National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for gulf coast ecosystem

  1. Gulf CoastGulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf CoastGulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Unit The Gulf Coast Cooperative Ecosystem of Ocean Energy Management · National Aeronautics and Space Administration · National Oceanic 27 University of New Orleans 28 University of Texas at Brownsville 29 The University of West Florida

  2. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  3. Learning from Gulf Coast Community Leaders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After hearing the stories about the work that leaders from the gulf coast and their organizations have done, it’s clear to me that they are changing the paradigm of gulf coast recovery -- changing the way buildings are developed in the gulf and creating a generation of green builders in New Orleans who work closely with low-income communities.

  4. Successful revegetation of a gas pipeline right-of-way in a Gulf Coast barrier island ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchman, R.R.; George, J.F.; Gaynor, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the revegetation of a 30-m-wide right-of-way (ROW) following construction of a 76-cm-diameter natural gas pipeline across Padre Island, Texas, a Gulf Coast barrier island. ROW construction activities were completed in 1979 and included breaching of the foredunes, grading, trenching, pipeline installation, and leveling - which effectively removed all existing vegetation from the full length of the ROW. Following construction, the foredunes were rebuilt, fertilized, and sprigged with Panicum amarum, a native dune grass known as bitter panicum. The remainder of the ROW across the mid-island flats was allowed to revegetate naturally. Plant cover by species and total vegetative cover was measured on paired permanent transects on the ROW and in the adjacent undisturbed vegetation. These cover data show that the disturbed ROW underwent rapid vegetative recovery during the first two growing seasons, attaining 54% of the cover on the undisturbed controls. By 1984, the percent vegetative cover and plant species diversity on the ROW and the adjacent undisturbed control area were not significantly different and the ROW vegetation was visually indistinguishable from the surrounding plant communities. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. A Path Forward for the Gulf Coast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our country has made a promise to the people and small businesses of the Gulf Coast to restore their environment, economy and health, and continue a conversation with the fisherman, environmental workers, elected officials, health officials, scientists and Gulf residents on how to restore the Gulf.

  6. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillingham, Gavin

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  7. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOPRESSURED...

  8. Proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association spring conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association cogeneration conference held March 23, 1993. The topics of the papers contained in the conference proceedings include planning for additional capacity by electric utilities, fuel selection, fuel supply, competition and market pressures, power transmission and access to power transmission facilities, case studies of successful cogeneration projects.

  9. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  10. Profitable Small Grain Production In the Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Travis D.; Livingston, Steve

    1987-01-01

    tiller formation. Early or heavy rainfall can delay planting dates, occasionally to the point that management decisions must be altered regarding types of wheat to plant. Inland soils are more varied, with a wider range of textures and generally... red winter Florida 302 Pioneer 2550? Terral 817 Coker 747? Hard red spring DK?22 S, DK 49 S Nadadores 63 ?Not recommended for the Gulf Coast. considerable risk of crop failure. Grazing of day neutral winter wheats reduces the risk of spring freeze...

  11. Pasture Improvement in the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison); Jones, John H.

    1939-01-01

    , carpet, and Angleton grasses, California bur clover (toothed bur clover), White Dutch clover, and common lespedez ?commended for permanent pastures in the region. Adequate drair wing to control weeds, and the seeding of desirable and nuapbcu pasture... grasses and clovers in a permanent pasture, and with- stands heavy grazing. This grass is recommended in any mixture for permanent pasture in the Gulf Coast Prairie. Bahia grass, Paspalum notaturn, is a native of the West Indies and South America...

  12. Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

  13. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Selected Resources in the NOAA Libraries and Information Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf Coast Hurricanes Selected Resources in the NOAA Libraries and Information Network Prepared to the rich collection of historical and current resources on Gulf Coast hurricanes held by the NOAA Libraries) chronologically by named hurricane, and 2) Topically by: Climatology, History, Storm Surge, and Other

  14. A coastal hazards data base for the US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C.; Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US Gulf Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. To allow for the identification of coastlines at risk from sea-level rise, 7 of the 22 original data variables in this data base were classified by vulnerability and used to create 7 relative risk variables. These relative risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a coastal vulnerability index for each grid cell and/or line segment. The data for these 29 variables (i.e., the 22 original variables and 7 risk variables) have been placed into the following data formats: (1) Gridded polygon data for the 22 original data variables. Data include elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. (2) Gridded polygon data for the seven classified risk variables. The risk variables are classified versions of: mean coastal elevation, geology, geomorphology, local subsidence trend, mean shoreline displacement, maximum tidal range, and maximum significant wave height. (3) 1:2,000,000 line segment data containing the 29 data variables (the 22 original data variables and the seven classified risk variables). (4) Supplemental point data for the stations used in calculating the sea-level trend and tidal range data sets. (5) Supplemental line segment data containing a 1:2,000,000 digitized coastline of the US Gulf Coast as defined by this document.

  15. The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    processes can contribute to reaching ecosystem goals. We draw primarily on information developed31 The Ecological Basis of Forest Ecosystem Management in the Oregon Coast Range Thomas A. Spies twelve major ecological themes (regional environment, ecosystem types and patterns, vegetation

  16. Economic Effects of Land Subsidence Due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the Texas Gulf Coast Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, L. L.; Larson, J.

    1975-01-01

    Land surface subsidence continues to be a destructive force in the Texas Gulf Coast area. The sinking of the surface has been linked by engineers to the withdrawal of groundwater. Subsidence causes damages and property value losses as saltwater...

  17. The Demographic Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mississippi Gulf Coast: An Analysis by Zip Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, David A

    2008-01-01

    344-362. Cossman, R. 2006. “Hurricane Katrina as a NaturalMississippi Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina: An In-depthInstitutions in the Wake of Hurricane Katrina. ” Journal of

  18. Crop and vegetative growth impact on water infiltration into gulf coast soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Dwayne Jack

    1985-01-01

    CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Soil Science CROP AND VEGETATIVE GROWTH IMPACT ON WATER INFILTRATION INTO GULF COAST SOILS A Thesis by DWAYNE JACK PEIRCE Approved as to style and content by: L. R. ossner (Chairman of Committee) M. J. Mc...

  19. Water infiltration studies of the major rice producing soil series of the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesmith, Douglas M

    1988-01-01

    WATER INFILTRATION STUDIES OF THE MAJOR RICE PRODUCING SOIL SERIES OF THE TEXAS GULF COAST A Thesis by DOUGLAS MICHAEL NESMITH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Soil Science MATER INFILTRATION STUDIES OF THE MAJOR RICE PRODUCING SOIL SERIES OF THE TEXAS GULF COAST A Thesis by DOUGLAS MICHAEL NESMITH Approved as to style and content by: L. Lloyd R. Hossner...

  20. Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherry, Dawn Ann

    2007-04-25

    -1 FORAGING ECOLOGY OF WINTERING WADING BIRDS ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO COAST A Dissertation by DAWN ANN SHERRY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2006 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences FORAGING ECOLOGY OF WINTERING WADING BIRDS ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO COAST A Dissertation by DAWN ANN SHERRY Submitted to the Office...

  1. Increasing hurricane wave power along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bromirski, Peter D.

    erosion along the North Carolina coast [Dolan and Davis, 1992]. From a coastal management and planningIncreasing hurricane wave power along the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf coasts Peter D. Bromirski1 power index (WPI) increases significantly in the Atlantic during the mid-1990s, resulting largely from

  2. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  3. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management and salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain: effects of structural marsh management: impoundments, marsh sediments, ponds, salinity Abstract Physical characteristics of sediments in coastal marsh compositions of waterbird communities. Sediments in marsh ponds of the Gulf Coast Chenier Plain potentially

  4. Producing Early-Maturity (Group IV) Soybeans on the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klosterboer, Arlen; Miller, Travis; Livingston, Stephen

    1996-04-11

    be planted in May and harvested in October and November, when rainfall is generally at a minimum. When Group IV?s were used, less than 1 year in 4 produced soybeans that were not damaged (molded, discolored) because of wet weather at harvest (August... along the Upper Texas Gulf Coast. Acreage in 1994 (all of Texas) reached 220,000, with nearly all beans being marketed through local elevators or by truck to the Port of Houston. Figure 1. Texas Gulf Coast counties predominantly growing maturity group...

  5. The contribution of mangrove expansion to salt marsh loss on the Texas Gulf coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Anna R.; Highfield, Wesley E.; Brody, Samuel D.; Louchouarn, Patrick

    2015-05-06

    to mangrove expansion into areas previously occupied by salt marsh plants. On the Texas (USA) coast of the western Gulf of Mexico, most cases of mangrove expansion have been documented within specific bays or watersheds. Based on this body of relatively small...

  6. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. Among the key priorities of the strategy are:...

  7. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,Energy 9, 2013FederalCommitteeFinal FY

  8. ABUNDANCE, DISTRIBUTION, MOVEMENTS, AND LENGTHS OF LARVAL HERRING ALONG THE WESTERN COAST OF THE GULF OF MAINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OF THE GULF OF MAINE JOSEPH J. GRAHAM, STANLEY B. CHENOWETH, AND CLARENCE W. DAVIS' ABSTRACT This paper of the Gulf of Maine. Larvae were most numerous in the catches throughout the coast in the autumn, reached the recruitment of immature herring to the sardine fishery of Maine: (1) winter mortality, (2) larval condition

  9. WilsonBull., 102(3), 1990, pp. 487-500 STOPOVER ON A GULF COAST BARRIER ISLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Frank R.

    during spring migration on Horn Island, a barrier island along the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico studiedwhen they stoppedon a barrier island alongthe coastof Mississippi following springtrans-Gulf migration migration. Stopover areas must be viewed as important links in species'annualcycleif the conservationof

  10. ,"Henry Hub Gulf Coast Natural Gas Spot Price ($/MMBTU)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Informationmonthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43U.S.longec 188 U.S.1 HomeRegional37Annual* jGulf Coast

  11. New genera and species of early Tertiary palynomorphs from Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stover, L. E.; Elsik, W. C.; Fairchild, W. W.

    1966-05-23

    pattern and wall thickness identical to C. pertusus, but C. guruba is normally bisulculate. Pollen similar to C. pertusus are found in the extant families Pal- mae and Magnoliaceae, and possibly in other families as well. It is evident that Ca1amuspol...- Stover, Elsik, and Fairchild—New Early Tertiary Pal ynomorphs from Gulf Coast 3 lar, annulate ulcus located at or near center of grain. Exine thin; sexine and nexine closely ap- pressed, of approximately equal thickness. Sexine of type species foveolate...

  12. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  13. Geopressured geothermal resource of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast: a technology characterization and environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Usibelli, A.; Deibler, P.; Sathaye, J.

    1980-12-01

    Two aspects of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast geopressured geothermal resource: (1) the technological requirements for well drilling, completion, and energy conversion, and, (2) the environmental impacts of resource exploitation are examined. The information comes from the literature on geopressured geothermal research and from interviews and discussions with experts. The technology characterization section emphasizes those areas in which uncertainty exists and in which further research and development is needed. The environmental assessment section discusses all anticipated environmental impacts and focuses on the two largest potential problems: (a) subsidence and (b) brine disposal.

  14. 4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A. Imy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) found that 68% of all December through February tornadoes in the United States occur in the Gulf Coast4.2 COOL SEASON SIGNIFICANT (F2-F5) TORNADOES IN THE GULF COAST STATES Jared L. Guyer and David A, Wisconsin Kar'retta Venable Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi 1. INTRODUCTION Tornadoes pose

  15. Pipeline transportation of natural gas from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp.'s national gas pipeline system from the Gulf Coast producing area (where 75% of its supply lies offshore) extends for 1832 mi along the Gulf Coast through the southeastern Piedmont and north to terminate in New York City. It serves high-priority markets in 11 southern and Atlantic seaboard states with a daily flowing capacity of 3.0 billion cu ft/day and an additional 1.5 billion cu ft/day available from storage. Also discussed are gas conditioning for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, water vapor and entrained salt water and solids, and measurement of gas volume with a meter and gravitometer and of heating value with a calorimeter; gas transmission through 9,295 mi of pipeline, made up mostly of four, 30-42 in. dia parallel pipelines with 1,062,452 hp of compression capacity; LNG storage, including unique facilities at the Eminence, Miss., Salt Dome Storage facility and the Carlstadt, N.J., LNG plant; odorization; operations; and pipeline protection against third-party damage and against corrosion.

