {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(g.s,0{sup +}) reaction is about ten times smaller. The well pronounced peak in the excitation function of {sup 7}Li({sup 7}Li,{sup 4}He){sup 10}Be(3.37 MeV,2{sup +}) reaction could correspond to excited states in {sup 14}C, at excitation energies around 30 MeV.

  4. P LI I CI L I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LI I - CI L - I 111 Ir LI C C c c c Ic c L ORNL/RASA-90/8 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE FORMER BAKER BROTHERSJNC. SITE, 2551-2555 HARLEAU PLACE, TOLEDO,OHIO (BTOOOl) MABAGEO BY MABAGEO BY MAUTIH MARIETTA ENBGY SYSTEM, INC. AWTIH MAftIETTA ENBGY SYSTEM, INC. FOR THE UNITE0 STATES FOR THE UNITE0 STATES OEPARTMENT OF EtdERGY OEPARTMENT OF EtdERGY R. D. Foley L. M. Floyd _-. This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE

  5. Batteries - Next-generation Li-ion batteries Breakout session

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the Other Technical Areas Being Discussed * Main point: we should consider next-gen Li-ion and beyond Li-ion together as a single portfolio of work, in which risk and...

  6. Shanghai Shen Li High Tech Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shen Li High Tech Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Shanghai Shen-Li High Tech Co Ltd Place: Shanghai, Shanghai Municipality, China Zip: 201400 Product: Focused on the...

  7. Hydrogen storage in LiH: A first principle study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banger, Suman Nayak, Vikas Verma, U. P.

    2014-04-24

    First principles calculations have been performed on the Lithium hydride (LiH) using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method within the framework of density functional theory. We have extended our calculations for LiH+2H and LiH+6H in NaCl structure. The structural stability of three compounds have been studied. It is found that LiH with 6 added Hydrogen atoms is most stable. The obtained results for LiH are in good agreement with reported experimental data. Electronic structures of three compounds are also studied. Out of three the energy band gap in LiH is ?3.0 eV and LiH+2H and LiH+6H are metallic.

  8. Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt001_es_eun_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

  9. Enforcement Letter, Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. Enforcement Letter, Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. December 4, 2015 Worker Safety and Health Enforcement Letter issued to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc. On December 4, 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement issued an Enforcement Letter (WEL-2015-05) to Construction Consultants L.I., Inc., relating to an electrical shock suffered by a subcontractor while working on a meteorological

  10. Probing the failure mechanism of nanoscale LiFePO₄ for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ji-guang; Wang, Chongmin

    2015-05-18

    LiFePO4 is a high power rate cathode material for lithium ion battery and shows remarkable capacity retention, featuring a 91% capacity retention after 3300 cycles. In this work, we use high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) to study the gradual capacity fading mechanism of LiFePO4 materials. We found that upon prolonged electrochemical cycling of the battery, the LiFePO4 cathode shows surface amorphization and loss of oxygen species, which directly contribute to the gradual capacity fading of the battery. The finding is of great importance for the design and improvement of new LiFePO4 cathode for high-energy and high-power rechargeable battery for electric transportation.

  11. A=07Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 7Li) GENERAL: See (HU57D, BA59K, BA59N, BR59M, FE59E, MA59E, MA59H, KU60A, PE60E, PH60A, SH60C, TA60L, BA61H, BA61N, BL61C, CL61D, KH61,...

  12. A=6Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 6Li) GENERAL: See Table 6.4 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). See also (AU55, LA55, ME56, FR57, HU57D, LE57F, PI58, BA59K, BR59M,...

  13. A=9Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    74AJ01) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See also Table 9.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Model calculations:(BA66T). Special reactions:(DO56D, GA66K, KL66C,...

  14. A=7Li (74AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7Li) GENERAL: See also (66LA04) and Table 7.1 Table of Energy Levels (in PDF or PS). Shell model:(KO61L, CO65I, KU65D, VO65A, BA66T, HA66F, WI66E, BO67R, BO67V, CO67M, FA67A,...

  15. A=10Li (1988AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would then be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV: see (1979AJ01). See also (1986GI10, 1987AB15),...

  16. A=10Li (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    width of the ground state is 1.2 0.3 MeV. 10Lig.s. is unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). See also (1974BA15, 1974CE1A, 1974TH01,...

  17. A=10Li (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MeV) corresponds to the ground state. 10Lig.s. would the be unbound with respect to breakup into 9Li + n by 0.80 0.25 MeV (1975WI26). However (1979AB11, 1980AB16), on the...

  18. Epitaxial thin film growth of LiH using a liquid-Li atomic template

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeshoji, Tamio; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Ohsawa, Takeo; Shiraki, Susumu; Hitosugi, Taro; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2014-11-24

    We report on the synthesis of lithium hydride (LiH) epitaxial thin films through the hydrogenation of a Li melt, forming abrupt LiH/MgO interface. Experimental and first-principles molecular dynamics studies reveal a comprehensive microscopic picture of the crystallization processes, which sheds light on the fundamental atomistic growth processes that have remained unknown in the vapor-liquid-solid method. We found that the periodic structure that formed, because of the liquid-Li atoms at the film/MgO-substrate interface, serves as an atomic template for the epitaxial growth of LiH crystals. In contrast, films grown on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} substrates indicated polycrystalline films with a LiAlO{sub 2} secondary phase. These results and the proposed growth process provide insights into the preparation of other alkaline metal hydride thin films on oxides. Further, our investigations open the way to explore fundamental physics and chemistry of metal hydrides including possible phenomena that emerge at the heterointerfaces of metal hydrides.

  19. Origin of high Li? conduction in doped Li?La?Zr?O?? garnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yan; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liang, Chengdu; An, Ke

    2015-08-06

    Substitution of a native ion in the crystals with a foreign ion that differs in valence (aliovalent doping) has been widely attempted to upgrade solid-state ionic conductors for various charge carriers including O?, H?, Li?, Na?, etc. The doping helps promote the high-conductive framework and dredge the tunnel for fast ion transport. The garnet-type Li?La?Zr?O?? (LLZO) is a fast Li? solid conductor, which received much attention as an electrolyte candidate for all-solid-state lithium ion batteries, showing great potential to offer high energy density and minimize battery safety concerns to meet extensive applications in large energy storage systems such as those for electric vehicles and aerospace. In the Li-stuffed garnet framework of LLZO, the 3D pathway formed by the incompletely occupied tetrahedral sites bridged by a single octahedron enables the superior Li? conductivity. For optimal performance, many aliovalent-doping efforts have been made throughout metal elements (Al?, Ta??) and metalloid elements (Ga?, Te??) in the periodic table with various valences to stabilize the high-conductive phase and increase the Li vacancy concentration.

  20. Making Li-air batteries rechargeable: material challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Yuyan; Ding, Fei; Xiao, Jie; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Park, Seh Kyu; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2013-02-25

    A Li-air battery could potentially provide three to five times higher energy density/specific energy than conventional batteries, thus enable the driving range of an electric vehicle comparable to a gasoline vehicle. However, making Li-air batteries rechargeable presents significant challenges, mostly related with materials. Herein, we discuss the key factors that influence the rechargeability of Li-air batteries with a focus on nonaqueous system. The status and materials challenges for nonaqueous rechargeable Li-air batteries are reviewed. These include electrolytes, cathode (electocatalysts), lithium metal anodes, and oxygen-selective membranes (oxygen supply from air). The perspective of rechargeable Li-air batteries is provided.

  1. Solution-processable glass LiI-Li4SnS4 superionic conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kern Ho Park; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju -Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M.; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-12-22

    The new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10–4 S cm–1 at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. Furthermore, the solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in electrochemical performances of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes.

  2. FIRST_Research Perspective_Li

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. Structure factor obtained from MD (a) and SAXS (b) at different temperatures: comparison of spatial heterogeneity from snapshots (c) of DILs (top) and MILs (bottom) FIRST Center Research Perspective: Nanoscale Heterogeneity and Dynamics of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Song Li Vanderbilt University Jianchang Guo, Kee Sung Han, Jose L. Bañuelos, Edward W. Hagaman, Robert W. Shaw Oak Ridge National Laboratory Research Summary: An increase of the alkyl chain length of the cation of room

  3. Microsoft Word - li_z.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of the Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size on the Estimation of Cloud Liquid Water Path and Its Potential for Rain Detection Z. Li, R. Chen, and F-L Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Liquid water path (LWP) is an important cloud microphysical property that determines the climatic effects of boundary layer clouds. Satellites provide the only means of acquiring global and long-term LWP estimates. The LWP is

  4. Insight into Sulfur Reactions in LiS Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Rui; Belharouak, Ilias; Zhang, Xiaofeng; chamoun, rita; Yu, Cun; Ren, Yang; Nie, Anmin; Reza, Shahbazian-Yassar; Lu, Jun; Li, James C.M.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-12-09

    Understanding and controlling the sulfur reduction species (Li2Sx, 1 ? x ? 8) under realistic battery conditions are essential for the development of advanced practical LiS cells that can reach their full theoretical capacity. However, it has been a great challenge to probe the sulfur reduction intermediates and products because of the lack of methods. This work employed various ex situ and in situ methods to study the mechanism of the LiS redox reactions and the properties of Li2Sx and Li2S. Synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction analysis used to characterize dry powder deposits from lithium polysulfide solution suggests that the new crystallite phase may be lithium polysulfides. The formation of Li2S crystallites with a polyhedral structure was observed in cells with both the conventional (LiTFSI) electrolyte and polysulfide-based electrolyte. In addition, an in situ transmission electron microscopy experiment observed that the lithium diffusion to sulfur during discharge preferentially occurred at the sulfur surface and formed a solid Li2S crust. This may be the reason for the capacity fade in LiS cells (as also suggested by EIS experiment in Supporting Information). The results can be a guide for future studies and control of the sulfur species and meanwhile a baseline for approaching the theoretical capacity of the LiS battery.

  5. Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High...

  6. Electrical conduction of LiF interlayers in organic diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bory, Benjamin F.; Janssen, Ren A. J.; Meskers, Stefan C. J.; Gomes, Henrique L.; Leeuw, Dago M. de

    2015-04-21

    An interlayer of LiF in between a metal and an organic semiconductor is commonly used to improve the electron injection. Here, we investigate the effect of moderate bias voltages on the electrical properties of Al/LiF/poly(spirofluorene)/Ba/Al diodes by systematically varying the thickness of the LiF layer (2-50?nm). Application of forward bias V below the bandgap of LiF (V?LiF/poly(spirofluorene) hetero-junction. Electrons are trapped on the poly(spirofluorene) side of the junction, while positively charged defects accumulate in the LiF with number densities as high as 10{sup 25}/m{sup 3}. Optoelectronic measurements confirm the built-up of aggregated, ionized F centres in the LiF as the positive trapped charges. The charged defects result in efficient transport of electrons from the polymer across the LiF, with current densities that are practically independent of the thickness of the LiF layer.

  7. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2005) Strategies To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  8. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (2004) Strategies For Detecting Hidden Geothermal Systems...

  9. Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vegas, Nevada Zip: 89110 Sector: Vehicles Product: Las Vegas - based manufacturer of lithium-powered plug-in vehicles. References: Li-ion Motors Corp (formerly EV Innovations...

  10. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Smith, K.; Wood, E.; Santhanagopalan, S.; Kim, G.; Shi, Y.; Pesaran, A. 25 ENERGY STORAGE; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION...

  11. Properties of (Ga,Mn)As codoped with Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyakozawa, Shohei; Chen, Lin; Matsukura, Fumihiro; Ohno, Hideo

    2014-06-02

    We grow Li codoped (Ga,Mn)As layers with nominal Mn composition up to 0.15 by molecular beam epitaxy. The layers before and after annealing are characterized by x-ray diffraction, transport, magnetization, and ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The codoping with Li reduces the lattice constant and electrical resistivity of (Ga,Mn)As after annealing. We find that (Ga,Mn)As:Li takes similar Curie temperature to that of (Ga,Mn)As, but with pronounced magnetic moments and in-plane magnetic anisotropy, indicating that the Li codoping has nontrivial effects on the magnetic properties of (Ga,Mn)As.

  12. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable LiS Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable ...

  13. Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interactions using the provided methodology, but a similar analysis of PC...Li+ ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Power Sources, 267:821-830 Research Org: ...

  14. Liberia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volume of work justifies the need for dedicated staff. The counterpart Off-Grid Power and Renewable Energy Unit is expected to be established concurrently. The Grid and Off-Grid...

  15. Primordial Li abundance and massive particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latin-Capital-Letter-Eth apo, H.

    2012-10-20

    The problem of the observed lithium abundance coming from the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis is as of yet unsolved. One of the proposed solutions is including relic massive particles into the Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. We investigated the effects of such particles on {sup 4}HeX{sup -}+{sup 2}H{yields}{sup 6}Li+X{sup -}, where the X{sup -} is the negatively charged massive particle. We demonstrate the dominance of long-range part of the potential on the cross-section.

  16. CI L C C I LI C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CI L C C - I LI C c C I I I I I I I L rr ORNL/RASA-94/l 0t-t. 27-6 \O [I ,-' :..L, &ml OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY RESULTS OF THE RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY at the former HERRING-HALL-MARVIN SAFE COMPANY (3rd Floor) 1550 Grand Boulevard, Hamilton, Ohio (HOOOl) M. E. Murray C. A. Johnson MANA6ED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITE0 STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENEMY This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office

  17. Characterization of low-melting electrolytes for potential geothermal borehole power supplies: The LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-05-01

    The suitability of modified thermal-battery technology for use as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications is under investigation. As a first step, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/LiBr-KBr-LiF/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures of 350 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. Incorporation of a reference electrode allowed the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization to be determined. The results of single-cell tests are presented, along with preliminary data for cells based on a lower-melting CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic salt.

  18. Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li/(CFx)n and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li(CFx)n and LiFePO4 Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Update on Performance Improvement of Sandia-Built Li...

  19. Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Title Enabling the Future of Li-Ion Batteries Publication Type Presentation Year of Publication 2015 Authors Gaines, LL Abstract...

  20. Localization of vacancies and mobility of lithium ions in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} as obtained by {sup 6,7}Li NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baklanova, Ya. V., E-mail: baklanovay@ihim.uran.ru [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Arapova, I. Yu.; Buzlukov, A.L.; Gerashenko, A.P.; Verkhovskii, S.V.; Mikhalev, K.N. [Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 18 Kovalevskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Denisova, T.A.; Shein, I.R.; Maksimova, L.G. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 91 Pervomaiskaya str., 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-12-15

    The {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectra and the {sup 7}Li spinlattice relaxation rate were measured on polycrystalline samples of Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}, synthesized at 1050 K and 1300 K. The {sup 7}Li NMR lines were attributed to corresponding structural positions of lithium Li1 and Li2 by comparing the EFG components with those obtained in the first-principles calculations of the charge density in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. For both samples the line width of the central {sup 7}Li transition and the spinlattice relaxation time decrease abruptly at the temperature increasing above ?500 K, whereas the EFG parameters are averaged (??{sub Q}?=42 (5) kHz) owing to thermally activated diffusion of lithium ions. - Graphical abstract: Path of lithium ion hopping in lithium zirconate Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. - Highlights: Polycrystalline samples Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} with monoclinic crystal structure synthesized at different temperatures were investigated by {sup 6,7}Li NMR spectroscopy. Two {sup 6,7}Li NMR lines were attributed to the specific structural positions Li1 and Li2. The distribution of vacancies was clarified for both lithium sites. The activation energy and pathways of lithium diffusion in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} were defined.

  1. Solution-processable glass LiI-Li4SnS4 superionic conductors for all-solid-state Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern Ho Park; Oh, Dae Yang; Choi, Young Eun; Nam, Young Jin; Han, Lili; Kim, Ju -Young; Xin, Huolin; Lin, Feng; Oh, Seung M.; Jung, Yoon Seok

    2015-12-22

    The new, highly conductive (4.1 × 10–4 S cm–1 at 30 °C), highly deformable, and dry-air-stable glass 0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4 is prepared using a homogeneous methanol solution. Furthermore, the solution process enables the wetting of any exposed surface of the active materials with highly conductive solidified electrolytes (0.4LiI-0.6Li4SnS4), resulting in considerable improvements in electrochemical performances of these electrodes over conventional mixture electrodes.

  2. Structure of neutron-rich Isotopes {sup 8}Li and {sup 9}Li and allowance for it in elastic scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M. A.; Imambekov, O.; Sagindykov, Sh. Sh.

    2008-07-15

    The differential cross sections for elastic proton scattering on the unstable neutron-rich nuclei {sup 8}Li and {sup 9}Li at E = 700 and 60 MeV per nucleon were considered. The {sup 8}Li nucleus was treated on the basis of the three-body {alpha}-t-n model, while the {sup 9}Li nucleus was considered within the {alpha}-t-n and {sup 7}Li-n-n models. The cross sections in question were calculated within Glauber diffraction theory. A comparison of the results with available experimental data made it possible to draw conclusions on the quality of the wave functions and potential used in the calculations.

  3. LiCl Dehumidifier LiBr absorption chiller hybrid air conditioning system with energy recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Suk M. (Huntsville, AL)

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to a hybrid air conditioning system that combines a solar powered LiCl dehumidifier with a LiBr absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier removes the latent load by absorbing moisture from the air, and the sensible load is removed by the absorption chiller. The desiccant dehumidifier is coupled to a regenerator and the desiccant in the regenerator is heated by solar heated hot water to drive the moisture therefrom before being fed back to the dehumidifier. The heat of vaporization expended in the desiccant regenerator is recovered and used to partially preheat the driving fluid of the absorption chiller, thus substantially improving the overall COP of the hybrid system.

  4. A=6Li (59AJ76)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    59AJ76) (See the Energy Level Diagram for 6Li) GENERAL: See also Table 6.2 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Theory: See (MO54F, AD55, AU55, BA55S, IR55, LA55, OT55, FE56, ME56, NE56D, FR57, LE57F, LY57, SO57, TA57, PI58, SK58). 1. (a) 3H(3He, d)4He Qm = 14.319 Eb = 15.790 (b) 3H(3He, p)5He Qm = 11.136 (c) 3H(3He, p)4He + n Qm = 12.093 The relative intensities (43 ± 2, 6 ± 2, 51 ± 2) of reactions (a), (b) and (c), do not vary for E(3He) = 225 to 600 keV. The deuterons are isotropic

  5. Material review of Li ion battery separators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Christoph J. Geiger, Sigrid; Falusi, Sandra; Roth, Michael

    2014-06-16

    Separators for Li Ion batteries have a strong impact on cell production, cell performance, life, as well as reliability and safety. The separator market volume is about 500 million m{sup 2} mainly based on consumer applications. It is expected to grow strongly over the next decade for mobile and stationary applications using large cells. At present, the market is essentially served by polyolefine membranes. Such membranes have some technological limitations, such as wettability, porosity, penetration resistance, shrinkage and meltdown. The development of a cell failure due to internal short circuit is potentially closely related to separator material properties. Consequently, advanced separators became an intense area of worldwide research and development activity in academia and industry. New separator technologies are being developed especially to address safety and reliability related property improvements.

  6. I I LI I L I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LI - I L I 1 II C c - ORNL/RASA-9618 OAK RlDGE NATlONAl. LA8ORATORY Results of the Independent Radiological Verification Survey at B&T Metals, 425 West Town Street, Columbus, Ohio (cooolv) M . E. Murray V. P. Patania C. A. Johnson M N M E D *wD OPEbM~ B V WUCNEEDllW?ME IWiARCH CoRpoRAng FoRTHEwITf@%tATeB ltEpAAMwTmBMeR(Ly ORNL-27 (34el ~~- L._~ This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Avaiiable to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and

  7. Investigation of the Decomposition Mechanism of Lithium Bis(oxalate)borate (LiBOB) Salt in the Electrolyte of an Aprotic LiO2 Battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Kah Chun; Lu, Jun; Low, John; Peng, Du; Wu, Huiming; Albishri, Hassan M.; Al-Hady, D. Abd; Curtiss, Larry A.; Amine, Khalil

    2014-04-01

    The stability of the lithium bis(oxalate) borate (LiBOB) salt against lithium peroxide (Li2O2) formation in an aprotic LiO2 (Liair) battery is investigated. From theoretical and experimental findings, we find that the chemical decomposition of LiBOB in electrolytes leads to the formation lithium oxalate during the discharge of a LiO2 cell. According to density functional theory (DFT) calculations, the formation of lithium oxalate as the reaction product is exothermic and therefore is thermodynamically feasible. This reaction seems to be independent of solvents used in the LiO2 cell, and therefore LiBOB is probably not suitable to be used as the salt in LiO2 cell electrolytes.

  8. Effects of electrolyte salts on the performance of Li-O2 batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Xu, Wu; Engelhard, Mark H.; Nie, Zimin; Burton, Sarah D.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Gross, Mark E.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-02-05

    It is well known that the stability of nonaqueous electrolyte is critical for the rechargeable Li-O2 batteries. Although stability of many solvents used in the electrolytes has been investigated, considerably less attention has been paid to the stability of electrolyte salt which is the second major component. Herein, we report the systematic investigation of the stability of seven common lithium salts in tetraglyme used as electrolytes for Li-O2 batteries. The discharge products of Li-O2 reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The performance of Li-O2 batteries was strongly affected by the salt used in the electrolyte. Lithium tetrafluoroborate (LiBF4) and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB) decompose and form LiF and lithium borates, respectively during the discharge of Li-O2 batteries. Several other salts, including lithium bis(trifluoromethane)sulfonamide (LiTFSI), lithium trifluoromethanesulfonate (LiTf), lithium hexafluorophosphate (LiPF6), lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) , and lithium bromide (LiBr) led to the discharge products which mainly consisted of Li2O2 and only minor signs of decomposition of LiTFSI, LiTf, LPF6 and LiClO4 were detected. LiBr showed the best stability during the discharge process. As for the cycling performance, LiTf and LiTFSI were the best among the studied salts. In addition to the instability of lithium salts, decomposition of tetraglyme solvent was a more significant factor contributing to the limited cycling stability. Thus a more stable nonaqueous electrolyte including organic solvent and lithium salt still need to be further developed to reach a fully reversible Li-O2 battery.

  9. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} and LiCaAlF{sub 6}

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, C.D.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.

    1996-05-14

    Ce{sup 3+}-doped LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF{sub 6} type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF{sub 6} and LiSrGaF{sub 6}, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF{sub 6} laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator. 10 figs.

  10. Optically pumped cerium-doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 and LiCaAlF.sub.6

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marshall, Christopher D. (Livermore, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Krupke, William F. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    Ce.sup.3+ -doped LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystals are pumped by ultraviolet light which is polarized along the c axis of the crystals to effectively energize the laser system. In one embodiment, the polarized fourth harmonic light output from a conventional Nd:YAG laser operating at 266 nm is arranged to pump Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 with the pump light polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 crystal may be placed in a laser cavity for generating tunable coherent ultraviolet radiation in the range of 280-320 nm. Additionally, Ce-doped crystals possessing the LiSrAlF.sub.6 type of chemical formula, e.g. Ce-doped LiCaAlF.sub.6 and LiSrGaF.sub.6, can be used. Alternative pump sources include an ultraviolet-capable krypton or argon laser, or ultraviolet emitting flashlamps. The polarization of the pump light will impact operation. The laser system will operate efficiently when light in the 280-320 nm gain region is injected or recirculated in the system such that the beam is also polarized along the c axis of the crystal. The Ce:LiSrAlF.sub.6 laser system can be configured to generate ultrashort pulses, and it may be used to pump other devices, such as an optical parametric oscillator.

  11. LiDAR (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technique LiDAR Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To...

  12. Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Municipality, China Product: China-based technology company that research in zinc-air batteries (fuel cells). References: Beijing ChangLi Union Energy Company1 This article is a...

  13. Qiaojia River Power Co Ltd Li County | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Changde City, Hainan Province, China Zip: 415500 Sector: Hydro Product: Hunan-based small hydro developer. References: Qiaojia River Power Co., Ltd, Li County1 This article is a...

  14. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the...

  15. LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Presentation from the 35th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Princeton, New Jersey on May 05-07, 2015. PDF icon LiT Electrolysis Research at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) More Documents & Publications Electrolytic Tritium Extraction in Molten Li-LiT Composite Electrolytes to Stabilize Metallic Linium Anodes Solid

  16. Heteroclite electrochemical stability of an I based Li7P2S8I superionic conductor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Liu, Zengcai; Gobet, Mallory; Pilar, Kartik; Sahu, Gayatri; Greenbaum, Steve; Liang, Chengdu

    2015-01-01

    Stability from Instability: A Li7P2S8I solid state Li-ion conductor derived from -Li3PS4 and LiI demonstrates exceptional electrochemical stability. The oxidation instability of I is subverted nullified via its incorporation into the coordinated structure. The inclusion of I also creates stability with metallic Li anode while simultaneously improving the interfacial kinetics. Low temperature membrane processability enables facile fabrication of dense membranes, making it suitable for industrial adoption.

  17. Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes Investigation of critical parameters in Li-ion battery electrodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es070_cabana_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Positive and Negative Electrodes: Novel and Optimized Materials Novel and Optimized Materials Phases for High Energy Density Batteries FY 2012 Annual Progress Report for Energy

  18. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Conference: Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime (Presentation) × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A

  19. Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Combined Quantum Chemical/Raman Spectroscopic Analyses of Li+ Cation Solvation: Cyclic Carbonate Solvents - Ethylene Carbonate and Propylene Earbonate Combined computational/Raman

  20. Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements Automotive Li-ion Battery Cooling Requirements Presents thermal management of lithium-ion battery packs for electric vehicles PDF icon cunningham.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity Overview of Battery R&D Activities

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - twin-otter-li-prof

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentstwin-otter-li-prof Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Twin Otter Lidar Profiles (TWIN-OTTER-LI-PROF) Instrument Categories Aerosols, Atmospheric Profiling, Cloud Properties Campaigns Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) [ Download Data ] Tropical Western Pacific, 2006.01.21 - 2006.02.13 Primary Measurements Taken The following measurements are those considered

  2. Efimov physics in {sup 6}Li atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Hammer, H.-W.; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas

    2010-01-15

    A new narrow three-atom loss resonance associated with an Efimov trimer crossing the three-atom threshold has recently been discovered in a many-body system of ultracold {sup 6}Li atoms in the three lowest hyperfine spin states at a magnetic field near 895 G. O'Hara and coworkers have used measurements of the three-body recombination rate in this region to determine the complex three-body parameter associated with Efimov physics. Using this parameter as the input, we calculate the universal predictions for the spectrum of Efimov states and for the three-body recombination rate in the universal region above 600 G where all three scattering lengths are large. We predict an atom-dimer loss resonance at 672+-2 G associated with an Efimov trimer disappearing through an atom-dimer threshold. We also predict an interference minimum in the three-body recombination rate at 759+-1 G where the three-spin mixture may be sufficiently stable to allow experimental study of the many-body system.

  3. THE HIGH TEMPERATURE CHEMICAL REACTIVITY OF LI2O

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessinger, G.; Missimer, D.

    2009-11-13

    The ultimate purpose of this study was to investigate the use of a Li-Ca mixture for direct reduction of actinide oxides to actinide metals at temperatures below 1500 C. For such a process to be successful, the products of the reduction reaction, actinide metals, Li{sub 2}O, and CaO, must all be liquid at the reaction temperature so the resulting actinide metal can coalesce and be recovered as a monolith. Since the established melting temperature of Li{sub 2}O is in the range 1427-1700 C and the melting temperature of CaO is 2654 C, the Li{sub 2}O-CaO (lithium oxidecalcium oxide) pseudo-binary system was investigated in an attempt to identify the presence of low-melting eutectic compositions. The results of our investigation indicate that there is no evidence of ternary Li-Ca-O phases or solutions melting below 1200 C. In the 1200-1500 C range utilizing MgO crucibles, there is some evidence for the formation of a ternary phase; however, it was not possible to determine the phase composition. The results of experiments performed with ZrO{sub 2} crucibles in the same temperature range did not show the formation of the possible ternary phase seen in the earlier experiment involving MgO crucibles, so it was not possible to confirm the possibility that a ternary Li-Ca-O or Li-Mg-O phase was formed. It appears that the Li{sub 2}O-CaO materials reacted, to some extent, with all of the container materials, alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnesia (MgO), zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}), and 95% Pt-5% Au; however, to clarify the situation additional experiments are required. In addition to the primary purpose of this study, the results of this investigation led to the conclusions that: (1) The melting temperature of Li{sub 2}O may be as low as 1250 C, which is considerably lower than the previously published values in the range 1427-1700 C; (2) Lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O) vaporizes congruently; (3) Lithium carbonate and Li2O react with 95% Pt-5% Au, and also reacts with pure Pt; and (4) It is likely that some or all of the past high temperature phase behavior and vaporization experiments involving Li{sub 2}O(s) at temperatures above 1250 C have actually involved Li{sub 2}O(l). If these past measurements were actually measurements performed on Li{sub 2}O(l) instead of the solid, the thermochemical data for phases and species in the Li-O system will require reevaluation.

  4. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of Pure LiFePO 4 and Nanocomposite C- LiFePO 4 Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure limore » thium iron phosphate ( LiFePO 4 ) and carbon-coated LiFePO 4 (C- LiFePO 4 ) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating on LiFePO 4 particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C- LiFePO 4 at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms of LiFePO 4 and C- LiFePO 4 showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively for LiFePO 4 where as in case of C- LiFePO 4 that were 163, 144, 118, and 70 mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pure LiFePO 4 was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C- LiFePO 4 was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.« less

  5. Structural and Electrochemical Characterization of PureLiFePO4and Nanocomposite C-LiFePO4Cathodes for Lithium Ion Rechargeable Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kumar, Arun; Thomas, R.; Karan, N. K.; Saavedra-Arias, J. J.; Singh, M. K.; Majumder, S. B.; Tomar, M. S.; Katiyar, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Pure lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) and carbon-coatedLiFePO4(C-LiFePO4) cathode materials were synthesized for Li-ion batteries. Structural and electrochemical properties of these materials were compared. X-ray diffraction revealed orthorhombic olivine structure. Micro-Raman scattering analysis indicates amorphous carbon, and TEM micrographs show carbon coating onLiFePO4particles. Ex situ Raman spectrum of C-LiFePO4at various stages of charging and discharging showed reversibility upon electrochemical cycling. The cyclic voltammograms ofLiFePO4and C-LiFePO4showed only a pair of peaks corresponding to the anodic and cathodic reactions. The first discharge capacities were 63, 43, and 13?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, and C/2, respectively forLiFePO4where as in case of C-LiFePO4that were 163, 144,more118, and 70?mAh/g for C/5, C/3, C/2, and 1C, respectively. The capacity retention of pureLiFePO4was 69% after 25 cycles where as that of C-LiFePO4was around 97% after 50 cycles. These results indicate that the capacity and the rate capability improved significantly upon carbon coating.less

  6. Influence of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction of platinum electrocatalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H; Xing, YC

    2011-06-01

    A Li-air battery can provide a much higher theoretical energy density than a Li-ion battery. The use of aqueous acidic electrolytes may prevent lithium oxide deposition from aprotic electrolytes and lithium carbonate precipitation from alkaline electrolytes. The present communication reports a study on the effect of Li ions on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in sulfuric acid electrolytes. It was found that the Li ions have negligible interactions with the active surface of Pt catalysts. However, significantly lower ORR activities were found when Li ions are present in the sulfuric acid. The intrinsic kinetic activities were found to decrease with the increase of Li ion concentrations, but level off when the Li ion concentrations are larger than 1.0 M. The low activities of Pt catalysts in Li ion containing electrolytes were attributed to a constraining effect of Li ions on the diffusion of oxygen in the electrolyte solution. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. DISCOVERY OF SUPER-Li-RICH RED GIANTS IN DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, Evan N.; Fu, Xiaoting; Deng, Licai; Guhathakurta, Puragra

    2012-06-10

    Stars destroy lithium (Li) in their normal evolution. The convective envelopes of evolved red giants reach temperatures of millions of kelvin, hot enough for the {sup 7}Li(p, {alpha}){sup 4}He reaction to burn Li efficiently. Only about 1% of first-ascent red giants more luminous than the luminosity function bump in the red giant branch exhibit A(Li) > 1.5. Nonetheless, Li-rich red giants do exist. We present 15 Li-rich red giants-14 of which are new discoveries-among a sample of 2054 red giants in Milky Way dwarf satellite galaxies. Our sample more than doubles the number of low-mass, metal-poor ([Fe/H] {approx}< -0.7) Li-rich red giants, and it includes the most-metal-poor Li-enhanced star known ([Fe/H] = -2.82, A(Li){sub NLTE} = 3.15). Because most of the stars have Li abundances larger than the universe's primordial value, the Li in these stars must have been created rather than saved from destruction. These Li-rich stars appear like other stars in the same galaxies in every measurable regard other than Li abundance. We consider the possibility that Li enrichment is a universal phase of evolution that affects all stars, and it seems rare only because it is brief.

  8. High performance anode for advanced Li batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, Carla

    2015-11-02

    The overall objective of this Phase I SBIR effort was to advance the manufacturing technology for ASIs Si-CNF high-performance anode by creating a framework for large volume production and utilization of low-cost Si-coated carbon nanofibers (Si-CNF) for the battery industry. This project explores the use of nano-structured silicon which is deposited on a nano-scale carbon filament to achieve the benefits of high cycle life and high charge capacity without the consequent fading of, or failure in the capacity resulting from stress-induced fracturing of the Si particles and de-coupling from the electrode. ASIs patented coating process distinguishes itself from others, in that it is highly reproducible, readily scalable and results in a Si-CNF composite structure containing 25-30% silicon, with a compositionally graded interface at the Si-CNF interface that significantly improve cycling stability and enhances adhesion of silicon to the carbon fiber support. In Phase I, the team demonstrated the production of the Si-CNF anode material can successfully be transitioned from a static bench-scale reactor into a fluidized bed reactor. In addition, ASI made significant progress in the development of low cost, quick testing methods which can be performed on silicon coated CNFs as a means of quality control. To date, weight change, density, and cycling performance were the key metrics used to validate the high performance anode material. Under this effort, ASI made strides to establish a quality control protocol for the large volume production of Si-CNFs and has identified several key technical thrusts for future work. Using the results of this Phase I effort as a foundation, ASI has defined a path forward to commercialize and deliver high volume and low-cost production of SI-CNF material for anodes in Li-ion batteries.

  9. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  10. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Development of CellPack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental...

  11. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, ...

  12. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  13. Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Xiang Ge Li La Xian Mai Di He Hydro Power Development Co., Ltd. Place: Yunnan...