  16. Foliar Uptake of Fog in the Coast Redwood Ecosystem: a Novel Drought-Alleviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    273 Foliar Uptake of Fog in the Coast Redwood Ecosystem: a Novel Drought-Alleviation Strategy Shared by Most Redwood Forest Plants Emily Limm1 , Kevin Simonin2 , and Todd Dawson3 Key words: fog, understory, Polystichum munitum, leaf wetness, foliar uptake, drought, climate Introduction Fog inundates

  17. Review of the NURE Assessment of the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Susan M., E-mail: SusanHall@usgs.gov [Central Energy Resources Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Historic exploration and development were used to evaluate the reliability of domestic uranium reserves and potential resources estimated by the U.S. Department of Energy national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province. NURE estimated 87 million pounds of reserves in the $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cost category in the Coast Plain uranium resource region, most in the Gulf Coast Uranium Province. Since NURE, 40 million pounds of reserves have been mined, and 38 million pounds are estimated to remain in place as of 2012, accounting for all but 9 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the reserve or production categories in the NURE estimate. Considering the complexities and uncertainties of the analysis, this study indicates that the NURE reserve estimates for the province were accurate. An unconditional potential resource of 1.4 billion pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 600 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the forward cost category of $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1980 prices), was estimated in 106 favorable areas by the NURE program in the province. Removing potential resources from the non-productive Houston embayment, and those reserves estimated below historic and current mining depths reduces the unconditional potential resource 33% to about 930 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and that in the $30/lb cost category 34% to 399 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Based on production records and reserve estimates tabulated for the region, most of the production since 1980 is likely from the reserves identified by NURE. The potential resource predicted by NURE has not been developed, likely due to a variety of factors related to the low uranium prices that have prevailed since 1980.

  18. Growth and reproduction of Scirpus americanus following fire and lesser snow geese herbivory on the upper Texas Gulf coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stahman, Matthew Glen

    1996-01-01

    and Louisiana Gulf coasts. Fire is used in the management of S-. ameficanus stands. This study was designed to evaluate the influence of fire and LSG herbivory on growth, development, and reproduction of SciEpus americanus. The study was conducted along...

  19. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of a section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 × 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in a clear seal rupture. The next step was to compare the magnitude of the event generated by such a displacement to documented magnitudes of “large” earthquakes generated by waterflooding and fluid disposal. Based on this analysis, we conclude that seismicity that may arise from CO2 injection appears not to be a serious complication for CO2 storage integrity, at least in the Gulf Coast area.

  20. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of amore »section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 × 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in a clear seal rupture. The next step was to compare the magnitude of the event generated by such a displacement to documented magnitudes of “large” earthquakes generated by waterflooding and fluid disposal. Based on this analysis, we conclude that seismicity that may arise from CO2 injection appears not to be a serious complication for CO2 storage integrity, at least in the Gulf Coast area.« less

  1. he Gulf Coast region offers many benefits for its peo-ple who call Louisiana home. The area is full of cultural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    he Gulf Coast region offers many benefits for its peo- ple who call Louisiana home. The area is developed through a collaborative partner- ship of the NOAA National Weather Service and the State portable if you live in an evacuation area. Don't forget special supplies for babies, the elderly

  2. Provenance of Corexit-related chemical constituents found in nearshore and inland Gulf Coast waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    , crude oil from the Deepwater Hori- zon accident began washing onto northern Gulf of Mexico(GOM) sandy beaches, continuing until about mid-July, 2010.This oil ar- rived considerably altered from its original, stocks of this dispersant were quickly exhausted and Corexit 9500 was used during the remaining response

  3. Potential application of a Gulf Coast Tick, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, Aggregation-Attachment-Pheromone for surveillance of free-living adults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hee Jung

    2005-02-17

    , Texas and Payne County, Oklahoma, and maintained in colony at the Tick Research Laboratory, Veterinary Medical Research Park, Texas A&M University were used in this project. These ticks were fed as immatures on commercial... in ticks fed for 3 and 8 days are different, and (3) that the ratio of these volatile compounds vary between Oklahoma and Texas tick strains. Materials and Methods Ticks. Gulf Coast ticks originating from Refugio County, Texas, and Payne...

  4. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  5. Ports on the Texas Gulf Coast -- Economic Importance and Role for Texas and U.S. Grain Crops. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Edward Mitch; Fuller, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    t h i s time period, these f a c i l i t i e s received approximately 635.884 mil l ion bushels f o r export. The seven North Texas Gulf e leva to rs have a combined storage capacity of 35.186 mil l ion bushels, while South Texas Gulf por t f... a c i l i t i e s have 15.8 mil l ion bushels of storage. The North Texas Gulf exported 514.318 mil l ion bushels during 1977 a s opposed t o 121.566 mi l l ion bushels f o r the South Texas Gulf. Dividing t o t a l exports by s torage...

  6. Fine-grained sedimentation on the Chenier Plain Coast and inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draut, Amy Elizabeth

    2003-01-01

    This thesis examines the evolution of a mud-dominated coastal sedimentary system on multiple time scales. Fine-grained systems exhibit different properties and behavior from sandy coasts, and have received relatively little ...

  7. Selected heavy metals in tissues of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) stranded along thr Texas and Florida Gulf coasts 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haubold, Elsa Maria

    1995-01-01

    Heavy metals are naturally occurring elements with global distribution. Industrial application of some heavy metals has led to ecosystem contamination and accumulation of unsafe levels in the food chain, even for those ...

  8. The Distribution of Perkinsus marinus, a protozoan parasite of the American oyster, Crassostrea virginica, along the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Darrell Eugene

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and distribution of Perkinsus marinus in the oyster-producing bays of the Texas coast was determined from Nov. 1987 through Nov. 1988. Oysters were collected from five oyster-producing bays in Texas by Texas Parks and Wildlife...

  9. Effect of time length of frozen storage and vacuum packaging on survival of V?i?b?r?i?o? v?u?l?n?i?f?i?c?u?s? in Gulf Coast oysters (C?r?a?s?s?o?s?t?r?e?a? v?i?r?g?i?n?i?c?a?) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurer, Ellen Marie

    1992-01-01

    in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1992 Major Subject: Veterinary Public Health EFFECT OF TIME LENGTH OF FROZEN STORAGE AND VACUUM PACKAGING ON SURVIVAL OF VIBRIO VULNIFICUS IN GULF COAST OYSTERS... of Frozen Storage and Vacuum Packaging on Survival of Vibrio vulnificus in Gulf Coast Oysters (Crassostrea virginica). (May 1992) Ellen Marie Maurer, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. A. B. Childers Vibrio vulnificus...

  10. A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osenberg, Craig W.

    A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Recommendations of an Expert Working Group, Stanley Senner, John M. Teal and Ping Wang #12;1 A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem, Executive deep-sea and shoreline habitats and closing economically valuable fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico

  11. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  12. A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osenberg, Craig W.

    A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Recommendations of an Expert Working Group of Mexico Ecosystem: Restoration Recommendations of an Expert Working Group. Pew Environment Group. Washington, DC. 112 pp. #12;A Once and Future Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Recommendations

  13. Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico Regional Land Cover Change Report 1996­2010 #12;About This Report The Gulf of Mexico at www.coast.noaa.gov. #12;GULF OF MEXICO REGIONAL LAND COVER CHANGE REPORT, 1996­2010 THE GULF OF MEXICO REGION covers over 200,400 square miles and extends from Texas'border with Mexico in the west to the tip

  14. Horticultural Survey of Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Edward C.

    1907-01-01

    e.-lst, cabbage; 2nd, onions; 3rd, Irish potatoes; 4th, CU- cumbers. Sarlta Maria.-lst, onions; 2nd, cucumbers; 3rd, beans; 4th, cabbage. While there is .some difference of opinion among inaiuiduals as to the relative value and profit in certain..., and to Halifax, Nova Scotia, as well as to other markets less distant. SANTA MARIA. For rapid development from 'brush and cactus to in- tensified profitable gardening Kingsville made a two-year record which probably had never been equalled up to that time...

  15. Western Gulf Coast Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricNCubic Feet) Underground

  16. MMS 95-0022 Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    OCS Study MMS 95-0022 Northern Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Ecosystems Study Final Report Volume.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region #12;OCS Study MMS 95-0022 Northern Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Ecosystems Study Final Report Volume II : Technical Report Editors

  17. MMS 95-0023 Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    OCS Study MMS 95-0023 Northern Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Ecosystems Study Final Report Volume Minerals Management Service bw Gulf of Mexico OCS Region #12;OCS Study MMS 95-0023 Northern Gulf of Mexico.S . Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service New Orleans Gulf of Mexico OCS Region May 1996 #12

  18. MMS 95-0021 Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    OCS Study MMS 95-0021 Northern Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Ecosystems Study Final Report Volume I Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region #12;OCS Study MMS 95-0021 Northern Gulf of Mexico.S . Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service New Orleans Gulf of Mexico OCS Region May 1996 #12

  19. Crude Injustice in the Gulf: Why Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico are Inconsistent with U.S. International Ocean Law and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    torium on Deepwater Oil Drilling, Demands Environmentalimpacts. The increasing demand for oil continues to pushthe Gulf ecosystem. Increas- ing demand for oil coupled with

  20. OCEAN MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A GAP WIND EVENT IN THE GULF OF TEHUANTEPEC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, David

    winds", are generated as cold air masses surge southward across the Gulf of Mexico and are forced14B.6 OCEAN MODEL SIMULATIONS OF A GAP WIND EVENT IN THE GULF OF TEHUANTEPEC Jon M. Schrage1. INTRODUCTION Off the Pacific coast of southern Mexico, in the Gulf of Tehuantepec, strong northerly winds often

  1. Geopressured-geothermal energy, US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Sixty-five papers are included. Eleven papers were entered into the data base previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for fifty-four. (MHR)

  2. Marinas on the Texas Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crompton, John L.; Beardsley, Dennis D.; Ditton, Robert B.

    1976-01-01

    ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Marine Gas/Oil Sales ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Dockside Fuel Pump ? ? ? ? ? Boating Equipment Sales ? ? I . ? ? Dry Boat Storage ? Boat Rental ? ? ? ? ? ? Boat Repair Service ? ? G> Motor Sales l> ? ? !0 +>0 +>0 +>0 C1 N 0 W .... 0 0') Boat Slips ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Marine Gas/Oil Sales ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Dockside Fuel Pump ? ? ? Boating Equipment Sales ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Dry Boat Storage Boat Rental...

  3. The Gulf Coast Energy Conservation Society 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faulkner, C. R.

    1979-01-01

    similar industry in the area illustrates that a need existed and hope fully has been satisfied. The society meets every other month on the second Thursday in January, March, May, July, September and November. The purpose of the society is the promotion... company support in the area of conservation. 4. Fresh outlooks on many aspects of energy conservation. 5. Improved public relations at both individual and group levels. Many members believe the continued benefits being derived from the society are due...

  4. Conservation in a Gulf Coast Chemical Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, F.

    1983-01-01

    being installed or designed. The location efforts to improve the efficiency of fuel fired equipment including a major retrofit of heat tube preheaters and waste heat boiler installation will be discussed. Three applications of waste material recovery...

  5. Gulf Coast Green Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERC Hydroelectric Projects |

  6. Did the northeastern Gulf of Mexico become greener after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    explosion occurred on the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil drilling platform in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico#12;Did the northeastern Gulf of Mexico become greener after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill ecosystem in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (NEGOM) from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (April ­ July 2010

  7. Gulf of Maine Strategic Regional Ocean Science Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pederson, Judith

    The Gulf of Maine Regional Ocean Science Initiative evolved from an awareness of the importance of integrated approaches to addressing ecological, environmental, and social influences in coastal and marine ecosystems at ...

  8. Physical controls on copepod aggregations in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woods, Nicholas W

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the role that the circulation in the Gulf of Maine (GOM) plays in determining the distribution of dense aggregations of copepods. These aggregations are an important part of the marine ecosystem, ...

  9. High-resolution geostatistical inversion of a seismic data set acquired in a Gulf of Mexico gas reservoir.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    High-resolution geostatistical inversion of a seismic data set acquired in a Gulf of Mexico gas, UNOCAL Corporation Summary Geostatistical inversion is applied on a Gulf-of-Mexico, 3D post-stack seismic in this paper is located in the Gulf of Mexico, off the coast of Louisiana. Existing development wells reach two

  10. Ecosystem Scale Acoustic Sensing Reveals Humpback Whale Behavior Synchronous with Herring Spawning Processes and Re-Evaluation Finds No Effect of Sonar on Humpback Song Occurrence in the Gulf of Maine in Fall 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Zheng

    We show that humpback-whale vocalization behavior is synchronous with peak annual Atlantic herring spawning processes in the Gulf of Maine. With a passive, wide-aperture, densely-sampled, coherent hydrophone array towed ...

  11. Convergent blooms of Karenia brevis along the Texas coast Robert D. Hetland1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hetland, Robert D.

    ] A numerical model of wind-driven surface flow in the Gulf of Mexico is used to examine physical controls of Mexico, has a relatively slow growth rate (doubling times of 2­3 days). Increases in K. brevis responsible for bloom formation in the western Gulf of Mexico is convergence due to downwelling at the coast

  12. Modelling the transport of lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae and postlarvae in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling the transport of lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae and postlarvae in the Gulf of Maine and settlement locations for lobsters in the Gulf of Maine. The physical model is based on a ®nite-element mesh by mid-season at most sites, but strong spatial differences persisted. The eastern Maine coast appears

  13. Age and Growth of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, From the U.S. Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that there was missing or 1Fishery management plan and environmental impact statement for coastal migratory pelagicAge and Growth of King Mackerel, Scomberomorus cavalla, From the U.S. Gulf of Mexico CHARLES S and Gulf of Mexico coasts of the United States has been thor oughly documented (Manooch et aI., 1978

  14. The response to Hurricane Katrina : a study of the Coast Guard's culture, organizational design & leadership in crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanial, Gregory J

    2007-01-01

    Hurricane Katrina slammed into the United States Gulf Coast early on August 28, 2005 killing almost 2,000 people and causing $81 billion in damages making Katrina the costliest natural disaster in United States history. ...

  15. Overview of the North Coast MPA Baseline Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaffe, Jules

    & Socioeconomic scope 10 Ecosystem Features Traditional Ecological Knowledge · Contextual Information e new contextual information More information on RFP p. 3-6 #12;North Coast Ecosystem Features.g., fisheries information, physical oceanographic information Baseline Program funds cannot be used to collect

  16. Identification of Submarine Landslide for Tsunami Hazard Assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Using a Probabilistic Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohithakshan Parambath, Lisha

    2014-04-23

    The eastern coast of USA, including the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), is more prone to tsunamis caused by submarine landslides than earthquakes. The Tsunami Hazard Assessment research program lead by ten Brink, 2009, reported the presence of ancient...

  17. Recent marine and lagoonal ostracodes from the Estero De Tastiota region, Sonora, Mexico (Northeastern Gulf of California)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, R. H.; Kaesler, R. L.

    1963-01-01

    coast of Sonora, Mexico, in the Gulf of California about one-third of its length (440 miles) south of the mouth of the Colorado River. The faunal assemblages represent an open-gulf biotope, a lower-lagoon biotope, an upper- lagoon biotope, and a tidal... in the lagoon; salinity ranges from 36c/oo in the open gulf to 48%0 on the tidal flat; and temperature ranges from 18°C in January to 29°C in July and Sep- tember. The substratum consists of very coarse sand in the open gulf, medium to coarse sand in the lagoon...

  18. Summary Report on Information Technology Integration Activities For project to Enhance NASA Tools for Coastal Managers in the Gulf of Mexico and Support Technology Transfer to Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulbransen, Thomas C.

    2009-04-27

    Deliverable to NASA Stennis Space Center summarizing summarizes accomplishments made by Battelle and its subcontractors to integrate NASA's COAST visualization tool with the Noesis search tool developed under the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative project.

  19. Gulf of Mexico -West Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gulf of Mexico - Alabama - West Florida - Louisiana - Mississippi - Texas #12;Regional Summary Gulf of Mexico Region Management Context The Gulf of Mexico Region includes Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Texas, and West Florida. Federal fisheries in this region are managed by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery

  20. Impact of prescribed burning on Gulf Coast tick populations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldham, Thomas Walter

    1983-01-01

    on adjacent unburned areas. Tick numbers remained lower on burned and unburned areas the second growing season after burning on mesquite- mixedgrass and bunchgrass-annual forb sites. Standing crops of herbaceous vegetation and mulch were reduced following... and unburned plant community . Adult ticks present in the vegetation and mulch layer were initially killed by the heat of the passing fire front. Habitat alterations caused by the fire limited tick numbers until vegetation recovered and senesced to form a...

  1. Ratooning Grain Sorghum on the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livingston, Stephen; Coffman, Cloyce G.

    1997-01-03

    , there is an opportunity to earn some additional income while multiplying the humus/residue production with an additional top crop. Grain sorghum is a logical cover crop when it is considered that vegetables return, but a small amount of humus and haygrazers require full... a factor of how early the main crop was planted and harvested, enabling the second crop to proceed under favorable conditions. Dry weather and high temperatures will slow juvenile growth and will reduce bloom set. In 1996 (drought year), heavy rains...

  2. Fig Culture in the Gulf Coast Region of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison); Wyche, R. H. (Robert Henry)

    1932-01-01

    . Knox, M. S.. Animal Husbandry A. K. Mackey. M. S., Animal Husbandry A. L. Darn&", M. A.. Dairy Husbandry "rl STATION STAFF+ Administration : Veterinary Science: A. B. Conner. M. S., Director *M. Francis, D. V. M.. Chief R. E. Karper, M. S.. Vice...

  3. Peanut Growing in the Gulf Coast Prairie of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stansel, R. H. (Roy Harrison)

    1935-01-01

    . Horlacher. Ph. D., Genetics S. W. Bilsing, Ph. D., Entomology J. H. Knox. M. S., Animal Husband D. Scoates. A. E., Agricultural Engineering A. L. Darnell. M. A.. Dairy Husbanl A. K. Mackey, M. S., Animal Husbandry R. 0. Berry, B. S., Biology R. G. Reeves...

  4. Trends in Gulf Coast Power Supply, Demand, and Costs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posey, L. G., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    load and peak load requirements are supplied by fuel oil, gas, and, where available, hydroelectric genera tors. Fuel Cost Forecast Three sources of information provide data to forecast fuel costs for each utility: ? Fuel contracts between... offsets are required for both NMHC and S02' These offsets are regarded as scarce corporate resources by the industries already operating in the area. They will be used carefUlly to optimize industrial growth with the least expensive offsets used first...

  5. Evidence of Surface Connectivity for Texas Gulf Coast Depressional Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and a regulatory perspective, to understand the surface water pathways that connect such wetlands to each other communities surrounded by terrestrial plant communities or undrained hydric soils surrounded by hydric soils hydrologically isolated as well; however, many are in fact connected, via subsurface pathways, with nearby water

  6. Infiltration Testing of Homes in the Houston Gulf Coast Area 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howel, E. S.

    1990-01-01

    Air Changes per Hour (ACH) are determined by construction and weather conditions. In this test, it was found that the ACH is equal to .59 plus .07 for every year of age the home has. The higher ACH values for age are due to deterioration...

  7. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    By replacing T-12 lights with more efficient T-8 units, Texas City will save 65.5 kW each year. | Courtesy of the City of Texas City, Texas By replacing T-12 lights with more...

  8. Rice… A Big Business on the Gulf Coast Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, R. J. Jr.

    1957-01-01

    of improved pasture usually is s~fficient to grow one rice crop. After 4 or 5 years of improved pasture, the residual phosphoric acid may be sufficient to grow two rice crops. Good clover growth in pasture before rice indicates that phosphorous... to convert from For several years 3 acres of this Persian and white clover pasture furnished almost continuow grazing for one cow from November to March. 14 rice to improved pasture by broadcasting grass and clover seed without seedbed preparation...

  9. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,DepartmentFederalJuly 8,toDepartment ofin

  10. Gulf Coast Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River Power Co Ltd JumpGuanhYuefengEnergyCorporation

  11. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 Infographic courtesy of theSolar PowerFundingDepartment of Energy

  12. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided 8/12/15 v3 Assumptions:MTBE

  13. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.101Company Level ImportsContango inHome

  14. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Genealogy of

  15. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecadeSign up forHoliday29 1.921

  16. Travel Characteristics of Marine Anglers Using Oil and Gas Platforms in the Central Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Travel Characteristics of Marine Anglers Using Oil and Gas Platforms in the Central Gulf of Mexico patterns of avid marine anglers using the oil and gas structures off the Louisiana coast. Although and their fishing methods. Study Area In 1985, the National Research Council identified more than 3,100 oil and gas

  17. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; hardin, danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach ? Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback ? With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements ? Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee ? Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007 ? Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf. ? Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged. ? Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications ? Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems ? Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs ? Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning ? Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability ? Analyzed SAV cover change at five other bays in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate extensibility of the analytical tools ? Initiated development of a conceptual model for understanding the causes and effects of HABs in the Gulf of Mexico IT Tool Development ? Established a website with the GoMRC web-based tools at www.gomrc.org ? Completed development of an ArcGIS-based decision support tool for SAV restoration prioritization decisions, and demonstrated its use in Mobile Bay ? Developed a web-based application, called Conceptual Model Explorer (CME), that enables non-GIS users to employ the prioritization model for SAV restoration ? Created CME tool enabling scientists to view existing, and create new, ecosystem conceptual models which can be used to document cause-effect relationships within coastal ecosystems, and offer guidance on management solutions. ? Adapted the science-driven advanced web search engine, Noesis, to focus on an initial set of coastal and marine resource issues, including SAV and HABs ? Incorporated map visualization tools with initial data layers related to coastal wetlands and SAVs

  18. Flessa, K.W., 2004. Ecosystem services and the value of water in the Colorado River delta and Estuary, USA and Mexico: Guidelines for mitigation and restoration.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arizona, University of

    in the northern Gulf of California (Figure 1). Since the completion of upstream dams, irrigation projects or indirectly, from ecosystem functions. Table 1 lists some of the services and goods provided to human society

  19. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  20. Cumulative Human Impacts on Mediterranean and Black Sea Marine Ecosystems: Assessing Current Pressures and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewison, Rebecca

    -based management and spatial plans provide new opportunities to balance uses and protection of marine ecosystems `Towards COast to Coast NETworks of marine protected areas (from the shore to the high and deep sea), coupled with sea-based wind energy potential (COCONET)'. The funders had no role in study design, data

  1. Sandia Energy - Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute Class of 2012 Kicks Off with 20 Students from the Gulf Cooperation Council Home Energy Assurance Infrastructure Security Infrastructure...

  2. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  3. The importance of tidal creek ecosystems Keywords: Estuary; Tidal creek; Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mallin, Michael

    . They are most abundant along the Atlantic Seaboard from New Jersey to Florida, and along the Gulf Coast). Tidal creeks are especially abundant in low-energy systems such as protected areas behind barrier. As an example, the four southernmost coastal counties in North Carolina (Onslow, Pender, New Hanover

  4. Economic development and coastal ecosystem change in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    development, oil/gas exploration, and food production1,3 . This is a primary reason for the higher per capita ecosystems are globally threatened by anthropogenic impacts, yet how these impacts are driven by economic half of the world's population lives near coasts that benefit human society with access to trade, land

  5. Fi in Gulf Pidgin Arabic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potsdam, Eric; Alanazi, Mohammad

    2014-12-01

    Gulf Pidgin Arabic (GPA) is a simplified communication system established by the non-Arabic immigrants to Gulf countries in the Middle East. In the past decades, millions of people with no Arabic skills have come from countries such as Bangladesh...

  6. Maine coast winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, Richard

    2000-01-28

    The Maine Coast Winds Project was proposed for four possible turbine locations. Significant progress has been made at the prime location, with a lease-power purchase contract for ten years for the installation of turbine equipment having been obtained. Most of the site planning and permitting have been completed. It is expect that the turbine will be installed in early May. The other three locations are less suitable for the project, and new locations are being considered.