  14. LiDAR At Chocolate Mountains Area (Alm, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    aerial Li-DAR survey flown over the project areas, securing over 177,000 square kilometers of <30cm accuracy digital elevation data. LiDAR data were analyzed to characterize...

  15. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP ...

  16. A Reactive Force Field study of Li/C Systems for Electrical Energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactive Force Field study of LiC Systems for Electrical Energy Storage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Reactive Force Field study of LiC Systems for Electrical...

  17. Electrochemical Performances of LiMnPO4 Synthesized from Non...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Li1.1MnPO4 exhibits the most stable cycling ability probably because of the existence of a trace amount of Li3PO4 impurity that functions as a solid-state electrolyte on...

  18. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like...

  19. Digital Sofcell Shanghai ShenLi Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ShenLi Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint venture Jump to: navigation, search Name: Digital Sofcell - Shanghai ShenLi - Goeta solid oxide fuel cell joint venture Place: China...

  20. The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The significance of Li-ion batteries in electric vehicle life-cycle energy and emissions and recycling's role in its reduction Title The significance of Li-ion batteries in...

  1. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP...

  2. Structure and Electrochemistry of Vanadium-Modified LiFePO4 ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Structure and Electrochemistry of Vanadium-Modified LiFePO4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure and Electrochemistry of Vanadium-Modified LiFePO4...

  3. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1xTx)N(T=Mn,Fe,Co,andNi)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreAs a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  4. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li 2 ( Li 1 - x T x ) N ( T = Mn , Fe , Co , and Ni )

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-01

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li?(Li1-xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.moreThe calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.less

  5. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1–xTx)N (T = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1–xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane→easy axis→easy plane→easy axis when progressing from T = Mn → Fe → Co → Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model.more » As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.« less

  6. Protection of Li Anodes Using Dual Phase Electrolytes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es012_mikhaylik_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Protection of Li Anodes Using Dual Phase Electrolytes Progress of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA Battery Manufacturing Grants FY 2011 Annual Prog

  7. Protection of Li Anodes Using Dual Phase Electrolytes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 0 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es012_mikhaylik_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Protection of Li Anodes Using Dual Phase Electrolytes Progress of DOE Materials, Manufacturing Process R&D, and ARRA Battery Manufacturing Grant

  8. Anode Materials for Rechargeable Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fultz, B.

    2001-01-12

    This research is on materials for anodes and cathodes in electrochemical cells. The work is a mix of electrochemical measurements and analysis of the materials by transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffractometry. At present, our experimental work involves only materials for Li storage, but we have been writing papers from our previous work on hydrogen-storage materials.

  9. Performance of LiAlloy/Ag(2)CrO(4) Couples in Molten CsBr-LiBr-KBr Eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI,RONALD A.; REINHARDT,FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    The performance of Li-alloy/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} systems was studied over a temperature range of 250 C to 300 C, for possible use as a power source for geothermal borehole applications. Single cells were discharged at current densities of 15.8 and 32.6 mA/cm{sup 2} using Li-Si and Li-Al anodes. When tested in 5-cell batteries, the Li-Si/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} system exhibited thermal runaway. Thermal analytical tests showed that the Ag{sub 2}CrO{sub 4} cathode reacted exothermically with the electrolyte on activation. Consequently, this system would not be practical for the envisioned geothermal borehole applications.

  10. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Li,Mg)TaO3 (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 This content will become publicly available on February 16, 2017 Title: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Authors: Yamanaka, Takamitsu [1] ; Nakamoto, Yuki [2] ; Takei, Fumihiko [3] ; Ahart, Muhtar [1] ; Mao, Ho-kwang [4] ; Hemley, Russell J. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution

  11. Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Li,Mg)TaO3 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on February 16, 2017 Title: Pressure-induced ferroelectric to paraelectric transition in LiTaO3 and (Li,Mg)TaO3 Authors: Yamanaka, Takamitsu [1] ; Nakamoto, Yuki [2] ; Takei, Fumihiko [3] ; Ahart, Muhtar [1] ; Mao, Ho-kwang [4] ; Hemley, Russell J. [1] + Show Author

  12. Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon arravt001_es_koo_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Li-Ion Polymer Battery Cell Manufacturing Plant in USA Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing

  13. Electrolytes in Support of 5 V Li-ion Chemistries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Support of 5 V Li-ion Chemistries Electrolytes in Support of 5 V Li-ion Chemistries 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es024_jow_2010_o.pdf More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry

  14. Method for treating electrolyte to remove Li.sub.2 O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomczuk, Zygmunt (Lockport, IL); Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Johnson, Gerald K. (Downers Grove, IL); Willit, James L. (Batavia, IL)

    1998-01-01

    A method of removing Li.sub.2 O present in an electrolyte predominantly of LiCl and KCl. The electrolyte is heated to a temperature not less than about 500.degree. C. and then Al is introduced into the electrolyte in an amount in excess of the stoichiometric amount needed to convert the Li.sub.2 O to a Li-Al alloy and lithium aluminate salt. The salt and aluminum are maintained in contact with agitation for a time sufficient to convert the Li.sub.2 O.

  15. Method for treating electrolyte to remove Li{sub 2}O

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomczuk, Z.; Miller, W.E.; Johnson, G.K.; Willit, J.L.

    1998-01-20

    A method is described for removing Li{sub 2}O present in an electrolyte predominantly of LiCl and KCl. The electrolyte is heated to a temperature not less than about 500 C and then Al is introduced into the electrolyte in an amount in excess of the stoichiometric amount needed to convert the Li{sub 2}O to a Li-Al alloy and lithium aluminate salt. The salt and aluminum are maintained in contact with agitation for a time sufficient to convert the Li{sub 2}O.

  16. First-Principles Calculations, Electrochemical and X-ray Absorption Studies of Li-Ni-PO4 Surface-Treated xLi2MnO3 (1 x)LiMO2 (M = Mn, Ni, Co) Electrodes for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolverton, Christopher; Croy, J R; Balasubramanian, M; Kang, Sun-Ho; Lopez-Rivera, C. M.; Thackeray, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    It has been previously hypothesized that the enhanced rate capability of Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} positive electrodes (M = Mn, Ni, Co) in Li-ion batteries might be associated with a defect Ni-doped Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} surface structure [i.e., Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4} (0 < y < 1)], thereby promoting fast Li{sup +}-ion conduction at the xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} particle surface. In this paper, the solubility of divalent metals (Fe, Mn, Ni, Mg) in {gamma}-Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is predicted with the first-principles GGA+U method in an effort to understand the enhanced rate capability. The predicted solubility (x) is extremely small; this finding is consistent with experimental evidence: 1) X-ray diffraction data obtained from Li-Ni-PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes that show that, after annealing at 550 C, a Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}-like structure forms as a second phase at the electrode particle surface, and 2) X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which indicate that the nickel ions are accommodated in the transition metal layers of the Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} component during the annealing process. However, electrochemical studies of Li{sub 3-2y}Ni{sub y}PO{sub 4}-treated xLi{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} {center_dot} (1-x)LiMO{sub 2} electrodes indicate that their rate capability increases as a function of y over the range y = 0 (Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) to y = 1 (LiNiPO{sub 4}), strongly suggesting that, at some level, the nickel ions play a role in reducing electrochemical impedance and increasing electrode stability at the electrode particle surface.

  17. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; et al

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on:more »inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.« less

  18. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; et al

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on:more » inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based “response plan” for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.« less

  19. Effect of LiAlO{sub 2} nanoparticle filler concentration on the electrical properties of PEOLiClO{sub 4} composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masoud, E.M.; El-Bellihi, A.-A.; Bayoumy, W.A.; Mousa, M.A.

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ? Structural modification of nano LiAlO{sub 2} filler increased conductivity. ? Good ionic conductivity for (LiAlO{sub 2}){sub 1.5}(PEO){sub 11}(LiClO{sub 4}) at room temperature. ? Nano LiAlO{sub 2} filler enhanced both ion migration and orientation. ? High dielectric properties for (LiAlO{sub 2}){sub 1.5}(PEO){sub 11}(LiClO{sub 4}) at room temperature. - Abstract: Nano-composite polymer electrolytes are receiving attention as potential candidates to be used as electrolyte membranes in lithium polymer batteries and other devices. In this work, polyethylene oxideLiClO{sub 4} based composite polymer electrolyte was prepared by solution casting method. The effect of LiAlO{sub 2} nanoparticle ceramic filler concentration on the structure and electrical conduction of the composite was studied. Nano-LiAlO{sub 2} was synthesized by solgel method. The samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transmission-Infra Red, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, and tested by dielectric properties, Direct and Alternating current measurements as well as by impedance spectroscopy. All samples showed a behavior referring to an ionic conduction. Generally, the melting temperature of the polymer electrolyte decreased with filler concentration. Both thermal property and filler concentration influenced conductivity value. At room temperature, the highest ionic conductivity was 9.76 10{sup ?5} ohm{sup ?1} cm{sup ?1} for sample with a composition of (LiAlO{sub 2}){sub 1.5}(polyethylene oxide){sub 11}(LiClO{sub 4}). All results were correlated and discussed.

  20. Predictive Models of Li-ion Battery Lifetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Kandler; Wood, Eric; Santhanagopalan, Shriram; Kim, Gi-heon; Shi, Ying; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-06-15

    It remains an open question how best to predict real-world battery lifetime based on accelerated calendar and cycle aging data from the laboratory. Multiple degradation mechanisms due to (electro)chemical, thermal, and mechanical coupled phenomena influence Li-ion battery lifetime, each with different dependence on time, cycling and thermal environment. The standardization of life predictive models would benefit the industry by reducing test time and streamlining development of system controls.

  1. Microsoft Word - Li_FinalReport_FASTER.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ATTN: ASR Program Managers, Drs. Dorothy Koch Climate and Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD20874 Title of Research Project: Continuous Evaluation of Fast Processes in Climate Models Using ARM Measurements Investigator: Zhijin Li, Researcher Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering, UCLA 9258 Boelter Hall, Los Angeles, CA 90095 Phone: (310) 794-5273; Fax: (310)943-1656

  2. Conduction below 100 °C in nominal Li6ZnNb4O14

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Yunchao; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Gill, Lance W.; Edward W. Hagaman; Wang, Yangyang; Sokolov, Alexei P.; Dai, Sheng; Ma, Cheng; Chi, Miaofang; Veith, Gabriel M.; et al

    2015-09-15

    The increasing demand for a safe rechargeable battery with a high energy density per cell is driving a search for a novel solid electrolyte with a high Li+ or Na+ conductivity that is chemically stable in a working Li-ion or Na-ion battery. Li6ZnNb4O14 has been reported to exhibit a σ Li > 10-2 S cm-1 at 250 °C, but to disproportionate into multiple phases on cooling from 850 °C to room temperature. An investigation of the room-temperature Li-ion conductivity in a porous pellet of a multiphase product of a nominal Li6ZnNb4O14 composition is shown to have bulk σ Li 3.3more » x 10-5 S cm-1 at room temperature that increases to 1.4 x 10-4 S cm-1 by 50 °C. 7Li MAS NMR spectra were fitted to two Lorentzian lines, one of which showed a dramatic increase with increasing temperature. As a result, a test for water stability indicates that Li+ may move to the particle and grain surfaces to react with adsorbed water as occurs in the garnet Li+ conductors.« less

  3. Spectroscopy of LiΛ9 by electroproduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Urciuoli, G. M.; Cusanno, F.; Marrone, S.; Acha, A.; Ambrozewicz, P.; Aniol, K. A.; Baturin, P.; Bertin, P. Y.; Benaoum, H.; Blomqvist, K. I.; et al

    2015-03-01

    Background: In the absence of accurate data on the free two-body hyperon-nucleon interaction, the spectra of hypernuclei can provide information on the details of the effective hyperon-nucleon interaction. Purpose: To obtain a high-resolution spectrum for the 9Be(e,e'K+)9ΛLi reaction. Method: Electroproduction of the hypernucleus 9ΛLi has been studied for the first time with sub-MeV energy resolution in Hall A at Jefferson Lab on a 9Be target. In order to increase the counting rate and to provide unambiguous kaon identification, two superconducting septum magnets and a Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) were added to the Hall A standard equipment. Results: The crossmore » section to low-lying states of 9ΛLi is concentrated within 3 MeV of the ground state and can be fitted with four peaks. The positions of the doublets agree with theory while a disagreement could exist with respect to the relative strengths of the peaks in the doublets. A Λ separation energy, BΛ, of 8.36±0.08 (stat.) ±0.08 (syst.) MeV was measured, in agreement with an earlier experiment.« less

  4. Searching for Sustainable and "Greener" Li-ion Batteries

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tarascon, Jean-Marie [University of Picardie at Aimens, France

    2010-01-08

    Lithium-ion batteries are strong candidates for powering upcoming generations of hybrid electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. But improvements in safety must be achieved while keeping track of materials resources and abundances, as well as materials synthesis and recycling processes, all of which could inflict a heavy energy cost. Thus, electrode materials that have a minimum footprint in nature and are made via eco-efficient processes are sorely needed. The arrival of electrode materials based on minerals such as LiFePO4 (tryphilite) is a significant, but not sufficient, step toward the long-term demand for materials sustainability. The eco-efficient synthesis of LiFePO4 nanopowders via hydrothermal/ solvo-thermal processes using latent bases, structure directing templates, or other bio-related approaches will be presented in this talk. However, to secure sustainability and greeness, organic electrodes appear to be ideal candidates.... We took a fresh look at organic based electrodes; the results of this research into sequentially metal-organic-framework electrodes and Li-based organic electrodes (LixCyOz) will be reported and discussed.

  5. Theoretical exploration of various lithium peroxide crystal structures in a Li-air battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lau, Kah; Qiu, Dantong; Luo, Xiangyi; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-14

    We describe a series of metastable Li?O? crystal structures involving different orientations and displacements of the O?? peroxy ions based on the known Li?O? crystal structure. Within the vicinity of the chemical potential ?G ~ 0.20 eV/Li from the thermodynamic ground state of the Li?O? crystal structure (i.e., Fppl structure), all of these newly found metastable Li?O? crystal structures are found to be insulating and high-k materials, and they have a common unique signature of an O?? O-O vibration mode (? ~ 799865 cm?), which is in the range of that commonly observed in Li-air battery experiments, regardless of the random O?? orientations and the symmetry in the crystal lattice. From XRD patterns analysis, the commercially available Li?O? powder is confirmed to be the thermodynamic ground state Fppl-like structure. However, for Li?O? compounds that are grown electrochemically under the environment of Li-O? cells, we found that the XRD patterns alone are not sufficient for structural identification of these metastable Li?O? crystalline phases due to the poor crystallinity of the sample. In addition, the commonly known Raman signal of O?? vibration mode is also found to be insufficient to validate the possible existence of these newly predicted Li?O? crystal structures, as all of them similarly share the similar O?? vibration mode. However considering that the discharge voltage in most Li-O? cells are typically several tenths of an eV below the thermodynamic equilibrium for the formation of ground state Fppl structure, the formation of these metastable Li?O? crystal structures appears to be thermodynamically feasible.

  6. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qian, Jiangfeng; Xu, Wu; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Engelhard, Mark H.; Henderson, Wesley A.; Zhang, Yaohui; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-07-01

    Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that corrodes battery materials. In this work, we demonstrate that a controlled trace-amount of water (25-100 ppm) can be an effective electrolyte additive for achieving dendrite-free Li metal deposition in LiPF6-based electrolytes and avoid its detrimental effect at the same time. Detailed analyses reveal that the trace amount of HF formed by the decomposition reaction of LiPF6 with water will be electrochemically reduced during initial Li deposition process to form a uniform and dense LiF-rich SEI layer on the surface of the substrate. This LiF-rich SEI layer leads to a uniform distribution of the electric field on the substrate surface and enables uniform and dendrite-free Li deposition. Meanwhile the detrimental effect of HF is diminished due to the consumption of HF in the LiF formation process. Microscopic analysis reveals that the as-deposited dendrite-free Li films exhibit a self-aligned and highly-compacted Li nanorods structure which is consistent with their charming blue color or known as structure color. These findings clearly demonstrate a novel approach to control the nucleation and grow process of Li metal films using well-controlled trace-amount of water. They also shine the light on the effect of water on other electrodeposition processes.

  7. Note: {sup 6}Li III light intensity observation for {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} ion beam operation at Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muto, Hideshi; Ohshiro, Yukimitsu; Yamaka, Shoichi; Yamaguchi, Hidetoshi; Shimoura, Susumu; Watanabe, Shin-ichi; Oyaizu, Michihiro; Kobayashi, Kiyoshi; Kotaka, Yasuteru; Nishimura, Makoto; Kase, Masayuki; Kubono, Shigeru; Hattori, Toshiyuki

    2014-12-15

    The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum at ? = 516.7 nm was observed during {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam tuning at the Hyper-Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source. Separation of ion species of the same charge to mass ratio with an electromagnetic mass analyzer is known to be an exceptionally complex process. However, {sup 6}Li III line intensity observation conducted in this study gives new insights into its simplification of this process. The light intensity of {sup 6}Li III line spectrum from the ECR plasma was found to have a strong correlation with the extracted {sup 6}Li{sup 3+} beam intensity from the RIKEN Azimuthal Varying Field cyclotron.

  8. Graphene Modified LiFePO4 Cathode Materials for High Power Lithium ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, X.; Wang, F.; Zhu, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2011-01-24

    Graphene-modified LiFePO{sub 4} composite has been developed as a Li-ion battery cathode material with excellent high-rate capability and cycling stability. The composite was prepared with LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene oxide nanosheets by spray-drying and annealing processes. The LiFePO{sub 4} primary nanoparticles embedded in micro-sized spherical secondary particles were wrapped homogeneously and loosely with a graphene 3D network. Such a special nanostructure facilitated electron migration throughout the secondary particles, while the presence of abundant voids between the LiFePO{sub 4} nanoparticles and graphene sheets was beneficial for Li{sup +} diffusion. The composite cathode material could deliver a capacity of 70 mAh g{sup -1} at 60C discharge rate and showed a capacity decay rate of <15% when cycled under 10C charging and 20C discharging for 1000 times.

  9. Crystal structure and chemical bonding of novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jung, Yaho; Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo; You, Tae-Soo

    2012-12-15

    A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} has been synthesized using the high-temperature reaction method and characterized by both powder and single-crystal X-ray diffractions. The title compound crystallized in the orthorhombic crystal system (space group Immm, Z=2, Pearson symbol oI78) with fifteen crystallographically unique atomic positions in the asymmetric unit, and the lattice parameters are refined as a=4.5244(4) A, b=6.9932(6) A, and c=53.043(5) A. The complex crystal structure of the title compound can be described as a 2:1 intergrowth of two closely related compounds: La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3} (Ce{sub 2}Li{sub 2}Ge{sub 3}-type) and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4} (Zr{sub 3}Cu{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type) acting like 'building-blocks' along the c-axis. Six La sites are categorized into three distinct types based on the local coordination environment showing the coordination numbers of 12-14. Three unique Li sites are placed in the centers of local tetrahedra formed by four Ge atoms which eventually construct Ge{sub 2} dimers or 1-dimensional cis-/trans-Ge chains. Theoretical investigations using the tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) method provide rationales for an improved structural stability and for unique local coordination geometries established by anionic elements including [LiGe{sub 4}] tetrahedra, cis-/trans-Ge chain and Ge{sub 2} dimers. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a novel ternary Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16}. The complex crystal structure can be viewed as a simple combination of two closely related known compounds acting as 'building-blocks', La{sub 2}Li{sub 2}G{sub 3} and La{sub 3}Li{sub 4}Ge{sub 4}, in a 2:1 stoichiometric ratio. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A novel Li-containing polar intermetallic compound La{sub 11}Li{sub 12}Ge{sub 16} was synthesized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The complex crystal structure was easily explained as a combination of two known compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Theoretical calculations indicated that the Fermi level was located near the pseudogap.

  10. 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE, Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esarravt001_eun_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications USABC Program Highlights Li-Ion Battery Cell Manufacturing Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials

  11. Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon es140_kepler_2012_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials

  12. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_20_jow.pdf More Documents & Publications Electrolytes in Support of 5 V Li-ion Chemistries Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Fluorinated Electrolyte for 5-V Li-Ion Chemistry

  13. Jian-Rong (Jeff) Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Jian-Rong (Jeff) Li Previous Next List Jeff Li Jian-Rong (Jeff) Li Formerly: Assistant Research Scientist, Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Presently: Professor, Beijing University of Technology, China PhD in Chemistry, Nankai University Postdoc in Chemistry, Miami University and Texas A&M University EFRC research: Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs) are newly developed molecule-based materials, constructed

  14. Diagnostic Studies on Li-Battery Cells and Cell Components | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy on Li-Battery Cells and Cell Components Diagnostic Studies on Li-Battery Cells and Cell Components 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es032_abraham_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Diagnostic studies on Li-battery cells and cell components Diagnostic Studies Electrochemistry Cell Model

  15. Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Study of novel nonflammable electrolytes in Sandia-built Li-ion cells. Even after decades of research, Li-ion cells still lack thermal stability. A number of approaches, including adding fire retardants or fluoro compounds to the electrolyte to mitigate fire, have been investigated. These additives improved the thermal stability of the cells (only

  16. Li electrodeposition dynamics visualized in-situ via a TEM liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Li electrodeposition dynamics visualized in-situ via a TEM liquid cell. ... Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Conferences Events Please see ...

  17. Chemical and Electrochemical Lithiation of LiVOPO4 Cathodes for Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Katharine L; Bridges, Craig A; Segre, C; VernadoJr, C Daniel; Applestone, Danielle; Bielawski, Christopher W; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical capacity of LiVOPO4 could be increased from 159 to 318 mAh/g with the insertion of a second Li+ ion into the lattice to form Li2VOPO4, significantly enhancing the energy density of lithium-ion batteries. The changes accompanying the second Li+ insertion into -LiVOPO4 and -LiVOPO4 are presented here at various degrees of lithiation, employing both electrochemical and chemical lithiation. Inductively coupled plasma, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and Fourier transform spectroscopy measurements indicate that a composition of Li2VOPO4 could be realized with an oxidation state of V3+ by the chemical lithiation process. The accompanying structural changes are evidenced by X-ray and neutron powder diffraction. Spectroscopic and diffraction data collected with the chemically lithiated samples as well as diffraction data on the electrochemically lithiated samples reveal that significant amount of lithium can be inserted into -LiVOPO4 before a more dramatic structural change occurs. In contrast, lithiation of -LiVOPO4 is more consistent with the formation of a two-phase mixture throughout most of the lithiation range. The phases observed with the ambient-temperature lithiation processes presented here are significantly different from those reported in the literature.

  18. LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Twenty-Nine Palms Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity...

  19. Influence of lithium salts on the discharge chemistry of Li-air cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M; Nanda, Jagjit; Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Dudney, Nancy J

    2012-01-01

    In this work we show that the use of a high boiling point ether solvent (tetraglyme) promotes the formation of Li2O2 in a lithium-air cell. In addition, another major constituent in the discharge product of a Li-air cell contains halides, from the lithium salt, and the tetraglyme used as the solvent. This information is critical to the development of Li-air electrolytes which are stable and promote the formation of the desired Li2O2 products.

  20. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additive (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Residual water presents in nonaqueous electrolytes has been widely regarded as a detrimental factor for lithium (Li) batteries. This is because water is highly reactive with the commonly used LiPF6 salt and leads to the formation of HF that

  1. Analysis of Heat Dissipation in Li-Ion Cells & Modules for Modeling of Thermal Runaway (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, G.-H.; Pesaran, A.

    2007-05-15

    The objectives of this study are: (1) To develop 3D Li-Ion battery thermal abuse ''reaction'' models for cell and module analysis; (2) To understand the mechanisms and interactions between heat transfer and chemical reactions during thermal runaway for Li-Ion cells and modules; (3) To develop a tool and methodology to support the design of abuse-tolerant Li-Ion battery systems for PHEVs/HEVs; and (4) To help battery developers accelerate delivery of abuse-tolerant Li-Ion battery systems in support of the FreedomCAR's Energy Storage Program.

  2. LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  3. LiDAR At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: LiDAR At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

  4. Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for engineering and structural diagnostics of nanoscale electrochemical processes Citation Details In-Document...

  5. Miniature All-solid-state Heterostructure Nanowire Li-ion Batteries...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    All-solid-state Heterostructure Nanowire Li-ion Batteries as a Toll for Engineering and Structural Diagnostics of Nanoscale Electrochemical Processes Citation Details In-Document...

  6. Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Materials. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Platforms and Methods for In Situ Characterization of...

  7. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered core–shell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolongedmore » 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.« less

  8. Investigation of the Rechargeability of Li-O2 Batteries in Non-aqueous Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jie; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Deyu; Hu, Dehong; Xu, Wu; Graff, Gordon L.; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang

    2011-07-01

    In order to understand the nature of the limited cycle life and poor energy efficiency associated with the secondary Li-O2 batteries the discharge products of primary Li-O2 cells at different depth of discharge (DOD) are systematically analyzed in this work. It is revealed that if discharged to 2.0 V a small amount of Li2O2 coexist with Li2CO3 and RO-(C=O)-OLi) in alkyl carbonate-based electrolyte. Further discharging the air electrodes to below 2.0 V the amount of Li2CO3 and LiRCO3 increases significantly due to the severe electrolyte decomposition. There is no Li2O detected in this alkyl carbonate electrolyte regardless of DOD. It is also found that the alkyl carbonate based electrolyte begins to decompose at 4.0 V during charging under the combined influences from the high surface area carbon, the nickel metal current collector and the oxygen atmosphere. Accordingly the impedance of the Li-O2 cell continues to increase after each discharge and recharge process indicating a repeated plating of insoluble lithium salts on the carbon surface. Therefore the whole carbon electrode becomes completely insulated only after a few cycles and loses the function of providing active tri-phase regions for the Li-oxygen batteries.

  9. First-Principles Study of Novel Conversion Reactions for High-Capacity Li-Ion Battery Anodes in the Li-Mg-B-N-H System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, T.H.; Graetz, J.; Liu, X.; Hong, J.; Majzoub, E.H.

    2011-07-28

    Anodes for Li-ion batteries are primarily carbon-based due to their low cost and long cycle life. However, improvements to the Li capacity of carbon anodes, LiC{sub 6} in particular, are necessary to obtain a larger energy density. State-of-the-art light-metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications often contain Li and involve reactions requiring Li transport, and light-metal ionic hydrides are candidates for novel conversion materials. Given a set of known solid-state and gas-phase reactants, we have determined the phase diagram in the Li-Mg-B-N-H system in the grand canonical ensemble, as a function of lithium chemical potential. We present computational results for several new conversion reactions with capacities between 2400 and 4000 mAh g{sup -1} that are thermodynamically favorable and that do not involve gas evolution. We provide experimental evidence for the reaction pathway on delithiation for the compound Li{sub 4}BN{sub 3}H{sub 10}. While the predicted reactions involve multiple steps, the maximum volume increase for these materials on lithium insertion is significantly smaller than that for Si.

  10. LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Zakharov

    2011-01-12

    Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

  11. Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prakash, R.V.; Parida, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    Fatigue crack growth behavior of Al-Li alloy 1441 having a marginally lower lithium content, compared to 80xx and 20xx series Al-Li alloys is presented in this paper. This investigation was conducted on single edge tension--SE(T)--specimens, under constant amplitude as well as under MiniLCA flight spectrum loading with the specific objective of determining the effects of stress ratio, orientation, thickness and cladding. Three thicknesses were considered: 1.2 mm(clad and unclad), 2.0 mm(clad and unclad) and 8.0 mm unclad. Constant amplitude fatigue tests were conducted at stress ratios of {minus}0.3, 0.1 and 0.7. Testing was performed under ambient conditions and along three orientations, namely L-T, T-L and L+45 degrees. Crack growth characteristics of this alloy are compared with that of BS:L73 (2014-T4 equivalent) for assessing the possibility of replacing BS:L73. Significant effect of stress ratio on crack growth rate was observed in all thicknesses. However, in case of 1.2 and 2.0 mm thick sheets, the effect was minimal at intermediate-crack growth regime. The orientation of the specimen does not adversely affect the fatigue crack growth behavior of 8.0 mm and 2.0 mm thick specimens. However, for 1.2 mm unclad sheet crack growth resistance in L-T direction was found to be superior to that along T-L direction. In majority of test cases considered, no significant effect was observed on crack growth rate due to thickness or cladding. Crack growth characteristics of Al-Li alloy 1441 and Al-Cu alloy BS:L73 under constant amplitude as well as MiniLCA spectrum loading are similar in the low and intermediate-crack growth rate regime. Based on these observations, it is felt that this Al-Li alloy has the potential for future aerospace applications.

  12. Lattice Mn3+ Behaviors in Li4Ti5O12/LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Full Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

    2013-05-28

    High voltage spinels LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (LNMO) with different contents of residual Mn3+ ions have been evaluated in full cells using Li4Ti5O12 (LTO) as standard anode. Greatly improved cycling stability has been observed for all spinels in LTO-limited full cell, compared with those in LNMO-limited ones, while the underlying mechanisms are quite different. It has been discovered that the participation of active Mn3+ in the extended cycling and thus its observable contribution to Li+ diffusion kinetics depend on the limiting electrode and the sufficiency of Li+ ions. Potential Mn dissolution has also been discussed to identify the key factors that need to be considered to construct full cells employing high voltage spinel as the cathode.

  13. Investigation of Mechanical Activation on Li-N-H Systems Using 6Li Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance at Ultra-High Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Kwak, Ja Hun; Yang, Zhenguo; Osborn, William; Markmaitree, Tippawan; Shaw, Leonard D.

    2008-07-15

    Abstract The significantly enhanced spectral resolution in the 6Li MAS NMR spectra of Li-N-H systems at ultra-high field of 21.1 tesla is exploited, for the first time, to study the detailed electronic and chemical environmental changes associated with mechanical activation of Li-N-H system using high energy balling milling. Complementary to ultra-high field studies, the hydrogen discharge dynamics are investigated using variable temperature in situ 1H MAS NMR at 7.05 tesla field. The significantly enhanced spectral resolution using ultra-high filed of 21.1 tesla was demonstrated along with several major findings related to mechanical activation, including the upfield shift of the resonances in 6Li MAS spectra induced by ball milling, more efficient mechanical activation with ball milling at liquid nitrogen temperature than with ball milling at room temperature, and greatly enhanced hydrogen discharge exhibited by the liquid nitrogen ball milled samples.

  14. Phase transitions of LiAlO{sub 2} at high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei Li; He Duanwei Zou Yongtao; Zhang Wei; Wang Zhao; Jiang Ming; Du Maolu

    2008-08-15

    This work presents a comprehensive study on phase transitions in LiAlO{sub 2} system at high pressures and temperatures (0.5-5.0 GPa and 300-1873 K, respectively), as well as the phase stability for polymeric phases of LiAlO{sub 2} in the studied P-T space by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Besides the previously described polymorphic hexagonal {alpha}-phase, orthorhombic {beta}-phase and tetragonal {delta}-phase, a possible new phase of LiAlO{sub 2} was observed after the tetragonal {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} sample was treated at 5.0 GPa and 389 K. The stable regimes of these high-pressure phases were defined through the observation of coexistence points of the polymeric phases. Our results revealed that LiAlO{sub 2} could experience structural phase transitions from {gamma}-LiAlO{sub 2} to its polymorphs at lower pressures and temperatures compared to the reported results. Hexagonal {alpha}-LiAlO{sub 2} with highly (003) preferential orientation was prepared at 5.0 GPa and 1873 K. - Graphical abstract: Constructing the pressure-temperature phase diagram for LiAlO{sub 2}.

  15. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon es024_jow_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Progress in Electrolyte Component R&D within the ABR Program, 2009 thru 2013

  16. High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es024_jow_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries High Voltage Electrolytes for Li-ion Batteries Molecular dynamics simulation and ab intio studies of electrolytes and electrolyte/electrode interfaces

  17. Characterization of the LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr/FeS(2) System for Potential Use as a Geothermal Borehole Power Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GUIDOTTI, RONALD A.; REINHARDT, FREDERICK W.

    1999-10-18

    We are continuing to study the suitability of modified thermal-battery technology as a potential power source for geothermal borehole applications. Previous work focused on the LiSi/FeS{sub 2} couple over a temperature range of 350 C to 400 C with the LiBr-KBr-LiF eutectic, which melts at 324.5 C. In this work, the discharge processes that take place in LiSi/CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic/FeS{sub 2} thermal cells were studied at temperatures between 250 C and 400 C using pelletized cells with immobilized electrolyte. The CsBr-LiBr-KBr eutectic was selected because of its lower melting point (228.5 C). Incorporation of a quasi-reference electrode allowed the determination of the relative contribution of each electrode to the overall cell polarization. The results of single-cell tests and limited battery tests are presented, along with preliminary data for battery stacks tested in a simulated geothermal borehole environment.

  18. Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals LiMnAs is a room temperature anti-ferromagnetic semiconductor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wijnheijmer, A. P.; Koenraad, P. M.; Marti, X.; Holy, V.; Cukr, M.; Novak, V.; Jungwirth, T.

    2012-03-12

    We performed scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy on a LiMnAs(001) thin film epitaxially grown on an InAs(001) substrate by molecular beam epitaxy. While the in situ cleavage exposed only the InAs(110) non-polar planes, the cleavage continued into the LiMnAs thin layer across several facets. We combined both topography and current mappings to confirm that the facets correspond to LiMnAs. By spectroscopy we show that LiMnAs has a band gap. The band gap evidenced in this study, combined with the known Neel temperature well above room temperature, confirms that LiMnAs is a promising candidate for exploring the concepts of high temperature semiconductor spintronics based on antiferromagnets.

  19. Liberia-NREL Biomass Resource Assessment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are more than enough to cover the country's annual electricity consumption of 297 GWh and oil consumption of 206 dam3. While the contribution of food crop residues, animal manure,...

  20. Liberia-National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Environment Facility (GEF), United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Global Water Partnership (GWP), German Society for International Cooperation...

  1. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-05-15

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles [1-2], among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials [3] and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique [4], including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  2. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-10-12

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles, among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique, including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  3. Elastic Hadron Scattering on Li Isotopes at Intermediate Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O.; Ibraeva, E.T.

    2005-01-01

    The elastic scattering of hadrons (protons, charged pions, and positively charged kaons) on {sup 6,7,8}Li nuclei is analyzed on the basis of Glauber-Sitenko diffraction theory. A few nuclear-wave-function versions found within two- and three-particle potential cluster models are used in the calculations. It is shown that the application of these wave functions in diffraction theory makes it possible to describe adequately the experimental differential cross sections and analyzing powers in hadron scattering at intermediate energies. In this study, particular attention is given to a comparison of the scattering of different particles on the same target nucleus, as well as to a comparison of scattering of particles of the same sort on different target nuclei.

  4. SESAME 7363: A new Li(6)D equation of state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppard, Daniel Glen; Kress, Joel David; Crockett, Scott; Collins, Lee A.; Greeff, Carl William

    2015-09-21

    A new Equation of State (EOS) for Lithium 6 Deuteride (6LiD) was created, sesame 7363. This EOS was released to the user community under “eos-developmental” as sesame 97363. The construction of this new EOS is a modification of a previously released EOS, sesame 73601. Sesame 7360 is too stiff (5-10% excess pressure) at high compressions and high temperatures (ρ = 4-110g/cm3, T = 30-10,000 eV) compared to orbital-free density-functional theory. Sesame 7363 is softer and gives a better representation of the physics over this range without compromising the agreement with the experimental and simulation data that sesame 7360 was based on.

  5. Stability of the solid electrolyte Li{sub 3}OBr to common battery solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroeder, D.J.; Hubaud, A.A.; Vaughey, J.T.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The stability of the anti-perovskite phase Li{sub 3}OBr has been assessed in a variety of battery solvents. - Highlights: Lithium stable solid electrolyte Li{sub 3}OBr unstable to polar organic solvents. Solvation with no dissolution destroys long-range structure. Ion exchange with protons observed. - Abstract: Recently a new class of solid lithium ion conductors was reported based on the anti-perovskite structure, notably Li{sub 3}OCl and Li{sub 3}OBr. For many beyond lithium-ion battery uses, the solid electrolyte is envisioned to be in direct contact with liquid electrolytes and lithium metal. In this study we evaluated the stability of the Li{sub 3}OBr phase against common battery solvents electrolytes, including diethylcarbonate (DEC) and dimethylcarbonate (DMC), as well as a LiPF{sub 6} containing commercial electrolyte. In contact with battery-grade organic solvents, Li{sub 3}OBr was typically found to be insoluble but lost its crystallinity and reacted with available protons and in some cases with the solvent. A low temperature heat treatment was able to restore crystallinity of the samples; however evidence of proton ion exchange was conserved.

  6. Summary of mechanical properties data and correlations for Li/sub 2/O, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, LiAlO/sub 2/, and Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Billone, M.C.; Grayhack, W.T.

    1988-04-01

    The data base for thermal expansion, elastic constants, compressive and tensile failure strengths and secondary thermal creep of leading solid-breeder (Li/sub 2/O, Li/sub 4/SiO/sub 4/, and LiAlO/sub 2/) and multiplier (Be) materials is reviewed, porosity, grain size, and stress (for thermal creep). Because the data base is rather sparse in some areas, general properties of ceramics and metals are used to help guide the formulation of the correlations. The primary purpose of the data base summary and correlation development is to pave the way for stress analysis sensitivity studies. These studies will help determine which properties are important enough to structural lifetime and deformation assessments to require more data. 18 refs., 5 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Hao Heather Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Hao Heather Li Previous Next List Li PhD Student Department of Chemistry Texas A & M University Email: hao.li[at]chem.tamu.edu Phone: 979-587-1954 BSc in Chemistry, Wuhan University, China EFRC research: Amine modified metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) stand out as a promising porous material to capture CO2 for its strong CO2 affinity, low regeneration energy and large pore volume. We have tethered a series of alkylamines onto Cr-MIL-101-SO3H and tested their

  8. Diagnostic studies on Li-battery cells and cell components | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy studies on Li-battery cells and cell components Diagnostic studies on Li-battery cells and cell components 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_02_abraham.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Energy Storage R&D Annual Progress Report Diagnostic Studies on Li-Battery Cells and Cell Components Mitigating Performance Degradation of

  9. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra Citation Details In-Document Search Title: X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line spectra We apply the magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics model POLAR to the calculation of polarization properties of satellite lines in Li-like Si driven by subpicosecond-duration laser pulses. We identify spectral lines whose polarization can serve as a marker of

  10. Fusion reactions in collisions induced by Li isotopes on Sn targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisichella, M.; Shotter, A. C.; Di Pietro, A.; Figuera, P.; Lattuada, M.; Marchetta, C.; Musumarra, A.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Ruiz, C.; Scuderi, V.; Strano, E.; Torresi, D.; Zadro, M.

    2012-10-20

    Fusion cross sections for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 120}Sn and {sup 7}Li+{sup 119}Sn systems have been measured. We aim to search for possible effects due to the different neutron transfer Q-values, by comparing the fusion cross sections for the two systems below the barrier. This experiment is the first step of a wider systematic aiming to study the above problems in collisions induced by stable and unstable Li isotopes on tin all forming the same compound nucleus.

  11. Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Applications, April 2005 | Department of Energy Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 Guide to Developing Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide (LiBr) Absorption for CHP Applications, April 2005 The objective of this paper is to summarize the development status of air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)-water absorption chillers to guide future efforts to develop chillers for combined heat and power (CHP) applications in light-commercial buildings. The key

  12. Alternating magnetic anisotropy of Li2(Li1xTx)N (T = Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jesche, A.; Ke, L.; Jacobs, J. L.; Harmon, B.; Houk, R. S.; Canfield, P. C.

    2015-05-11

    Substantial amounts of the transition metals Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni can be substituted for Li in single crystalline Li2(Li1xTx)N. Isothermal and temperature-dependent magnetization measurements reveal local magnetic moments with magnitudes significantly exceeding the spin-only value. The additional contributions stem from unquenched orbital moments that lead to rare-earth-like behavior of the magnetic properties. Accordingly, extremely large magnetic anisotropies have been found. Most notably, the magnetic anisotropy alternates as easy plane?easy axis?easy plane?easy axis when progressing from T = Mn ? Fe ? Co ? Ni. This behavior can be understood based on a perturbation approach in an analytical, single-ion model. As a result, the calculated magnetic anisotropies show surprisingly good agreement with the experiment and capture the basic features observed for the different transition metals.

  13. Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Ultrathin Li3VO4 NanoribbonGraphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties Two-dimensional (2D) "graphene-like" inorganic materials, ...

  14. Can Vanadium Be Substituted into LiFePO[subscript 4]? (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the solid solution LiFesub 1-3y2Vsub yPOsub 4, the a and b lattice parameters and cell volume decrease with increasing vanadium content, while the c lattice parameter...

  15. New Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Improved Equations For Na-K, Na-Li And Sio2 Geothermometers By Outlier Detection And Rejection Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  16. X-ray line polarization spectroscopy of Li-like satellite line...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of satellite lines in Li-like Si driven by subpicosecond-duration laser pulses. ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Journal of Physics B Research Org: Los Alamos National ...

  17. Proceedings of the AD HOC Workshop on Ceramics for Li/FeS{sub 2} batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    Representatives from industry, the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), DOE, national laboratories, and other govt agencies met to develop recommendations and actions for accelerating the development of ceramic components critical to the successful introduction of the Li/FeS{sub 2} bipolar battery for electric vehicles. Most of the workshop is devoted to electrode materials, bipolar designs, separators, and bipolar plates. The bulk of this document is viewographs and is divided into: ceramics, USABC overview, SAFT`s Li/FeS{sub 2} USABC program, bipolar Li/FeS{sub 2} component development, design requirements for bipolar plates, separator design requirements, compatibility of ceramic insulators with lithium, characterization of MgO for use in separators, resistivity measurements of separators, sintered AlN separators for LiMS batteries, etc.

  18. Nanocrystallization of LiCoO2 Cathodes for Thin Film Batteries Utilizing Pulse Thermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-01

    This factsheet describes a study whose focus is on the nanocrystallization of the LiCoO2 cathode thin films on polyimide substrates and evaluate the microstructural evolution and resistance as a function of PTP processing conditions.

  19. Search for Solar Axion Emission from 7Li and D(p,gamma)3He Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Solar Axion Emission from 7Li and D(p,gamma)3He Nuclear Decays with the CAST gamma-ray Calorimeter Andriamonje, S.; Aune, S.; DAPNIA, Saclay; Autiero, D.; CERN Lyon, IPN; Barth,...

  20. Microsoft Word - aac2012_Li_1_WG4-SLAC-PUB-15212.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    et al., "Results from Plasma Wakefield Experiments at FACET", IPAC'11, San Sebastian, Spain, 2011, SLAC-PUB-14560. 5. E. Adli et al., to be published. 6. S.Z. Li and M.J. Hogan,...

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A 12V Start-Stop Li Polymer Battery Pack

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by LG Chem Power at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about A 12V start-stop Li polymer...

  2. Second-Use Li-Ion Batteries to Aid Automotive and Utility Industries (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-01-01

    Repurposing Li-ion batteries at the end of useful life in electric drive vehicles could eliminate owners' disposal concerns and offer low-cost energy storage for certain applications.

  3. Structural Analysis of Southern Dixie Valley using LiDAR and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and characterize young faults, high resolution LiDAR and 1:12,000-scale low-sun-angle (LSA) aerial photography was acquired for the NAS Fallon study area. The LSA photos were...

  4. Calibration of LI-7500 sensor for 60m CO2/H20 flux system

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of LI-7500 Sensor for the CO2flx and ECOR Systems Marc L. Fischer David R. Cook Revision Date 05042007 (D. R. Cook) Introduction This...

  5. Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte Additive Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dendrite-Free Li Deposition Using Trace-Amounts of Water as an Electrolyte ...

  6. Search for Solar Axion Emission from 7Li and D(p,gamma)3He Nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for Solar Axion Emission from 7Li and D(p,gamma)3He Nuclear Decays with the CAST gamma-ray Calorimeter Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Solar Axion...

  7. Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion all-solid-state...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in Li-ion all-solid-state batteries with Al anodes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Insights into capacity loss mechanisms in...

  8. Structural and Chemical Evolution of Li- and Mn-rich Layered Cathode Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Xu, Pinghong; Gu, Meng; Xiao, Jie; Browning, Nigel D.; Yan, Pengfei; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-02-24

    Lithium (Li)- and manganese-rich (LMR) layered-structure materials are very promising cathodes for high energy density lithium-ion batteries. However, their voltage fading mechanism and its relationships with fundamental structural changes are far from being sufficiently understood. Here we report the detailed phase transformation pathway in the LMR cathode (Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2) during cycling for the samples prepared by hydro-thermal assistant method. It is found the transformation pathway of LMR cathode is closely correlated to its initial structure and preparation conditions. The results reveal that LMR cathode prepared by HA approach experiences a phase transformation from the layered structure to a LT-LiCoO2 type defect spinel-like structure (Fd-3m space group) and then to a disordered rock-salt structure (Fm-3m space group). The voltage fade can be well correlated with the Li ion insertion into octahedral sites, rather than tetrahedral sites, in both defect spinel-like structure and disordered rock-salt structure. The reversible Li insertion/removal into/from the disordered rock-salt structure is ascribed to the Li excess environment that can satisfy the Li percolating in the disordered rock-salt structure despite the increased kinetic barrier. Meanwhile, because of the presence of a great amount of oxygen vacancies, a significant decrease of Mn valence is detected in the cycled particle, which is below that anticipated for a potentially damaging Jahn-Teller distortion (+3.5). Clarification of the phase transformation pathway, cation redistribution, oxygen vacancy and Mn valence change undoubtedly provides insights into a profound understanding on the voltage fade, and capacity degradation of LMR cathode. The results also inspire us to further enhance the reversibility of LMR cathode via improving its surface structural stability.

  9. Department of Li/sup /minus// and H/sup /minus// ion sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walther, S.R.

    1988-12-01

    Sources of Li/sup /minus// and H/sup /minus// ions are needed for diagnostic neutral beam and for current drive in fusion plasmas. Previous efforts to generate Li/sup /minus// beams have focused on electron capture in a gas or production on a low work function surface in a plasma. Volume production of Li/sup /minus// by dissociative attachment of optically pumped lithium molecules has also been studied. This thesis presents the first experimental results for volume production of a Li/sup /minus// ion beam from a plasma discharge. A theoretical model for volume production of Li/sup /minus// ions and separate model for Li/sub 2/ production in the lithium discharge are developed to explain the experimental results. The model is in good agreement with the experiment and shows favorable parameter scalings for further improvement of the Li/sup /minus// ion source. A /sup 6/Li/degree/ diagnostic neutral beam based on this ion source is proposed for measurement of magnetic pitch angle in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Previous efforts in developing H/sup /minus// ion sources have concentrated on volume production in a plasma discharge. Experiments to improve the H/sup /minus// current density from a magnetically filtered multicusp ion source by seeding the discharge with cesium or barium have been conducted. A substantial (> factor of five) increase in H/sup /minus// output is achieved for both cesium and barium addition. Further experiments with barium have shown that the increase is due to H/sup /minus// production on the anode walls. The experiments with cesium are consistent with this formation mechanism. These results show that this new type of 'converterless' surface production H/sup /minus// source provides greatly improved performance when compared to a volume H/sup /minus// source. 92 refs., 47 figs.

  10. Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tool for engineering and structural diagnostics of nanoscale electrochemical processes. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for engineering and structural diagnostics of nanoscale electrochemical processes. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Miniature all-solid-state heterostructure nanowire Li-ion batteries as a tool for engineering and structural diagnostics of nanoscale electrochemical processes.

  11. Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties Two-dimensional (2D) "graphene-like" inorganic materials, because of the short lithium ion

  12. New High Power Li2MTi6O14Anode Material | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Power Li2MTi6O14Anode Material New High Power Li2MTi6O14Anode Material 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_21_amine.pdf More Documents & Publications Developing High Capacity, Long Life, and High Power Anodes Cathodes Engineering of high energy cathode material

  13. Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies | Department of Energy Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies Significant Cost Improvement of Li-Ion Cells Through Non-NMP Electrode Coating, Direct Separator Coating, and Fast Formation Technologies 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon

  14. Li-Chiang Lin | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Li-Chiang Lin Previous Next List Li-Chiang Lin Formerly: PhD Student, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering University of California, Berkeley Presently: Postdoctoral Fellow, MIT Email: lclin [at] mit.edu BS in Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan MS in Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taiwan EFRC research: Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one of viable strategies for reducing the negative

  15. Changyi Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technologies | Blandine Jerome Changyi Li Previous Next List LiC PhD Student Department of Chemistry University of California Email: changyi [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-495-2303 BA in Chemistry, California Institute of Technology EFRC Research CO2 separation is an energy intensive process using conventional solution-phase methods. Membrane-based gas separations have the potential to be a much more efficient process. The research in our group focuses on creating hybrid

  16. Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery Cathodes |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Effect of an Ultrathin Coating on Stabilizing Li-ion Battery Cathodes Sunday, January 31, 2016 Improvements in the high-voltage cycling stability of lithium ion battery cathode materials are needed to enable the wide-spread adoption of renewable energy technologies such as electric vehicles. One cathode material which exhibits significant advantages over the commonly-used commercial material LiCoO2 in terms of higher capacity, increased thermal

  17. Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Imaging Techniques | Department of Energy Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques Characterization of Li-ion Batteries using Neutron Diffraction and Infrared Imaging Techniques 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm044_wang_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML User

  18. Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program | Department of Energy Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Characterization of Materials for Li-ion Batteries: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon

  19. Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Validation | Department of Energy Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation Development of Cell/Pack Level Models for Automotive Li-Ion Batteries with Experimental Validation 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting PDF icon es120_shaffer_2012_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Development of Cell/Pack

  20. Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy for Li-ion Batteries Development of High Energy Cathode for Li-ion Batteries 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es056_zhang_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Phase Behavior and Solid State Chemistry in Olivines Development of High Energy Cathode Materials Interfacial Processes - Diagnostics

  1. Via E-Mail Michael Li Electricity Policy Specialist U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 1, 2010 Via E-Mail Michael Li Electricity Policy Specialist U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 smartgridpolicy@hq.doe.gov Re: Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy And Logistical Challenges Dear Mr. Li: On behalf of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), I would like to provide our comments on the Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, 75 Fed. Reg. 57,006

  2. Thermally Stable Electrolyte For Li-ion Cells. (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Thermally Stable Electrolyte For Li-ion Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermally Stable Electrolyte For Li-ion Cells. Abstract not provided. Authors: Nagasubramanian, Ganesan ; Orendorff, Christopher J. Publication Date: 2011-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1106400 Report Number(s): SAND2011-7083C 464734 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: The Knowledge Foundation's 2nd Annual International Conference held November

  3. Streamlining the Optimization of Li-Ion Battery Electrodes | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Streamlining the Optimization of Li-Ion Battery Electrodes Streamlining the Optimization of Li-Ion Battery Electrodes 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_12_lu.pdf More Documents & Publications Screen Electrode Materials & Cell Chemistries and Streamlining Optimization of Electrode Screen Electrode Materials and Cell Chemistries FY 2011 Annual Progress Report

  4. Optimization of LiFePO4 Nanoparticle Suspensions with Polyethyleneimine for Aqueous Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianlin; Armstrong, Beth L; Kiggans, Jim; Daniel, Claus; Wood III, David L

    2012-01-01

    Addition of dispersants to aqueous based lithium-ion battery electrode formulations containing LiFePO{sub 4} is critical to obtaining a stable suspension. The resulting colloidal suspensions enable dramatically improved coating deposition when processing electrodes. This research examines the colloidal chemistry modifications based on polyethyleneimine (PEI) addition and dispersion characterization required to produce high quality electrode formulations and coatings for LiFePO{sub 4} active cathode material. The isoelectric point, a key parameter in characterizing colloidal dispersion stability, of LiFePO{sub 4} and super P C45 were determined to be pH = 4.3 and 3.4, respectively. PEI, a cationic surfactant, was found to be an effective dispersant. It is demonstrated that 1.0 wt % and 0.5 wt % PEI were required to stabilize the LiFePO{sub 4} and super P C45 suspension, respectively. LiFePO{sub 4} cathode suspensions with 1.5 wt % PEI demonstrated the best dispersibility of all components, as evidenced by viscosity and agglomerate size of the suspensions and elemental distribution within dry cathodes. The addition of PEI significantly improved the LiFePO{sub 4} performance.

  5. Operando NMR and XRD study of chemically synthesized LiCx oxidation in a dry room environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Gill, Lance W.; Hagaman, Edward W.; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-08-01

    We test the stability of pre-lithiated graphite anodes for Li-ion batteries in a dry room battery processing room. The reaction between LiCx and laboratory air was followed using operando NMR and x-ray diffraction as these methods are sensitive to change in Li stoichiometry in graphite. There is minimal reactivity between LiC6 and N2, CO2 or O2; however, LiC6 reacts with moisture to form lithium (hydr)oxide. The reaction rate follows zero-order kinetics with respects to intercalated lithium suggesting that lithium transport through the graphite is fast. The reaction mechanism occurs by sequential formation of higher stages LiC12, then LiC18, and then LiC24 as the hydrolysis proceeds to the formation of LixOHy and graphite end products. Slowing down the formation rate of the LixOHy passivation layer stabilizes of the higher stages.

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of Lithium Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (LiBFMB) for Lithium Ion Battery Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Chen; Han, Kee Sung; Baggetto, Loic; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Custelcean, Radu; Lee, Dr. Eun-Sung; Guo, Bingkun; Bi, Zhonghe; Jiang, Deen; Veith, Gabriel M; Hagaman, Edward {Ed} W; Brown, Gilbert M; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manthiram, Arumugam; Dai, Sheng; Sun, Xiao-Guang

    2014-01-01

    A new orthochelated salt, lithium bis(monofluoromalonato)borate (LiBFMB), has been synthesized and purified for the first time for application in lithium ion batteries. The presence of fluorine in the borate anion of LiBFMB increases its oxidation potential and also facilitates ion dissociation, as reflected by the ratio of ionic conductivity measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy ( exp) and that by ion diffusivity coefficients obtained using pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG-NMR) technique ( NMR). Half-cell tests using 5.0 V lithium nickel manganese oxide (LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4) as a cathode and EC/DMC/DEC as a solvent reveals that the impedance of the LiBFMB cell is much larger than those of LiPF6 and LiBOB based cells, which results in lower capacity and poor cycling performance of the former. XPS spectra of the cycled cathode electrode suggest that because of the stability of the LiBFMB salt, the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) formed on the cathode surface is significantly different from those of LiPF6 and LiBOB based electrolytes, resulting in more solvent decomposition and thicker SEI layer. Initial results also indicate that using high dielectric constant solvent PC alters the surface chemistry, reduces the interfacial impedance, and enhances the performance of LiBFMB based 5.0V cell.

  7. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  8. Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}CoPO{sub 4}F and Li{sub 2}NiPO{sub 4}F) as cathode materials for lithium ion battery from atomistic simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sanghun Park, Sung Soo

    2013-08-15

    Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F, M: Co and Ni) have been investigated from atomistic simulation. In order to predict the characteristics of these materials as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, structural property, defect chemistry, and Li{sup +} ion transportation property are characterized. The coreshell model with empirical force fields is employed to reproduce the unit-cell parameters of crystal structure, which are in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the formation energies of intrinsic defects (Frenkel and antisite) are determined by energetics calculation. From migration energy calculations, it is found that these flurophosphates have a 3D Li{sup +} ion diffusion network forecasting good Li{sup +} ion conducting performances. Accordingly, we expect that this study provides an atomic scale insight as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}CoPO{sub 4}F and Li{sub 2}NiPO{sub 4}F). Display Omitted - Highlights: Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F, M: Co and Ni) are investigated from classical atomistic simulation. The unit-cell parameters from experimental studies are reproduced by the coreshell model. Li{sup +} ion conducting Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F has a 3D Li{sup +} ion diffusion network. It is predicted that Li/Co or Li/Ni antisite defects are well-formed at a substantial concentration level.

  9. Controlled Nucleation and Growth Process of Li2S2/Li2S in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Zuo, Pengjian; Koech, Phillip K.; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2013-09-20

    Lithium-sulfur battery is a promising next-generation energy storage system because of its potentially three to five times higher energy density than that of traditional lithium ion batteries. However, the dissolution and precipitation of soluble polysulfides during cycling initiate a series of key-chain reactions that significantly shorten battery life. Herein, we demonstrate that through a simple but effective strategy, significantly improved cycling performance is achieved for high sulfur loading electrodes through controlling the nucleation and precipitation of polysulfieds on the electrode surface. More than 400 or 760 stable cycling are successfully displayed in the cells with locked discharge capacity of 625 mAh g-1 or 500 mAh g-1, respectively. The nucleation and growth process of dissolved polysulfides has been electrochemically altered to confine the thickness of discharge products passivated on the cathode surface, increasing the utilization rate of sulfur while avoiding severe morphology changes on the electrode. More importantly, the exposure of new lithium metal surface to the S-containing electrolyte is also greatly reduced through this strategy, largely minimizing the anode corrosion caused by polysulfides. This work interlocks the electrode morphologies and its evolution with electrochemical interference to modulate cell performances by using Li-S system as a platform, providing different but critical directions for this community.

  10. Development of bulk-type all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery using LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unemoto, Atsushi, E-mail: unemoto@imr.tohoku.ac.jp; Ikeshoji, Tamio [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yasaku, Syun; Matsuo, Motoaki [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Nogami, Genki; Tazawa, Masaru; Taniguchi, Mitsugu [Mitsubishi Gas Chemicals Co., Ltd., 182 Tayuhama Shinwari, Kita-ku, Niigata 950-3112 (Japan); Orimo, Shin-ichi [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-25

    Stable battery operation of a bulk-type all-solid-state lithium-sulfur battery was demonstrated by using a LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte. The electrochemical activity of insulating elemental sulfur as the positive electrode was enhanced by the mutual dispersion of elemental sulfur and carbon in the composite powders. Subsequently, a tight interface between the sulfur-carbon composite and the LiBH{sub 4} powders was manifested only by cold-pressing owing to the highly deformable nature of the LiBH{sub 4} electrolyte. The high reducing ability of LiBH{sub 4} allows using the use of a Li negative electrode that enhances the energy density. The results demonstrate the interface modification of insulating sulfur and the architecture of an all-solid-state Li-S battery configuration with high energy density.

  11. First principles treatment of structural, optical, and thermoelectric properties of Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} as electrode for a Li secondary battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Wilayat; Reshak, A.H.

    2015-01-15

    The electronic structure, electronic charge density and linear optical properties of the metallic Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} compound, having cubic symmetry, are calculated using the full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method. The calculated band structure and density of states using the local density, generalized gradient and EngelVosko approximations, depict the metallic nature of the cubic Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} compound. The bands crossing the Fermi level in the calculated band structure are mainly from the Mn-d states with small support of N-p states. In addition, the Mn-d states at the Fermi level enhance the density of states, which is very useful for the electronic transport properties. The valence electronic charge density depicts strong covalent bond between Mn and two N atoms and polar covalent bond between Mn and Li atoms. The frequency dependent linear optical properties like real and imaginary part of the dielectric function, optical conductivity, reflectivity and energy loss function are calculated on the basis of the computed band structure. Both intra-band and inter-band transitions contribute to the calculated optical parameters. Using the BoltzTraP code, the thermoelectric properties like electrical and thermal conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, power coefficient and heat capacity of the Li{sub 7}MnN{sub 4} are also calculated as a function of temperature and studied.

  12. A model for HAZ hardness profiles in Al-Li-X alloys: Application to the Al-Li-Cu Alloy 2095

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rading, G.O.; Shamsuzzoha, M.; Berry, J.T.

    1998-10-01

    In a previous paper details were presented of a theoretical model describing the evolution of the hardness profiles in the heat-affected zones (HAZ) of Al-Li-X weldments. The intent of the model was to qualitatively predict the general shape of such a profile, which indicates points of double inflection. In the present paper, experimental results are presented to validate the model. Panels of Al-Li-Cu Alloy 2095 in the peak aged (T8) condition were welded by the gas tungsten arc (GTA) process using AA 2319 filler metal. Conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies were conducted on specimens taken from specific points across the HAZ to estimate the relative ratios of T{sub 1} (Al{sub 2}CuLi) and {delta}{prime} (Al{sub 3}Li) precipitates, as well as incoherent grain boundary phases. Electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) was used to determine the variation of concentrations of elements across the HAZ, while the hardness profile was determined using Vickers microhardness measurements. The hardness profile and the associated pattern of phases present agree well with the information predicted qualitatively by the previously described model.

  13. Synthesis of spherical LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composite microparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakenov, Zhumabay; Taniguchi, Izumi

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {yields} We could prepare LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites by a novel preparation method. {yields} The LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites were spherical particles with a mean diameter of 3.65 {mu}m. {yields} The LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composite cathode exhibited 112 mAh g{sup -1} at 0.05 C. {yields} It also showed a good rate capability up to 5 C at room temperature and 55 {sup o}C. -- Abstract: Spherical LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composite microparticles were prepared by a combination of spray pyrolysis and spray drying followed by heat treatment and examined as a cathode material for lithium batteries. The structure, morphology and electrochemical performance of the resulting spherical LiMnPO{sub 4}/C microparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy and standard electrochemical techniques. The final sample was identified as a single phase orthorhombic structure of LiMnPO{sub 4} and spherical powders with a geometric mean diameter of 3.65 {mu}m and a geometric standard deviation of 1.34. The electrochemical cells contained the spherical LiMnPO{sub 4}/C microparticles exhibited first discharge capacities of 112 and 130 mAh g{sup -1} at 0.05 C at room temperature and 55 {sup o}C, respectively. These also showed a good rate capability up to 5 C at room temperature and 55 {sup o}C.

  14. Novel Energy Sources -Material Architecture and Charge Transport in Solid State Ionic Materials for Rechargeable Li ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katiyar, Ram S; Gmez, M; Majumder, S B; Morell, G; Tomar, M S; Smotkin, E; Bhattacharya, P; Ishikawa, Y

    2009-01-19

    Since its introduction in the consumer market at the beginning of 1990s by Sony Corporation Li-ion rechargeable battery and LiCoO2 cathode is an inseparable couple for highly reliable practical applications. However, a separation is inevitable as Li-ion rechargeable battery industry demand more and more from this well serving cathode. Spinel-type lithium manganate (e.g., LiMn2O4), lithium-based layered oxide materials (e.g., LiNiO2) and lithium-based olivine-type compounds (e.g., LiFePO4) are nowadays being extensively studied for application as alternate cathode materials in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Primary goal of this project was the advancement of Li-ion rechargeable battery to meet the future demands of the energy sector. Major part of the research emphasized on the investigation of electrodes and solid electrolyte materials for improving the charge transport properties in Li-ion rechargeable batteries. Theoretical computational methods were used to select electrodes and electrolyte material with enhanced structural and physical properties. The effect of nano-particles on enhancing the battery performance was also examined. Satisfactory progress has been made in the bulk form and our efforts on realizing micro-battery based on thin films is close to give dividend and work is progressing well in this direction.

  15. Li2S encapsulated by nitrogen-doped carbon for lithium sulfur batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Yuzi; Ashuri, Maziar; Liu, Caihong; Shaw, Leon L.

    2014-09-26

    Using high-energy ball milling of the Li2S plus carbon black mixture followed by carbonization of pyrrole, we have established a facile approach to synthesize Li2S-plus-C composite particles of average size 400 nm, encapsulated by a nitrogen-doped carbon shell. Such an engineered coreshell structure exhibits an ultrahigh initial discharge specific capacity (1029 mAh/g), reaching 88% of the theoretical capacity (1,166 mAh/g of Li2S) and thus offering the highest utilization of Li2S in the cathode among all of the reported works for the encapsulated Li2S cathodes. This Li2S/C composite core with a nitrogen-doped carbon shell can still retain 652 mAh/g after prolonged 100 cycles. These superior properties are attributed to the nitrogen-doped carbon shell that can improve the conductivity to enhance the utilization of Li2S in the cathode. As a result, fine particle sizes and the presence of carbon black within the Li2S core may also play a role in high utilization of Li2S in the cathode.

  16. ALD of Al2O3 for Highly Improved Performance in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A.; Jung, Y. S.; Ban, C.; Riley, L.; Cavanagh, A.; Yan, Y.; George, S.; Lee, S. H.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in energy density, rate capability and safety will be required for the implementation of Li-ion batteries in next generation electric vehicles. We have demonstrated atomic layer deposition (ALD) as a promising method to enable superior cycling performance for a vast variety of battery electrodes. The electrodes range from already demonstrated commercial technologies (cycled under extreme conditions) to new materials that could eventually lead to batteries with higher energy densities. For example, an Al2O3 ALD coating with a thickness of ~ 8 A was able to stabilize the cycling of unexplored MoO3 nanoparticle anodes with a high volume expansion. The ALD coating enabled stable cycling at C/2 with a capacity of ~ 900 mAh/g. Furthermore, rate capability studies showed the ALD-coated electrode maintained a capacity of 600 mAh/g at 5C. For uncoated electrodes it was only possible to observe stable cycling at C/10. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al2O3 coating with a thickness of ~5 A can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 degrees C. The ALD-coated NG electrodes displayed a 98% capacity retention after 200 charge-discharge cycles. In contrast, bare NG showed a rapid decay. Additionally, Al2O3 ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 A have been shown to allow LiCoO2 to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs Li/Li+. Bare LiCoO2 rapidly deteriorated in the first few cycles. The capacity fade is likely caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte at higher potentials or perhaps cobalt dissolution. Interestingly, we have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO2 where we coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. We have also recently coated a binder free LiNi0.04Mn0.04Co02O2 electrode containing 5 wt% single-walled carbon nanotubes as the conductive additive and demonstrated both high rate capability as well as the ability to cycle the cathode to 5 V vrs. Li/Li+. Finally, we coated a Celgard (TM) separator and enabled stable cycling in a high dielectric electrolyte. These results will be presented in detail.

  17. Pushing the Theoretical Limit of Li-CFx Batteries: A Tale of Bi-functional Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan; Li, Juchuan; Sahu, Gayatri; Dudney, Nancy J; Liang, Chengdu

    2014-01-01

    In a typical battery, electrodes deliver capacities less or equal the theoretical maxima of the electrode materials.1 The inert electrolyte functions solely as the ionic conductor without contribution to the cell capacity because of its distinct mono-function in the concept of conventional batteries. Here we demonstrate that the most energy-dense Li-CFx battery2 delivers a capacity exceeding the theoretical maximum of CFx with a solid electrolyte of Li3PS4 (LPS) that has dual functions: as the inert electrolyte at the anode and the active component at the cathode. Such a bi-functional electrolyte reconciles both inert and active characteristics through a synergistic discharge mechanism of CFx and LPS. Li3PS4 is known as an inactive solid electrolyte with a broad electrochemical window over 5 V.3 The synergy at the cathode is through LiF, the discharge product of CFx, which activates the electrochemical discharge of LPS at a close electrochemical potential of CFx. Therefore, the solid-state Li-CFx batteries output 126.6% energy beyond their theoretic limits without compromising the stability of the cell voltage. The extra energy comes from the electrochemical discharge of LPS, the inert electrolyte. This bi-functional electrolyte revolutionizes the concept of conventional batteries and opens a new avenue for the design of batteries with an unprecedentedly high energy density.

  18. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M. C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Kuhne, W. W. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Halverson, N. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Chang, C. -S. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Kitamura, E. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Hawthorn, L. [Georgia Regents University Cancer Center, Augusta, GA (United States). Integrated Genomics Core; Milliken, C. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Caldwell, E. F. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Stieve-Caldwell, E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Martinez, N. E. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences; Stafford, C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Univ. of South Carolina Medical School, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based response plan for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.

  19. mRNA Transcript Abundance during Plant Growth and the Influence of Li+ Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, M. C.; Kuhne, W. W.; Halverson, N. V.; Chang, C. -S.; Kitamura, E.; Hawthorn, L.; Martinez, N. E.; Stafford, C.; Milliken, C. E.; Caldwell, E. F.; Stieve-Caldwell, E.

    2014-10-23

    Lithium (Li) toxicity in plants is, at a minimum, a function of Li+ concentration, exposure time, species and growth conditions. Most plant studies with Li+ focus on short-term acute exposures. This study examines short- and long-term effects of Li+ exposure in Arabidopsis with Li+ uptake studies and measured shoot mRNA transcript abundance levels in treated and control plants. Stress, pathogen-response and arabinogalactan protein genes were typically more up-regulated in older (chronic, low level) Li+-treatment plants and in the much younger plants from acute high-level exposures. The gene regulation behavior of high-level Li+ resembled prior studies due to its influence on: inositol synthesis, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthases and membrane ion transport. In contrast, chronically-exposed plants had gene regulation responses that were indicative of pathogen, cold, and heavy-metal stress, cell wall degradation, ethylene production, signal transduction, and calcium-release modulation. Acute Li+ exposure phenocopies magnesium-deficiency symptoms and is associated with elevated expression of stress response genes that could lead to consumption of metabolic and transcriptional energy reserves and the dedication of more resources to cell development. In contrast, chronic Li+ exposure increases expression signal transduction genes. The identification of new Li+-sensitive genes and a gene-based response plan for acute and chronic Li+ exposure are delineated.