  7. Ecosystem Services Ecosystem Function and the Ecosystem Approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallianou, Koralia

    2013-11-28

    This project focused on mapping the delivery of three ecosystems services each in one case study area in Scotland and then identify how the Scottish policies such as woodland expansion biodiversity, conservation and food ...

  8. Infaunal abundance in restored and reference marshes of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Brittney

    2011-05-04

    Creation Efforts. Estuaries and Coasts 14: 1-16 Sacco JN, Seneca ED, Wentworth TR (1994) Infaunal Community Development of Artificially Established Salt Marshes in North Carolina. Estuaries 17:489. Sandnes J,Forbes T, Hansen R, Rygg B (2000) Bioturbation... half of the salt and brackish marshes in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have been reduced to open water. A widely accepted approach to mitigate the loss of valuable ecological services is the construction of new marsh habitat. Marsh construction...

  9. Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tree Biomass Estimates on Forest Land in California's North Coast Region1 Tian-Ting Shih2 Tree biomass is one essential component in a forest ecosystem and is getting more attention nowadays due to its sequestration, energy production, and other natural and social resources uses and impacts. A biomass estimator

  10. Engineering the global ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stringfellow, William T.; Jain, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    of humans deliberately engineering agricultural landscapes.010-0302-8 EDITORIAL Engineering the global ecosystemtale about human explorers engineering the ecosystem of Mars

  11. Innovation Ecosystem Development Initiative

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ideas that address today's most urgent energy challenges. For More Information For more information about the Innovation Ecosystem Initiative, please visit eere.energy.gov...

  12. GULF OF MEXICO RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GULF OF MEXICO RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2009 #12;Suggested citation: Sempier, S.H., K. Havens, R. Stickney, C. Wilson, and D.L. Swann. 2009. Gulf of Mexico Research Plan. MASGP-09-024. Document design organizations. Texas · Louisiana · Florida Mississippi-Alabama #12;iGulf of Mexico Research Plan CONTENTS TABLE

  13. Introduction The northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    69 Introduction The northwestern Gulf of Mexico (NWGOM) reefs and banks are asso- ciated,McGrail,and Sonnier Banks in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico Douglas C.Weaver Emma L.Hickerson George P.Schmahl Flower- western Gulf of Mexico (NWGOM) were conducted as part of the Sustainable Seas Expedition (SSE) during July

  14. Groundfish Trawler Profitability, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundfish Trawler Profitability, Northern Gulf of Mexico JOHN P. WARREN and WADE L. GRIFFIN Figure I.-Major Gulf of Mexico groundfish ports. MISSISSIPPI Introduction Trawling for bottomfish (ground- fish) in the northern Gulf of Mexico has developed into a significant indus- try for fishing fleets

  15. GULF OF MEXICO PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -^ ^ / GULF OF MEXICO PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL DATA FROM ALASKA CRUISES Marine Biological Laboratory, Commissioner GULF OF MEXICO PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL DATA FROM ALASKA CRUISES Compiled by Albert Collier Fishery OF THE GULF OF MEXICO By Kenneth H. Driimmond and George B. Austin, Jr. Department of Oceanography The A. & M

  16. Gulf Petro Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  17. Graduate studies Ecosystem Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate studies in Ecosystem Science and Management Ph.D. M.S. M.Agr. or Natural Resources Development MNRD Department of Ecosystem Science and Management College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The thesisbased Master of Science and Ph.D. degrees are designed for research or academic careers

  18. Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Soil community composition and ecosystem processes Comparing agricultural ecosystems with natural, nitrogen, pesticides Abstract. Soil organisms play principal roles in several ecosystem functions, i decomposition, and acting as an environmental buffer. Agricultural soils would more closely resemble soils

  19. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM...

  20. ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES atlantic and gulf of mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    149 ATL ANTIC AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTAL PEL AGIC FISHERIES UNIT 7 atlantic and gulf of mexico Center Miami Florida INTRODUCTION Coastal pelagic species of the U.S. Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico north of the Yucatan peninsula in Mexico. Cobia and dolphinfish are broadly distributed in tropical

  1. Biogenic silica fluxes and accumulation rates in the Gulf of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thunell, R.C.; Pride, C.J.; Tappa, E. ); Muller-Karger, F.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Gulf of California, though small in size, plays an important role in the global silica cycle. The seasonal pattern of biogenic silica flux in the gulf is closely related to that of phytoplankton biomass levels and is controlled by changes in weather and hydrographic conditions. The highest opal fluxes ([approximately] 0.35 g[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) occur during winter and spring, and they are comparable to those measured in some of the most productive ecosystems of the world. Approximately 15%-25% of the biogenic silica produced in surface waters is preserved in gulf sediments, a figure significantly higher than the average global ocean preservation rate. However, the flux of opal at 500 m water depth is less than 25% of that being produced at the surface, suggesting that most of the recycling of biogenic silica in the Gulf of California occurs in the upper water column. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  2. nature geoscience | VOL 1 | DECEMBER 2008 | www.nature.com/naturegeoscience 805 Sustaining coastal urban ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Törnqvist, Torbjörn E.

    Sustaining coastal urban ecosystems Torbjörn E. TörnqvisT1 * and douglas j. MEffErT2 are at 1 Department and in the future. Preserving protective shorelines and wetlands wherever feasible, limiting the growth of urban is required to make urban coasts more resilient. ­92­93­94­95­96­97 ­91 ­90 ­89 ­88 ­87 31 30 29 28 27 26

  3. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  4. February 21 -22, 2014 Coast Coal Harbour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Handy, Todd C.

    February 21 - 22, 2014 Coast Coal Harbour 1180 W Hastings St Vancouver, BC Healthy Mothers contact by phone: +1 604-822- 7708 or by e-mail: melissa.ipce@ubc.ca. Location The Coast Coal Harbour

  5. Ecosystem services in tropical agriculture: evaluating biodiversity and ecosystem function Understanding the relationship between biodiversity, ecosystem function, and service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Brian

    1 Ecosystem services in tropical agriculture: evaluating biodiversity and ecosystem function Overview: Understanding the relationship between biodiversity, ecosystem function, and service provision a pressing concern: ecological degradation is leading to permanent reduction or loss of critical ecosystem

  6. Temperature calibration of Gulf of Mexico corals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer Mae

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution proxy records of climate are limited and have poor coverage of the tropical ocean-atmosphere system. One particular area in which climate records are lacking is the northern Gulf of Mexico. Four coral cores were collected...

  7. Marine Fisheries On the cover: Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chuss, and Silver Hake, Merluccius bilinearis, for Processing Into Surimi Investment in Gulf of Mexico Shrimp Vessels, 1965-77 Characteristics of the Texas Shrimp Fleet, 1979-82 Fish or Fish Oil in the Diet

  8. Estimating and controlling Gulf Coast ticks, Amblyomma maculatum Koch, on the coastal prairie of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bengaly, Sekouba

    1987-01-01

    cattle 26 e C ~ Caner el 5 Pirmechri n-Chl or myri fc s ~ Lace Seasan Fenvalerace m 0 Early Seasan Fenvalerace c 4 X 07/17 08/0 I 08/15 08/29 09/13 09/27 10/ IQ gefe kkG. 3. C P ' o f Pf' t' k, Otokf' Duges, burden on Hereford cattle treated...

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), located in Louisiana and Texas, and conducted in two segments from November 30 through December 11, 1987, and February 1 through 10, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SPR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involved the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SPR, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the SPR Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the SPR Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 200 refs., 50 figs., 30 tabs.

  10. Trapping capacity of fault zones, downdip Yegua Formation, Texas Gulf Coast basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hintz, Jena Christine

    2001-01-01

    , Pittman's method gave the most reliable results for predicting capillary pressure and therefore the height of the oil column. However, all methods for predicting capillary pressure worked well for samples with porosities above 20% and permeabilities above...

  11. Pressure solution and microfracturing in primary oil migration, upper cretaceous Austin Chalk, Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chanchani, Jitesh

    1994-01-01

    to oil generation offers a possible explanation for the mechanism of the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. Detailed petrographic analysis was undertaken to study the primary migration of oil in the Austin Chalk. The important components...

  12. Engineering geologic analysis of reclaimed spoil at a southeast Texas Gulf Coast surface lignite mine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, Scott Charles

    1987-01-01

    to be extremely heterogeneous. The spoil is composed of sand- to boulder-sxzed fragments of the pre-mtne overburden oriented randomly )n a clay/silt matrtx. The spoil material was found to segregate upon dragline dumping. The coarser clastic material was found... mining technique used in Texas lignite mines. At the Gibbons Creek Lignite Nine overburden is removed by dragline and cast in conical piles to form rows of spoil ridges in the mined-out portion of the preceding mine cut. The lignite is then removed...

  13. Blue Crab Population Ecology and Use by Foraging Whooping Cranes on the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Danielle Marie

    2012-02-14

    In 2002, a proposal was submitted to divert water from the confluence of the Guadalupe and San Antonio Rivers to San Antonio, Texas. To investigate the potential impacts of diverting water from the Guadalupe Estuary, my ...

  14. The distribution of Lucifer faxoni Borradaile in the neritic waters of the Texas Gulf coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harper, Donald Ernest

    1966-01-01

    . Johnsnaopkins Univ. 3, p. 113, pl. 8. (1878) Lu?ife sp. BrooksPhil. , T sns. Roy. 3o . Io don. 173 (1). O. E7, pls. 7-9. (1992) Lucifer faxoni Borradaile9 Ann. Hag. Mat. Hist. Ser. 8, ~1, 9. PTE. (1915) The following diagnosis is somewhat modified from Hansen...

  15. Assessing Katrina’s Demographic and Social Impacts onThe Mississippi Gulf Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, David A; Forgette, Richard; Van Boening, Mark; Kinnell, Ann Marie; Holley, Cliff

    2007-01-01

    Franco Angeli. Haines, V. , Beggs, J. , & Hurlbert, J. (Haines, V. , Hurlbert, J. , & Beggs, J. (1999). The disasterJ. S. , Haines, V. A. , & Beggs, J. J. (2000). Core networks

  16. A descriptive analysis of recreation related drownings on the Texas Gulf Coast from 1980 through 1988 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Kenneth Sigfried

    1991-01-01

    Department of Health for all coastal counties in Texas. Only Galveston and Nueces County conduct post mortum examinations of drowning victims and file complete accident reports. This study is an analysis of Texas Department of Health, and Galveston... of death, and 58 percent oi the male victims were legally intoxicated. Only one of 157 recreational drownings, for which the presence or absence of lifeguards at the accident site was Known, occurred under guarded condition". The typical drowning...

  17. Locating deep reservoirs with economic potential in the Texas Gulf Coast using AVO 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanderhurst, Jeffrey James

    2001-01-01

    , Amplitude Variation with Offset (AVO) analysis was used on 2 sands located between 10,500 ft and 14,000 ft to investigate potential hydrocarbon charge and to validate if the bright spots are hydrocarbon associated. Before AVO analysis began, a prestack...

  18. Sedimentary environments and processes in a shallow, Gulf Coast Estuary-Lavaca Bay, Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bronikowski, Jason Lee

    2004-11-15

    Sedimentation rates in sediment cores from Lavaca Bay have been high within the last 1-2 decays within the central portion of the bay, with small fluctuations from river input. Lavaca Bay is a broad, flat, and shallow (<3 m) microtidal estuary...

  19. Thermal properties of an upper tidal flat sediment on the Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramer, Nicholas C.

    2007-04-25

    the sediment shrinkage curve to changing heat transfer properties. Due to the complicated nature of the drying-shrinking sediment, it was necessary to measure the sediment shrinkage curve and heat transfer properties in separate experiments. The shrinkage curve...

  20. Resources for Stormwater Managers throughout the Texas Gulf Coast: An Annotated Bibliography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, John; Jensen, Ric

    2005-01-01

    . This fact sheet provides a basic overview of how onsite wastewater treatment systems work, and describes the functions of septic tanks and drainfields. The fact sheet provides tips for homeowners on maintenance and management issues, including such areas... has produced a series of educational and technical resources that focus on stormwater management. These publications and technical materials describe practical methods homeowners can take to lessen pesticide and fertilizer applications to landscapes...