  20. The ARIES-RS power core -- Recent development in Li/V designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, D.K.; Billone, M.C.; Hua, T.Q.

    1997-04-01

    The ARIES-RS fusion power plant design study is based on reversed-shear (RS) physics with a Li/V (lithium breeder and vanadium structure) blanket. The reversed-shear discharge has been documented in many large tokamak experiments. The plasma in the RS mode has a high beta, low current, and low current drive requirements. Therefore, it is an attractive physics regime for a fusion power plant. The blanket system based on a Li/V has high temperature operating capability, good tritium breeding, excellent high heat flux removal capability, long structural life time, low activation, low after heat and good safety characteristics. For these reasons, the ARIES-RS reactor study selected Li/V as the reference blanket. The combination of attractive physics and attractive blanket engineering is expected to result in a superior power plant design. This paper summarizes the power core design of the ARIES-RS power plant study.

  1. Hartree-Fock calculation of the differential photoionization cross sections of small Li clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galitskiy, S. A.; Artemyev, A. N.; Jänkälä, K.; Lagutin, B. M.; Demekhin, Ph. V.

    2015-01-21

    Cross sections and angular distribution parameters for the single-photon ionization of all electron orbitals of Li{sub 2−8} are systematically computed in a broad interval of the photoelectron kinetic energies for the energetically most stable geometry of each cluster. Calculations of the partial photoelectron continuum waves in clusters are carried out by the single center method within the Hartree-Fock approximation. We study photoionization cross sections per one electron and analyze in some details general trends in the photoionization of inner and outer shells with respect to the size and geometry of a cluster. The present differential cross sections computed for Li{sub 2} are in a good agreement with the available theoretical data, whereas those computed for Li{sub 3−8} clusters can be considered as theoretical predictions.

  2. Materials for Better Li-based Storage Systems for a "Green Energy Society"

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jean-Marie Tarascon

    2010-01-08

    Li-ion batteries are strongly considered for powering the upcoming generations of HEVs and PHEVs, but there are still the issues of safety and costs in terms of materials resources and abundances, synthesis, and recycling processes. Notions of materials having minimum footprint in nature, made via eco-efficient processes, must be integrated in our new research towards the next generation of sustainable and "greener" Li-ion batteries. In this July 13, 2009 talk sponsored by Berkeley Lab's Environental Energy Technologies Division, Jean-Marie Tarascon, a professor at the University of Picardie (Amiens), discuss Eco-efficient synthesis via hydrothermal/solvothermal processes using latent bases as well as structure directing templates or other bio-related approaches of LiFePO4 nanopowders.

  3. Detailed Hydrographic Feature Extraction from High-Resolution LiDAR Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny L. Anderson

    2012-05-01

    Detailed hydrographic feature extraction from high-resolution light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data is investigated. Methods for quantitatively evaluating and comparing such extractions are presented, including the use of sinuosity and longitudinal root-mean-square-error (LRMSE). These metrics are then used to quantitatively compare stream networks in two studies. The first study examines the effect of raster cell size on watershed boundaries and stream networks delineated from LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs). The study confirmed that, with the greatly increased resolution of LiDAR data, smaller cell sizes generally yielded better stream network delineations, based on sinuosity and LRMSE. The second study demonstrates a new method of delineating a stream directly from LiDAR point clouds, without the intermediate step of deriving a DEM. Direct use of LiDAR point clouds could improve efficiency and accuracy of hydrographic feature extractions. The direct delineation method developed herein and termed mDn, is an extension of the D8 method that has been used for several decades with gridded raster data. The method divides the region around a starting point into sectors, using the LiDAR data points within each sector to determine an average slope, and selecting the sector with the greatest downward slope to determine the direction of flow. An mDn delineation was compared with a traditional grid-based delineation, using TauDEM, and other readily available, common stream data sets. Although, the TauDEM delineation yielded a sinuosity that more closely matches the reference, the mDn delineation yielded a sinuosity that was higher than either the TauDEM method or the existing published stream delineations. Furthermore, stream delineation using the mDn method yielded the smallest LRMSE.

  4. Report for in-situ 7Li NMR experiment in PNNL Phase -1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi

    2014-08-19

    To understand the detailed local structural evolution, an in-situ 7Li NMR study was performed. An operando identification of the lithium germanide phases under various cycling regimens permitted understanding of the kinetics of phase transition between different structural phases, including the amorphous phases, and how these correlated with capacity retention. Combining data from TEM and in-situ 7Li NMR, we discovered that the phase inter-conversion during cycling was mediated by co-existing amorphous and crystalline phases, and that the high capacity observed was correlated with an over-lithiated lithium germanide phase.

  5. Ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of silicon nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurova, N. V. Burdov, V. A.

    2013-12-15

    The results of ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals doped with shallow donors (Li, P) are reported. It is shown that phosphorus introduces much more significant distortions into the electronic structure of the nanocrystal than lithium, which is due to the stronger central cell potential of the phosphorus ion. It is found that the Li-induced splitting of the ground state in the conduction band of the nanocrystal into the singlet, doublet, and triplet retains its inverse structure typical for bulk silicon.

  6. Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    batteries as identified by in situ studies. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid first-cycle lithiation strategy for enhanced performance of Li-MoS2 batteries as identified by in situ studies. Abstract not provided. Authors: Jiayu Wan ; Wenzhong Bao ; Yang Liu ; Jiaqi Dai ; Fei Shen ; Lihui Zhou ; Xinghan Cai ; Dan Urban ;

  7. Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li/S Batteries

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li/S Batteries Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Key Parameters Governing the Energy Density of Rechargeable Li/S Batteries Authors: Gao, Jie ; Abruña, Héctor D. Publication Date: 2014-03-06 OSTI Identifier: 1161939 DOE Contract Number: SC0001086 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: J. Phys. Chem. Lett.; Journal Volume: 5(5); Related Information: Emc2 partners

  8. Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators (Conference) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Low energy detectors: 6Li-glass scintillators Authors: Lee, Hye Young [1] ; Taddeucci, Terry N [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2012-03-22 OSTI Identifier: 1178711 Report Number(s): LA-UR-12-01482; LA-UR-12-1482 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Fission Workshop ; March 8, 2012 ; Los Alamos,

  9. A high performance hybrid battery based on aluminum anode and LiFePO4 cathode

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Bi, Zhonghe; Liu, Hansan; Bridges, Craig A.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Dai, Sheng; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2015-10-07

    A unique battery hybrid utilizes an aluminum anode, a LiFePO4 cathode and an acidic ionic liquid electrolyte based on 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride (EMImCl) and aluminum trichloride (AlCl 3) (EMImCl-AlCl 3, 1-1.1 in molar ratio) with or without LiAlCl4 is proposed. This hybrid ion battery delivers an initial high capacity of 160 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/5. It also shows good rate capability and cycling performance.

  10. Enhancing performance of Li/(CFx)n cells at low temperatures. (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    | SciTech Connect Enhancing performance of Li/(CFx)n cells at low temperatures. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Enhancing performance of Li/(CFx)n cells at low temperatures. No abstract prepared. Authors: Nagasubramanian, Ganesan Publication Date: 2007-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1028949 Report Number(s): SAND2007-2065C TRN: US201122%%624 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the 25th International

  11. Fabrication and Testing Capabilities for 18650 Li/(CFx)n Cells. (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Fabrication and Testing Capabilities for 18650 Li/(CFx)n Cells. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fabrication and Testing Capabilities for 18650 Li/(CFx)n Cells. Abstract not provided. Authors: Nagasubramanian, Ganesan Publication Date: 2007-08-01 OSTI Identifier: 1147597 Report Number(s): SAND2007-5628J 521695 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: International Journal of

  12. Lithium cobalt(II) pyrophosphate, Li[subscript 1.86]CoP[subscript

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2]O[subscript 7], from synchrotron X-ray powder data (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Lithium cobalt(II) pyrophosphate, Li[subscript 1.86]CoP[subscript 2]O[subscript 7], from synchrotron X-ray powder data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lithium cobalt(II) pyrophosphate, Li[subscript 1.86]CoP[subscript 2]O[subscript 7], from synchrotron X-ray powder data Structure refinement of high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data of the

  13. Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations of Deuteron-4He Scattering And 6Li States

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Calculations of Deuteron-4He Scattering And 6Li States Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ab Initio Many-Body Calculations of Deuteron-4He Scattering And 6Li States Authors: Quaglioni, S ; Navratil, P Publication Date: 2011-02-08 OSTI Identifier: 1118007 Report Number(s): LLNL-JRNL-469878 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Phisical Review C, na, na, April 14, 2011, pp. 04460

  14. Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ion Batteries: A XANES Study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Chemical Bonding In Amorphous Si Coated-carbon Nanotube As Anodes For Li ion Batteries: A XANES Study The chemical bonding nature and its evolution upon electrochemical cycling in amorphous Si coated-carbon nanotube (Si-CNT) anode has been investigated using comprehensive X-ray

  15. Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries Development of High Capacity Anode for Li-ion Batteries 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es065_zhang_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Novel Lithium Ion Anode Structures: Overview of New DOE BATT Anode Projects Hybrid Nano Carbon Fiber/Graphene Platelet-Based High-Capacity Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries Hybrid Nano Carbon

  16. Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters using

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gen3Ž Electrode Materials: Final Summary | Department of Energy Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters using Gen3Ž Electrode Materials: Final Summary Statistical Design of Experiment for Li-ion Cell Formation Parameters using Gen3Ž Electrode Materials: Final Summary 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_03_gering.pdf More Documents &

  17. Hard Carbon Materials for High-Capacity Li-ion Battery Anodes | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Hard Carbon Materials for High-Capacity Li-ion Battery Anodes Hard Carbon Materials for High-Capacity Li-ion Battery Anodes 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es104_dai_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: A Combined Experimental and Modeling Approach for the Design of High Coulombic Efficiency Si Electrodes In situ Characterizations of New

  18. I L S-V I I I J* I LI

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    L - S-V I I I J* I LI 11. LI L - OAK RlDGE NATBONAL LABORATORY <;> "J :-: ,rj _ .- ORNLnM- 12225 I: ?, .,I Radiological Survey Results at the Former Bridgeport Brass Company Facility Seymour, Connecticut R. D. Foley R. F . Carrier c MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTERlS, INC. - FOR TRE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY / l- _I. _ --..--.- This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Cffice of Scientific and

  19. Michael Li Electricity Policy Specialist U.S. Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    6-390 Village Blvd. Princeton, NJ 08540 609.452.8060 | www.nerc.com November 1, 2010 Michael Li Electricity Policy Specialist U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Room 8H033 Washington, DC 20585 RE: "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges" Dear Mr. Li: I am writing in response to the Department of Energy's ("DOE") Request for Information (RFI) regarding the "Smart Grid RFI:

  20. Progress in the material development of LiCaAlF sub 6 :Cr sup 3+ laser crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michelle D. Shinn.; Chase, L.L.; Caird, J.A.; Payne, S.A.; Atherton, L.J.; Kway, W.L.

    1990-03-01

    High Cr{sup 3+} doping levels, up to 8 mole percent, and low losses have been obtained with the tunable solid-state laser material LiCaAlF{sub 6}:Cr{sup 3+} (Cr:LiCAF). Measurements and calculations show that high pumping and extraction efficiencies are possible with the improved material. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A synthesis of LiFePO{sub 4} starting from FePO{sub 4} under reducing atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo; Cento, Cinzia; Masci, Amedeo; Carewska, Maria; Gislon, Paola

    2014-06-19

    A fast and easy way to produce LiFePO{sub 4} starting from FePO{sub 4}, used as iron and phosphorus source, is proposed. 5% hydrogen is employed as a reducing agent and various compounds containing lithium as lithiation agents. The selected lithiation agents included: LiCl, CH{sub 3}COOLi, LiOH, Li{sub 2}S, LiH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Solid state synthesis is used for the LiFePO{sub 4} preparation and the so obtained materials are structurally characterized by XRD. The materials are used to fabricate composite electrode and their specific capacity is evaluated by low rate galvanostatic charge/discharge cycles (C/10 rate). Among the various lithium salts, the acetate give rise to the LiFePO{sub 4} with the best electrochemical performance. The morphology of this material is further investigated by SEM microscopy and the specific capacity is evaluated as a function of the discharge rate and the cycle number.

  2. Compatibility of Lithium Salts with Solvent of the Non-Aqueous Electrolyte in LiO2 Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Peng; Lu, Jun; Lau, Kah Chun; Luo, Xiangyi; Bareno, Javier; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Ren, Yang; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Curtiss, Larry A.; Sun, Yang-Kook; Amine, Khalil

    2013-02-20

    The stability of lithium salts, especially in the presence of reduced oxygen species, O2 and H2O (even in a small amount), plays an important role in the cyclability and capacity of LiO2 cells. This combined experimental and computational study provides evidence that the stability of the electrolyte used in LiO2 cells strongly depends on the compatibility of lithium salts with solvent. In the case of the LiPF61NM3 electrolyte, the decomposition of LiPF6 occurs in the cell as evidenced by in situ XRD, FT-IR and XPS analysis, which triggers the decomposition of 1NM3 solvent due to formation of HF from the decomposition of LiPF6. These reactions lead to degradation of the electrolyte and cause poor cyclability of the cell. The same reactions are not observed when LiTFSI and LiCF3SO3 are used as the lithium salts in 1NM3 solvent, or LiPF6 is used in TEGDME solvent.

  3. First Principles Prediction of Nitrogen-doped Carbon Nanotubes as a High-Performance Cathode for Li-S Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhiguo; Niu, Xinyue; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong M.; Liu, Jun; Gao, Fei

    2013-07-16

    The insulating nature of sulfur and the solubility of the polysulfide in organic electrolyte are two main factors that limit the application of lithium sulfur (Li-S) battery systems. Enhancement of Li conductivity, identification of a strong adsorption agent of polysulfides and the improvement of the whole sulfur-based electrode are of great technological importance. The diffusion of Li atoms on the outer-wall, inner-wall and inter-wall spaces in nitrogen-doped double-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and penetrations of Li and S atoms through the walls are studied using density functional theory. We find that N-doping does not alternate the diffusion behaviors of Li atoms throughout the CNTs, but the energy barrier for Li atoms to penetrate the wall is greatly decreased by N-doping (from ~9.0 eV to ~ 1.0 eV). On the other hand, the energy barrier for S atoms to penetrate the wall remains very high, which is caused by the formation of the chemical bonds between the S and nearby N atoms. The results indicate that Li atoms are able to diffuse freely, whereas S atoms can be encapsulated inside the N-doped CNTs, suggesting that the N-doped CNTs can be potentially used in high performance Li-S batteries.

  4. Operando NMR and XRD study of chemically synthesized LiCx oxidation in a dry room environment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Gill, Lance W.; Hagaman, Edward W.; Dudney, Nancy J.

    2015-08-01

    We test the stability of pre-lithiated graphite anodes for Li-ion batteries in a dry room battery processing room. The reaction between LiCx and laboratory air was followed using operando NMR and x-ray diffraction as these methods are sensitive to change in Li stoichiometry in graphite. There is minimal reactivity between LiC6 and N2, CO2 or O2; however, LiC6 reacts with moisture to form lithium (hydr)oxide. The reaction rate follows zero-order kinetics with respects to intercalated lithium suggesting that lithium transport through the graphite is fast. The reaction mechanism occurs by sequential formation of higher stages LiC12, then LiC18, and thenmore » LiC24 as the hydrolysis proceeds to the formation of LixOHy and graphite end products. Slowing down the formation rate of the LixOHy passivation layer stabilizes of the higher stages.« less

  5. Effect of fuel rate and annealing process of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material for Li-ion batteries synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halim, Abdul; Setyawan, Heru; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2014-02-24

    In this study the effect of fuel rate and annealing on particle formation of LiFePO{sub 4} as battery cathode using flame spray pyrolysis method was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical study was done using ANSYS FLUENT program. In experimentally, LiFePO{sub 4} was synthesized from inorganic aqueous solution followed by annealing. LPG was used as fuel and air was used as oxidizer and carrier gas. Annealing process attempted in inert atmosphere at 700C for 240 min. Numerical result showed that the increase of fuel rate caused the increase of flame temperature. Microscopic observation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that all particles have sphere and polydisperse. Increasing fuel rate caused decreasing particle size and increasing particles crystallinity. This phenomenon attributed to the flame temperature. However, all produced particles still have more amorphous phase. Therefore, annealing needed to increase particles crystallinity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that all particles have PO4 function group. Increasing fuel rate led to the increase of infrared spectrum absorption corresponding to the increase of particles crystallinity. This result indicated that phosphate group vibrated easily in crystalline phase. From Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, annealing can cause the increase of Li{sup +} diffusivity. The diffusivity coefficient of without and with annealing particles were 6.8439910{sup ?10} and 8.5988810{sup ?10} cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1}, respectively.

  6. Multiphoton photoluminescence contrast in switched Mg:LiNbO{sub 3} and Mg:LiTaO{sub 3} single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichenbach, P., E-mail: philipp.reichenbach@iapp.de; Kmpfe, T.; Thiessen, A.; Haumann, A.; Eng, L. M. [Institut fr Angewandte Photophysik, Technische Universitt Dresden, George-Bhr-Str. 1, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Woike, T. [Institut fr Strukturphysik, Technische Universitt Dresden, Zellescher Weg 16, 01069 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-09-22

    We observed a multiphoton luminescence contrast between virgin and single-switched domains in Mg-doped LiNbO{sub 3} (LNO) and LiTaO{sub 3} (LTO) single crystals with different doping levels of 07?mol. % and 08?mol. %, respectively. A luminescence contrast in the range of 3% was measured between as-grown and electrically inverted domain areas in Mg:LNO samples, while the contrast reaches values of up to 30% for the Mg:LTO case. Under annealing, an exponential decay of the domain contrast was observed. The activation energy of about 1?eV being determined for the decay allowed a comparison with reported activation energies of associated defects, clearly illustrating a strong connection between thermal contrast decay and the H{sup +} and Li{sup +}-ion mobility. Finally, performing similar experiments on oxidized samples undoubtedly demonstrated that the origin of the reported luminescence contrast is strongly connected with lithium ions.

  7. Temperature Dependence of Aliovalent-vanadium Doping in LiFePO4 Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, Katharine L; Bridges, Craig A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Idrobo Tapia, Juan C; Manthiram, Arumugam; Goodenough, J. B.; Segre, C; Katsoudas, John; Maroni, V. A.

    2013-01-01

    Vanadium-doped olivine LiFePO4 cathode materials have been synthesized by a novel low-temperature microwave-assisted solvothermal (MW-ST) method at 300 oC. Based on chemical and powder neutron/X-ray diffraction analysis, the compositions of the synthesized materials were found to be LiFe1-3x/2Vx x/2PO4 (0 x 0.2) with the presence of a small number of lithium vacancies charge-compensated by V4+, not Fe3+, leading to an average oxidation state of ~ 3.2+ for vanadium. Heating the pristine 15 % V-doped sample in inert or reducing atmospheres led to a loss of vanadium from the olivine lattice with the concomitant formation of a Li3V2(PO4)3 impurity phase; after phase segregation, a partially V-doped olivine phase remained. For comparison, V-doped samples were also synthesized by conventional ball milling and heating, but only ~ 10 % V could be accommodated in the olivine lattice in agreement with previous studies. The higher degree of doping realized with the MW-ST samples demonstrates the temperature dependence of the aliovalent-vanadium doping in LiFePO4.

  8. Aliovalent titanium substitution in layered mixed Li Ni-Mn-Co oxides for lithium battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kam, Kinson; Doeff, Marca M.

    2010-12-01

    Improved electrochemical characteristics are observed for Li[Ni1/3Co1/3-yMyMn1/3]O2 cathode materials when M=Ti and y<0.07, compared to the baseline material, with up to 15percent increased discharge capacity.

  9. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as amore » function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.« less

  10. Method for improving voltage regulation of batteries, particularly Li/FeS/sub 2/ thermal batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godshall, N.A.

    1986-06-10

    Batteries are improved, especially with respect to voltage regulation properties, by employing as anode and cathode compositions, those which fall in a thermodynamically invariant region of the metallurgical phase diagram of the combination of the constituent components. The invention is especially useful in the Li/FeS/sub 2/ system.

  11. REVERSIBLE HYDROGEN STORAGE IN A LiBH{sub 4}-C{sub 60} NANOCOMPOSITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teprovich, J.; Zidan, R.; Peters, B.; Wheeler, J.

    2013-08-06

    Reversible hydrogen storage in a LiBH{sub 4}:C{sub 60} nanocomposite (70:30 wt. %) synthesized by solvent-assisted mixing has been demonstrated. During the solvent-assisted mixing and nanocomposite formation, a chemical reaction occurs in which the C{sub 60} cages are significantly modified by polymerization as well as by hydrogenation (fullerane formation) in the presence of LiBH{sub 4}. We have determined that two distinct hydrogen desorption events are observed upon rehydrogenation of the material, which are attributed to the reversible formation of a fullerane (C{sub 60}H{sub x}) as well as a LiBH4 species. This system is unique in that the carbon species (C{sub 60}) actively participates in the hydrogen storage process which differs from the common practice of melt infiltration of high surface area carbon materials with LiBH{sub 4} (nanoconfinment effect). This nanocomposite demonstrated good reversible hydrogen storage properties as well as the ability to absorb hydrogen under mild conditions (pressures as low as 10 bar H{sub 2} or temperatures as low as 150?C). The nanocomposite was characterized by TGA-RGA, DSC, XRD, LDI-TOF-MS, FTIR, 1H NMR, and APPI MS.

  12. Evaluation of Li2MnSiO4 Cathode | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es018_belharouak_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Search for High Energy Density Cathode Materials Evaluation of Li2MnSiO4 Cathode Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells

  13. Evaluation of Li2MnSiO4 Cathode | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon esp_18_belharouak.pdf More Documents & Publications Search for High Energy Density Cathode Materials Evaluation of Li2MnSiO4 Cathode Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High-Capacity Polyanion Cathodes

  14. Electrolytes and Separators for High Voltage Li Ion Cells | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es100_angell_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electrolytes and Separators for High Voltage Li Ion Cells High Voltage Electrolyte for Lithium Batteries Linking Ion Solvation and Lithium Battery Electrolyte Properties

  15. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; Xiao, Jie

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) with highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.

  16. Interfacial reaction dependent performance of hollow carbon nanosphere - sulfur composite as a cathode for Li-S battery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Gu, Meng; Wagner, Michael J.; Hays, Kevin A.; Chen, Junzheng; Li, Xiaohong S.; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Ji -Guang; Liu, Jun; et al

    2015-05-26

    Lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is a promising energy storage system due to its high energy density, cost effectiveness and environmental friendliness of sulfur. However, there are still a number of challenges, such as low Coulombic efficiency and poor long-term cycling stability, impeding the commercialization of Li-S battery. The electrochemical performance of Li-S battery is closely related with the interfacial reactions occurring between hosting substrate and active sulfur species which are poorly conducting at fully oxidized and reduced states. Here, we correlate the relationship between the performance and interfacial reactions in the Li-S battery system, using a hollow carbon nanosphere (HCNS) withmore » highly graphitic character as hosting substrate for sulfur. With an appropriate amount of sulfur loading, HCNS/S composite exhibits excellent electrochemical performance because of the fast interfacial reactions between HCNS and the polysulfides. However, further increase of sulfur loading leads to increased formation of highly resistive insoluble reaction products (Li2S2/Li2S) which limits the reversibility of the interfacial reactions and results in poor electrochemical performance. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate the importance of the interfacial reaction reversibility in the whole electrode system on achieving high capacity and long cycle life of sulfur cathode for Li-S batteries.« less

  17. Electrolyte Solvation and Ionic Association. V. Acetonitrile-Lithium Bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Sang D.; Borodin, Oleg; Seo, D. M.; Zhou, Zhi B.; Henderson, Wesley A.

    2014-09-30

    Electrolytes with the salt lithium bis(fluorosulfonyl)imide (LiFSI) have been evaluated relative to comparable electrolytes with other lithium salts. Acetonitrile (AN) has been used as a model electrolyte solvent. The information obtained from the thermal phase behavior, solvation/ionic association interactions, quantum chemical (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (with an APPLE&P many-body polarizable force field for the LiFSI salt) of the (AN)n-LiFSI mixtures provides detailed insight into the coordination interactions of the FSI- anions and the wide variability noted in the electrolyte transport property (i.e., viscosity and ionic conductivity).

  18. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Wisinger, Nina; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquid cell.

  19. Dielectric properties of a polar ZnSnO{sub 3} with LiNbO{sub 3}-type

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dielectric properties of a polar ZnSnO{sub 3} with LiNbO{sub 3}-type structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dielectric properties of a polar ZnSnO{sub 3} with LiNbO{sub 3}-type structure The dielectric properties of a polar LiNbO{sub 3}-type ZnSnO{sub 3} synthesized under high-pressure have been investigated with respect to the dielectric permittivity in the relative low frequency range of 10 kHz to 1 MHz and the SHG response at an

  20. High Rate and High Capacity Li-Ion Electrodes for Vehicular Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillon, A. C.

    2012-01-01

    Significant advances in both energy density and rate capability for Li-ion batteries are necessary for implementation in electric vehicles. We have employed two different methods to improve the rate capability of high capacity electrodes. For example, we previously demonstrated that thin film high volume expansion MoO{sub 3} nanoparticle electrodes ({approx}2 {micro}m thick) have a stable capacity of {approx}630 mAh/g, at C/2 (charge/dicharge in 2 hours). By fabricating thicker conventional electrodes, an improved reversible capacity of {approx}1000 mAh/g is achieved, but the rate capability decreases. To achieve high-rate capability, we applied a thin Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} atomic layer deposition coating to enable the high volume expansion and prevent mechanical degradation. Also, we recently reported that a thin ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coating can enable natural graphite (NG) electrodes to exhibit remarkably durable cycling at 50 C. Additionally, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ALD films with a thickness of 2 to 4 {angstrom} have been shown to allow LiCoO{sub 2} to exhibit 89% capacity retention after 120 charge-discharge cycles performed up to 4.5 V vs. Li/Li{sup +}. Capacity fade at this high voltage is generally caused by oxidative decomposition of the electrolyte or cobalt dissolution. We have recently fabricated full cells of NG and LiCoO{sub 2} and coated both electrodes, one or the other electrode as well as neither electrode. In creating these full cells, we observed some surprising results that lead us to obtain a greater understanding of the ALD coatings. In a different approach we have employed carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) to synthesize binder-free, high-rate capability electrodes, with 95 wt.% active materials. In one case, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods are employed as the active storage anode material. Recently, we have also employed this method to demonstrate improved conductivity and highly improved rate capability for a LiNi{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} cathode material. Raman spectroscopy was employed to understand how the SWNTs function as a highly flexible conductive additive.

  1. Prediction of {sup 2}D Rydberg energy levels of {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li based on very accurate quantum mechanical calculations performed with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bubin, Sergiy; Sharkey, Keeper L.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2013-04-28

    Very accurate variational nonrelativistic finite-nuclear-mass calculations employing all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions are carried out for six Rydberg {sup 2}D states (1s{sup 2}nd, n= 6, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) of the {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li isotopes. The exponential parameters of the Gaussian functions are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to these parameters. The experimental results for the lower states (n= 3, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 6) and the calculated results for the higher states (n= 7, Horizontal-Ellipsis , 11) fitted with quantum-defect-like formulas are used to predict the energies of {sup 2}D 1s{sup 2}nd states for {sup 7}Li and {sup 6}Li with n up to 30.

  2. Neutron scattering study on cathode LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and solid electrolyte 5(Li{sub 2}O)(P{sub 2}O{sub 5})

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kartini, E. Putra, Teguh P. Jahya, A. K. Insani, A.; Adams, S.

    2014-09-30

    Neutron scattering is very important technique in order to investigate the energy storage materials such as lithium-ion battery. The unique advantages, neutron can see the light atoms such as Hydrogen, Lithium, and Oxygen, where those elements are negligible by other corresponding X-ray method. On the other hand, the energy storage materials, such as lithium ion battery is very important for the application in the electric vehicles, electronic devices or home appliances. The battery contains electrodes (anode and cathode), and the electrolyte materials. There are many challenging to improve the existing lithium ion battery materials, in order to increase their life time, cyclic ability and also its stability. One of the most scientific challenging is to investigate the crystal structure of both electrode and electrolyte, such as cathodes LiCoO{sub 2}, LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and LiFePO{sub 4}, and solid electrolyte Li{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Since all those battery materials contain Lithium ions and Oxygen, the used of neutron scattering techniques to study their structure and related properties are very important and indispensable. This article will review some works of investigating electrodes and electrolytes, LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} and 5(Li{sub 2}O)(P{sub 2}O{sub 5}), by using a high resolution powder diffraction (HRPD) at the multipurpose research reactor, RSG-Sywabessy of the National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Indonesia.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Real-time Metrology for Li-ion Battery R&D and Manufacturing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Applied Spectra at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about real-time metrology for Li...

  4. Effect of entropy of lithium intercalation in cathodes and anodes on Li-ion battery thermal management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Xu, Wu; Towne, Silas A; Williford, Ralph E; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Yang, Zhenguo

    2010-06-01

    The entropy changes (ΔS) in various cathode and anode materials, as well as complete Li-ion batteries, were measured using an electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system (ETMS). LiCoO2 has a much larger entropy change than electrodes based on LiNixCoyMnzO2 and LiFePO4, while lithium titanate based anode has lower entropy change compared to graphite anodes. Reversible heat generation rate was found to be a significant portion of the total heat generation rate. The appropriate combinations of cathode and anode were investigated to minimize reversible heat.

  5. Astrophysical S factor for the radiative-capture reaction p{sup 6}Li {yields} {sup 7}Be{gamma}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.; Burtebaev, N. Zazulin, D. M.; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Amar, A. S. A.

    2011-07-15

    A new measurement of differential cross sections for elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering in the energy range 0.35-1.2 MeV was performed. A partial-wave analysis of the data obtained in this way was carried out, and potentials simulating the p{sup 6}Li interaction were constructed. Various experiments devoted to studying elastic p{sup 6}Li scattering over the broad energy range of 0.5-50 MeV were analyzed on the basis of the optical model. By using the potentials obtained from the partial-wave analysis, the possibility of describing the astrophysical S factor for radiative proton capture on {sup 6}Li at low energies was considered within the potential cluster model involving forbidden states.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced High Energy Li-Ion Cell for PHEV and EV Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by 3M at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced high energy Li-ion cell for PHEV...

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Efficient Rechargeable Li/O2 Batteries Utilizing Stable Inorganic Molten Salt Electrolytes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Liox at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about efficient rechargeable Li/O2 batteries...

  8. Thermal neutron detection using a silicon pad detector and {sup 6}LiF removable converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbagallo, Massimo; Cosentino, Luigi; Marchetta, Carmelo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Scire, Carlotta; Scire, Sergio; Schillaci, Maria; Vecchio, Gianfranco; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Forcina, Vittorio; Peerani, Paolo; Vaccaro, Stefano

    2013-03-15

    A semiconductor detector coupled with a neutron converter is a good candidate for neutron detection, especially for its compactness and reliability if compared with other devices, such as {sup 3}He tubes, even though its intrinsic efficiency is rather lower. In this paper we show a neutron detector design consisting of a 3 cm Multiplication-Sign 3 cm silicon pad detector coupled with one or two external {sup 6}LiF layers, enriched in {sup 6}Li at 95%, placed in contact with the Si active surfaces. This prototype, first characterized and tested at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud and then at JRC Ispra, was successfully shown to detect thermal neutrons with the expected efficiency and an outstanding gamma rejection capability.

  9. Deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li at an energy of 25 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtebayev, N.; Artemov, S. V.; Duisebayev, B. A.; Kerimkulov, Zh. K.; Kuranov, S. B.; Sakuta, S. B.

    2010-05-15

    At an energy of 25 MeV and in the angular range 7{sup o}-175{sup o} in the laboratory frame, angular distributions were measured for elastic deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei and for the respective inelastic-scattering processes accompanied by the transitions to the ground state (1+) of the {sup 6}Li nucleus and to its excited state at E{sub x} = 2.186 MeV (J{sup {pi}} = 3{sup +}). The resulting data were analyzed on the basis of the optical model of the nucleus and the coupled-reaction-channel method with allowance for the mechanism of alpha-particle-cluster exchange. It is shown that only upon including, in the analysis, channel coupling and the exchange mechanism can the experimental cross sections for elastic and inelastic scattering be reproduced over the entire range of angles.

  10. The High-Resolution Lightweight Telescope for the EUV (HiLiTE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Galarce, D S; Boerner, P; Soufli, R; De Pontieu, B; Katz, N; Title, A; Gullikson, E M; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L

    2008-06-02

    The High-resolution Lightweight Telescope for the EUV (HiLiTE) is a Cassegrain telescope that will be made entirely of Silicon Carbide (SiC), optical substrates and metering structure alike. Using multilayer coatings, this instrument will be tuned to operate at the 465 {angstrom} Ne VII emission line, formed in solar transition region plasma at {approx}500,000 K. HiLiTE will have an aperture of 30 cm, angular resolution of {approx}0.2 arc seconds and operate at a cadence of {approx}5 seconds or less, having a mass that is about 1/4 that of one of the 20 cm aperture telescopes on the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) instrument aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). This new instrument technology thus serves as a path finder to a post-AIA, Explorer-class missions.

  11. NANOSTRUCTURED METAL OXIDES FOR ANODES OF LI-ION RECHARGEABLE BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Au, M.

    2009-12-04

    The aligned nanorods of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and nanoporous hollow spheres (NHS) of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated as the anodes for Li-ion rechargeable batteries. The Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanorods demonstrated 1433 mAh/g reversible capacity. The NHS of SnO{sub 2} and Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} delivered 400 mAh/g and 250 mAh/g capacities respectively in multiple galvonastatic discharge-charge cycles. It was found that high capacity of NHS of metal oxides is sustainable attributed to their unique structure that maintains material integrity during cycling. The nanostructured metal oxides exhibit great potential as the new anode materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries with high energy density, low cost and inherent safety.

  12. Synthesis of rock-salt type lithium borohydride and its peculiar Li{sup +} ion conduction properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyazaki, R.; Maekawa, H.; Takamura, H.

    2014-05-01

    The high energy density and excellent cycle performance of lithium ion batteries makes them superior to all other secondary batteries and explains why they are widely used in portable devices. However, because organic liquid electrolytes have a higher operating voltage than aqueous solution, they are used in lithium ion batteries. This comes with the risk of fire due to their flammability. Solid electrolytes are being investigated to find an alternative to organic liquid. However, the nature of the solid-solid point contact at the interface between the electrolyte and electrode or between the electrolyte grains is such that high power density has proven difficult to attain. We develop a new method for the fabrication of a solid electrolyte using LiBH{sub 4,} known for its super Li{sup +} ion conduction without any grain boundary contribution. The modifications to the conduction pathway achieved by stabilizing the high pressure form of this material provided a new structure with some LiBH{sub 4}, more suitable to the high rate condition. We synthesized the H.P. form of LiBH{sub 4} under ambient pressure by doping LiBH{sub 4} with the KI lattice by sintering. The formation of a KI - LiBH{sub 4} solid solution was confirmed both macroscopically and microscopically. The obtained sample was shown to be a pure Li{sup +} conductor despite its small Li{sup +} content. This conduction mechanism, where the light doping cation played a major role in ion conduction, was termed the Parasitic Conduction Mechanism. This mechanism made it possible to synthesize a new ion conductor and is expected to have enormous potential in the search for new battery materials.

  13. Preliminary Analysis on Linac Oscillation Data LI05-19 and Wake Field Energy Loss in FACET Commissioning 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2012-07-23

    In this note, preliminary analysis on linac ocsillation data in FACET linac LI05-09 plus LI11-19 is presented. Several quadrupoles are identified to possibly have different strength, compared with their designed strength in the MAD optics model. The beam energy loss due to longitudinal wake fields in the S-band linac is also analytically calculated, also by LITRACK numerical simulations.

  14. Theoretical exploration of various lithium peroxide crystal structures in a Li-air battery

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lau, Kah; Qiu, Dantong; Luo, Xiangyi; Greeley, Jeffrey; Curtiss, Larry; Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-14

    We describe a series of metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures involving different orientations and displacements of the O₂²⁻ peroxy ions based on the known Li₂O₂ crystal structure. Within the vicinity of the chemical potential ΔG ~ 0.20 eV/Li from the thermodynamic ground state of the Li₂O₂ crystal structure (i.e., Föppl structure), all of these newly found metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures are found to be insulating and high-k materials, and they have a common unique signature of an O₂²⁻ O-O vibration mode (ω ~ 799–865 cm⁻¹), which is in the range of that commonly observed in Li-air battery experiments, regardless of themore » random O₂²⁻ orientations and the symmetry in the crystal lattice. From XRD patterns analysis, the commercially available Li₂O₂ powder is confirmed to be the thermodynamic ground state Föppl-like structure. However, for Li₂O₂ compounds that are grown electrochemically under the environment of Li-O₂ cells, we found that the XRD patterns alone are not sufficient for structural identification of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystalline phases due to the poor crystallinity of the sample. In addition, the commonly known Raman signal of O₂²⁻ vibration mode is also found to be insufficient to validate the possible existence of these newly predicted Li₂O₂ crystal structures, as all of them similarly share the similar O₂²⁻ vibration mode. However considering that the discharge voltage in most Li-O₂ cells are typically several tenths of an eV below the thermodynamic equilibrium for the formation of ground state Föppl structure, the formation of these metastable Li₂O₂ crystal structures appears to be thermodynamically feasible.« less

  15. Mechanical and electrochemical response of a LiCoO2 cathode using reconstructed microstructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mendoza, Hector; Roberts, Scott Alan; Brunini, Victor E.; Grillet, Anne M.

    2016-01-02

    As LiCoO2 cathodes are charged, delithiation of the LiCoO2 active material leads to an increase in the lattice spacing, causing swelling of the particles. When these particles are packed into a bicontinuous, percolated network, as is the case in a battery electrode, this swelling leads to the generation of significant mechanical stress. In this study we performed coupled electrochemical-mechanical simulations of the charging of a LiCoO2 cathode in order to elucidate the mechanisms of stress generation and the effect of charge rate and microstructure on these stresses. Energy dispersive spectroscopy combined with scanning electron microscopy imaging was used to createmore » 3D reconstructions of a LiCoO2 cathode, and the Conformal Decomposition Finite Element Method is used to automatically generate computational meshes on this reconstructed microstructure. Replacement of the ideal solution Fickian diffusion model, typically used in battery simulations, with a more general non-ideal solution model shows substantially smaller gradients of lithium within particles than is typically observed in the literature. Using this more general model, lithium gradients only appear at states of charge where the open-circuit voltage is relatively constant. While lithium gradients do affect the mechanical stress state in the particles, the maximum stresses are always found in the fully-charged state and are strongly affected by the local details of the microstructure and particle-to-particle contacts. These coupled electrochemical-mechanical simulations begin to yield insight into the partitioning of volume change between reducing pore space and macroscopically swelling the electrode. Lastly, preliminary studies that include the presence of the polymeric binder suggest that it can greatly impact stress generation and that it is an important area for future research.« less

  16. HASL-258 IN SITU Ge(Li) AND Nal(T1) GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    HASL-258 IN SITU Ge(Li) AND Nal(T1) GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETRY September 1972 Health and Safety Laboratory (AEC) New York, New York DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

  17. A Safer Replacement for Highly Flammable Liquids Currently Used in Li-ion

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Batteries | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) A Safer Replacement for Highly Flammable Liquids Currently Used in Li-ion Batteries Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) SBIR/STTR Home About Funding Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) Applicant and Awardee Resources Commercialization Assistance Other Resources Awards SBIR/STTR Highlights Reporting Fraud Contact Information Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer

  18. Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Fail-Safe Design for Large Capacity Li-Ion Battery Systems National Renewable Energy Laboratory Contact NREL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Fail Safe Design for Large Capacity Lithium-ion Batteries.pdf (2,324 KB) Technology Marketing Summary Lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) are a promising candidate for energy storage of electric drive vehicles due to their high power and energy density. The total electric

  19. Tao Li | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blandine Jerome Tao Li Previous Next List Postdoctoral Researcher Department of Materials Science and Engineering University of California, Berkeley Email: taoli [at] berkeley.edu Phone: 510-643-6804 PhD in Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh BS in Chemistry, Fudan University EFRC research: By embedding inorganic particles in polymer matrices, the resulting mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) can potentially combine the benefits of both materials to simultaneously achieve high selectivity, high

  20. Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ohio | Department of Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon arravt008_es_dicarlo_2011_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Process for Low Cost Domestic Production of LIB Cathode Materials Construction of a Li Ion Battery (LIB) Cathode Production Plant in Elyria, Ohio

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - 17_Li_ARM07_Aerosol_Breakout.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Separating Real Aerosol Effects from p g Artifacts Using Space-borne, Air-borne and Ground Measurements and Under- and Ground Measurements and Under standing Physical Processes Using a CRM Zhanqing Li Uni ersit of Mar land University of Maryland Contributors T. Yuan, M.-J. Jeong, R. Zhang and J. Fan Objectives j * Evaluate various effects on remote sensing products from satellite and g p f m ground sensors. * Separate artifacts from the real Separate artifacts from the real effects. * Eventually

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - Garcia-Diaz - LiT Electrolysis Projects Summary V3

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    * Maroni is the Baseline for LiT Electrolysis * LLNL LDRD tries to improve molten salt liquid-liquid extraction and SRNL is contributing by investigating RbCl containing salts * SRNL LDRD tries process intensification to eliminate molten salt liquid-liquid extraction using advanced solid state electrolytes 2 3 * Upper Process shows generalized process flow diagram for Maroni Process * Lower right shows the simplification in the process flow diagram through the elimination of the liquid-liquid

  3. Impedance spectroscopy study of SiO2-Li2O:Nd2O3 glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereia, R.; Gozzo, C B; Guedes, I.; Boatner, Lynn A; Terezo, A J; Costa, M M

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, neodymium-doped lithium silicate glasses have been prepared by the conventional melt-quenching technique. The dielectric properties, electric modulus and electrical conductivity of SiO2-Li2O (SiLi-0Nd) and SiO2-Li2O:Nd2O3 (SiLi-1.35Nd) have been studied from 1 Hz to 1 MHz in the 333 423 K temperature range. At a given temperature and frequency, we observe that the resistivity increases while the conductivity accordingly decreases when neodymium ions are added to the glass matrix. The activation energy of two distinct regions was evaluated from the ln( dc)=f(1/T) plot and was found to be E1(T<363K)=0.61(0.66)eV and E2(T>363K)=1.26(1.09)eV for SiLi-0Nd (SiLi-1,35Nd). The dielectric constant ( Re) decreases while the dielectric loss (tan ( )) increases under Nd2O3 doping. We also observe that for both glasses, Re and tan ( ) tend to increase with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing frequency.

  4. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO? using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Khalifah, Peter; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2015-01-01

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO? by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygen concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ?O?? ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO?. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O? loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.

  5. Nanostructured Metal Carbides for Aprotic Li-O2 Batteries. New Insights into Interfacial Reactions and Cathode Stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Harrison, Katharine; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2015-05-01

    The development of nonaqueous Lioxygen batteries, which relies on the reversible reaction of Li + O2 to give lithium peroxide (Li2O2), is challenged by several factors, not the least being the high charging voltage that results when carbon is typically employed as the cathode host. We report here on the remarkably low 3.2 V potential for Li2O2 oxidation on a passivated nanostructured metallic carbide (Mo2C), carbon-free cathode host. Furthermore, online mass spectrometry coupled with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy unequivocally demonstrates that lithium peroxide is simultaneously oxidized together with the LixMoO3-passivated conductive interface formed on the carbide, owing to their close redox potentials. We found that the process rejuvenates the surface on each cycle upon electrochemical charge by releasing LixMoO3 into the electrolyte, explaining the low charging potential.

  6. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Khalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygenmore »concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.« less

  7. Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures as cathode materials for flexible lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Y.H., E-mail: yhding@xtu.edu.cn [College of Chemical Engineering, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Ren, H.M. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China); Huang, Y.Y. [BTR New Energy Materials Inc., Shenzhen 518000 (China); Chang, F.H.; Zhang, P. [Institute of Rheology Mechanics, Xiangtan University, Hunan 411105 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: Graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} composites as a high-performance cathode material for flexible lithium-ion batteries have been prepared by using a co-precipitation method to synthesize graphene/LiFePO4 powders as precursors and then followed by a solvent evaporation process. - Highlights: Flexible LiFePO{sub 4}/graphene films were prepared first time by a solvent evaporation process. The flexible electrode exhibited a high discharge capacity without conductive additives. Graphene network offers the electrode adequate strength to withstand repeated flexing. - Abstract: Three-dimensional graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures for flexible lithium-ion batteries were successfully prepared by solvent evaporation method. Structural characteristics of flexible electrodes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrochemical performance of graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} was examined by a variety of electrochemical testing techniques. The graphene/LiFePO{sub 4} nanostructures showed high electrochemical properties and significant flexibility. The composites with low graphene content exhibited a high capacity of 163.7 mAh g{sup ?1} at 0.1 C and 114 mAh g{sup ?1} at 5 C without further incorporation of conductive agents.

  8. Inclusion property of Cs, Sr, and Ba impurities in LiCl crystal formed by layer-melt crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Jung-Hoon; Cho, Yung-Zun; Lee, Tae-Kyo; Eun, Hee-Chul; Kim, Jun-Hong; Park, Hwan-Seo; Kim, In-Tae; Park, Geun-Il

    2013-07-01

    Pyroprocessing is one of the promising technologies enabling the recycling of spent nuclear fuels from a commercial light water reactor (LWR). In general, pyroprocessing uses dry molten salts as electrolytes. In particular, LiCl waste salt after pyroprocessing contains highly radioactive I/II group fission products mainly composed of Cs, Sr, and Ba impurities. Therefore, it is beneficial to reuse LiCl salt in the pyroprocessing as an electrolyte for economic and environmental issues. Herein, to understand the inclusion property of impurities within LiCl crystal, the physical properties such as lattice parameter change, bulk modulus, and substitution enthalpy of a LiCl crystal having 0-6 at% Cs{sup +} or Ba{sup 2+} impurities under existence of 1 at% Sr{sup 2+} impurity were calculated via the first-principles density functional theory. The substitution enthalpy of LiCl crystals having 1 at% Sr{sup 2+} showed slightly decreased value than those without Sr{sup 2+} impurity. Therefore, through the substitution enthalpy calculation, it is expected that impurities will be incorporated within LiCl crystal as co-existed form rather than as a single component form. (authors)

  9. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO? using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Khalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO? by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygen concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ?O?? ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO?. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O? loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.

  10. Structural transitions of ternary imide Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, C.; Gao, M. X.; Pan, H. G. Liu, Y. F.

    2014-08-25

    Phase transitions and energetic properties of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with different crystal structures are investigated by experiments and first-principles calculations. The Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} with the primitive cubic and orthorhombic structure is obtained by dynamically dehydrogenating a Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2}-2LiH mixture up to 280?C under an initial vacuum and 9.0?bars H{sub 2}, respectively. It is found that the obtained orthorhombic Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is converted to a primitive cubic structure as the dehydrogenation temperature is further increased to 400?C or performed by a 36?h of high-energetic ball milling. Moreover, the primitive cubic phase can be converted to an orthorhombic phase after heating at 280?C under 9.0?bars H{sub 2} for 1?h. Thermodynamic calculations show that the orthorhombic phase is the ground state structure of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}. The mechanism for phase transitions of Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2} is also discussed from the angle of energy.

  11. Studies on the thermal breakdown of common Li-ion battery electrolyte components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Roth, Emanuel Peter; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2015-08-06

    While much attention is paid to the impact of the active materials on the catastrophic failure of lithium ion batteries, much of the severity of a battery failure is also governed by the electrolytes used, which are typically flammable themselves and can decompose during battery failure. The use of LiPF6 salt can be problematic as well, not only catalyzing electrolyte decomposition, but also providing a mechanism for HF production. This work evaluates the safety performance of the common components ethylene carbonate (EC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) in the context of the gasses produced during thermal decomposition, looking at both the quantity and composition of the vapor produced. EC and DEC were found to be the largest contributors to gas production, both producing upwards of 1.5 moles of gas/mole of electrolyte. DMC was found to be relatively stable, producing very little gas regardless of the presence of LiPF6. EMC was stable on its own, but the addition of LiPF6 catalyzed decomposition of the solvent. As a result, while gas analysis did not show evidence of significant quantities of any acutely toxic materials, the gasses themselves all contained enough flammable components to potentially ignite in air.

  12. Studies on the thermal breakdown of common Li-ion battery electrolyte components

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamb, Joshua; Orendorff, Christopher J.; Roth, Emanuel Peter; Langendorf, Jill Louise

    2015-08-06

    While much attention is paid to the impact of the active materials on the catastrophic failure of lithium ion batteries, much of the severity of a battery failure is also governed by the electrolytes used, which are typically flammable themselves and can decompose during battery failure. The use of LiPF6 salt can be problematic as well, not only catalyzing electrolyte decomposition, but also providing a mechanism for HF production. This work evaluates the safety performance of the common components ethylene carbonate (EC), diethyl carbonate (DEC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), and ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) in the context of the gasses producedmore » during thermal decomposition, looking at both the quantity and composition of the vapor produced. EC and DEC were found to be the largest contributors to gas production, both producing upwards of 1.5 moles of gas/mole of electrolyte. DMC was found to be relatively stable, producing very little gas regardless of the presence of LiPF6. EMC was stable on its own, but the addition of LiPF6 catalyzed decomposition of the solvent. As a result, while gas analysis did not show evidence of significant quantities of any acutely toxic materials, the gasses themselves all contained enough flammable components to potentially ignite in air.« less

  13. Enhanced autonomic shutdown of Li-ion batteries by polydopamine coated polyethylene microspheres

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baginska, Marta; Blaiszik, Benjamin J.; Rajh, Tijana; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.

    2014-07-17

    Thermally triggered autonomic shutdown of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is demonstrated using polydopamine (PDA)-coated polyethylene microspheres applied onto a battery anode. The microspheres are dispersed in a buffered 10 mM dopamine salt solution and the pH is raised to initiate the polymerization and coat the microspheres. Coated microspheres are then mixed with an aqueous binder, applied onto a battery anode surface, dried, and incorporated into Li-ion coin cells. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy are used to verify the presence of the polydopamine on the surface of the microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy is used to examine microsphere surface morphology and resulting anodemore » coating quality. Charge and discharge capacity, as well as impedance, are measured for Li-ion coin cells as a function of microsphere content. Autonomous shutdown is achieved by applying 1.7 mg cm–2 of PDA-coated microspheres to the electrode. Furthermore, the PDA coating significantly reduces the mass of microspheres for effective shutdown compared to our prior work with uncoated microspheres.« less

  14. Retention and release of tritium in aluminum clad, Al-Li alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1991-12-31

    Tritium retention in and release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloys is modeled from experimental and operational data developed during the thirty plus years of tritium production at the Savannah River Site. The model assumes that tritium atoms, formed by the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}He reaction, are produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly becomes supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms are trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability is the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release is determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. This model is used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloys. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Retention and release of tritium in aluminum clad, Al-Li alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Tritium retention in and release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloys is modeled from experimental and operational data developed during the thirty plus years of tritium production at the Savannah River Site. The model assumes that tritium atoms, formed by the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}He reaction, are produced in solid solution in the Al-Li alloy. Because of the low solubility of hydrogen isotopes in aluminum alloys, the irradiated Al-Li rapidly becomes supersaturated in tritium. Newly produced tritium atoms are trapped by lithium atoms to form a lithium tritide. The effective tritium pressure required for trap or tritide stability is the equilibrium decomposition pressure of tritium over a lithium tritide-aluminum mixture. The temperature dependence of tritium release is determined by the permeability of the cladding to tritium and the local equilibrium at the trap sites. This model is used to calculate tritium release from aluminum clad, aluminum-lithium alloys. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Interaction of CuS and sulfur in Li-S battery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Ke; Su, Dong; Zhang, Qing; Bock, David C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Gan, Hong

    2015-10-27

    Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) battery has been a subject of intensive research in recent years due to its potential to provide much higher energy density and lower cost than the current state of the art lithiumion battery technology. In this work, we have investigated Cupric Sulfide (CuS) as a capacitycontributing conductive additive to the sulfur electrode in a Li-S battery. Galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling has been used to compare the performance of both sulfur electrodes and S:CuS hybrid electrodes with various ratios. We found that the conductive CuS additive enhanced the utilization of the sulfur cathode under a 1C rate discharge. However, under a C/10 discharge rate, S:CuS hybrid electrodes exhibited lower sulfur utilization in the first discharge and faster capacity decay in later cycles than a pure sulfur electrode due to the dissolution of CuS. The CuS dissolution is found to be the result of strong interaction between the soluble low order polysulfide Li2S3 and CuS. As a result, we identified the presence of conductive copper-containing sulfides at the cycled lithium anode surface, which may degrade the effectiveness of the passivation function of the solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) layer, accounting for the poor cycling performance of the S:CuS hybrid cells at low rate.

  17. Correlating Local Structure with Electrochemical Activity in Li2MnO3

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nanda, Jagjit; Sacci, Robert L.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Dixit, Hemant M.; Cooper, Valentino R.; Pezeshki, Alan M.; Ruther, Rose E.

    2015-07-31

    Li2MnO3 is of interest as one component of the composite lithium-rich oxides, which are under development for high capacity, high voltage cathodes in lithium ion batteries. Despite such practical importance, the mechanism of electrochemical activity in Li2MnO3 is contested in the literature, as are the effects of long-term electrochemical cycling. Here, Raman spectroscopy and mapping are used to follow the chemical and structural changes that occur in Li2MnO3. Both conventional slurry electrodes and thin films are studied as a function of the state of charge (voltage) and cycle number. Thin films have similar electrochemical properties as electrodes prepared from slurries,more » but allow for spectroscopic investigations on uniform samples without carbon additives. Spectral changes correlate well with electrochemical activity and support a mechanism whereby capacity is lost upon extended cycling due to the formation of new manganese oxide phases. Raman mapping of both thin film and slurry electrodes charged to different voltages reveals significant variation in the local structure. Poor conductivity and slow kinetics associated with a two-phase reaction mechanism contribute to the heterogeneity.« less

  18. Can Vanadium Be Substituted into LiFePO[subscript 4]?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omenya, Fredrick; Chernova, Natasha A.; Upreti, Shailesh; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2015-10-15

    Vanadium is shown to substitute for iron in the olivine LiFePO{sub 4} up to at least 10 mol %, when the synthesis is carried out at 550 C. In the solid solution LiFe{sub 1-3y/2}V{sub y}PO{sub 4}, the a and b lattice parameters and cell volume decrease with increasing vanadium content, while the c lattice parameter increases slightly. However, when the synthesis is performed at 650 C, a NASICON phase, Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is also formed, showing that solid solution is a function of the synthesis temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure indicates vanadium is in the 3+ oxidation state and in an octahedral environment. Magnetic studies reveal a shift of the antiferromagnetic ordering transition toward lower temperatures with increasing vanadium substitution, confirming solid solution formation. The addition of vanadium enhances the electrochemical performance of the materials especially at high current densities.

  19. Enhanced autonomic shutdown of Li-ion batteries by polydopamine coated polyethylene microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baginska, Marta; Blaiszik, Benjamin J.; Rajh, Tijana; Sottos, Nancy R.; White, Scott R.

    2014-07-17

    Thermally triggered autonomic shutdown of a Lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery is demonstrated using polydopamine (PDA)-coated polyethylene microspheres applied onto a battery anode. The microspheres are dispersed in a buffered 10 mM dopamine salt solution and the pH is raised to initiate the polymerization and coat the microspheres. Coated microspheres are then mixed with an aqueous binder, applied onto a battery anode surface, dried, and incorporated into Li-ion coin cells. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy are used to verify the presence of the polydopamine on the surface of the microspheres. Scanning electron microscopy is used to examine microsphere surface morphology and resulting anode coating quality. Charge and discharge capacity, as well as impedance, are measured for Li-ion coin cells as a function of microsphere content. Autonomous shutdown is achieved by applying 1.7 mg cm2 of PDA-coated microspheres to the electrode. Furthermore, the PDA coating significantly reduces the mass of microspheres for effective shutdown compared to our prior work with uncoated microspheres.

  20. Optimized Operating Range for Large-Format LiFePO4/Graphite Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Jiuchun; Shi, Wei; Zheng, Jianming; Zuo, Pengjian; Xiao, Jie; Chen, Xilin; Xu, Wu; Zhang, Jiguang

    2014-06-01

    e investigated the long-term cycling performance of large format 20Ah LiFePO4/graphite batteries when they are cycled in various state-of-charge (SOC) ranges. It is found that batteries cycled in the medium SOC range (ca. 20~80% SOC) exhibit superior cycling stability than batteries cycled at both ends (0-20% or 80-100%) of the SOC even though the capcity utilized in the medium SOC range is three times as large as those cycled at both ends of the SOC. Several non-destructive techniques, including a voltage interruption approach, model-based parameter identification, electrode impedance spectra analysis, ?Q/?V analysis, and entropy change test, were used to investigate the performance of LiFePO4/graphite batteries within different SOC ranges. The results reveal that batteries at the ends of SOC exhibit much higher polarization impedance than those at the medium SOC range. These results can be attributed to the significant structural change of cathode and anode materials as revealed by the large entropy change within these ranges. The direct correlation between the polarization impedance and the cycle life of the batteries provides an effective methodology for battery management systems to control and prolong the cycle life of LiFePO4/graphite and other batteries.

  1. Evolution of Elastic X-ray Scattering in Laser-Shocked Warm Dense Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugland, N L; Gregori, G; Bandyopadhyay, S; Brenner, C; Brown, C; Constantin, C; Glenzer, S H; Khattak, F; Kritcher, A L; Niemann, C; Otten, A; Pasley, J; Pelka, A; Roth, M; Spindloe, C; Riley, D

    2009-06-02

    We have studied the dynamics of warm dense Li with near-elastic x-ray scattering. Li foils were heated and compressed using shock waves driven by 4 ns long laser pulses. Separate 1 ns long laser pulses were used to generate a bright source of 2.96 keV Cl Ly-{alpha} photons for x-ray scattering, and the spectrum of scattered photons was recorded at a scattering angle of 120{sup o} using a HOPG crystal operated in the von Hamos geometry. A variable delay between the heater and backlighter laser beams measured the scattering time evolution. Comparison with radiation hydrodynamics simulations shows that the plasma is highly coupled during the first several nanoseconds, then relaxes to a moderate coupling state at later times. Near-elastic scattering amplitudes have been successfully simulated using the screened one-component plasma model. Our main finding is that the near-elastic scattering amplitudes are quite sensitive to the mean ionization state {bar Z}, and by extension to the choice of ionization model in the radiation-hydrodynamics simulations used to predict plasma properties within the shocked Li.

  2. Interaction of CuS and sulfur in Li-S battery system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Ke; Su, Dong; Zhang, Qing; Bock, David C.; Marschilok, Amy C.; Takeuchi, Kenneth J.; Takeuchi, Esther S.; Gan, Hong

    2015-10-27

    Lithium-Sulfur (Li-S) battery has been a subject of intensive research in recent years due to its potential to provide much higher energy density and lower cost than the current state of the art lithiumion battery technology. In this work, we have investigated Cupric Sulfide (CuS) as a capacitycontributing conductive additive to the sulfur electrode in a Li-S battery. Galvanostatic charge/discharge cycling has been used to compare the performance of both sulfur electrodes and S:CuS hybrid electrodes with various ratios. We found that the conductive CuS additive enhanced the utilization of the sulfur cathode under a 1C rate discharge. However, undermore » a C/10 discharge rate, S:CuS hybrid electrodes exhibited lower sulfur utilization in the first discharge and faster capacity decay in later cycles than a pure sulfur electrode due to the dissolution of CuS. The CuS dissolution is found to be the result of strong interaction between the soluble low order polysulfide Li2S3 and CuS. As a result, we identified the presence of conductive copper-containing sulfides at the cycled lithium anode surface, which may degrade the effectiveness of the passivation function of the solid-electrolyte-interphase (SEI) layer, accounting for the poor cycling performance of the S:CuS hybrid cells at low rate.« less

  3. Li-Ion polymer cells thermal property changes as a function of cycle-life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maleki, Hossein; Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Hallmark, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The impact of elevated temperature chargeedischarge cycling on thermal conductivity (K-value) of Lithium Ion Polymer (LIP) cells of various chemistries from three different manufacturers was investigated. These included high voltage (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.35 V), wide voltage (Si:C/LiCoO2:2.7e4.35 V) and conventional (Graphite/LiCoO2:3.0e4.2 V) chemistries. Investigation results show limited variability within the in-plane and through-plane K-values for the fresh cells with graphite-based anodes from all three suppliers. After 500 cycles at 45 C, in-plane and through-plane K-values of the high voltage cells reduced less vs. those for the wide voltage cells. Such results suggest that high temperature cycling could have a greater impact on thermal properties of Si:C cells than on the LIP cells with graphite (Gr) anode cells we tested. This difference is due to the excess swelling of Si:C-anode based cells vs. Gr-anode cells during cycling, especially at elevated temperatures. Thermal modeling is used to evaluate the impact of K-value changes, due to cycles at 45 C, on the cells internal heat propagation under internal short circuit condition that leads to localized meltdown of the separator.

  4. Viscosity and density of aqueous solutions of LiBr, LiCl, ZnBr[sub 2], CaCl[sub 2], and LiNO[sub 3]; 1: Single salt solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wimby, J.M.; Berntsson, T.S. . Dept. of Heat and Power Technology)

    1994-01-01

    New experimental data for the viscosity and density of the binary systems lithium chloride + water, lithium bromide + water, calcium chloride + water, lithium nitrate + water, and zinc bromide + water are presented. Densities are presented in tabular form and as 10-parameter correlations, while kinematic and dynamic viscosities are presented in tabular form. Data are presented in the concentration range from intermediate dilution to close to room temperature crystallization concentration. The temperature ranges are 20--70 C for density and 25--90 C for viscosity. When available, literature data are compared with the new data, and some disagreement is found. New thermogravimetric curves are presented for the dehydration of CaCl[sub 2], ZnBr[sub 2], and LiBr in order to enable evaluation of drying as a composition determination technique.

  5. Combined effect of chemical pressure and valence electron concentration through the electron-deficient Li substitution on the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Gnu; Jeon, Jieun; Kim, Youngjo; Kwon Kang, Sung; Ahn, Kyunghan; You, Tae-Soo

    2013-09-15

    Four members of the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system have been prepared by high-temperature reaction method and characterized by X-ray diffractions. All compounds crystallize in the orthorhombic Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type structure (space group Pnma, Pearson code oP16) with bonding interactions for interslab Ge{sub 2} dimers. The Li substitution for rare-earth elements in the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} system leads to a combined effect of the increased chemical pressure and the decreased valance electron concentration (VEC), which eventually results in the structure transformation from the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type with all broken interslab GeGe bond for the parental RE{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} to the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type structure for the ternary RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system. Site-preference between rare-earth metals and Li is proven to generate energetically the most favorable atomic arrangements according to coloring-problem, and the rationale is provided using both the size-factor and the electronic-factor related, respectively, to site-volume and electronegativity as well as QVAL values. Tight-binding, linear-muffin-tin-orbital (TB-LMTO) calculations are performed to investigate electronic densities of states (DOS) and crystal orbital Hamilton population (COHP) curves. The influence of reduced VEC for chemical bonding including the formation of interslab Ge{sub 2} dimers is also discussed. The magnetic property measurements prove that the non-magnetic Li substitution leads to the ferromagnetic (FM)-like ground state for Ce{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} and the co-existence of antiferromagntic (AFM) and FM ground states for Sm{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4}. - Graphical abstract: Reported is a combined effect of the chemical pressure and the reduced VEC caused by the smaller monovalent non-magnetic Li substitution for the larger trivalent magnetic rare-earth metals in the RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr, and Sm) system. This results in the structure transformation from the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type to the Gd{sub 5}Si{sub 4}-type structure and the changes in magnetic properties. Display Omitted - Highlights: Four Li-containing intermetallic compounds RE{sub 4}LiGe{sub 4} (RE=La, Ce, Pr and Sm) were synthesized. The combined effect of the chemical pressure and the reduced VEC caused by Li substitution for a rare-earth metal results in the structure transformation. Electronic structures and magnetic properties of title compounds were thoroughly investigated.

  6. Nanoscale Phase Separation, Cation Ordering, and Surface Oxygen Chemistry in Pristine Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gu, Meng; Genc, Arda; Belharouak, Ilias; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

    2013-05-14

    Li-rich layered material Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 possesses high voltage and high specific capacity, which makes it an attractive candidate for the transportation industry and sustainable energy storage systems. The rechargeable capacity of the Li-ion battery is linked largely to the structural stability of the cathode materials during the charge-discharge cycles. However, the structure and cation distribution in pristine (un-cycled) Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 have not yet been fully characterized. Using a combination of aberration-corrected scanning/transmission electron microscopy, X-ray dispersive energy spectroscopy (XEDS), electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), and complementary multislice image simulation, we have probed the crystal structure, cation/anion distribution, and electronic structure of Li1.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 nanoparticle. We discovered that the electronic structure and valence state of transition metal ions show significant variations, which have been identified to be attributed to the oxygen deficiency near the particle surfaces. Characterization of the nanoscale phase separation and cation ordering in the pristine material are critical for understanding the capacity and voltage fading of this material for battery application.

  7. Successes and failures of Hubbard-corrected density functional theory. The case of Mg doped LiCoO2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Santana Palacio, Juan A.; Kim, Jeongnim; Kent, Paul R.; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2014-10-28

    We have evaluated the successes and failures of the Hubbard-corrected density functional theory approach to study Mg doping of LiCoO2. We computed the effect of the U parameter on the energetic, geometric, and electronic properties of two possible doping mechanisms: (1) substitution of Mg onto a Co (or Li) site with an associated impurity state and (2) formation of impurity-state-free complexes of substitutional Mg and point defects in LiCoO2. We find that formation of impurity states results in changes on the valency of Co in LiCoO2. Variation of the Co U shifts the energy of the impurity state, resulting inmore » energetic, geometric, and electronic properties that depend significantly on the specific value of U. In contrast, the properties of the impurity-state-free complexes are insensitive to U. These results identify reasons for the strong dependence on the doping properties on the chosen value of U and for the overall difficulty of achieving agreement with the experimentally known energetic and electronic properties of doped transition metal oxides such as LiCoO2.« less

  8. Selected test results from the neosonic polymer Li-ion battery.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, David T.; Hund, Thomas D.

    2010-07-01

    The performance of the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery was measured using a number of tests including capacity, capacity as a function of temperature, ohmic resistance, spectral impedance, hybrid pulsed power test, utility partial state of charge (PSOC) pulsed cycle test, and an over-charge/voltage abuse test. The goal of this work was to evaluate the performance of the polymer Li-ion battery technology for utility applications requiring frequent charges and discharges, such as voltage support, frequency regulation, wind farm energy smoothing, and solar photovoltaic energy smoothing. Test results have indicated that the Neosonic polymer Li-ion battery technology can provide power levels up to the 10C{sub 1} discharge rate with minimal energy loss compared to the 1 h (1C) discharge rate. Two of the three cells used in the utility PSOC pulsed cycle test completed about 12,000 cycles with only a gradual loss in capacity of 10 and 13%. The third cell experienced a 40% loss in capacity at about 11,000 cycles. The DC ohmic resistance and AC spectral impedance measurements also indicate that there were increases in impedance after cycling, especially for the third cell. Cell No.3 impedance Rs increased significantly along with extensive ballooning of the foil pouch. Finally, at a 1C (10 A) charge rate, the over charge/voltage abuse test with cell confinement similar to a multi cell string resulted in the cell venting hot gases at about 45 C 45 minutes into the test. At 104 minutes into the test the cell voltage spiked to the 12 volt limit and continued out to the end of the test at 151 minutes. In summary, the Neosonic cells performed as expected with good cycle-life and safety.