  1. Characterization of genetic variation of the gulf killifish (Fundulus grandis) along the Texas coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Amanda

    2014-09-25

    Texas locations, Galveston and Corpus Christi. Patterns of sequence variation and the phylogeographic association of haplotypes were characterized for 1,253 bp of sequence of the mitochondrial DNA genes ND2 and ND5, and for a segment of the D-loop region...

  2. Land Bedding as a Method of Drainage in the Gulf Coast Region of Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruss, E. W.

    1915-01-01

    managed erosion controls can cause excessive amounts of sediment and debris to be carried into stormwater systems. Possible pollutants that can be discharged from construction sites include sediment, solid and sanitary wastes, phosphorus (fertilizer... of pollutants into waters of the United States. BMPs also include treatment requirements, operating procedures, and practices to control plant site runoff, spillage, or leaks; sludge or waste disposal; or drainage from raw materials storage. erosion: Wearing...

  3. Mineralogy and diagenesis of Gulf Coast Tertiary shales Ann-Mag Field, Brooks County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bott, Winston Frederick

    1985-01-01

    , which is charactrerized by thinning or absence of salt, shale ridges, massifs, and diapirs, and associated long, linear belts of growth faults; and the Rio Grande embayment, which has large but discontinuous belts of growth faults and deep shale... the H202 and becomes soluble. The reaction is given below: 2 + HP02 + 2 HOAc ~ , in(OAc)Z + 2 H20 + 02. The pH 5 N NaOAc is necessary in this step because it increases the effeciency of the H202 by reducing the pH. It also acts as a di lutant...

  4. Influence of Cropping Systems On Cotton and Corn Yields on the Gulf Coast Prairie. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeter, B. E.; Smith, J. C.; Whiteley, E. L.

    1962-01-01

    and better stands of cotton were obtained. The main disadvantage of this system was that two planting operations a year were re- quired. Cropping systems containing Dallisgrass and White clover are more highly recommended than all other systems tested... clover can cause bloat in cattle; (3) 2 years are needed to obtain high forage yields and (4) it is difficult to obtain a good seedbed for corn or cotton when the land goes out of forage production. Dallisgrass and White clover produced higher...

  5. The Impact of Tenure Arrangements and Crop Rotations on Upper Gulf Coast Rice Farms. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perry, Gregory M.; Rister, M. Edward; Richardson, James W.; Grant, Warren R.; Sij, John W. Jr

    1986-01-01

    , lenders, and landowners, among others. Throughout the study, emphasis was directed towards highlighting differences in the effect on a farm's economic viability among combi nations of two principal crop rota tions (soybeans-rice (SR) and soy beans..., the highest expected earnings being $- 23,183 for the SSR 1/7 strategy. The SSR 1/7 strategy was preferred to the other strategies (SR 1/7, SR 1/2, and SSR 1/2) for most categories of risk pref erences. Results of the sensitivity anal yses, based...

  6. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of EnergyDepartment of Energy FindingTraffic

  7. Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancing Programs | DepartmentINDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES

  8. DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10 DOE ASSESSMENTathas released a Request

  9. Fish Stocks in the Gulf of Mexico Overall Economics of Gulf Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the oil spill. As the crude oil sinks, the bottom- oriented fish community may be impacted. The major1 April 2010 Fish Stocks in the Gulf of Mexico FACT SHEET Overall Economics of Gulf Fisheries coastal areas. Impacts on these shrimp will increase as the oil slick approaches nearshore areas. Shrimp

  10. High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast Enterprises, New Orleans, Louisiana Building America Best Practices Series...

  11. Mesoscale Eddies in the Gulf of Alaska: Observations and Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rovegno, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Chao, Y. 2012. Modeling the mesoscale eddy field in the GulfShriver, J. F. 2001. Mesoscale variability in the boundaryof the Gulf of Alaska mesoscale circulation. Progress in

  12. Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jeff

    2015-06-09

    Engel Presents his book, "Into the Desert: Reflections on the Gulf War," a reevaluation of the Gulf War's origins, the war itself, and its regional and long term impact on international relations.

  13. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    both helped me with seismic stratigraphy and lots of geologyanalysis of seismic sequence stratigraphy within the Gulf

  14. RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RESOLVING EQUIVOCALITY IN ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT by LARRY DENNIS STURM WOLFE Bachelor of Science OF THE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in the School of Resource and Environmental Management of Philosophy Title of Dissertation: Resolving Equivocality in Ecosystem Management Examining Committee: Chair

  15. CoastWatch Data in Google Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CoastWatch Data in Google Earth: A How-to Guide Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDIS CoastWatch Operations Managers Meeting, June, 2007 #12;Peter Hollemans, Terrenus Earth Sciences Consultant for NOAA/NESDISJune, 2007 Talk Outline · About Google Earth · Preparing Data

  16. Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ten Brink, Uri S.

    Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report to the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program #12;#12;Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico Report should be cited as: Regional Assessment of Tsunami Potential in the Gulf of Mexico: U.S. Geological

  17. CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER III MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MARINE METEOROLOGY OF THE GULF OF MEXICO, A BRIEF REVIEW 1 By DALE F. LEIPPER, Department oj Oceonography, Agricultural and Mechanical College oj Tuas The best general summary of the weather over the Gulf of Mexico

  18. HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE EXPLORATIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER I HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE EXPLORATIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE EXPLORATIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO By PAUL S. GALTSOFF, Fish and explorations in the Gulf of Mexico prcsented in this paper is based on published materials avail- able

  19. COLLECTIONS BY THE OREGON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLLECTIONS BY THE OREGON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO Marine Biological Laboratory MAR G - 1957 WOODS COLLECTIONS BY THE OHEG-ON IN THE GULF OF MEXICO List of Crustaceans, Mollusks, ard Fishes Identified From Collections Made by the Exploratory Fishing Vessel Oregon in the Gulf of Mexico and Adjacent Seas 1950 Through

  20. MFR PAPER 11 03 Economics of Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MFR PAPER 11 03 Economics of Gulf of Mexico Industrial and Foodfish Trawlers ROLFJUHL ABS TRACT of the groundfish and foodfish trawling industry in the northern Gulf of Mexico . The need for these data stems from stocks of the north ern Gulf o f Mexico have ga ined considerably in impo r- tance as a source

  1. CHAPTER XIX MAMMALS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHAPTER XIX MAMMALS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO #12;Blank page retained for pagination #12;MAMMALS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO GORDON GUNTER, Institute of Marine Science, The University of Texas The mammalian fauna of the Gulf of Mexico consists of the manatee, the West Indian seal, and \\'"arious cetaceans. In this account

  2. Crude Injustice in the Gulf: Why Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico are Inconsistent with U.S. International Ocean Law and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    a morato- rium on deepwater drilling after finding that "Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf ofReview Process for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf is

  3. Crude Injustice in the Gulf: Why Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico are Inconsistent with U.S. International Ocean Law and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico Aremorato- rium on deepwater drilling after finding that "underMMS Approved 27 Gulf Drilling Operations After BP Disaster,

  4. Star Formation in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armond, Tina; Bally, John; Aspin, Colin

    2011-01-01

    We present an optical/infrared study of the dense molecular cloud, L935, dubbed "The Gulf of Mexico", which separates the North America and the Pelican nebulae, and we demonstrate that this area is a very active star forming region. A wide-field imaging study with interference filters has revealed 35 new Herbig-Haro objects in the Gulf of Mexico. A grism survey has identified 41 Halpha emission-line stars, 30 of them new. A small cluster of partly embedded pre-main sequence stars is located around the known LkHalpha 185-189 group of stars, which includes the recently erupting FUor HBC 722.

  5. Predicted impacts from offshore produced water discharges on hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, V. J.; Hinz, S.C.; Justic, D.; Scavia, D.; Veil, J. A.; Satterlee, K.; Parker, M. E.; Wilson, S.; Environmental Science Division; LimnoTech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ of Michigan; Shell E&P Co.; Exxon Mobil Production Co.; U.S. EPA

    2008-06-01

    Summer hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L) in the bottom waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico has received considerable scientific and policy attention because of potential ecological and economic impacts. This hypoxic zone forms off the Louisiana coast each summer and has increased from an average of 8,300 km{sup 2} in 1985-1992 to over 16,000 km{sup 2} in 1993-2001, reaching a record 22,000 km{sup 2} in 2002. The almost threefold increase in nitrogen load from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) to the Gulf since the middle of the last century is the primary external driver for hypoxia. A goal of the 2001 Federal Action Plan is to reduce the 5-year running average size of the hypoxic zone to below 5,000 km{sup 2} by 2015. After the Action Plan was developed, a new question arose as to whether sources other than the MRB may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding substances. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone, many of which discharge varying volumes of produced water. The objectives of this study were to assess the incremental impacts of produced water discharges on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and to evaluate the significance of these discharges relative to loadings from the MRB. Predictive simulations were conducted with three existing models of Gulf hypoxia using produced water loads from an industry study. Scenarios were designed that addressed loading uncertainties, settleability of suspended constituents, and different assumptions on delivery locations for the produced water loads. Model results correspond to the incremental impacts of produced water loads, relative to the original model results, which included only loads from the MRB. The predicted incremental impacts of produced water loads on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico from all three models were small. Even considering the predicted ranges between lower- and upper-bound results, these impacts are likely to be within the errors of measurement for bottomwater dissolved oxygen and hypoxic area at the spatial scale of the entire hypoxic zone.

  6. Modelling Marine Ecosystems Mick Follows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    ?What is the marine ecosystem? · Food webFood web · Focus onFocus on phytoplanktonphytoplankton Bacteria, archaea #12 species or functional types ofe.g. why do particular species or functional types of phytoplankton occupy

  7. Entrepreneurial ecosystems around the world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Anand R

    2013-01-01

    Entrepreneurship is a vehicle of growth and job creation. America has understood it and benefitted most from following this philosophy. Governments around the world need to build and grow their entrepreneurial ecosystems ...

  8. UNEP Policy Series ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 UNEP Policy Series ECOSYSTEM MANAGEMENT Sustaining Forests: Sustaining forests: Investing in our ...........................................................................6 II. Threats to the world's forests: a complex policy problem ............................7 A. Market failures, financial mechanisms and costs of business ..................8 III. Innovative policy

  9. Early life ecology of sailfish, Istiophorus platypterus, in the northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simms, Jeffrey R.

    2010-07-14

    Sailfish, Istiophorus platypterus, are commonly taken by the recreational and commercial fisheries in the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) and larvae are frequently reported in the region, indicating the Gulf's potential role as ...

  10. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  11. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06302009"...

  12. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  13. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014...

  14. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  15. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  16. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981" ,"Release...

  17. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981"...

  18. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

  19. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  20. Continental rifting across the Southern Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Fiona Helen

    2006-01-01

    shape the interpretations of the multi-channel seismic data.seismic sequence stratigraphy within the Gulf will produce a ?rst-order interpretation

  1. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Alaska Arkansas California Colorado Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Kansas Louisiana Montana New Mexico North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas Utah West Virginia Wyoming...

  2. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  3. Gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Henry Benjamin

    1986-01-01

    OCE-8020560. Additional funding and the majority of sample collection was done on geochemical survey cruises in 1983, 1984 and 1985 through the participation of the aforementioned oil companies. Finally, I'd like to thank Kathy York for her love... the sediment. Some hydrates were found associated with oil stained sediments while others were interspersed with carbonate rubble. These hydrated cores represent less than 1% of the approximately 1000 piston cores that have been taken in the Gulf of Mexico...

  4. Gulf Cooperation Council: Arabia's model of integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etaibi, G.T.

    1984-01-01

    This study is an analysis of the foundations and emergence in 1981 of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC), which consists of six traditional Arab Gulf states (the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar, and Kuwait). It finds the GCC to be a unique case among twentieth-century integrative schemes. The study also identifies and analyzes relevant local, regional, and international forces. Among the local forces are traditional religio-political systems, economic dependence on a depletable resource, and the presence of a large number of foreign residents. On the regional level, this study takes into consideration such issues as the Arab League, Arab Nationalism, and the Islamic revolutionary movement in Iran. On the international level, the influence of the superpowers and the major industrialized nations on the emergence and future of the GCC Community are analyzed. Throughout the past decade there has been a growing scholarly interest in the Gulf region. In preparation for this study, the author relied heavily on the literature generated by this new research, as well as on documents and official publications, mostly in Arabic. A survey was conducted among a limited number of GCC graduate students during the summer of 1983. In addition, interviews with selected members of the GCC Secretariat-General and various member-state officials were conducted during a research trip in the region in the spring of 1984.