  9. Thermal Properties of LiCl-KCl Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Anderson, Mark; Simpson, Mike

    2012-11-30

    This project addresses both practical and fundamental scientific issues of direct relevance to operational challenges of the molten LiCl-KCl salt pyrochemical process, while providing avenues for improvements in the process. In order to understand the effects of the continually changing composition of the molten salt bath during the process, the project team will systematically vary the concentrations of rare earth surrogate elements, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, and neodymium, which will be added to the molten LiCl-KCl salt. They will also perform a limited number of focused experiments by the dissolution of depleted uranium. All experiments will be performed at 500 deg C. The project consists of the following tasks. Researchers will measure density of the molten salts using an instrument specifically designed for this purpose, and will determine the melting points with a differential scanning calorimeter. Knowledge of these properties is essential for salt mass accounting and taking the necessary steps to prevent melt freezing. The team will use cyclic voltammetry studies to determine redox potentials of the rare earth cations, as well as their diffusion coefficients and activities in the molten LiCl-KCl salt. In addition, the team will perform anodic stripping voltammetry to determine the concentration of the rare earth elements and their solubilities, and to develop the scientific basis for an on-line diagnostic system for in situ monitoring of the cation species concentration (rare earths in this case). Solubility and activity of the cation species are critically important for the prediction of the salt's useful lifetime and disposal.

  10. Resonant Coherent Excitation of Fast Hydrogen Atoms in Front of a LiF(001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auth, C.; Mertens, A.; Winter, H.; Borisov, A.G.; Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    We have scattered protons and hydrogen atoms with energies of some keV from a LiF(001) surface under a grazing angle of incidence. From the intensity of Lyman-{alpha} radiation (transition from n=2 to n=1, {lambda}=121.6 nm ) as a function of projectile energy for different azimuthal orientations of the crystal surface, we find clear evidence for a resonant coherent excitation of n=2 states of hydrogen atoms in the oscillating electric field in front of the insulator surface. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Transport and Failure in Li-ion Batteries Monday, February 13, 2012 - 1:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Stephen J. Harris, General Motors R&D While battery performance is well predicted by the macrohomogeneous model of Newman and co-workers, predicting degradation and failure remains a challenge. It may be that, like most materials, failure depends on local imperfections and inhomogeneities. We use tomographic data to evaluate the homogeneity of the tortuosity of the

  12. Three-Body Recombination of {sup 6}Li Atoms with Large Negative Scattering Lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braaten, Eric; Kang, Daekyoung; Platter, Lucas; Hammer, H.-W.

    2009-08-14

    The three-body recombination rate at threshold for distinguishable atoms with large negative pair scattering lengths is calculated in the zero-range approximation. The only parameters in this limit are the 3 scattering lengths and the Efimov parameter, which can be complex-valued. We provide semianalytic expressions for the cases of 2 or 3 equal scattering lengths, and we obtain numerical results for the general case of 3 different scattering lengths. Our general result is applied to the three lowest hyperfine states of {sup 6}Li atoms. Comparisons with recent experiments provide indications of loss features associated with Efimov trimers near the 3-atom threshold.

  13. Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New Synthetic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Approach (ANL-IN-10-031) - Energy Innovation Portal Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Energy Storage Energy Storage Find More Like This Return to Search Electrode Materials for Rechargeable Li-ion Batteries: a New Synthetic Approach (ANL-IN-10-031) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <p> This figure shows the high-rate performance of the new class of cathode materials featuring bi-layered structures.&nbsp; The highest current rate of 1500

  14. Observation of Electron-Beam-Induced Phase Evolution Mimicking the Effect of the ChargeDischarge Cycle in Li-Rich Layered Cathode Materials Used for Li Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ping; Yan, Pengfei; Romero, Eric; Spoerke, Erik David; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min

    2015-01-27

    Capacity loss, and voltage decrease upon electrochemical charge-discharge cycling observed in lithium-rich layered cathode oxides (Li[LixMnyTM1-x-y]O2, TM = Ni, Co or Fe) have recently been attributed to the formation of a surface reconstructed layer (SRL) that evolves from a thin (<2 nm), defect spinel layer upon the first charge, to a relatively thick (~5nm), spinel or rock-salt layer upon continuous charge-discharge cycling. Here we report observations of a SRL and structural evolution of the SRL on the Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) particles, which are identical to those reported due to the charge-discharge cycle but are a result of electron-beam irradiation during scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. Sensitivity of the lithium-rich layered oxides to high-energy electrons leads to the formation of thin, defect spinel layer on surfaces of the particles when exposed to a 200kV electron beam for as little as 30 seconds under normal high-resolution STEM imaging conditions. Further electron irradiation produces a thicker layer of the spinel phase, ultimately producing a rock-salt layer at a higher electron exposure. Atomic-scale chemical mapping by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in STEM indicates the electron-beam-induced SRL formation on LNMO is accomplished by migration of the transition metal ions to the Li sites without breaking down the lattice. The observation through this study provides an insight for understanding the mechanism of forming the SRL and also possibly a mean to study structural evolution in the Li-rich layered oxides without involving the electrochemistry.

  15. Nanoscale imaging of fundamental Li battery chemistry: solid-electrolyte interphase formation and preferential growth of lithium metal nanoclusters

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sacci, Robert L; Black, Jennifer M; Wisinger, Nina Balke; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren Leslie; Unocic, Raymond R

    2015-01-01

    The performance characteristics of Li-ion batteries are intrinsically linked to evolving nanoscale interfacial electrochemical reactions. To probe the mechanisms of solid electrolyte interphase formation and Li electrodeposition from a standard battery electrolyte, we use in situ electrochemical scanning transmission electron microscopy for controlled potential sweep-hold electrochemical measurements with simultaneous BF and ADF STEM image acquisition. Through a combined quantitative electrochemical measurement and quantitative STEM imaging approach, based upon electron scattering theory, we show that chemically sensitive ADF STEM imaging can be used to estimate the density of evolving SEI constituents and distinguish contrast mechanisms of Li-bearing components in the liquidmore » cell.« less

  16. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Qiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zheng, Doug; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Liair batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1,more0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.less

  17. Vector analyzing power of {pi}{sup +7}Li scattering in the region of the {delta}{sub 33} resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibraeva, E. T.; Zhusupov, M. A.; Zaykin, A. Yu.; Imambekov, O.

    2006-04-15

    Within Glauber diffraction theory, the vector analyzing power iT{sub 11} is calculated at three energies of positively charged pions, 134, 164, and 194 MeV, incident to {sup 7}Li nuclei. These energy values lie in the region of the {delta}{sub 33} resonance in {pi}{sup {+-}}N interaction, the resonance maximum being at 180 MeV. The calculation of iT{sub 11} was performed with several model {sup 7}Li wave functions, including the {alpha}t-cluster and shell-model ones. The properties of {pi}{sup +7}Li scattering are found to be sensitive to the structural features of the target nucleus. A comparison of the results of the calculations with experimental data shows that the wave functions in question and the potentials used to calculate them are quite appropriate.

  18. Selective Separation of Cs and Sr from LiCl-Based Salt for Electrochemical Processing of Oxide Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P Sachdev

    2008-07-01

    Electrochemical processing technology is currently being used for the treatment of metallic spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at Idaho National Laboratory. The treatment of oxide-based spent nuclear fuel via electrochemical processing is possible provided there is a front-end oxide reduction step. During this reduction process, certain fission products, including Cs and Sr, partition into the salt phase and form chlorides. Both solid state and molten LiCl-zeolite-A ion exchange tests were conducted for selectively removing Cs and Sr from LiCl-based salt. The solid-state tests produced in excess of 99% removal of Cs and Sr. The molten state tests failed due to phase transformation of the zeolite structure when in contact with the molten LiCl salt.

  19. Nanostructured Metal Carbides for Aprotic Li-O2 Batteries. New Insights into Interfacial Reactions and Cathode Stability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kundu, Dipan; Black, Robert; Adams, Brian; Harrison, Katharine; Zavadil, Kevin R.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2015-05-01

    The development of nonaqueous Li–oxygen batteries, which relies on the reversible reaction of Li + O2 to give lithium peroxide (Li2O2), is challenged by several factors, not the least being the high charging voltage that results when carbon is typically employed as the cathode host. We report here on the remarkably low 3.2 V potential for Li2O2 oxidation on a passivated nanostructured metallic carbide (Mo2C), carbon-free cathode host. Furthermore, online mass spectrometry coupled with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy unequivocally demonstrates that lithium peroxide is simultaneously oxidized together with the LixMoO3-passivated conductive interface formed on the carbide, owing to their close redoxmore » potentials. We found that the process rejuvenates the surface on each cycle upon electrochemical charge by releasing LixMoO3 into the electrolyte, explaining the low charging potential.« less

  20. Structure and optical homogeneity of LiNbO{sub 3}:Zn (0.034.5 mol.%) crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidorov, Nikolay E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Tepljakova, Natalja E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Gabain, Aleksei E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Yanichev, Aleksander E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru Palatnikov, Mikhail E-mail: tepl-na@chemy.kolasc.net.ru E-mail: Jovial1985@yandex.ru

    2014-11-14

    Structure and optical homogeneity of LiNbO{sub 3}:Zn (0.034.5 mol.%) crystals were searched by photoinduced light scattering and by Raman spectroscopy. The photorefractive effect depends on Zn{sup 2+} concentration nonmonotonically. Decrease of photorefractive effect is explained by decrease of structure defects with localized electrons. The Zn{sup 2+} cations replace structure defects Nb{sub Li} and Li{sub Nb}, trapping levels appear near the bottom of the conduction band and photo electrons recombine with emission under laser radiation. By the Raman spectra the area of the high structure order is found. In this area the own alternation, the alternation of impurity cations and the vacancies along the polar axis is almost perfect.

  1. Unraveling the voltage fade mechanism in layer Li-Mn-rich electrode: formation of the tetrahedral cations for spinel conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Abraham, Daniel P; Huq, Ashfia; Payzant, E Andrew; Wood III, David L; Daniel, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of high-voltage layered lithium-and manganese-rich (LMR) composite oxide electrode has dramatically enhanced the energy density of current Li-ion energy storage systems. However, practical usage of these materials is currently not viable because of their inability to maintain a consistent voltage profile (voltage fading) during subsequent charge-discharge cycles. This report rationalizes the cause of this voltage fade by providing the evidence of layer to spinel-like (LSL) structural evolution pathways in the host Li1.2Mn0.55Ni0.15Co0.1O2 LMR composite oxide. By employing neutron powder diffraction, and temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility, we show that LSL structural rearrangement in LMR oxide occurs through a tetrahedral cation intermediate via: i) diffusion of lithium atoms from octahedral to tetrahedral sites of the lithium layer [(LiLioct LiLitet] which is followed by the dispersal of the lithium ions from the adjacent octahedral site of the metal layer to the tetrahedral sites of lithium layer [LiTM oct LiLitet]; and ii) migration of Mn from the octahedral sites of the transition metal layer to the permanent octahedral site of lithium layer via tetrahedral site of lithium layer [MnTMoct MnLitet MnLioct)]. The findings opens the door to the potential routes to mitigate this atomic restructuring in the high-voltage LMR composite oxide cathodes by manipulating the composition/structure for practical use in high-energy-density lithium-ion batteries.

  2. Crystal structure, growth and characterization of LiPbB?O??: A new congruent melting nonlinear optical crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, M.J.; Li, R.K.

    2013-05-01

    A new congruent-melting crystal LiPbB?O?? (LPBO) has been grown and its structure was determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. LPBO crystallizes in a polar space group R3c with a large unit cell of a=b=21.649(11) , c=17.193(11) , and Z=24. The basic anionic unit, (B?O?)?? group, is connected by terminal O atoms to build an infinite [(B?O?)?]? helical chain along the c axis. Second harmonic generation (SHG) measurements of the title compound indicate that LPBO can be phase matchable and its SHG coefficient is almost equal to that of KDP, which is about 3.3 times that of its analog BaLiB?O??. This significant enhancement of the SHG effect can be tentatively attributed to the lone pair Pb? cations with severely distorted coordination. LPBO has a wide transparent region from 410 to 2500 nm with a UV absorption edge about 261 nm according to the reflectance spectra. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of LiPbB?O?? composed of the (B?O?)?? anionic group and the lone pair Pb and Li polyhedra along c axis. Highlights: A new congruent-melt NLO crystal LiPbB?O?? (LPBO) has been grown. The basic structural unit of LPBO is B?O? group same as that found in LiB?O?. LPBO is phase matchable with SHG signal 10 times that of its Ba-analog. LPBO is highly transparent within 4101700 nm with a UV cut-off of 261 nm.

  3. 5LI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  4. 6LI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  5. 7LI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  6. 8LI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  7. 9LI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  8. PHEV/EV Li-Ion Battery Second-Use Project (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Pesaran, A.

    2010-04-01

    Accelerated development and market penetration of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) and electric vehicles (Evs) are restricted at present by the high cost of lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries. One way to address this problem is to recover a fraction of the battery cost via reuse in other applications after the battery is retired from service in the vehicle, if the battery can still meet the performance requirements of other energy storage applications. In several current and emerging applications, the secondary use of PHEV and EV batteries may be beneficial; these applications range from utility peak load reduction to home energy storage appliances. However, neither the full scope of possible opportunities nor the feasibility or profitability of secondary use battery opportunities have been quantified. Therefore, with support from the Energy Storage activity of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is addressing this issue. NREL will bring to bear its expertise and capabilities in energy storage for transportation and in distributed grids, advanced vehicles, utilities, solar energy, wind energy, and grid interfaces as well as its understanding of stakeholder dynamics. This presentation introduces NREL's PHEV/EV Li-ion Battery Secondary-Use project.

  9. A model for heat-affected zone hardness profiles in Al-Li-X alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rading, G.O.; Berry, J.T.

    1998-09-01

    A model based on reaction kinetics and elemental diffusion is proposed to account for the presence of double inflection in the hardness profiles of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in weldments of Al-Li-X alloys tested without postweld heat treatment (PWHT). Such profiles are particularly evident when (1) the base metal is in the peak-aged (T8 or T6) temper condition prior to welding; (2) the welding process is a high-heat input process, i.e., gas tungsten arc (GTA), gas metal arc (GMA) or plasma arc (PA) welding; and (3) a filler alloy deficient in lithium (i.e., AA 2319) is used. In the first part of this paper, the theoretical mechanisms are presented. It is proposed that the double inflection appears due to complete or partial reversion of the semi-coherent, plate-like precipitates (i.e., {theta}{prime}, T{sub 1} or S{prime}); coarsening of the plate-like precipitates at constant volume fraction; precipitation of {delta}{prime} as a result of natural aging; and diffusion of lithium from the HAZ into the weld pool due to the concentration gradient between the weld pool and the base metal. In the second part (to be published in next month`s Welding Journal), experimental validation of the model is provided using weldments of the Al-Li-Cu Alloy 2095.

  10. Nitrogen-tuned bonding mechanism of Li and Ti adatom embedded graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sangho; Chung, Yong-Chae, E-mail: yongchae@hanyang.ac.kr

    2013-09-15

    The effects of nitrogen defects on the bonding mechanism and resultant binding energy between the metal and graphene layer were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For the graphitic N-doped graphene, Li adatom exhibited ionic bonding character, while Ti adatom showed features of covalent bonding similar to that of pristine graphene. However, in the cases of pyridinic and pyrrolic structures, partially covalent bonding characteristic occurred around N atoms in the process of binding with metals, and this particular bond formation enhanced the bond strength of metal on the graphene layer as much as it exceeded the cohesive energy of the metal bulk. Thus, Li and Ti metals are expected to be dispersed with atomic accuracy on the pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene layers. These results demonstrate that the bonding mechanism of metalgraphene complex can change according to the type of N defect, and this also affects the binding results. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: Nitrogen defects changed the bonding mechanism between metal and graphene. Bonding character and binding results were investigated using DFT calculations. Covalent bonding character occurred around pyridinic and pyrrolic N-doped graphene. Pyridinic and pyrrolic N atoms are effective for metal dispersion on the graphene.

  11. Dynamics of laser-blow-off induced Li plume in confined geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Bhupesh; Singh, R K; Kumar, Ajai [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)] [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar-382 428 (India)

    2013-08-15

    Dynamics of Li plasma plume created by laser-blow-off technique in air ambient is reported. Plasma plume dynamics and its optical emission are investigated in planar and confined geometries using time resolved shadowgraph imaging and optical emission spectroscopy. Significant differences in the plasma characteristics in confined geometry are quantitatively investigated by comparing the plasma parameters (temperature and density) in free expansion and confined geometry configurations. Dynamics and physical parameters of the primary as well as the reflected shock waves (in confined geometry) and their interactions with expanding plasma are briefly addressed. A large enhancement in the emission intensities of Li I 610.3 nm (2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}? 3d {sup 2}P{sub 3/2,5/2}) and 670.8 nm (2s {sup 2}S{sub 1/2}? 2p {sup 2}P{sub 1/2,3/2}) is correlated with the shock wave dynamics in the two geometries. Strong self reversal in the neutral emission infers an increase in the population density of neutrals within the confined plasma plume.

  12. Astrophysical S factors for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovichenko, S. B.

    2011-03-15

    Within the potential cluster model where orbital states are classified according to Young diagrams and isospin, astrophysical S factors are considered for radiative proton capture by {sup 3}H and {sup 7}Li nuclei at energies of up to 1 and 10 keV, respectively. It is shown that the approach used, which takes into account only the E1 transition for the p{sup 3}H capture process, makes it possible to describe well the most recent experimental data at c.m. energies in the range from 50 keV to 5MeV. In the case of proton capture by {sup 7}Li nuclei, an M1 processwas taken into account in addition to the E1 transition, and a general behavior and the magnitude of the experimental S factor could be correctly reproduced owing to this at astrophysical energies, including the region around the resonance at 0.441 MeV (in the laboratory frame).

  13. Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structure (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Li1.5Mn0.5As Alloys in the Cu2Sb Structure × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize

  14. L LI LI I I

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... Commercial facilities were used as MED and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites for storage and processing of uranium and thorium ores and for fabricating and machining metal made ...

  15. TU-F-BRE-07: In Vivo Neutron Detection in Patients Undergoing Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR) for Primary Kidney Cancer Using 6Li and 7Li Enriched TLD Pairs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lonski, P; Kron, T; Franich, R; Keehan, S; Siva, S; Taylor, M

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for primary kidney cancer often involves the use of high-energy photons combined with a large number of monitor units. While important for risk assessment, the additional neutron dose to untargeted healthy tissue is not accounted for in treatment planning. This work aims to detect out-of-field neutrons in vivo for patients undergoing SABR with high-energy (>10 MV) photons and provides preliminary estimates of neutron effective dose. Methods: 3 variations of high-sensitivity LiF:Mg,Cu,P thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) material, each with varying {sup 6}Li / {sup 7}Li concentrations, were used in custom-made Perspex holders for in vivo measurements. The variation in cross section for thermal neutrons between Li isotopes was exploited to distinguish neutron from photon signal. Measurements were made out-of-field for 7 patients, each undergoing 3D-conformal SABR treatment for primary kidney cancer on a Varian 21iX linear accelerator. Results: In vivo measurements show increased signal for the {sup 6}Li enriched material for patients treated with 18 MV photons. Measurements on one SABR patient treated using only 6 MV showed no difference between the 3 TLD materials. The out-of-field photon signal decreased exponentially with distance from the treatment field. The neutron signal, taken as the difference between {sup 6}Li enriched and {sup 7}Li enriched TLD response, remains almost constant up to 50 cm from the beam central axis. Estimates of neutron effective dose from preliminary TLD calibration suggest between 10 and 30 mSv per 1000 MU delivered at 18 MV for the 7 patients. Conclusion: TLD was proven to be a useful tool for the purpose of in vivo neutron detection at out-of-field locations. Further work is required to understand the relationship between TL signal and neutron dose. Dose estimates based on preliminary TLD calibration in a neutron beam suggest the additional neutron dose was <30 mSv per 1000 MU at 18 MV.

  16. Observation of Electron-Beam-Induced Phase Evolution Mimicking the Effect of the Charge–Discharge Cycle in Li-Rich Layered Cathode Materials Used for Li Ion Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lu, Ping; Yan, Pengfei; Romero, Eric; Spoerke, Erik David; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Wang, Chong-Min

    2015-01-27

    Capacity loss, and voltage decrease upon electrochemical charge-discharge cycling observed in lithium-rich layered cathode oxides (Li[LixMnyTM1-x-y]O2, TM = Ni, Co or Fe) have recently been attributed to the formation of a surface reconstructed layer (SRL) that evolves from a thin (<2 nm), defect spinel layer upon the first charge, to a relatively thick (~5nm), spinel or rock-salt layer upon continuous charge-discharge cycling. Here we report observations of a SRL and structural evolution of the SRL on the Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LNMO) particles, which are identical to those reported due to the charge-discharge cycle but are a result of electron-beam irradiation during scanningmore » transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. Sensitivity of the lithium-rich layered oxides to high-energy electrons leads to the formation of thin, defect spinel layer on surfaces of the particles when exposed to a 200kV electron beam for as little as 30 seconds under normal high-resolution STEM imaging conditions. Further electron irradiation produces a thicker layer of the spinel phase, ultimately producing a rock-salt layer at a higher electron exposure. Atomic-scale chemical mapping by electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in STEM indicates the electron-beam-induced SRL formation on LNMO is accomplished by migration of the transition metal ions to the Li sites without breaking down the lattice. The observation through this study provides an insight for understanding the mechanism of forming the SRL and also possibly a mean to study structural evolution in the Li-rich layered oxides without involving the electrochemistry.« less

  17. Direct measurement of the chemical reactivity of silicon electrodes with LiPF6-based battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M; Baggetto, Loic; Sacci, Robert L; Unocic, Raymond R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Browning, Jim

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the chemistry and extent of reactivity between a lithium ion battery electrode surface (Si) and a liquid electrolyte (1.2M LiPF6-3:7 wt% ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate). This layer is estimated to be 3.6 nm thick and partially originates from the consumption of the silicon surface.

  18. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, P.; Jiang, D.; Kent, P.R.C.

    2011-03-31

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  19. Accurate static and dynamic properties of liquid-electrolytes for Li-ion batteries from ab initio molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Jiang, Deen; Kent, Paul R

    2011-01-01

    Lithium-ion batteries have the potential to revolutionize the transportation industry, as they did for wireless communication. A judicious choice of the liquid electrolytes used in these systems is required to achieve a good balance among high-energy storage, long cycle life and stability, and fast charging. Ethylene-carbonate (EC) and propylene-carbonate (PC) are popular electrolytes. However, to date, almost all molecular-dynamics simulations of these fluids rely on classical force fields, while a complete description of the functionality of Li-ion batteries will eventually require quantum mechanics. We perform accurate ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of ethylene- and propylene-carbonate with LiPF6 at experimental concentrations to build solvation models which explain available neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) results and to compute Li-ion solvation energies and diffusion constants. Our results suggest some similarities between the two liquids as well as some important differences. Simulations also provide useful insights into formation of solid-electrolyte interphases in the presence of electrodes in conventional Li-ion batteries.

  20. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO[sub 2] anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khandkar, A.C.

    1994-08-23

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO[sub 2] ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well. 11 figs.

  1. Creep resistant, metal-coated LiFeO.sub.2 anodes for molten carbonated fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khandkar, Ashok C. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1994-01-01

    A porous, creep-resistant, metal-coated, LiFeO.sub.2 ceramic electrode for fuel cells is disclosed. The electrode is particularly useful for molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) although it may have utilities in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) as well.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF HALIDE MODIFIERS ON THE SORPTION KINETICS OF THE LI-MG-N-H SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anton, D.; Gray, J.; Price, C.; Lascola, R.

    2011-07-20

    The effects of different transition metal halides (TiCl{sub 3}, VCl{sub 3}, ScCl{sub 3} and NiCl{sub 2}) on the sorption properties of the 1:1 molar ratio of LiNH{sub 2} to MgH{sub 2} are investigated. The modified mixtures were found to contain LiNH{sub 2}, MgH{sub 2} and LiCl. TGA results showed that the hydrogen desorption temperature was reduced with the modifier addition in this order: TiCl{sub 3} > ScCl{sub 3} > VCl{sub 3} > NiCL{sub 2}. Ammonia release was not significantly reduced resulting in a weight loss greater than the theoretical hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The isothermal sorption kinetics of the modified systems showed little improvement after the first dehydrogenation cycle over the unmodified system but showed drastic improvement in rehydrogenation cycles. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy identified the cycled material to be composed of LiH, MgH{sub 2}, Mg(NH{sub 2}){sub 2} and Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2}.

  3. A High-Conduction Ge Substituted Li3AsS4 Solid Electrolyte with Exceptional Low Activation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes show potential to enable high-energy-density secondary batteries and offer distinctive safety features as an advantage over traditional liquid electrolytes. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity, low activation energy, and outstanding electrochemical stability in crystalline solid electrolytes is a challenge for the synthesis of novel solid electrolytes. Herein we report an exceptionally low activation energy (Ea) and high room temperature superionic conductivity via facile aliovalent substitution of Li3AsS4 by Ge, which increased the conductivity by two orders of magnitude as compared to the parent compound. The composition Li3.334Ge0.334As0.666S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.12 mScm-1 at 27oC. Local Li+ hopping in this material is accompanied by distinctive low activation energy Ea of 0.17 eV being the lowest of Li+ solid conductors. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the efficacy of surface passivation of solid electrolyte to achieve compatibility with metallic lithium electrodes.

  4. Mitigation of ASR by the use of LiNO{sub 3}Characterization of the reaction products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leemann, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.leemann@empa.ch [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, berlandstr. 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland); Lrtscher, Luzia [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Bernard, Laetitia; Le Saout, Gwenn; Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, berlandstr. 129, 8600 Dbendorf (Switzerland); Espinosa-Marzal, Rosa M. [Institute for Surface Science and Technology (D-MATL), ETH Zurich, Schafmattstr. 6, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-05-01

    The influence of the LiNO{sub 3} on the ASR product was studied both in a model system and in mortars. In the model system, the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases the dissolution rate and the solubility of silica. Lithium changes the 2-dimensional cross-linked (Q{sub 3} dominated) network of the ASR product into a less structured, Q{sub 2} dominated product, likely by adopting the role of calcium. In the mortar samples the addition of LiNO{sub 3} decreases expansion and significantly influences the chemical composition and the morphology of the reaction product. Lithium decreases the calcium, sodium and potassium content and changes the relatively porous plate-like reaction product into a dense one without texture. The findings in the mortars indicate that the ASR-suppressing effect of lithium is caused by the lower potential of the reaction product to swell. Furthermore, it forms a protective barrier after an initial reaction slowing down ASR. - Highlights: Detection of lithium in ASR product by ToF-SIMS Relation between composition of pore solution and ASR product Identification of ASR suppressing mechanisms of LiNO{sub 3}.

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of LiBF 4 in propylene carbonate. A model lithium ion battery electrolyte

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Sheardy, Alex T.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Borodin, Oleg; Harris, Stephen J.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2014-08-20

    Since their introduction into the commercial marketplace in 1991, lithium ion batteries have become increasingly ubiquitous in portable technology. Nevertheless, improvements to existing battery technology are necessary to expand their utility for larger-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. Advances may be realized from improvements to the liquid electrolyte; however, current understanding of the liquid structure and properties remains incomplete. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of solutions of LiBF4 in propylene carbonate (PC), interpreted using first-principles electronic structure calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole (XCH) approximation, yields new insight into the solvation structure of the Li+ ion in this model electrolyte.more » By generating linear combinations of the computed spectra of Li+-associating and free PC molecules and comparing to the experimental spectrum, we find a Li+–solvent interaction number of 4.5. This result suggests that computational models of lithium ion battery electrolytes should move beyond tetrahedral coordination structures.« less

  6. Layer cathode methods of manufacturing and materials for Li-ion rechargeable batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Sun-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2008-01-01

    A positive electrode active material for lithium-ion rechargeable batteries of general formula Li.sub.1+xNi.sub..alpha.Mn.sub..beta.A.sub..gamma.O.sub.2 and further wherein A is Mg, Zn, Al, Co, Ga, B, Zr, or Ti and 0

  7. A Combustion Chemistry Analysis of Carbonate Solvents in Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, S J; Timmons, A; Pitz, W J

    2008-11-13

    Under abusive conditions Li-ion batteries can rupture, ejecting electrolyte and other flammable gases. In this paper we consider some of the thermochemical properties of these gases that will determine whether they ignite and how energetically they burn. We show that flames of carbonate solvents are fundamentally less energetic than those of conventional hydrocarbons. An example of this difference is given using a recently developed mechanism for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) combustion, where we show that a diffusion flame burning DMC has only half the peak energy release rate of an analogous propane flame. We find a significant variation among the carbonate solvents in the factors that are important to determining flammability, such as combustion enthalpy and vaporization enthalpy. This result suggests that thermochemical and kinetic factors might well be considered when choosing solvent mixtures.

  8. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; Vaknin, David

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we show that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.

  9. Evaluation of the physi- and chemisorption of hydrogen in alkali (Na, Li) doped fullerenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Patrick; Teprovich, Jospeph A.; Compton, Robert; Affholter, Kathleen A; Schwartz, Viviane; Veith, Gabriel M; Zidan, Ragiay

    2015-01-01

    Alkali doped fullerenes synthesized by two different solvent assisted mixing techniques are compared for their hydrogen uptake activity. In this study we investigated the interaction of hydrogen with alkali doped fullerenes via physisorption. In addition, we present the first mass spectrometric evidence for the formation of C60H60 via chemisorption. Hydrogen physisorption isotherms up to 1 atm at temperatures ranging from 77-303 K were measured demonstrating an increase in hydrogen uptake versus pure C60 and increased isosteric heats of adsorption for the lithium doped fullerene Li12C60. However, despite these improvements the low amount of physisorbed hydrogen at 1 atm and 77 K in these materials suggests that fullerenes do not possess enough accessible surface area to effectively store hydrogen due to their close packed crystalline nature.

  10. Development of high temperature transport technology for LiCl-KCl eutectic salt in pyroprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sung Ho; Lee, Hansoo; Kim, In Tae; Kim, Jeong-Guk

    2013-07-01

    The development of high-temperature transport technologies for molten salt is a prerequisite and a key issue in the industrialization of pyro-reprocessing for advanced fuel cycle scenarios. The solution of a molten salt centrifugal pump was discarded because of the high corrosion power of a high temperature molten salt, so the suction pump solution was selected. An apparatus for salt transport experiments by suction was designed and tested using LiC-KCl eutectic salt. The experimental results of lab-scale molten salt transport by suction showed a 99.5% transport rate (ratio of transported salt to total salt) under a vacuum range of 100 mtorr - 10 torr at 500 Celsius degrees. The suction system has been integrated to the PRIDE (pyroprocessing integrated inactive demonstration) facility that is a demonstrator using non-irradiated materials (natural uranium and surrogate materials). The performance of the suction pump for the transport of molten salts has been confirmed.

  11. The Optimization and Calibration of the AWCC Using 252Cf Interrogation and the Comparison with an AmLi Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen; Rael, Carlos D.

    2015-12-18

    The purpose of this report is to provide information on the modifications to the Active Well Coincidence Counter (AWCC) for the use of 252Cf integration sources in place of AmLi sources

  12. Electrochemical performance of polyaniline coated LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode active material for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ?ahan, Halil Dokan, Fatma K?l?c Ayd?n, Abdlhamit zdemir, Burcu zdemir, Nazl? Patat, ?aban

    2013-12-16

    LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} compound are synthesized by combustion method using glycine as a fuel at temperature (T), 800C which was coated by a polyaniline. The goal of this procedure is to promote better electronic conductivity of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} particles in order to improve their electrochemical performance for their application as cathodes in secondary lithium ion batteries. The structures of prepared products have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To investigate the effect of polyaniline coating galvanostatic charge-discharge cycling (148 mA g{sup ?1}) studies are made in the voltage range of 3.5-4.5 V vs. Li at room temperature. Electrochemical performance of the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} was significantly improved by the polaniline coating.

  13. Lithium cobalt(II) pyrophosphate, Li[subscript 1.86]CoP[subscript 2]O[subscript 7], from synchrotron X-ray powder data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hui; Upreti, Shailesh; Chernova, Natasha A.; Whittingham, M.Stanley

    2015-10-15

    Structure refinement of high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction data of the title compound gave the composition Li{sub 1.865}CoP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which is also verified by the ICP measurement. Two Co sites exist in the structure: one is a CoO{sub 5} square pyramid and the other is a CoO{sub 6} octahedron. They share edges and are further interconnected through P{sub 2}O{sub 7} groups, forming a three-dimensional framework, which exhibits different kinds of intersecting tunnels containing Li cations and could be of great interest in Li ion battery chemistry. The structure also exhibits cation disorder with 13.5% Co residing at the lithium (Li1) site. Co seems to have an average oxidation state of 2.135, as obtained from the strutural stochiometry that closely supports the magnetic susceptibility findings.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Farasis Energy, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density Li...

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Energy Density Li-ion Cells for EV’s Based on Novel, High Voltage Cathode Material Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Farasis at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high energy density Li-ion cells for...

  16. Modeling Solute Thermokinetics in LiCI-KCI Molten Salt for Nuclear Waste Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Dane; Eapen, Jacob

    2013-10-01

    Recovery of actinides is an integral part of a closed nuclear fuel cycle. Pyrometallurgical nuclear fuel recycling processes have been developed in the past for recovering actinides from spent metallic and nitride fuels. The process is essentially to dissolve the spent fuel in a molten salt and then extract just the actinides for reuse in a reactor. Extraction is typically done through electrorefining, which involves electrochemical reduction of the dissolved actinides and plating onto a cathode. Knowledge of a number of basic thermokinetic properties of salts and salt-fuel mixtures is necessary for optimizing present and developing new approaches for pyrometallurgical waste processing. The properties of salt-fuel mixtures are presently being studied, but there are so many solutes and varying concentrations that direct experimental investigation is prohibitively time consuming and expensive (particularly for radioactive elements like Pu). Therefore, there is a need to reduce the number of required experiments through modeling of salt and salt-fuel mixture properties. This project will develop first-principles-based molecular modeling and simulation approaches to predict fundamental thermokinetic properties of dissolved actinides and fission products in molten salts. The focus of the proposed work is on property changes with higher concentrations (up to 5 mol%) of dissolved fuel components, where there is still very limited experimental data. The properties predicted with the modeling will be density, which is used to assess the amount of dissolved material in the salt; diffusion coefficients, which can control rates of material transport during separation; and solute activity, which determines total solubility and reduction potentials used during electrorefining. The work will focus on La, Sr, and U, which are chosen to include the important distinct categories of lanthanides, alkali earths, and actinides, respectively. Studies will be performed using LiCl-KCl salt at the eutectic composition (58 mol% LiCl, 42 mol% KCl), which is used for treating spent EBR-II fuel. The same process being used for EBRII fuel is currently being studied for widespread international implementation. The methods will focus on first-principles and first- principles derived interatomic potential based simulations, primarily using molecular dynamics. Results will be validated against existing literature and parallel ongoing experimental efforts. The simulation results will be of value for interpreting experimental results, validating analytical models, and for optimizing waste separation by potentially developing new salt configurations and operating conditions.