  5. FOREST INVENTORY Managing Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;FOREST INVENTORY #12;Managing Forest Ecosystems Volume 10 Series Editors: Klaus von Gadow Georg Superior de Agronomía, Lisbon, Portugal Aims & Scope: Well-managed forests and woodlands are a renewable resource, producing essential raw material with minimum waste and energy use. Rich in habitat and species

  6. Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ministry of Environment Ecosystem Branch 2202 Main Mall University of British Columbia Vancouver aware of and which would definitely provide information applicable throughout the basin, is a study being proposed by Dr. Molly Webb. The last three years of this study will provide information

  7. SRR Rangeland Ecosystem Services Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyoming, University of

    be converted to monetary value What are Ecosystem Services from Rangelands #12;Types of EGS Biological;Biological EGS Domestic livestock Wildlife Forage for livestock Forage for wildlife Food for humans;Hydrological/Atmospheric EGS Drinking water Floods for channel and riparian area rejuvenation Water

  8. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Project Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    California’s North Coast Fishing Communities HistoricalCalifornia’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historicalprovided by North Coast fishing community members, including

  9. A Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    . Ecosystem 9:463:473 #12;which TAC are evaluated, and hence require basic information, of lower precisionA Public Sentiment Index for Ecosystem Management Ratana Chuenpagdee,1 * Lisa Liguori,2 Dave ABSTRACT Although ecosystem-based management can lead to sustainable resource use, its successful imple

  10. Research papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    calibration derived from a set of sensitivity experiments to model parameters. The tidal energy budgetResearch papers Tidal characteristics of the gulf of Tonkin Nguyen Nguyet Minh a,c , Marchesiello of this study is to revisit the dominant physical processes that characterize tidal dynamics in the Gulf

  11. Nitrous Oxide Emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrous Oxide Emissions from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone J O H N T . W A L K E R , * , C R A I,thoughlargenitrogeninputsanddeoxygenation typical of these systems create the potential for large N2O emissions. We report the first N2O emission measurements from the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone (GOMHZ), including an estimate of the emission "pulse

  12. Physical Environment Ecosystem Indicators and Trends Used by FOCI -2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of discussions begun in 2003 on eddy kinetic energy in the Gulf of Alaska and modeled drift trajectories dealing explicitly with the western Gulf of Alaska and eastern Bering Sea. Within these are continuations of negative sea surface temperature anomalies in the Gulf of Alaska and a relatively warm water pool

  13. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  14. MARINE MAMMALS OF THE ATL ANTIC REGION AND GULF OF MEXICO marine mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    301 MARINE MAMMALS OF THE ATL ANTIC REGION AND GULF OF MEXICO UNIT 23 marine mammals of the atlantic region and the gulf of mexico INTRODUCTION The Atlantic region, including the Gulf of Mexico, has above: Oceanic bottlenose dolphins in the Gulf of Mexico. SEFSC/NMFS Species Act (ESA;Table 23

  15. Gulf Alternative Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERC Hydroelectric Projects | OpenGuinea-USAIDAmbujaGulf

  16. Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County,SolarFERC Hydroelectric Projects |County, Florida: EnergyGulf

  17. Gulf Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen River Power Co Ltd JumpGuanhYuefengEnergyCorporationGulf

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Genealogy ofFederal Offshore Gulf

  19. WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

    2004-01-01

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

  20. Educators' Guide Lessons from the Deep

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .the.Gulf.of.Mexico......................................... 15 Suggested.Learning.Procedures.and.Options....... 17 Initial.Lessons.in.the.Lessons1 Educators' Guide Lessons from the Deep: Exploring the Gulf of Mexico's Deep-Sea Ecosystems on the mobile offshore drilling unit Deepwater Horizon about 40 miles southeast of the Louisiana coast

  1. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Husseini, M. [Gulf PetroLink, Manama (Bahrain); Chimblo, R. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  2. Energy, Water Ecosystem Engineering | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy-Water Resource Systems SHARE Energy-Water Resource Systems Examine sustainable energy production and water availability in healthy ecosystems through technology development,...

  3. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  4. Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehrlich, Paul R.

    Managing Earth's Ecosystems: An Interdisciplinary Challenge Gretchen C. Daily* and Paul R. Ehrlich sheltered from competitive market forces, such as universities. Channels developed to direct flows

  5. Environmental Processes, Social Perspectives and Economic Valuations of the Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Amy M.

    2011-10-21

    Coastal ecosystems provide important resources for social, economic and environmental capital to global and local communities. Socially, coastal ecosystems provide a place for people to recreate and get in touch with nature. ...

  6. Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian Gulf. In addition, a forecast of the required reserve development and associated costs to meet the expected demand through the year 2010 is presented.

  7. Factors Shaping Macrofaunal Polychaete Communities in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carvalho, Russell G

    2013-04-23

    This dissertation addresses large-scale trends in composition, density, taxonomic and functional diversity in deep-sea benthic polychaete communities in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). The study includes samples from two major sampling programs: the Deep...

  8. Microsoft Word - Accessing Gulf Resources article.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gulf, plays some key role in 16-18% of the nation's total oil supply and is connected by pipelines to 50% of the country's refining capacity. It is very clear in my mind that the...

  9. Commercial Fishing for Gulf Butterfish, Peprilus burti, Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on catch rates, unloading and shipping costs, and marketing results are presented. in the Gulf of Mexico sustain an annual har vest of as much as 50,000 t (Gledhilll ). Furthermore, butterfish of marketable size

  10. Nitrous Oxide Production in the Gulf of Mexico Hypoxic Zone 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Lindsey A.

    2010-10-12

    The Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone is created by strong persistent water stratification and nutrient loading from the Mississippi River which fuels primary production and bacterial decomposition. The Texas-Louisiana shelf ...

  11. Characterization of Gulf of Mexico Clay Using Automated Triaxial Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murali, Madhuri

    2012-02-14

    . This thesis presents the results of SHANSEP triaxial testing performed on undisturbed samples of Gulf of Mexico clay. Background information is given about the clay, the sampling program and the laboratory testing program. The GEOTAC Truepath automated stress...

  12. What is the Ecosystem Commons? Why do we need the Ecosystem Commons?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escher, Christine

    at regional and national ecosystem services events and conferences Provide news and information exchange information and pool resources to advance the rapidly evolving arena of ecosystem services ecosystem services efforts? For more information visit www.ecosystemcommons.org (June 2011) Photos 1, 3

  13. PERSPECTIVES Meta-ecosystems: a theoretical framework for a spatial ecosystem ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Robert D.

    with limited overlap. One perspective comes from population and community ecology, with emphasis on population and metacommunity concepts. A meta-ecosystem is defined as a set of ecosystems connected by spatial flows of energy and indirect interactions at landscape or regional scales. The meta-ecosystem perspective thereby has

  14. Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach P. Marrow1 *, M. Koubarakis2 , R the concept of an information ecosystem. An information ecosystem is analo gous to a natural ecosystem individuals. This paper describes a multi-agent platform, DIET (Decentralised Information Ecosystem

  15. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  16. The effect of diagenesis on enhanced recovery methods in Frio reservoir sandstones of the middle Texas Gulf Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mark Alan

    1981-01-01

    Oil 6 Minerals St. . Tr . 170-1 10, 285-10, 408 10, 237-10, 297 10, 534-10, 564 10, 950-10, 998 10, 848-10, 974 11, 775-11, 878 Thin)y interbedded sand- stone and shale. Moderate bioturbation. Shel. f Turb rdi te Humble St. Tr. 152- 1... Burrowed sand and shale w/abundant shale clasts Same Same Same Intensel burrowed ss. 4. 7 10. 4 10. 4 10. 4 10. 4 10. 4 10. 4 3. 0 0. 25 0. 43 1. 22 0. 39 0. 85 74, 0 10. 3 15. 4 20. 3 19. 2 28. 2 8890. 3 8891. 9 8892. 7...

  17. The eects of oil spill and clean-up on dominant US Gulf coast marsh macrophytes: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    the use of chemicals such as cleaners or bioremediation, may be necessary to address the problem. Clean. # 2000 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Bioremediation; Coastal marshes; Oil clean) to pro- viding ®sh and wildlife habitats, and improving water quality (Mitsch and Gosselink, 1993). Field

  18. The effect of fertilizer treatments on several amino acids of Dallis grass grown in the Gulf Coast region of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polzer, Wilfred Leo

    1956-01-01

    blook experiment with twelve treatments each replioated four times. It was set up as a pasture fertilizer test with sulfur, sources of phosphorus and lime used as fertilizer for the treatments. Table 1 gives the field randomiza- tion of the twelve... Super and 46 Sulfur Lime and Super 47 Hock Phos. and Sulfur Super Lime and Super and Sulfur Rock Pbos. 1954. The spr1ng and summer had been especially dry at the location of this test; therefore the forage d1d not have good growth...

  19. Hydrology of a Forested Wetland Complex in an Urbanizing Area of the Texas Gulf Coast and Clean Water Act Implications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, Dex Daniel

    2014-12-15

    . ................................................................ 28 Fig. 5. Monthly precipitation and runoff for 2005–2009.. ............................................... 31 Fig. 6. Annual hydrographs (2005–2008) of daily precipitation and runoff data (axes plotted at different scales for clarity... methods (e.g. Smith et al. 1995, Johnson 2005, Reif et al. 2009, Lane and D’Amico 2010), nation-wide wetland extent (see the National Wetlands Inventory, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, available at 6 http://www.fws.gov/wetlands), and impacts...

  20. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-05-LNG

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-AA-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE- FE DKT.3365NO. 3600LLC- ORDER

  1. Coast Electric Power Assn | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar EnergyLawler,Coal TechnologiesClio Power Ltd Jump to:CloudsPowerCoast

  2. The general circulation of the Gulf of Aqaba (Gulf of Eilat) revisited: The interplay between the exchange flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gildor, Hezi

    an ecological system that includes coral reefs and other tropical biota that are unique in such high latitudes importance and the severe anthropogenic stresses that endanger the gulf and may alter it permanently

  3. Wellcome Trust The UK's innovation ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambaut, Andrew

    Wellcome Trust The UK's innovation ecosystem Summary of a review commissioned by the Wellcome Trust innovation ecosystem does not always support its effective uptake. Good intellectual property (IP) management commissioned the consultancy Bain & Company to undertake an analysis of UK innovation and external IP

  4. Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Development A Contribution to Improve Tool Support Across-evolution of projects that depend and rely on each other, these software ecosystems have led to an increased importance an investigation into the nature of the information needs of software developers working on projects that are part

  5. Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Ian J.

    1 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Service Assessments by Ian Bateman, Georgina Mace, Carlo Fezzi, Giles Atkinson and Kerry Turner CSERGE Working Paper EDM 10-10 #12;2 Economic Analysis for Ecosystem Turneri,2 i. Centre for Social and Economic Research on the Global Environment (CSERGE), School

  6. Scaling metabolism from organisms to ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enquist, Brian Joseph

    of ecosystem respiration based on the kinetics of meta- bolic reactions11­13 and the scaling of resource use constant for plants and microbes12,13 , the two groups that comprise most of the biomass in terrestrial rates, Bi, for all Box 1 A general model for scaling biochemical kinetics from organisms to ecosystems

  7. Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee Megan Dethier Dail Brown Administration National Marine Fisheries Service NOAA Technical Memorandum NMFS-F/SPO-43 July 2000 #12;A copy-WestHighway Silver Spring, MD 20910 #12;Marine and Estuarine Ecosystem and Habitat Classification Rebecca J. Allee

  8. Coast Electric Power Association- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Coast Electric Power Association provides incentives for commercial customers to increase the energy efficiency of facilities. Rebates are provided for new or replacement energy efficient heat...

  9. West Coast Port Closure Enforcement Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enforcement Policy Statement: West Coast Port Closures More Documents & Publications Central Air Conditioner Enforcement Policy Statement Vessel Cold-Ironing Using a Barge...