  17. Insight into the Atomic Structure of High-Voltage Spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material in the First Cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xuejie; Yu, Xiqian; Lin, Mingxiang; Ben, Liubin; Sun, Yang; Wang, Hao; Yang, Zhenzhong; Gu, Lin; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zhao, Haofei; et al

    2014-12-22

    Application of high-voltage spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material is the closest and the most realistic approach to meeting the midterm goal of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). However, this application has been hampered by long-standing issues, such as capacity degradation and poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Although it is well-known that the structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 into which Li ions are reversibly intercalated plays a critical role in the above issues, performance degradation related to structural changes, particularly in the first cycle, are not fully understood. Here, we report detailed investigations ofmore » local atomic-level and average structure of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 during first cycle (3.5–4.9 V) at room temperature. We observed two types of local atomic-level migration of transition metals (TM) ions in the cathode of a well-prepared LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4//Li half-cell during first charge via an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Surface regions (~2 nm) of the cycled LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 particles show migration of TM ions into tetrahedral Li sites to form a Mn3O4-like structure. However, subsurface regions of the cycled particles exhibit migration of TM ions into empty octahedral sites to form a rocksalt-like structure. The migration of these TM ions are closely related to dissolution of Ni/Mn ions and building-up of charge transfer impedance, which contribute significantly to the capacity degradation and the poor first-cycle Coulombic efficiency of spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode material. Accordingly, we provide suggestions of effective stabilization of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 structure to obtain better electrochemical performance.« less

  18. Combustion synthesized nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode for lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathiya, K.; Bhuvaneswari, D.; Gangulibabu; Kalaiselvi, N.

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C compound has been synthesized using a novel corn assisted combustion (CAC) method, wherein the composite prepared at 850 C is found to exhibit superior physical and electrochemical properties than the one synthesized at 800 C (Fig. 1). Despite the charge disproportionation of V{sup 4+} and a possible solid solution behavior of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} cathode upon insertion and de-insertion of Li{sup +} ions, the structural stability of the same is appreciable, even with the extraction of third lithium at 4.6 V (Fig. 2). An appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} with an excellent columbic efficiency (99%) and better capacity retention upon high rate applications have been exhibited by Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode, thus demonstrating the feasibility of CAC method in preparing the title compound to best suit with the needs of lithium battery applications. Display Omitted Highlights: ? Novel corn assisted combustion method has been used to synthesize Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C. ? Corn is a cheap and eco benign combustible fuel to facilitate CAC synthesis. ? Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C exhibits an appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} (C/10 rate). ? Currently observed columbic efficiency of 99% is better than the reported behavior. ? Suitability of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode up to 10C rate is demonstrated. -- Abstract: Nanocrystalline Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C composite synthesized using a novel corn assisted combustion method at 850 C exhibits superior physical and electrochemical properties than the one synthesized at 800 C. Despite the charge disproportionation of V{sup 4+} and a possible solid solution behavior of Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} cathode upon insertion and extraction of Li{sup +} ions, the structural stability of the same is appreciable, even with the extraction of third lithium at 4.6 V. An appreciable specific capacity of 174 mAh g{sup ?1} and better capacity retention upon high rate applications have been exhibited by Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}/C cathode, thus demonstrating the suitability of the same for lithium-ion battery applications.

  19. Treatment of electrochemical cell components with lithium tetrachloroaluminate (LiAlCl.sub.4) to promote electrolyte wetting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eberhart, James G. (Naperville, IL); Battles, James E. (Oak Forest, IL)

    1980-01-01

    Electrochemical cell components such as interelectrode separators, retaining screens and current collectors are contacted with lithium tetrachloroaluminate prior to contact with molten electrolytic salt to improve electrolyte wetting. The LiAlCl.sub.4 can be applied in powdered, molten or solution form but, since this material has a lower melting point than the electrolytic salt used in high-temperature cells, the powdered LiAlCl.sub.4 forms a molten flux prior to contact by the molten electrolyte when both materials are initially provided in solid form. Components of materials such as boron nitride and other materials which are difficult to wet with molten salts are advantageously treated by this process.

  20. Conductivity and optical band gaps of polyethylene oxide doped with Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapi, Sharanappa Raghu, S. Subramanya, K. Archana, K. Mini, V. Devendrappa, H.

    2014-04-24

    The conductivity and optical properties of Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doped polyethylene oxide (PEO) films were studied. The polymer electrolyte films are prepared using solution casting technique. The material phase change was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Optical absorption study was conducted using UV- Vis. Spectroscopy in the wavelength range 1901100nm on pure and doped PEO films. The direct and indirect optical band gaps were found decreased from 5.814.51eV and 4.843.43eV respectively with increasing the Li{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The conductivity found to increases with increasing the dopant concentration due to strong hopping mechanism at room temperature.

  1. Photoluminescence performance of thulium doped Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2} under irradiation of ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet lights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhaofeng; Li, Yezhou; Liu, Xiong; Wei, Xingmin; Chen, Yueling; Zhou, Fei; Wang, Yuhua

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: A novel blue-emitting phosphor Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} was reported. Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} exhibited excellent thermal and irradiation stability. Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} was found to possess high color purity. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized Tm{sup 3+} doped Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2} phosphors and investigated their photoluminescence properties under the excitation of ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet lights. The crystal structure analysis and variation of cell parameters confirm that Tm{sup 3+} ions have been successfully doped in the structure of Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2} host by occupying the sites of Ca{sup 2+} with the coordination number of 6. The luminescence results suggest that Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} is a good blue-emitting phosphor when excited by ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet irradiations. In addition, it is observed that there is nearly no degradation for Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} after undergoing thermal and irradiation treatments. Possible mechanisms for the luminescence processes are proposed on the basis of the discussion of excitation and emission spectra. In particular, the emission color of Li{sub 4}SrCa(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}:Tm{sup 3+} by excitation of 147 and 172 nm irradiations is very close to the standard blue color, suggesting that it could be potentially applied in plasma display panels and mercury-free fluorescence lamps.

  2. Microstructure evolution in the fusion welding of heat-treatable Al-Cu-Li alloys. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, K.

    1994-01-01

    Aluminum alloys 2090 and 2195 and Al-2.5Cu were welded autogenously using the gas tungsten-arc (GTA) and CO2 laser beam (LB) welding processes. Relationships between microstructure and mechanical properties in the fusion zone (FZ) and the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in both the as-welded and the postweld heat-treated conditions were studied. Solute segregation due to non-equilibrium solidification in the FZ and its effect on precipitation after postweld aging was quantitatively investigated. After aging treatment, precipitates were found surrounding eutectic regions where higher solute content was measured. Fast cooling LB weld exhibited narrower solute enriched regions and narrower precipitate segregation zones (PSZ`s) adjacent to the eutectic. A partial recovery of strength and hardness in the FZ`s was achieved by postweld aging at 160 C and 190 C for 16 hours. A higher Li/Cu ratio in 2090 promoted the formation of uniformly distributed delta(prime) precipitates in the as-welded HAZ. An evident reduction in the FZ ductility occurred in the 2195 LB welds due to the existence of porosity and shrinkage cavities, and the constraint effect from narrower FZ`s. GTA welds in both 2090 and 2195 alloys exhibited a hardness recovery in the near HAZ, which was not obvious in the LB welds. Postweld aging enhanced this hardness variation. Overaging, dissolution and reprecipitation of various strengthening precipitates occurred in the different regions of the HAZ, and consequently induced the hardness variation. Higher heat inputs increased the HAZ width and enhanced the hardness increase in the near HAZ. Aged HAZ microstructure was affected by the precipitation in the as-welded condition. The formation of Li-containing precipitates in the GTA HAZ, especially alpha(prime) in Li-lean 2195, consumed Li from the matrix. Consequently, the precipitation of T1 was affected.

  3. HIGH PRECISION ABUNDANCES OF THE OLD SOLAR TWIN HIP 102152: INSIGHTS ON Li DEPLETION FROM THE OLDEST SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monroe, TalaWanda R.; Melendez, Jorge; Tucci Maia, Marcelo; Freitas, Fabricio C.; Yong, David; Asplund, Martin; Alves-Brito, Alan; Casagrande, Luca; Bergemann, Maria; Bedell, Megan; Bean, Jacob; Lind, Karin; Castro, Matthieu; Do Nascimento, Jose-Dias; Bazot, Michael

    2013-09-10

    We present the first detailed chemical abundance analysis of the old 8.2 Gyr solar twin, HIP 102152. We derive differential abundances of 21 elements relative to the Sun with precisions as high as 0.004 dex ({approx}<1%), using ultra high-resolution (R = 110,000), high S/N UVES spectra obtained on the 8.2 m Very Large Telescope. Our determined metallicity of HIP 102152 is [Fe/H] = -0.013 {+-} 0.004. The atmospheric parameters of the star were determined to be 54 K cooler than the Sun, 0.09 dex lower in surface gravity, and a microturbulence identical to our derived solar value. Elemental abundance ratios examined versus dust condensation temperature reveal a solar abundance pattern for this star, in contrast to most solar twins. The abundance pattern of HIP 102152 appears to be the most similar to solar of any known solar twin. Abundances of the younger, 2.9 Gyr solar twin, 18 Sco, were also determined from UVES spectra to serve as a comparison for HIP 102152. The solar chemical pattern of HIP 102152 makes it a potential candidate to host terrestrial planets, which is reinforced by the lack of giant planets in its terrestrial planet region. The following non-local thermodynamic equilibrium Li abundances were obtained for HIP 102152, 18 Sco, and the Sun: log {epsilon} (Li) = 0.48 {+-} 0.07, 1.62 {+-} 0.02, and 1.07 {+-} 0.02, respectively. The Li abundance of HIP 102152 is the lowest reported to date for a solar twin, and allows us to consider an emerging, tightly constrained Li-age trend for solar twin stars.

  4. Direct Probing of Charge Injection and Polarization-Controlled Ionic Mobility on Ferroelectric LiNbO3 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strelcov, Evgheni; Ievlev, Dr. Anton; Jesse, Stephen; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Shur, V.Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2014-01-01

    Mapping surface potential with time-resolved Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (tr-KPFM) in LiNbO3 periodically-poled single crystal revealed activation of the surface ionic subsystem. Electric fields higher than certain threshold value but lower than the switching field induce injection of charge from the biased electrode, formation of an active region in its vicinity and uneven distribution of screening charge on the opposite ferroelectric domains. Tr-KPFM technique allows investigating these phenomena in details.

  5. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structuralmore » degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.« less

  6. Recent advances on the understanding of structural and composition evolution of LMR cathodes for Li-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Pengfei; Zheng, Jianming; Xiao, Jie; Wang, Chong-Min; Zhang, Jiguang

    2015-06-08

    Lithium-rich, magnesium-rich (LMR) cathode materials have been regarded as one of the very promising cathodes for Li-ion battery applications. However, their practical application is still limited by several challenges, especially by their limited electrochemical stability rate capability. In this work, we present recent progresses on the understanding of the structural and composition evolution of LMR cathode materials with emphasis being placed on the correlation between structural/chemical evolution and electrochemical properties. In particular, using Li [Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6O2 as a typical example, we clearly illustrate the structural characteristics of the pristine materials and their dependence on the materials processing history, cycling induced structural degradation/chemical partition and their correlation with degradation of electrochemical performance. The fundamental understanding obtained in this work may also guide the design and preparation of new cathode materials based on ternary system of transitional metal oxide.

  7. Green synthesis of boron doped graphene and its application as high performance anode material in Li ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, Madhumita; Sreena, K.P.; Vinayan, B.P.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2015-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Boron doped graphene (B-G), synthesized by simple hydrogen induced reduction technique using boric acid as boron precursor, have more uneven surface as a result of smaller bonding distance of boron compared to carbon, showed high capacity and high rate capability compared to pristine graphene as an anode material for Li ion battery application. - Abstract: The present work demonstrates a facile route for the large-scale, catalyst free, and green synthesis approach of boron doped graphene (B-G) and its use as high performance anode material for Li ion battery (LIB) application. Boron atoms were doped into graphene framework with an atomic percentage of 5.93% via hydrogen induced thermal reduction technique using graphite oxide and boric acid as precursors. Various characterization techniques were used to confirm the boron doping in graphene sheets. B-G as anode material shows a discharge capacity of 548 mAh g{sup ?1} at 100 mA g{sup ?1} after 30th cycles. At high current density value of 1 A g{sup ?1}, B-G as anode material enhances the specific capacity by about 1.7 times compared to pristine graphene. The present study shows a simplistic way of boron doping in graphene leading to an enhanced Li ion adsorption due to the change in electronic states.

  8. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Li-air batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Zheng, Doug; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Liair batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. The reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  9. Electrolysis of uranium nitride containing fission product elements (Mo, Pd, Nd) in a molten LiCl-KCl eutectic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satoh, Takumi; Iwai, Takashi; Arai, Yasuo

    2007-07-01

    The electrolysis of burnup-simulated uranium nitride, UN, containing representative solid fission product elements (Mo, Pd, Nd) was investigated in the molten LiCl-KCl eutectic salt with 0.54 wt% UCl{sub 3} from the view point of application of pyrochemical reprocessing to nitride fuel cycle. It was found from cyclic voltammetry and anodic polarization curve measurement that anodic dissolution of UN began at about -0.75 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode in all samples. After the electrolysis at the constant anodic potential of -0.65 {approx} -0.60 V vs. Ag/AgCl, most of UN was dissolved into LiCl- KCl as UCl{sub 3} at the anode, and U was recovered in the liquid Cd cathode in all samples. Further, Nd was dissolved into LiCl-KCl as NdCl{sub 3}, while Mo and Pd were not dissolved but remained at the anode. (authors)

  10. Probing the initiation of voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials at the atomic scale

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wu, Yan; Ma, Cheng; Yang, Jihui; Li, Zicheng; Allard, Jr., Lawrence Frederick; Liang, Chengdu; Chi, Miaofang

    2015-01-21

    Li-rich layered oxides hold great promise for improving the energy density of present-day Li-ion batteries. However, their application is limited by the voltage decay upon cycling, and the origin of such a phenomenon is poorly understood. A major issue is determining the voltage range over which detrimental reactions originate. In the present study, a unique yet effective approach was employed to probe this issue. Instead of studying the materials during the first cycle, electrochemical behavior and evolution of the atomic structures were compared in extensively cycled specimens under varied charge/discharge voltages. With the upper cutoff voltage lowered from 4.8 tomore4.4 V, the voltage decay ceased to occur even after 60 cycles. In the meantime, the material maintained its layered structure without any spinel phase emerging at the surface, which is unambiguously shown by the atomic-resolution Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy. These results have conclusively demonstrated that structural/chemical changes responsible for the voltage decay began between 4.4 and 4.8 V, where the layered-to-spinel transition was the most dramatic structural change observed. Thus, this discovery lays important groundwork for the mechanistic understanding of the voltage decay in Li-rich layered cathode materials.less

  11. Channel coupling and exchange of an alpha-particle cluster in deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuta, S. B.; Burtebaev, N.; Artemov, S. V.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2012-07-15

    Existing experimental data on elastic and inelastic deuteron scattering on {sup 6}Li nuclei in the energy range from 8 to 50 MeV were analyzed within the approach of coupled reaction channels. The coupling of elastic scattering and inelastic scattering accompanied by the transition to the 3{sup +} state at E{sub x} 2.186 MeV and the mechanism involving the exchange of an alpha-particle cluster were taken into account in respective calculations. The phenomenological potentials obtained from the present analysis describe well experimental angular distributions at all energies and in full angular ranges. The depths of the real and imaginary parts of the potentials in question depend smoothly on energy at fixed values of the remaining parameters. The energy dependence of relevant volume integrals agrees well with similar data for the p + {sup 6}Li, {alpha} + {sup 6}Li, and {sup 12}C + {sup 12}C systems and with the predictions of a microscopic theory.

  12. Kinetic investigation of catalytic disproportionation of superoxide ions in the non-aqueous electrolyte used in Liair batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang; Zheng, Dong; McKinnon, Meaghan E.; Yang, Xiao -Qing; Qu, Deyang

    2014-10-28

    Superoxide reacts with carbonate solvents in Liair batteries. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane is found to catalyze a more rapid superoxide (O2-) disproportionation reaction than the reaction between superoxide and propylene carbonate (PC). With this catalysis, the negative impact of the reaction between the electrolyte and O2-produced by the O2 reduction can be minimized. A simple kinetic study using ESR spectroscopy was reported to determine reaction orders and rate constants for the reaction between PC and superoxide, and the disproportionation of superoxide catalyzed by Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane and Li ions. As a result, the reactions are found to be first order and the rate constants are 0.033 s-1 M-1, 0.020 s-1 M-1and 0.67 s-1M-1 for reactions with PC, Li ion and Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, respectively.

  13. The Importance of Nanometric Passivating Films on Cathodes forLi - Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Brian D.; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zach; Mehdi, Beata L.; Browning, Nigel D.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm*can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance.

  14. A materials database for Li(Si)/FeS sub 2 thermal batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.

    1990-09-01

    The establishment of a database for the materials that are used in production Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal batteries designed at Sandia National Laboratories is described. The database is a Hewlett-Packard (HP) network type (IMAGE) designed to run on an HP3000 computer. Heavy emphasis is placed on the use of screen forms for entry, editing, and retrieval of data. Custom screen forms were used for the various materials in the battery. For the purposes of the materials database, each battery is composed of four mixes: cathode, separator, anode, and heat (pyrotechnic) powders. A consistent lot-numbering system was adopted for both the mixes and the discrete components that make up the mixes. Each serial number of a particular battery is linked to the lot numbers of the four mixes used in the battery. Each mix, in turn, is linked to the lot numbers of the discrete components that are contained within the mix. This allows traceability of each of the components used in any given serial number of a particular battery. The materials database provides the necessary traceability, as required by the Department of Energy, for the lifetime of the program associated with the battery. 3 refs., 23 figs.

  15. Interactions between drops of molten Al-Li alloys and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyder, M.L.; Nelson, L.S.; Duda, P.M.; Hyndman, D.A.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories, at the request of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), studied the interactions between single drops of molten aluminum-lithium alloys and water. Most experiments were performed with ``B`` alloy (3.1 w/o Li, balance A1). Objectives were to develop experimental procedures for preparing and delivering the melt drops and diagnostics for characterizing the interactions, measure hydrogen generated by the reaction between melt and water, examine debris recovered after the interaction, determine changes in the aqueous phase produced by the melt-water chemical reactions, and determine whether steam explosions occur spontaneously under the conditions studied. Although many H{sub 2} bubbles were generated after the drops entered the water, spontaneous steam explosions never occurred when globules of the ``B`` alloy at temperatures between 700 and 1000C fell freely through water at room temperature, or upon or during subsequent contact with submerged aluminum or stainless steel surfaces. Total amounts of H{sub 2} (STP) increased from about 2 to 9 cm{sup 3}/per gram of melt as initial melt temperature increased over this range of temperatures.

  16. Electrochemical and physical analysis of a Li-ion cell cycled at elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Joongpyo; Kostecki, Robert; Richardson, Thomas; Song, Xiangyun; Striebel, Kathryn A.

    2002-06-21

    Laboratory-size LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2/graphite lithium-ion pouch cells were cycled over 100 percent DOD at room temperature and 60 degrees C in order to investigate high-temperature degradation mechanisms of this important technology. Capacity fade for the cell was correlated with that for the individual components, using electrochemical analysis of the electrodes and other diagnostic techniques. The high-temperature cell lost 65 percent of its initial capacity after 140 cycles at 60 degrees C compared to only 4 percent loss for the cell cycled at room temperature. Cell ohmic impedance increased significantly with the elevated temperature cycling, resulting in some of loss of capacity at the C/2 rate. However, as determined with slow rate testing of the individual electrodes, the anode retained most of its original capacity, while the cathode lost 65 percent, even when cycled with a fresh source of lithium. Diagnostic evaluation of cell components including XRD, Raman, CSAFM and suggest capacity loss occurs primarily due to a rise in the impedance of the cathode, especially at the end-of-charge. The impedance rise may be caused in part by a loss of the conductive carbon at the surface of the cathode and/or by an organic film on the surface of the cathode that becomes non-ionically conductive at low lithium content.

  17. Improving microstructure of silicon/carbon nanofiber composites as a Li battery anode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, Jane Y; Meyer III, Harry M; Burton, David J.; Qi, Dr. Yue; Nazri, Maryam; Nazri, G. Abbas; Palmer, Andrew C.; Lake, Patrick D.

    2013-01-01

    We report the interfacial study of a silicon/carbon nanofiber (Si/CNF) nanocomposite material as a potentially high performance anode for rechargeable lithium ion batteries. The carbon nanofiber is hollow, with a graphitic interior and turbostratic exterior. Amorphous silicon layers were uniformly coated via chemical vapor deposition on both the exterior and interior surfaces of the CNF. The resulting Si/CNF composites were tested as anodes for Li ion batteries and exhibited capacities near 800 mAh g1 for 100 cycles. After cycling, we found that more Si had fallen off from the outer wall than from the innerwall of CNF. Theoretical calculations confirmed that this is due to a higher interfacial strength at the Si/Cedge interface at the inner wall than that of the Si/C-basal interface at the outer wall. Based upon the experimental analysis and theoretical calculation, we have proposed several interfacial engineering approaches to improve the performance of the electrodes by optimizing the microstructure of this nanocomposite.

  18. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; et al

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we showmore » that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.« less

  19. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-14

    A selective radiation cooling material which is absorptive only in the 8 to 13 microns wavelength range is accomplished by placing ceramic magnesium oxide and/or polycrystalline lithium fluoride on an infrared-reflective substrate. The reflecting substrate may be a metallic coating, foil or sheet, such as aluminum, which reflects all atmospheric radiation from 0.3 to 8 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride being nonabsorptive at those wavelengths. <10% of submicron voids in the material is permissible in which case the MgO and/or LiF layer is diffusely scattering, but still nonabsorbing, in the wavelength range of 0.3 to 8 microns. At wavelengths from 8 to 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride radiate power through the ''window'' in the atmosphere, and thus remove heat from the reflecting sheet of material and the attached object to be cooled. At wavelengths longer than 13 microns, the magnesium oxide and lithium fluoride reflects the atmospheric radiation back into the atmosphere. This high reflectance is only obtained if the surface is sufficiently smooth: roughness on a scale of 1 micron is permissible but roughness on a scale of 10 microns is not. An infrared-transmitting cover or shield is mounted in spaced relationship to the material to reduce convective heat transfer. If this is utilized in direct sunlight, the infrared transmitting cover or shield should be opaque in the solar spectrum of 0.3 to 3 microns.

  20. Direct molecular diffusion and micro-mixing for rapid dewatering of LiBr solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigham, S; Isfahani, RN; Moghaddam, S

    2014-03-01

    A slow molecular diffusion rate often limits the desorption process of an absorbate molecule from a liquid absorbent. To enhance the desorption rate, the absorbent is often boiled to increase the liquid vapor interfacial area. However, the growth of bubbles generated during the nucleate boiling process still remains mass-diffusion limited. Here, it is shown that a desorption rate higher than that of boiling can be achieved, if the vapor absorbent interface is continuously replenished with the absorbate-rich solution to limit the concentration boundary layer growth. The study is conducted in a LiBr-water-solution, in which the water molecules' diffusion rate is quite slow. The manipulation of the vapor solution interface concentration distribution is enabled by the mechanical confinement of the solution flow within microchannels, using a hydrophobic vapor-venting membrane and the implementation of microstructures on the flow channel's bottom wall. The microstructures stretch and fold the laminar streamlines within the solution film and produce vortices. The vortices continuously replace the concentrated solution at the vapor solution interface with the water-rich solution brought from the bottom and middle of the flow channel. The physics of the process is described using a combination of experimental and numerical studies. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Synthesis, crystal structure and magnetic properties of Li{sub 0.44}Eu{sub 3}[B{sub 3}N{sub 6}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kokal, I.; Aydemir, U.; Prots, Yu.; Frster, T.; Sichelschmidt, J.; Yahyaoglu, M.; Auffermann, G.; Schnelle, W.; Schappacher, F.; Pttgen, R.; Somer, M.

    2014-02-15

    Li{sub 0.44}Eu{sub 3}[B{sub 3}N{sub 6}] was synthesized from the metathesis reaction of Li{sub 3}[BN{sub 2}] and EuCl{sub 3} at 850 C. Li{sub 0.44}Eu{sub 3}[B{sub 3}N{sub 6}] crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3{sup }c (No. 167) with a=12.0225(2) , c=6.8556(2) and Z=6. In the crystal structure, isolated, planar cyclic [B{sub 3}N{sub 6}]{sup 9?} units are charge-balanced by the mixed-valence Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+} and Li{sup +} cations. Li{sup +} occupies partially (44%) the Wyckoff site 6b and is sandwiched between the [B{sub 3}N{sub 6}]{sup 9?} anions. Mssbauer spectroscopy results show the resonance lines of Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, indicating the heterogeneous mixed valency of the Eu atoms. X-Band ESR investigations between 5 and 300 K reveal an intense signal over the whole temperature range originating from Eu{sup 2+}. Magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate a CurieWeiss behavior with an experimental effective magnetic moment of ?{sub eff}=8.28 ?{sub B} per formula unit. - Graphical abstract: Single crystals of Li{sub 0.44}Eu{sub 3}[B{sub 3}N{sub 6}] was obtained from the metathesis reaction of Li{sub 3}[BN{sub 2}] and EuCl{sub 3.}{sup 151}Eu Mssbauer, ESR and magnetic susceptibility measurements reveal the heterogeneous mixed valency of the Eu atoms. Display Omitted - Highlights: Single crystals of Li{sub 0.44}Eu{sub 3}[B{sub 3}N{sub 6}] was obtained from the metathesis reaction of Li{sub 3}[BN{sub 2}] and EuCl{sub 3} at 850 C. Crystal structure is built up by isolated, planar cyclic [B{sub 3}N{sub 6}]{sup 9?} units which are surrounded by mixed valence Eu{sup 3+}/Eu{sup 2+}. Li{sup +} occupies partially (44%) the site 6b and is sandwiched between the [B{sub 3}N{sub 6}]{sup 9?} anions. The {sup 151}Eu Mssbauer spectroscopy, electron spin resonance spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility measurements confirm the heterogeneous mixed valency of Eu.

  2. Synthesis and electrochemical performance of high-capacity 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} cathode materials using a CouetteTaylor reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Mansoo; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Kim, Jik-Soo; Park, Suk-Joon; Lee, Young Moo; Jin, Bong-Soo

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: The cathode material synthesized by co-precipitation using a CouetteTaylor reactor. The first and second discharge capacities were measured to be 311 and 307 mA h g{sup ?1}. The material has an excellent rate capability. - Abstract: The 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} cathode material for the Li-ion battery is synthesized by co-precipitation using a CouetteTaylor reactor. Particle size analysis (PSA) and a field emission-scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) images show that the obtained precursor and cathode material exhibit a narrow particle size distribution and spherical shape. The structure and composition of the 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} are confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The first and second discharge capacities of 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} are measured to be 311 and 307 mA h g{sup ?1}, respectively. The material also has an excellent rate capability (250 and 180 mA h g{sup ?1} at 1 C and 5 C, respectively). In the rate capability test at 60 C, 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} has a higher capacity of over 210 mA h g{sup ?1} in the range 0.110 C. In the cyclic performance test, the capacity retention at high temperature is over 85% after 50 cycles, which is similar to that at room temperature. The 0.34Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}0.66LiMn{sub 0.63}Ni{sub 0.24}Co{sub 0.13}O{sub 2} is therefore a high-capacity material with potential for use as an electrode in Li-ion batteries.

  3. Direct observation of the redistribution of sulfur and polysufides in Li-S batteries during first cycle by in situ X-Ray fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiquian; Pan, Huilin; Zhou, Yongning; Northrup, Paul; Xiao, Jie; Bak, Seongmin; Liu, Mingzhao; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Qu, Deyang; Liu, Jun; Wu, Tianpin; Yang, Xiao-Qing

    2015-03-25

    The demands on low cost and high energy density rechargeable batteries for both transportation and large-scale stationary energy storage are stimulating more and more research toward new battery systems. Since sulfur is an earth-abundant material with low cost, research on the high energy density LiS batteries (2600 W h kg?) are getting more and more attention. The reactions between sulfur and lithium during chargedischarge cycling are quite complicated, going through multiple electron transfer process associated with chemical and electrochemical equilibrium between long- and short-chain polysulfide Li?Sx intermediates (1 < x ? 8). It is reported that the long-chain polysulfides can be dissolved into electrolyte with aprotic organic solvents and migrated to the Li anode side. This so-called shuttle effect is believed to be the main reason for capacity loss and low columbic efficiency of the LiS batteries. In the past few years, a great deal of efforts have been made on how to overcome the problem of polysulfide dissolution through new sulfur electrode construction and cell designs, as well as the modification of the electrolyte. Although it has been reported by several publications that some LiS cells can sustain more than a thousand cycles based on the thin film electrode configurations, the long-term cycling stability is still one of the major barriers for the real application of LiS batteries. More in-depth studies on the fundamental understanding of the sulfur reaction mechanism and interactions among the different polysulfide species, the electrolyte and the electrodes are still greatly needed. Various in situ techniques have been developed and applied to study the mechanism of the sulfur chemistry in LiS batteries during electrochemical cycling, such as transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UVvisible spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The applications of these characterization techniques have demonstrated their power in probing the structure changes, morphology evolutions, and coordination of sulfur and polysulfides with the electrolyte in LiS cells, providing complementary information to each other thus enhancing the understanding in LiS battery systems. In this communication, in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microscopy was combined with XAS to directly probe the morphology changes of LiS batteries during first cycle. The morphology changes of the sulfur electrode and the redistribution of sulfur and polysulfides were monitored in real time through the XRF images, while the changes of the sulfur containing compounds were characterized through the XAS spectra simultaneously. In contrast to other studies using ex situ or single characterization technique as reported in the literatures, the in situ technique used in this work has the unique feature of probing the LiS cell under operating conditions, as well as the combination of XRF imaging with spectroscopy data. By doing this, the morphology evolution and redistribution of specific sulfur particles during cycling can be tracked and identified at certain locations in a real time. In addition, this technique allows us to select the field-of-view (FOV) area from micrometer to centimeter size, providing the capability to study the LiS reactions not just at the material level, but also at the electrode level. This is very important for both understanding LiS chemistry and designing effective strategies for LiS batteries.

  4. Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}, a new lithium-rich fluorooxoborate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilz, Thomas; Nuss, Hanne; Jansen, Martin

    2012-02-15

    The new lithium fluorooxoborate, Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}, is obtained by a solid state reaction from LiBO{sub 2} and LiBF{sub 4} at 553 K and crystallizes in the acentric orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1} (no. 19) with the cell parameters a=4.8915(9), b=8.734(2), and c=12.301(2) A. Chains of fluorinated boroxine rings along the b axis consists of BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as BO{sub 3}F tetrahedra. Mobile lithium ions are compensating the negative charge of the anionic chain, in which the fourfold coordinated boron atoms bear a negative formal charge. Annealing Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} at temperatures above 573 K leads to conversion into Li{sub 2}B{sub 6}O{sub 9}F{sub 2}. The title compound is an ionic conductor with the highest ion conductivity among the hitherto know lithium fluorooxoborates, with conductivities of 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} and 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} S cm{sup -1} at 473 and 523 K, respectively. - Graphical abstract: Repetition unit of Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Li{sub 2}B{sub 3}O{sub 4}F{sub 3} is the third member within the family of lithium fluorooxoborates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It shows the highest lithium ion conductivity among them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chains of interconnected fluorinated boroxine rings run along the b axis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acentric space group meets the requirement for second harmonic generation.

  5. Dual Phase Li4 Ti5O12TiO2 Nanowire Arrays As Integrated Anodes For High-rate Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Jin; Chabot, Victor; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Xingcheng; Chen, Zhongwei

    2014-08-19

    Lithium titanate (Li4Ti5O12) is well known as a zero strain material inherently, which provides excellent long cycle stability as a negative electrode for lithium ion batteries. However, the low specific capacity (175 mA h g?1) limits it to power batteries although the low electrical conductivity is another intrinsic issue need to be solved. In this work, we developed a facile hydrothermal and ion-exchange route to synthesize the self-supported dual-phase Li4Ti5O12TiO2 nanowire arrays to further improve its capacity as well as rate capability. The ratio of Li4Ti5O12 to TiO2 in the dual phase Li4Ti5O12TiO2 nanowire is around 2:1. The introduction of TiO2 into Li4Ti5O12 increases the specific capacity. More importantly, by interface design, it creates a dual-phase nanostructure with high grain boundary density that facilitates both electron and Li ion transport. Compared with phase-pure nanowire Li4Ti5O12 and TiO2 nanaowire arrays, the dual-phase nanowire electrode yielded superior rate capability (135.5 at 5 C, 129.4 at 10 C, 120.2 at 20 C and 115.5 mA h g?1 at 30 C). In-situ transmission electron microscope clearly shows the near zero deformation of the dual phase structure, which explains its excellent cycle stability.

  6. Composit, Nanoparticle-Based Anode material for Li-ion Batteries Applied in Hybrid Electric (HEV's)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Malgorzata Gulbinska

    2009-08-24

    Lithium-ion batteries are promising energy storage devices in hybrid and electric vehicles with high specific energy values ({approx}150 Wh/kg), energy density ({approx}400 Wh/L), and long cycle life (>15 years). However, applications in hybrid and electric vehicles require increased energy density and improved low-temperature (<-10 C) performance. Silicon-based anodes are inexpensive, environmentally benign, and offer excellent theoretical capacity values ({approx}4000 mAh/g), leading to significantly less anode material and thus increasing the overall energy density value for the complete battery (>500 Wh/L). However, tremendous volume changes occur during cycling of pure silicon-based anodes. The expansion and contraction of these silicon particles causes them to fracture and lose electrical contact to the current collector ultimately severely limiting their cycle life. In Phase I of this project Yardney Technical Products, Inc. proposed development of a carbon/nano-silicon composite anode material with improved energy density and silicon's cycleability. In the carbon/nano-Si composite, silicon nanoparticles were embedded in a partially-graphitized carbonaceous matrix. The cycle life of anode material would be extended by decreasing the average particle size of active material (silicon) and by encapsulation of silicon nanoparticles in a ductile carbonaceous matrix. Decreasing the average particle size to a nano-region would also shorten Li-ion diffusion path and thus improve rate capability of the silicon-based anodes. Improved chemical inertness towards PC-based, low-temperature electrolytes was expected as an additional benefit of a thin, partially graphitized coating around the active electrode material.

  7. Connecting the irreversible capacity loss in Li-ion batteries with the electronic insulating properties of solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) components.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Leung, Kevin; Lin, Yu -Xiao; Liu, Zhe; Chen, Long -Qing; Lu, Peng; Qi, Yue

    2016-02-05

    The formation and continuous growth of a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer are responsible for the irreversible capacity loss of batteries in the initial and subsequent cycles, respectively. In this article, the electron tunneling barriers from Li metal through three insulating SEI components, namely Li2CO3, LiF and Li3PO4, are computed by density function theory (DFT) approaches. Based on electron tunneling theory, it is estimated that sufficient to block electron tunneling. It is also found that the band gap decreases under tension while the work function remains the same, and thus the tunneling barrier decreases under tension and increases under compression.more » A new parameter, η, characterizing the average distances between anions, is proposed to unify the variation of band gap with strain under different loading conditions into a single linear function of η. An analytical model based on the tunneling results is developed to connect the irreversible capacity loss, due to the Li ions consumed in forming these SEI component layers on the surface of negative electrodes. As a result, the agreement between the model predictions and experimental results suggests that only the initial irreversible capacity loss is due to the self-limiting electron tunneling property of the SEI.« less

  8. ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE US HEV/PHEV MANUFACTURING BASE: STABILIZED LITHIUM METAL POWDER, ENABLING MATERIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGY FOR HIGH ENERGY LI-ION BATTERIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovleva, Marina

    2012-12-31

    FMC Lithium Division has successfully completed the project Establishing Sustainable US PHEV/EV Manufacturing Base: Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion Batteries. The project included design, acquisition and process development for the production scale units to 1) produce stabilized lithium dispersions in oil medium, 2) to produce dry stabilized lithium metal powders, 3) to evaluate, design and acquire pilot-scale unit for alternative production technology to further decrease the cost, and 4) to demonstrate concepts for integrating SLMP technology into the Li- ion batteries to increase energy density. It is very difficult to satisfy safety, cost and performance requirements for the PHEV and EV applications. As the initial step in SLMP Technology introduction, industry can use commercially available LiMn2O4 or LiFePO4, for example, that are the only proven safer and cheaper lithium providing cathodes available on the market. Unfortunately, these cathodes alone are inferior to the energy density of the conventional LiCoO2 cathode and, even when paired with the advanced anode materials, such as silicon composite material, the resulting cell will still not meet the energy density requirements. We have demonstrated, however, if SLMP Technology is used to compensate for the irreversible capacity in the anode, the efficiency of the cathode utilization will be improved and the cost of the cell, based on the materials, will decrease.

  9. Synthesis, Structure, and Electrochemical Performance of High Capacity Li2Cu0.5Ni0.5O2 Cathodes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruther, Rose E; Zhou, Hui; Dhital, Chetan; Saravanan, Kuppan; Kercher, Andrew K.; Chen, Guoying; Huq, Ashfia; Delnick, Frank M.; Nanda, Jagjit

    2015-09-08

    Orthorhombic Li2NiO2, Li2CuO2, and solid solutions thereof have been studied as potential cathode materials for lithium-ion batteries due to their high theoretical capacity and relatively low cost. While neither endmember shows good cycling stability, the intermediate composition, Li2Cu0.5Ni0.5O2, yields reasonably high reversible capacities. A new synthetic approach and detailed characterization of this phase and the parent Li2CuO2 are presented. The cycle life of Li2Cu0.5Ni0.5O2 is shown to depend critically on the voltage window. The formation of Cu1+ at low voltage and oxygen evolution at high voltage limit the electrochemical reversibility. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), in situ Raman spectroscopy,more » and gas evolution measurements are used to follow the chemical and structural changes that occur as a function of cell voltage.« less

  10. Ambient synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical activity of LiFePO? nanomaterials derived from iron phosphate intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patete, Jonathan M.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Scofield, Megan E.; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Zhang, Yiman; Marschilok, Amy C.; Wang, Xiaoya; Bai, Jianming; Han, Jinkyu; Wang, Lei; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Yimei; Graetz, Jason A.

    2015-05-30

    LiFePO? materials have become increasingly popular as a cathode material due to the many benefits they possess including thermal stability, durability, low cost, and long life span. Nevertheless, to broaden the general appeal of this material for practical electrochemical applications, it would be useful to develop a relatively mild, reasonably simple synthesis method of this cathode material. Herein, we describe a generalizable, 2-step methodology of sustainably synthesizing LiFePO? by incorporating a template-based, ambient, surfactantless, seedless, U-tube protocol in order to generate size and morphologically tailored, crystalline, phase-pure nanowires. The purity, composition, crystallinity, and intrinsic quality of these wires were systematically assessed using transmission electron microscopy TEM, HRTEM, SEM, XRD, SAED, EDAX and high-resolution synchrotron XRD. From these techniques, we were able to determine that there is an absence of defects present in our wires, supporting the viability of our synthetic approach. Electrochemical analysis was also employed to assess their electrochemical activity. Although our nanowires do not contain any noticeable impurities, we attribute their less than optimal electrochemical rigor to differences in the chemical bonding between our LiFePO? nanowires and their bulk-like counterparts. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time experimentally that the Fe-O3 chemical bond plays an important role in determining the overall conductivity of the material, an assertion which is further supported by recent first principles calculations. Nonetheless, our ambient, solution-based synthesis technique is capable of generating highly crystalline and phase-pure energy-storage-relevant nanowires that can be tailored so as to fabricate different sized materials of reproducible, reliable morphology.

  11. Ambient synthesis, characterization, and electrochemical activity of LiFePO₄ nanomaterials derived from iron phosphate intermediates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Patete, Jonathan M.; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Scofield, Megan E.; Volkov, Vyacheslav; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Zhang, Yiman; Marschilok, Amy C.; Wang, Xiaoya; Bai, Jianming; Han, Jinkyu; et al

    2015-05-30

    LiFePO₄ materials have become increasingly popular as a cathode material due to the many benefits they possess including thermal stability, durability, low cost, and long life span. Nevertheless, to broaden the general appeal of this material for practical electrochemical applications, it would be useful to develop a relatively mild, reasonably simple synthesis method of this cathode material. Herein, we describe a generalizable, 2-step methodology of sustainably synthesizing LiFePO₄ by incorporating a template-based, ambient, surfactantless, seedless, U-tube protocol in order to generate size and morphologically tailored, crystalline, phase-pure nanowires. The purity, composition, crystallinity, and intrinsic quality of these wires were systematicallymore » assessed using transmission electron microscopy TEM, HRTEM, SEM, XRD, SAED, EDAX and high-resolution synchrotron XRD. From these techniques, we were able to determine that there is an absence of defects present in our wires, supporting the viability of our synthetic approach. Electrochemical analysis was also employed to assess their electrochemical activity. Although our nanowires do not contain any noticeable impurities, we attribute their less than optimal electrochemical rigor to differences in the chemical bonding between our LiFePO₄ nanowires and their bulk-like counterparts. Specifically, we demonstrate for the first time experimentally that the Fe-O3 chemical bond plays an important role in determining the overall conductivity of the material, an assertion which is further supported by recent first principles calculations. Nonetheless, our ambient, solution-based synthesis technique is capable of generating highly crystalline and phase-pure energy-storage-relevant nanowires that can be tailored so as to fabricate different sized materials of reproducible, reliable morphology.« less

  12. {sup 16}O resonances near 4? threshold through {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Borello-Lewin, T.; Miyake, H.; Horodynski-Matsushigue, L. B.; Duarte, J. L. M.; Rodrigues, C. L.; Faria, P. Neto de; Cunsolo, A.; Cappuzzello, F.; Foti, A.; Agodi, C.; Cavallaro, M.; Napoli, M. di; Ukita, G. M.

    2014-11-11

    Several narrow alpha resonant {sup 16}O states were detected through the {sup 12}C({sup 6}Li,d) reaction, in the range of 13.5 to 17.5 MeV of excitation energy. The reaction was measured at a bombarding energy of 25.5 MeV employing the So Paulo Pelletron-Enge-Spectrograph facility and the nuclear emulsion technique. Experimental angular distributions associated with natural parity quasi-bound states around the 4? threshold are presented and compared to DWBA predictions. The upper limit for the resonance widths obtained is near the energy resolution (15 keV)

  13. Monte Carlo semi-empirical model for Si(Li) x-ray detector: Differences between nominal and fitted parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Pino, N.; Padilla-Cabal, F.; Garcia-Alvarez, J. A.; Vazquez, L.; D'Alessandro, K.; Correa-Alfonso, C. M.; Godoy, W.; Maidana, N. L.; Vanin, V. R.

    2013-05-06

    A detailed characterization of a X-ray Si(Li) detector was performed to obtain the energy dependence of efficiency in the photon energy range of 6.4 - 59.5 keV, which was measured and reproduced by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. Significant discrepancies between MC and experimental values were found when the manufacturer parameters of the detector were used in the simulation. A complete Computerized Tomography (CT) detector scan allowed to find the correct crystal dimensions and position inside the capsule. The computed efficiencies with the resulting detector model differed with the measured values no more than 10% in most of the energy range.

  14. Elastic Scattering Of {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 80}Se At Near And Above Barrier Energies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fimiani, L.; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Barbara, E. de; Testoni, J. E.; Zalazar, L.; Arazi, A.; Cardona, M. A.; Carnelli, P.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    In this work we propose to study the elastic scattering of the weakly bound projectiles {sup 6,7}Li on an intermediate mass target {sup 80}Se. From the experimental results presented here, precise angular distributions at energies below, around and above the nominal Coulomb barriers of the systems were obtained. The final goal of our work is to determine the characteristic parameters of the optical potential and use them to address the question of whether the usual threshold anomaly or the breakup threshold anomaly are present or not in these systems.

  15. Crystal structural study of ternary molybdate LiRbBi{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klevtsova, R.F.; Glinskaya, L.A.; Alekseev, V.I.

    1994-03-01

    Single crystals of the title compound have been synthesized and its crystal structure has been determined. The compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group C2/c, Z = 2 (a = 5.3056, b = 12.976, c = 19.578 {angstrom}, {beta} = 92.583{degrees}, R = 0.029). A distinctive feature of the structure is lacy layers of eight-vertex Bi polyhedra and Mo tetrahedra connected to them via common vertices. The adjacent layers are linked together by ten-vertex Rb polyhedra and Li octahedra.

  16. Comparison of LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8} cathode materials prepared by different methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, K.; Zachau-Christiansen, B.; Skaarup, S.; Saidi, Y.; Barker, J.; Olsen, I.I.; Pynenburg, R.; Koksbang, R.

    1996-03-01

    Lithium trivanadate, LiV{sub 3}O{sub 8}, can be prepared in a finely dispersed form by dehydration of aqueous lithium vanadate gels. Two methods of dehydration, both easily adaptable to large-scale production, are described in this work: freeze drying and spray drying. After heat-treatment of the dried gels (xerogels) to remove loosely bound water they show a high capacity for lithium insertion, approaching four additional lithium per formula unit, and good reversibility as electrode materials for high energy density lithium cells. How the heat-treatment temperature influences the crystal structure is demonstrated as well as the electrochemical properties of the vanadium oxide.

  17. Study on a regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic based waste salt generated from the pyrochemical process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eun, H.C.; Cho, Y.Z.; Choi, J.H.; Kim, J.H.; Lee, T.K.; Park, H.S.; Kim, I.T.; Park, G.I.

    2013-07-01

    A regeneration process of LiCl-KCl eutectic waste salt generated from the pyrochemical process of spent nuclear fuel has been studied. This regeneration process is composed of a chemical conversion process and a vacuum distillation process. Through the regeneration process, a high efficiency of renewable salt recovery can be obtained from the waste salt and rare earth nuclides in the waste salt can be separated as oxide or phosphate forms. Thus, the regeneration process can contribute greatly to a reduction of the waste volume and a creation of durable final waste forms. (authors)

  18. li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    li Aone+amth arfumionto itu%illti&% p?e~6a'&ionofthoChOmiQo SinaL report, pattisulerly dfh, raqmot b dto evaluation. 8. A eixdtoirth~atension primarily to inauro havlrg Chealeo &&able . fbroowultationonWtj0 ~itoevaluation~rkforthet&wto Bsddw Timoveoy ?lant, but 980 to keep Chemioo avsilable for dmelopm~t ark on the alternate oatbanatie mtoolaw leaoh proosa80 DIECDBfiIOH Be are requesting anamndcmntto o&end CoatmotAT(W&-1489 with the Chmaloal Qonstruobloon Cor;orhlon.

  19. CO{sub 2} capture properties of lithium silicates with different ratios of Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}: an ab initio thermodynamic and experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuhua Duan, Yuhua; Pfeiffer, Heriberto; Li, Bingyun, Romero-Ibarra, Issis C; Sorescu, Dan C; Luebke, David; Halley, J Woods

    2013-06-05

    The lithium silicates have attracted scientific interest due to their potential use as high-temperature sorbents for CO{sub 2} capture. The electronic properties and thermodynamic stabilities of lithium silicates with different Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratios (Li{sub 2}O, Li{sub 8}SiO{sub 6}, Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}, Li{sub 6}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7}, Li{sub 2}SiO{sub 3}, Li{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 5}, Li{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and a-SiO{sub 2}) have been investigated by combining first-principles density functional theory with lattice phonon dynamics. All these lithium silicates examined are insulators with band-gaps larger than 4.5 eV. By decreasing the Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratio, the first valence bandwidth of the corresponding lithium silicate increases. Additionally, by decreasing the Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratio, the vibrational frequencies of the corresponding lithium silicates shift to higher frequencies. Based on the calculated energetic information, their CO{sub 2} absorption capabilities were extensively analyzed through thermodynamic investigations on these absorption reactions. We found that by increasing the Li{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} ratio when going from Li{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 7} to Li{sub 8}SiO{sub 6}, the corresponding lithium silicates have higher CO{sub 2} capture capacity, higher turnover temperatures and heats of reaction, and require higher energy inputs for regeneration. Based on our experimentally measured isotherms of the CO{sub 2} chemisorption by lithium silicates, we found that the CO{sub 2} capture reactions are two-stage processes: (1) a superficial reaction to form the external shell composed of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and a metal oxide or lithium silicate secondary phase and (2) lithium diffusion from bulk to the surface with a simultaneous diffusion of CO{sub 2} into the shell to continue the CO{sub 2} chemisorption process. The second stage is the rate determining step for the capture process. By changing the mixing ratio of Li{sub 2}O and SiO{sub 2}, we can obtain different lithium silicate solids which exhibit different thermodynamic behaviors. Based on our results, three mixing scenarios are discussed to provide general guidelines for designing new CO{sub 2} sorbents to fit practical needs.

  20. GeOx/Reduced Graphene Oxide Composite as an Anode for Li-ion Batteries: Enhanced Capacity via Reversible Utilization of Li2O along with Improved Rate Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lv, Dongping; Gordin, Mikhail; Yi, Ran; Xu, Terrence (Tianren); Song, Jiangxuan; Jiang, Yingbing; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai

    2014-09-01

    A self-assembled GeOx/reduced graphene oxide (GeOx/RGO) composite, where GeOx nanoparticles were grown directly on reduced graphene oxide sheets, was synthesized via a facile one-step reduction approach and studied by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy elemental mapping, and other techniques. Electrochemical evaluation indicates that incorporation of reduced graphene oxide enhances both the rate capability and reversible capacity of GeOx, with the latter being due to the RGO enabling reversible utilization of Li2O. The composite delivers a high reversible capacity of 1600 mAhg-1 at a current density of 100 mAg-1, and still maintains a capacity of 410 mAhg-1 at a high current density of 20 Ag-1. Owing to the flexible reduced graphene oxide sheets enwrapping the GeOx particles, the cycling stability of the composite was also improved significantly. To further demonstrate its feasibility in practical applications, the synthesized GeOx/RGO composite anode was successfully paired with a high voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode to form a full cell, which showed good cycling and rate performance.

  1. The crystal and electronic structures of the Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} (x=0.05) indide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chumak, Ihor; Pavlyuk, Volodymyr; Pauly, Hermann; Ehrenberg, Helmut

    2013-01-15

    The crystal structure of Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} (x=0.05) has been determined on a single crystal synthesized from the elements in a tantalum crucible. The compound crystallizes in orthorhombic space group Pmma (a=9.325 (3) A, b=3.198 (1) A, c=8.043 (3) A at 296 K) with 12 atoms per unit cell and represents a new structure type. The structure of Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} is closely related to the LaCoAl{sub 4} structure and belongs to the structural family, the representative members of which may be derived from the hexagonal AlB{sub 2} structure type by a combination of internal deformation and substitution. The strong In-In interaction and close to zero electrons concentration around Li and Ag atoms, calculated by LTMO, allow to suggest high mobility of lithium atoms located within the channels formed by the strongly waved [-In-In-] polyanionic chains. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} (x=0.05) indide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} has been determined on a single crystal. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A detailed crystal chemical analysis of Li{sub 2-x}Ag{sub 1+x}In{sub 3} was performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic structure of the title compound was calculated.

  2. Identifying surface structural changes in layered Li-excess nickel manganese oxides in high voltage lithium ion batteries: A joint experimental and theoretical study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Bo; Fell, Christopher R.; Chi, Miaofang; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2011-09-06

    High voltage cathode materials Li-excess layered oxide compounds Li[Ni{sub x}Li{sub 1/3-2x/3}Mn{sub 2/3-x/3}]O{sub 2} (0 < x < 1/2) are investigated in a joint study combining both computational and experimental methods. The bulk and surface structures of pristine and cycled samples of Li[Ni{sub 1/5}Li{sub 1/5}Mn{sub 3/5}]O{sub 2} are characterized by synchrotron X-Ray diffraction together with aberration corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (a-S/TEM). Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) is carried out to investigate the surface changes of the samples before/after electrochemical cycling. Combining first principles computational investigation with our experimental observations, a detailed lithium de-intercalation mechanism is proposed for this family of Li-excess layered oxides. The most striking characteristics in these high voltage high energy density cathode materials are (1) formation of tetrahedral lithium ions at voltage less than 4.45 V and (2) the transition metal (TM) ions migration leading to phase transformation on the surface of the materials. We show clear evidence of a new spinel-like solid phase formed on the surface of the electrode materials after high-voltage cycling. It is proposed that such surface phase transformation is one of the factors contributing to the first cycle irreversible capacity and the main reason for the intrinsic poor rate capability of these materials.

  3. Complete Feshbach-type calculations of energy positions and widths of autoionizing states in Li-like atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cardona, Juan Carlos; Sanz-Vicario, Jose Luis; Martin, Fernando

    2010-08-15

    Applications of the Feshbach formalism to systems of more than two active electrons are very scarce due to practical limitations in the construction of the projection operators P and Q that are inherent to the theory. As a consequence, most previous applications rely on the use of approximate quasiprojection operators, whose theoretical justification is not yet clear. In this work, an implementation of the Feshbach formalism for three-electron atoms is presented that includes all the ingredients of the original formalism. Energy positions and autoionization widths of the lowest {sup 2}S{sup e}, {sup 2}P{sup o}, and {sup 2}D{sup e} autoionizing states of Li and Ne{sup 7+} have been evaluated. The results show that the use of quasiprojection operators is justified for the evaluation of resonant positions. However, for the {sup 2}S{sup e} states of Li, the use of quasiprojection operators can lead to errors in the autoionization widths of the order of 100%.

  4. Preparation of LiFePO{sub 4} with inverse opal structure and its satisfactory electrochemical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Junbiao . E-mail: ljb01@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Tang Zilong; Zhang Zhongtai; Shen Wanci

    2005-12-08

    Phase pure, well-crystallized and homogeneous LiFePO{sub 4} powder with inverse opal structure was obtained by calcining the precursors of Li{sup +}, Fe{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4} {sup 3-} in the presence of organic template of poly(styrene-methyl methacrylate-acrylic acid) latex micro-spheres under nitrogen atmosphere. The resultant products were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), chemical titration, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Land 2001A electrochemical measurement system. Results indicated that after the decomposition of organic template, inverse opal structure and conductive carbon were left in the resultant products. With the large specific surface area resulting from inverse opal structure and with the conductive carbon, the products delivered satisfactory capacity and superior rate capability at room temperature, i.e., over 100 mAh/g at the high current density of 5.9C.

  5. Solvent extraction of Li+, H3O+ and NH4+ into nitrobenzene by using sodium dicarbollylcobaltate and calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makrlik, Emanuel; Selucky, P.; Vanura, Petr; Moyer, Bruce A

    2013-01-01

    From extraction experiments and c-activity measurements, the exchange extraction constants corresponding to the general equilibrium M+ (aq) + NaL+ (nb) , ML+ (nb) + Na+ (aq) taking place in the two-phase water nitrobenzene system (M+ = Li+, H3O+, NH+4; L = calix[4]arene-bis(t-octylbenzo-18-crown-6); aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) were evaluated. Furthermore, the stability constants of the ML+ complexes in nitrobenzene saturated with water were calculated; they were found to increase in the following cation order: zH3O+ < Li+ < NH+4.

  6. Elastic Scattering of {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al at Backward Angles in the 7-11 MeV Energy Range for Application in RBS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Arazi, A.; Cardona, M. A.; Figueira, J. M.; Hojman, D.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Negri, A. E.; Pacheco, A. J.; Abriola, D.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Grinberg, P.; Marti, G. V.; Fernandez Niello, J. O.

    2010-08-04

    We have measured elastic excitation functions for the {sup 7}Li+{sup 27}Al system, in an energy range close to its Coulomb barrier (E{sub lab} = 8.4 MeV) in steps of 0.25 MeV. For this purpose, an array of eight surface-barrier detectors was used. To get an insight on the background composition (mainly {alpha} particles), a telescope-detector was used for atomic-number identification. Identical measurements for the {sup 6}Li+{sup 27}Al system are planned for the near future.

  7. A digital map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wullschleger, Stan

    2014-07-03

    This dataset represent a map of the high center (HC) and low center (LC) polygon boundaries delineated from high resolution LiDAR data for the arctic coastal plain at Barrow, Alaska. The polygon troughs are considered as the surface expression of the ice-wedges. The troughs are in lower elevations than the interior polygon. The trough widths were initially identified from LiDAR data, and the boundary between two polygons assumed to be located along the lowest elevations on trough widths between them.

  8. Sphere-Shaped Hierarchical Cathode with Enhanced Growth of Nanocrystal Planes for High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Linjing; Li, Ning; Wu, Borong; Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Feng

    2015-01-14

    High-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries have been intensively pursued as power sources in electronic vehicles and renewable energy storage systems in smart grids. With this purpose, developing high-performance cathode materials is urgently needed. Here we report an easy and versatile strategy to fabricate high-rate and cycling-stable hierarchical sphered cathode Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2, by using an ionic interfusion method. The sphere-shaped hierarchical cathode is assembled with primary nanoplates with enhanced growth of nanocrystal planes in favor of Li+ intercalation/deintercalation, such as (010), (100), and (110) planes. This material with such unique structural features exhibits outstanding rate capability, cyclability, and high discharge capacities, achieving around 70% (175 mAhg–1) of the capacity at 0.1 C rate within about 2.1 min of ultrafast charging. Such cathode is feasible to construct high-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries.

  9. Preparation of LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries by a mist CVD process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tadanaga, Kiyoharu; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Sakuda, Atsushi; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro; Duran, Alicia; Aparacio, Mario

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films were prepared by using the mist CVD process. An aqueous solution of lithium and manganese acetates is used for the precursor solution. The cell with the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} thin films exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g. The cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles. - Abstract: LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode thin films for thin film lithium secondary batteries were prepared by using so-called the mist CVD process, employing an aqueous solution of lithium acetate and manganese acetate, as the source of Li and Mn, respectively. The aqueous solution of starting materials was ultrasonically atomized to form mist particles, and mists were transferred by nitrogen gas to silica glass substrate to form thin films. FE-SEM observation revealed that thin films obtained by this process were dense and smooth, and thin films with a thickness of about 750 nm were obtained. The electrochemical cell with the thin films obtained by sintering at 700 C exhibited a capacity of about 80 mAh/g, and the cell showed good cycling performance during 10 cycles.

  10. MAS NMR Study of the Metastable Solid Solutions Found in the LiFePO4/FePO4 System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabana, Jordi; Shirakawa, Junichi; Chen, Guoying; Richardson, Thomas; Grey, Clare P.

    2009-10-09

    Li and 3IP NMR experiments were conducted on a series of single- or two-phase samples in the LiFePCvFePCM system with different overall lithium contents, and containing the two end-members and/or two metastable solid solution hases, Lio.6FeP04 or Lio.34FeP04. These experiments were carried out at different temperatures in order to search for vacancy/charge ordering and ion/electron mobility in the metastable phases. Evidence for Li+-Fe2+ interactions was bserved for both Lio.6FeP04 and Lio.34FePC>4. The strength of this interaction leads to the formation of LiFePCvlike clusters in the latter, as shown by the room temperature data. Different motional processes are proposed to exist as the temperature is increased and various scenarios are discussed. While concerted lithium-electron hopping and/or correlations explains the data below 125C, evidence for some uncorrelated motion is found at higher temperatures, together with the onset of phase mixing.

  11. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: A Guide to Developing Air-Cooled LiBr Absorption for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guide to Developing Air- Cooled LiBr Absorption for Combined Heat and Power Applications April 2005 By Robert A. Zogg Michael Y. Feng Detlef Westphalen TIAX LLC Re: D0281 Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION/BACKGROUND .................................................................................................1 2.0 LIBR ABSORPTION OVERVIEW...................................................................................................3 3.0 KEY TECHNOLOGY BARRIERS

  12. Sphere-Shaped Hierarchical Cathode with Enhanced Growth of Nanocrystal Planes for High-Rate and Cycling-Stable Li-Ion Batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Linjing; Li, Ning; Wu, Borong; Xu, Hongliang; Wang, Lei; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Wu, Feng

    2015-01-14

    High-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries have been intensively pursued as power sources in electronic vehicles and renewable energy storage systems in smart grids. With this purpose, developing high-performance cathode materials is urgently needed. Here we report an easy and versatile strategy to fabricate high-rate and cycling-stable hierarchical sphered cathode Li1.2Ni0.13Mn0.54Co0.13O2, by using an ionic interfusion method. The sphere-shaped hierarchical cathode is assembled with primary nanoplates with enhanced growth of nanocrystal planes in favor of Li+ intercalation/deintercalation, such as (010), (100), and (110) planes. This material with such unique structural features exhibits outstanding rate capability, cyclability, and high discharge capacities, achievingmore » around 70% (175 mAhg–1) of the capacity at 0.1 C rate within about 2.1 min of ultrafast charging. Such cathode is feasible to construct high-energy and high-power Li-ion batteries.« less

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of LiBF 4 in propylene carbonate. A model lithium ion battery electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Jacob W.; Lam, Royce K.; Sheardy, Alex T.; Shih, Orion; Rizzuto, Anthony M.; Borodin, Oleg; Harris, Stephen J.; Prendergast, David; Saykally, Richard J.

    2014-08-20

    Since their introduction into the commercial marketplace in 1991, lithium ion batteries have become increasingly ubiquitous in portable technology. Nevertheless, improvements to existing battery technology are necessary to expand their utility for larger-scale applications, such as electric vehicles. Advances may be realized from improvements to the liquid electrolyte; however, current understanding of the liquid structure and properties remains incomplete. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of solutions of LiBF4 in propylene carbonate (PC), interpreted using first-principles electronic structure calculations within the eXcited electron and Core Hole (XCH) approximation, yields new insight into the solvation structure of the Li+ ion in this model electrolyte. By generating linear combinations of the computed spectra of Li+-associating and free PC molecules and comparing to the experimental spectrum, we find a Li+solvent interaction number of 4.5. This result suggests that computational models of lithium ion battery electrolytes should move beyond tetrahedral coordination structures.

  14. Effects of Laser Energy and Wavelength on the Analysis of LiFePO4 Using Laser Assisted Atom Probe Tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Rich; Janssen, Yuri; Kalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying S.

    2015-01-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative accuracy of atom probe tomography (APT) examinations of LiFePO4 (LFP) are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted APT of LFP has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of UV laser the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at. %) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ increased the observed oxygen concentration to near its correct stoichiometry and was well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of 16O2+ ions. This observation supports the premise that lower laser energies lead to a higher probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Conversely, at higher laser energies the resultant lower effective electric field reduces the probability of oxygen molecule ionization. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (~50% deficiency) and correct ratios of the remaining elements, including the oxygen concentration. The loss of Li is explained by selective dc evaporation of lithium between laser pulses and relatively negligible oxygen loss as neutrals during green-laser pulsing. Lastly, plotting of multihit events on a Saxey plot for the straight-flight path data (green laser only) revealed a surprising dynamic recombination process for some molecular ions mid-flight.

  15. Redox probing study of the potential dependence of charge transport through Li2O2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudsen, Kristian B.; Luntz, Alan C.; Jensen, Søren H.; Vegge, Tejs; Hjelm, Johan

    2015-11-20

    In the field of energy storage devices the pursuit for cheap, high energy density, reliable secondary batteries is at the top of the agenda. The Li–O2 battery is one of the possible technologies that, in theory, should be able to close the gap, which exists between the present state-of-the-art Li-ion technologies and the demand placed on batteries by technologies such as electrical vehicles. Here we present a redox probing study of the charge transfer across the main deposition product lithium peroxide, Li2O2, in the Li–O2 battery using outer-sphere redox shuttles. The change in heterogeneous electron transfer exchange rate as a function of the potential and the Li2O2 layer thickness (~depth-of-discharge) was determined using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. In addition, the attenuation of the electron transfer exchange rate with film thickness is dependent on the probing potential, providing evidence that hole transport is the dominant process for charge transfer through Li2O2 and showing that the origin of the sudden death observed upon discharge is due to charge transport limitations.

  16. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuta, S. B.; Artemov, S.V.; Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2009-12-15

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  17. Accurate potential energy curve of the LiH{sup +} molecule calculated with explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, Wei-Cheng; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2014-03-28

    Very accurate calculations of the ground-state potential energy curve (PEC) of the LiH{sup +} ion performed with all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions with shifted centers are presented. The variational method is employed. The calculations involve optimization of nonlinear exponential parameters of the Gaussians performed with the aid of the analytical first derivatives of the energy determined with respect to the parameters. The diagonal adiabatic correction is also calculated for each PEC point. The PEC is then used to calculate the vibrational energies of the system. In that calculation, the non-adiabatic effects are accounted for by using an effective vibrational mass obtained by the minimization of the difference between the vibrational energies obtained from the calculations where the Born-Oppenheimer approximation was not assumed and the results of the present calculations.

  18. New insights into the thermodynamic behavior of 2LiBH4-MgH2 composite for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cova, Federico; Ronnebro, Ewa; Choi, Yong-Joon; Gennari, Fabiana; Larochette, Pierre

    2015-06-15

    The composite 2LiBH4:MgH2 has been studied as a possible hydrogen storage material due to its high storage capacity. The present work is directed towards the clarification of the thermodynamic behavior of the system, especially in the temperature region above 400C. We reveal different reaction paths during hydrogen absorption and desorption at various temperatures which has important implication for applications. At temperatures higher than 413C, the observation of two different absorption pressure plateaus indicates that two different reactions occur, however, below this temperature there is only one plateau present in the system. During desorption, the double plateau can be observed at temperatures as low as 375C.

  19. Ultrathin Li3VO4 Nanoribbon/Graphene Sandwich-Like Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Lithium ion Storage Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Pei-Jun; Liu, Jun N.; Liang, Shuquan; Liu, Jun; Wang, W. J.; Lei, Ming; Tang, Shasha; Yang, Qian

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) "graphene-like" inorganic materials, because of the short lithium ion diffusion path and unique 2D carrier pathways, become a new research focus of the lithium storages. Some "graphene-like" binary compounds, such as, MnO2, MoS2 and VO2 ultrathin nanosheets, have been synthesized by a peeling method, which also exhibit enhanced lithium storage performances. However, it still remains a great challenge to synthesize widely-used lithium-containing ternary oxides with "graphene-like" nanostructures, because the lithium-containing ternary oxides, unlike ternary layered double hydroxides (LDH), are very hard to be directly peeled. Herein, we successfully synthesized ultrathin Li3VO4 nanoribbons with a thickness of about 3 nm by transformation from ultrathin V2O5xH2O nanoribbons, moreover, we achieved the preparation of ultrathin Li3VO4 nanoribbon@graphene sandwich-like nanostructures (LVO/G) through a layer-by-layer assembly method. The unique sandwich-like nanostructures shows not only a high specific reversible capacitance (up to 452.5 mA hg-1 after 200 cycles) but also an excellent cycling performance (with more than 299.2 mA hg-1 of the capacity at 10 C after 1000 cycles) as well as very high rate capability. Such template strategy, using "graphene-like" binary inorganic nanosheets as templates to synthesize lithium-containing ternary oxide nanosheets, may be extended to prepare other ternary oxides with "graphene-like" nanostructures

  20. Microstructure evolution of Li uptake/removal in MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles with high lithium storage performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yulong; Zhang, Hong; Ouyang, Pan; Chen, Wenhao [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Li, Zhicheng, E-mail: zhchli@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: The carbon-coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) ultra fine nanoparticles are synthesized by one-pot hydrothermal method. MoO{sub 2}@C nanoparticles have high specific capacity, excellent cycling performance and rate performance. Phase transformations for lithium ion uptake/removal are examined carefully by TEM. Phase transformations are highly reversible during the redox process. - Abstract: A facile one pot strategy of a hydrothermal methodology was applied to synthesize the carbon coated MoO{sub 2} (MoO{sub 2}@C) nanostructured particles, which are composed of ultra fine nanoparticles with homogeneous carbon coating about several nanometers. As an electrode in lithium ion batteries, the MoO{sub 2}@C shows a high specific capacity and reversible capacity (730 mA h g{sup ?1} after 60 cycles). Microstructure investigations, by using a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, of the MoO{sub 2}@C based electrodes employed at various states during the first discharge/charge cycle were conducted to elucidate the lithium ion uptake/removal mechanism and cycling behavior. In the lithium uptake process, the original MoO{sub 2} phase transfers into Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} through an addition type reaction, and then nanosized metallic Mo emerges as a result of a conversion reaction. In turn, Mo could be oxidized to the intermediate Li{sub 0.98}MoO{sub 2} before converting to hyperfine MoO{sub 2} phase on upcoming lithium removal process.