  10. Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Fisheries Science Center, NMFS, NOAA #12;Pacific Island Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Materials

  11. ENVS 4000, Spring (Jan-Apr) 2006 Monitoring Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Dan L.

    systems depend on ecosystems for food, materials, energy, purification, enjoyment, a sense of place challenges. Adaptive ecosystem management depends on knowledge of system states and dynamics, and therefore and models for ecosystem monitoring and management, including Environmental Benefit Analysis, Environmental

  12. The sustainability of scientific software: ecosystem context and science policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    The sustainability of scientific software: ecosystem context and science, use friction and the software ecosystem context. In particular we highlight the impact of the complexity of ecosystem context, in terms of the diversity

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizae and terrestrial ecosystem Matthias C. Rillig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rilli, Matthias C.

    REVIEW Arbuscular mycorrhizae and terrestrial ecosystem processes Matthias C. Rillig Microbial in terrestrial ecosystems. Despite their acknowledged importance in ecology, most research on AMF has focused (interacting) routes via which AMF can influence ecosystem processes. These include indirect pathways (through

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  15. ID Ecoregion name ID Ecoregion name 103 Alaska & Canada Pacific Coastal 140 East Texas Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    ID Ecoregion name ID Ecoregion name 103 Alaska & Canada Pacific Coastal 140 East Texas Gulf 107 California 135 Lower Rio Grande - Bravo 160 Sonora 139 West Texas Gulf 161 Guzman - Samalayuca #12;

  16. Size structuring of planktonic communities : biological rates and ecosystem dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taniguchi, Darcy Anne Akiko

    2013-01-01

    taxonomic and ecosystem function information, they also haveinformation on the organisms’ adaptations to an ecosysteminformation on organism function to understand their role in the ecosystem.

  17. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  18. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo of T richodesmium floating on the surface over water of very low phosphorus content. #12;CONTENTS Page Methods

  19. History of Oceanography in the Offshore Waters of the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6 History of Oceanography in the Offshore Waters of the Gulf of Maine by John B. Colton, Jr. McKeman, Dnpcio, History of Oceanography in the Offshore Waters of the Gulf of Maine by JOHN B of the Gulf of Maine By JOHN B . COLTON, Jr ., Fishery Biologist (Research) Bureau of Commercial Fisheries

  20. Sources of Variability in Gulf of Maine Circulation, and the Observations Needed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Sources of Variability in Gulf of Maine Circulation, and the Observations Needed to Model it. James in the Gulf of Maine are then quantified, with an emphasis on variability on timescales longer than tidal and the volume of water entering from the Scotian Shelf to the Gulf of Maine produce roughly comparable amounts

  1. FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE By HENRY B. BIGELOW and WILLIAM C. SCHROEDER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISHES OF THE GULF OF MAINE By HENRY B. BIGELOW and WILLIAM C. SCHROEDER Museum of ComparativeOInInenced an oceanographic and bIOlogIcal survey of the Gulf of Maine, with special refer- ence to its fishes to its floating Service. 210941-53__2 AREA COVERED The term "Gulf of Maine" covers the oceanic bight from Nantucket Shoals

  2. THE LANTERNFISHES (PISCES: MYCfOPHIDAE) OF THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE LANTERNFISHES (PISCES: MYCfOPHIDAE) OF THE EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO JOHN V. GARTNER, JR.,l THOMAS of Myctophidae were taken in midwater trawl samples from the eastern Gulf of Mexico during March through October diverse (Backus et al. 1977). The Gulf of Mexico is one such regime. Backus et a1. (1977) noted

  3. MMS 2002-035 Stability and Change in Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    OCS Study MMS 2002-035 Stability and Change in Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Communities Volume I: Executive Summary U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region #12;U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region OCS Study MMS

  4. MMS 2002-036 Stability and Change in Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    OCS Study MMS 2002-036 Stability and Change in Gulf of Mexico Chemosynthetic Communities Volume II: Technical Report U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region #12;U.S. Department of the Interior Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico OCS Region OCS Study MMS 2002

  5. Persistence of Gulf Stream separation during the Last Glacial Period: Implications for current separation theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    as freely meandering jet in the open ocean. On a basin- wide scale, the Gulf Stream separation latitudePersistence of Gulf Stream separation during the Last Glacial Period: Implications for current at which the Gulf Stream separated from the western boundary of the Atlantic Ocean in the past. The modern

  6. Precipitation Response to the Gulf Stream in an Atmospheric GCM* AKIRA KUWANO-YOSHIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Shang-Ping

    Precipitation Response to the Gulf Stream in an Atmospheric GCM* AKIRA KUWANO-YOSHIDA Earth The precipitation response to sea surface temperature (SST) gradients associated with the Gulf Stream a narrow band of precipitation, surface convergence, and evaporation that closely follows the Gulf Stream

  7. Role of anomalous warm gulf waters in the intensification of Hurricane Menas Kafatos,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Role of anomalous warm gulf waters in the intensification of Hurricane Katrina Menas Kafatos,1 several strong hurricanes intensifying in the Gulf of Mexico before making landfall that severely damaged the Gulf States, especially Hurricane Katrina. Remarkable similarities between sea surface temperature

  8. Main Coast Winds - Final Scientific Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Huckaby; Harley Lee

    2006-03-15

    The Maine Coast Wind Project was developed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of small, distributed wind systems on coastal sites in Maine. The restructuring of Maine's electric grid to support net metering allowed for the installation of small wind installations across the state (up to 100kW). The study performed adds insight to the difficulties of developing cost-effective distributed systems in coastal environments. The technical hurdles encountered with the chosen wind turbine, combined with the lower than expected wind speeds, did not provide a cost-effective return to make a distributed wind program economically feasible. While the turbine was accepted within the community, the low availability has been a negative.

  9. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO? site characterization mega transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO?) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO?-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO? storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO? injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial-scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well-documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine-filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO? utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO? leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surface

  10. A system theoretic safety analysis of U.S. Coast Guard aviation mishap involving CG-6505

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickey, Jon (Jon Patrick)

    2012-01-01

    During a 22-month period, between 2008 and 2010, the U.S. Coast Guard experienced seven Class-A aviation mishaps resulting in the loss of 14 Coast Guard aviators and seven Coast Guard aircraft. This represents the highest ...

  11. Relighting Forest Ecosystems Jay E. Steele

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geist, Robert

    -time cinematic relighting of large, forest ecosystems re- mains a challenging problem, in that important global-time cinematic relighting is achievable for forest scenes contain- ing hundreds of millions of polygons. 1

  12. Models of marine microbes: molecules to ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Follows, Mick

    Models of marine microbes: molecules to ecosystems Mick Follows, MIT #12;Microbes in the ocean Image: Jed Fuhrman #12;Microbes in the ocean Image: Jed Fuhrman · Base of food chain/food web · Modulate

  13. Modeling Ocean Ecosystems: The PARADIGM Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothstein, Lewis M.

    The role of the oceans in Earth systems ecology, and the effects of climate variability on the ocean and its ecosystems, can be understood only by observing, describing, and ultimately predicting the state of the ocean as ...

  14. Marine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on marine sanctuaries · Mi@gate noise impacts from oil explora@on and renewable energy distances with lidle energy loss §Higher marine organismsMarine Ecosystems Acous&cs Program Bob Dziak Program PIs: Joseph

  15. Understanding emergent innovation ecosystems in health care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Mark A

    2015-01-01

    ’ (Rikkiev & Mäkinen, 2013). Most prior research is in semiconductors, computing and communications technology, which saw waves of convergence in the 1990s and early 2000s (Fredrik Hacklin, 2005; Stieglitz, 2003). There are limited studies in automotive... ’ (EV). This concept can then be extended to explicitly link the key actors in the industrial or innovation ecosystem, as shown in Figure 3. Figure 3 –Linking Ecosystem, Business Model and Value Network This approach provides a mechanism to make...

  16. Gulf of Mexico pipelines heading into deeper waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1987-06-08

    Pipeline construction for Gulf of Mexico federal waters is following drilling and production operations into deeper waters, according to U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS) records. Review of MMS 5-year data for three water depth categories (0-300 ft, 300-600 ft, and deeper than 600 ft) reveals this trend in Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction. Comparisons are shown between pipeline construction applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed. This article is the first of annual updates of MMS gulf pipeline data. Future installments will track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. These figures will also be evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data.

  17. Predicting Fire Behavior in U.S. Mediterranean Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    behavior in Mediterranean ecosystems are reviewed. A computer-based system which uses rele- vant fuel

  18. Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tryfonopoulos, Christos

    Agents in Decentralised Information Ecosystems: The DIET Approach P. Marrow1 *, M. Koubarakis2 , R be through the concept of an information ecosystem. An information ecosystem is analogous to a natural ecosystem in which there are flows of materials and energy analogous to information flow between many

  19. Digital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Mikls Herdon1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ecosystem - enterprise information systems - SME 1 Introduction The Digital Business Ecosystem (DBEDigital Business Ecosystem Tools as Interoperability Drivers Miklós Herdon1 , Mária Raffai2 , Ádám of the Digital Business Ecosystem (DBE) has been come life in order to build an Internet-based environment

  20. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Green Coast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana High Performance Builder Spotlight: Green Coast Enterprises - New Orleans, Louisiana DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study:...

  1. Ex-vessel demand by size for the Gulf shrimp 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chui, Margaret Kam-Too

    1980-01-01

    EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR THE GULF SHRIMP A Thesis by MARGARET RAM-TOO CHUI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major... Subject: Agricultural Economics EX-VESSEL DEMAND BY SIZE FOR SHRIMP IN THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by MARGARET KAM-TOO CHUI Approved as to style and content by: ai an of Committee) (Hea f ep tment) (Member) (Member) August 1980 ABSTRACT Ex...

  2. MFR PAPER 1229 Red Snappers of the Carolina Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carolina and South Carolina ports takes large quantities of fishes typical of Caribbean reefs and banks valuable of the snappers in commerce and rec- reation. It is known off North Carolina and South Carolina on the red snapper. The red snapper is found from North Carolina south to Key West, around the entire Gulf

  3. Post Fukushima tsunami simulations for Malaysian coasts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koh, Hock Lye, E-mail: kohhl@ucsiuniversity.edu.my [Office of Deputy Vice Chancellor for Research and Post Graduate Studies, UCSI University, Jalan Menara Gading, 56000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Teh, Su Yean, E-mail: syteh@usm.my [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Abas, Mohd Rosaidi Che [Malaysian Meteorological Department, MOSTI, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The recent recurrences of mega tsunamis in the Asian region have rekindled concern regarding potential tsunamis that could inflict severe damage to affected coastal facilities and communities. The 11 March 2011 Fukushima tsunami that crippled nuclear power plants in Northern Japan has further raised the level of caution. The recent discovery of petroleum reserves in the coastal water surrounding Malaysia further ignites the concern regarding tsunami hazards to petroleum facilities located along affected coasts. Working in a group, federal government agencies seek to understand the dynamics of tsunami and their impacts under the coordination of the Malaysian National Centre for Tsunami Research, Malaysian Meteorological Department. Knowledge regarding the generation, propagation and runup of tsunami would provide the scientific basis to address safety issues. An in-house tsunami simulation models known as TUNA has been developed by the authors to assess tsunami hazards along affected beaches so that mitigation measures could be put in place. Capacity building on tsunami simulation plays a critical role in the development of tsunami resilience. This paper aims to first provide a simple introduction to tsunami simulation towards the achievement of tsunami simulation capacity building. The paper will also present several scenarios of tsunami dangers along affected Malaysia coastal regions via TUNA simulations to highlight tsunami threats. The choice of tsunami generation parameters reflects the concern following the Fukushima tsunami.

  4. From Individuals to Ecosystem Function: Toward an Integration of Evolutionary and Ecosystem Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Thomas E.

    From Individuals to Ecosystem Function: Toward an Integration of Evolutionary and Ecosystem Ecology in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support

  5. Connectivity of West Coast Marine Sanctuaries: Tracking Sooty Shearwaters Throughout Dynamic Upwelling Ecosystems in the California Current System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, James; Adams, Josh

    2013-01-01

    Conference Oregon Marine Renewable Energy Environmentalin alternative marine-based energy infrastructure off CA,

  6. Office for Coastal Management www.coast.noaa.gov/czm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Access ($4.4 million federal; $6.8 million matching) Making sure people have access to the coast provides and are needed to maintain sustainable fisheries, robust recreation and tourism industries, and thriving wildlife

  7. Power extraction from an oscillating water column along a coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martins-rivas, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    For reasons of wave climate, geography, construction, maintenance, energy storage and transmission, some devices for extracting energy from sea waves will likely be installed on the coast. We study here the specific case ...

  8. Petroleum Service Projects in the Gulf of Guinea 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-Worgu, Kenneth Chukwumeka

    2011-10-21

    Liquefied Natural Gas Company FPSO Floating Production Storage and Offloading Vessel GMD Group Managing Director GOG Gulf of Guinea KRW Korean Won KW Kilowatts LNG Liquefied Natural Gas TAMU Texas A&M University MMIE Ministry of Mines, Industry... .............................................................. 103 6.7 Nontechnical Challenges .......................................................... 104 VII INSULATION PROJECT ON AGBAMI FPSO ................................. 106 7.1 Background on Envirocage...

  9. Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain Regional Supplement Organization of field the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation with regional, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  10. MARINE DEBRIS Impacts in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARINE DEBRIS Impacts in the Gulf of Mexico NOAA Fisheries Service Southeast Regional Office Protected Resources Division Revised June 2014 #12;WHAT IS MARINE DEBRIS? MARINE IMPACTS · Degrades the quality and health of our oceans · Damages or degrades marine habitats · Poses risks to human health

  11. Sequestration Options for the West Coast States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Larry

    2006-04-30

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is one of seven partnerships that have been established by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and British Columbia. Led by the California Energy Commission, WESTCARB is a consortium of about 70 organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and universities; private companies working on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. Both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options were evaluated in the Region during the 18-month Phase I project. A centralized Geographic Information System (GIS) database of stationary source, geologic and terrestrial sink data was developed. The GIS layer of source locations was attributed with CO{sub 2} emissions and other data and a spreadsheet was developed to estimate capture costs for the sources in the region. Phase I characterization of regional geological sinks shows that geologic storage opportunities exist in the WESTCARB region in each of the major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery. The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, the potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, and the cumulative production from gas reservoirs suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. A GIS-based method for source-sink matching was implemented and preliminary marginal cost curves developed, which showed that 20, 40, or 80 Mega tonnes (Mt) of CO{sub 2} per year could be sequestered in California at a cost of $31/tonne (t), $35/t, or $50/t, respectively. Phase I also addressed key issues affecting deployment of CCS technologies, including storage-site monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks. A framework for screening and ranking candidate sites for geologic CO{sub 2} storage on the basis of HSE risk was developed. A webbased, state-by-state compilation of current regulations for injection wells, and permits/contracts for land use changes, was developed, and modeling studies were carried out to assess the application of a number of different geophysical techniques for monitoring geologic sequestration. Public outreach activities resulted in heightened awareness of sequestration among state, community and industry leaders in the Region. Assessment of the changes in carbon stocks in agricultural lands showed that Washington, Oregon and Arizona were CO{sub 2} sources for the period from 1987 to 1997. Over the same period, forest carbon stocks decreased in Washington, but increased in Oregon and Arizona. Results of the terrestrial supply curve analyses showed that afforestation of rangelands and crop lands offer major sequestration opportunities; at a price of $20 per t CO{sub 2}, more than 1,233 MMT could be sequestered over 40-years in Washington and more than 1,813 MMT could be sequestered in Oregon.

  12. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore »clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  13. Building sustainable ecosystem-oriented architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bassil, Youssef

    2012-01-01

    Currently, organizations are transforming their business processes into e-services and service-oriented architectures to improve coordination across sales, marketing, and partner channels, to build flexible and scalable systems, and to reduce integration-related maintenance and development costs. However, this new paradigm is still fragile and lacks many features crucial for building sustainable and progressive computing infrastructures able to rapidly respond and adapt to the always-changing market and environmental business. This paper proposes a novel framework for building sustainable Ecosystem- Oriented Architectures (EOA) using e-service models. The backbone of this framework is an ecosystem layer comprising several computing units whose aim is to deliver universal interoperability, transparent communication, automated management, self-integration, self-adaptation, and security to all the interconnected services, components, and devices in the ecosystem. Overall, the proposed model seeks to deliver a co...

  14. The Need to Reduce Mobile Source Emissions in the South Coast Air Basin

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: South Coast Air Quality Management District

  15. Introduction Amendment 22 to the Gulf of Mex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , modified buoy gear.Although many reef fish spe cies are retained, the predominant target species the west central Florida coast. Longline and other buoy gear are prohibited inside The authors

  16. The geometry of coexistence in large ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Jacopo; Suweis, Samir; Barabás, György; Banavar, Jayanth R; Allesina, Stefano; Maritan, Amos

    2015-01-01

    The role of interactions in shaping the interplay between the stability of an ecosystem and its biodiversity is still not well understood. We introduce a geometrical approach, that lends itself to both analytic and numerical analyses, for studying the domain of interaction parameters that results in stable coexistence. We find the remarkable result that just a few attributes of the interactions are responsible for stable coexistence in large random ecosystems. We analyze more than 100 empirical networks and find that their architecture generally has a limited effect on in sustaining biodiversity.

  17. Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angilletta, Michael

    1 23 Urban Ecosystems ISSN 1083-8155 Urban Ecosyst DOI 10.1007/s11252-015-0460-x Urban heat island at link.springer.com". #12;Urban heat island mitigation strategies and lizard thermal ecology: landscaping. Urban heat island (UHI) effects may further exacerbate the impacts of climate change on organisms

  18. "Ecosystem Services, Biodiversity and Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of plant, animal and micro-organism communities and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional and the nonliving environment interacting as a functional unit." "Ecosystem services are the benefits people capture for the foreseeable future. #12;John Beddington's "Perfect Storm" Population Increase Poverty Reduction Food Security

  19. The Nitrogen Paradox in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , by an abundance of N-fixing plants, and by sustained export of bioavailable N at the ecosystem scale. However and biogeochemical cycles through their vast exchanges of energy, water, carbon, and nutrients with the global, recycle, and export (via leaching and denitrification) very large quantities of N (e.g., Davidson et al

  20. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Fisheries and Oceanography Division Pelagic Fisheries Research Program Motivation · Juvenile & subadult bigeye aggregates

  1. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  2. Managing for ocean biodiversity to sustain marine ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen R.; Sandifer, Paul A.; Allan, J. David; Beck, Michael W.; Fautin, Daphne G.; Fogarty, Michael J.; Halpern, Benjamin S.; Incze, Lewis S.; Leong, Jo-Ann C.; Norse, Elliott; Stachowicz, John J.; Wall, Diana H.

    2009-05-01

    Managing a complex ecosystem to balance delivery of all of its services is at the heart of ecosystem-based management. But how can this balance be accomplished amidst the conflicting demands of stakeholders, managers, and policy makers? In marine...

  3. Deep-Diving Cetaceans of the Gulf of Mexico : : Acoustic Ecology and Response to Natural and Anthropogenic Forces Including the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merkens, Karlina Paul

    2013-01-01

    In the Gulf of Mexico increased winds can produce surfaceGulf of Mexico. A third blended satellite product is WIND,

  4. The Health Impact of Chemical Exposures During the Gulf War: A Research Planning Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Health Impact of Chemical Exposures During the Gulf War: A Research Planning Conference and Disease Registry #12;Research Planning Conference Report i Table of Contents Acknowledgments

  5. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

  6. Tidal salt marshes of the southeast Atlantic Coast: A community profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegert, R.G.; Freeman, B.J.

    1990-09-01

    This report is part of a series of community profiles on the ecology of wetland and marine communities. This particular profile considers tidal marshes of the southeastern Atlantic coast, from North Carolina south to northern Florida. Alone among the earth's ecosystems, coastal communities are subjected to a bidirectional flooding sometimes occurring twice each day; this flooding affects successional development, species composition, stability, and productivity. In the tidally influenced salt marsh, salinity ranges from less than 1 ppt to that of seawater. Dominant plant species include cordgrasses (Spartina alterniflora and S. cynosuroides), black needlerush (Juncus romerianus), and salt marsh bulrush (Scirpus robustus). Both terrestrail and aquatic animals occur in salt marshes and include herons, egrets ospreys (Pandion haliaetus), bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), alligators (Alligator Mississippiensis), manatees (Trichecus manatus), oysters, mussels, and fiddler crabs. Currently, the only significant direct commercial use of the tidal salt marshes is by crabbers seeking the blue crab Callinectes sapidus, but the marshes are quite important recreationally, aesthetically, and educationally. 151 refs., 45 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division Characterization Research Program Réka Domokos #12;Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Science Center Ecosystems and Oceanography Division -80 -77 -74 -71 -68 -65 -62 -59 -56 -53 -50 -47 -44 Sv

  8. Reverse Engineering Software Ecosystems Doctoral Dissertation submitted to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanza, Michele

    and the information in the versioning system repositories of the projects in an ecosystem and generating visual perspectives. Given the large amount of information in an ecosystem, we provide exploration mechanisms that allow one to navigate the wealth of information available about the ecosystem. We distinguish between

  9. South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs in the Southern Coastal Areas information needed for ecosystem restoration in the Southern Coastal Areas of South Florida. In 1996 is the successor to the Science Subgroup. 2 South Florida Ecosystem Restoration: Scientific Information Needs

  10. Letter to the Editor Ecosystem services: Multiple classification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    population's information about the world, especially when it comes to ecosystem services, is extremelyLetter to the Editor Ecosystem services: Multiple classification systems are needed In a recent to enrich our thinking about ecosystem services rather than a problem to be defined away. Let us start

  11. Towards faster method search through static ecosystem analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    by augmenting the data available to the developer with information derived from the analysis of the ecosystemTowards faster method search through static ecosystem analysis Boris Spasojevi´c University of Bern from the same ecosystem ­ written in the same language and sharing dependencies. We implemented a proof

  12. Comprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Richard Y.

    , carbon sequestration, ecosystem, multi-tier, multi-modal, multi-scale, self organized, sensor array to comprehensively monitor ecosystem carbon sequestration. The network consists of CO2, Weather (pressureComprehensive Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Subalpine Forest Ecosystems and Its Relation

  13. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 07/19/07 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on ­ The Hello World! Program Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell/Quasar Ecosystem

  14. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 07/19/07 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Developing Code for Cell - SIMD Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions

  15. Pipelines following exploration in deeper Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1988-07-04

    Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction has been falling of sharply to shallow-water (less than 300 ft) areas, while construction for middle depth (300 - 600 ft) and deepwater (600 + ft) areas as been holding steady. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data compiled by the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS). This article continues a series of updates based on MMS gulf pipeline data (OGJ, June 8, 1987, p. 50). These installments track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. The figures are also evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data published in Oil and Gas Journal's annual Pipeline Economics Reports.

  16. Gulf Cordgrass Production, Utilization, and Nutritional Value Following Burning. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oefinger, R.D.; Scifres, F.J.

    1977-01-01

    ). Growth characteristics of gulf cordgrass give rise to its apparent adaptability to fire. Regrowth follow ing burning progresses rapidly, thus quickly rendering succulent regrowth acceptable as forage to domestic grazing animals (6). Young regrowth... and species of Acacia) on the uplands to the west. Soil Characteristics Physical and Chemical Components The loamy sand sites, burned in fall 1974 were characterized by a near neutral soil surface, becoming more basic to 30 centimeters deep (Table 1...

  17. Jumpstarting commercial-scale CO2 capture and storage with ethylene production and enhanced oil recovery in the US Gulf

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Levine, Jonathan S.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Carey, J. William; Stauffer, Philip H.

    2015-04-27

    CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technology has yet to be widely deployed at a commercial scale despite multiple high-profile demonstration projects. We suggest that developing a large-scale, visible, and financially viable CCUS network could potentially overcome many barriers to deployment and jumpstart commercial-scale CCUS. To date, substantial effort has focused on technology development to reduce the costs of CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. Here, we propose that near-term investment could focus on implementing CO2 capture on facilities that produce high-value chemicals/products. These facilities can absorb the expected impact of the marginal increase in the cost of production onmore »the price of their product, due to the addition of CO2 capture, more than coal-fired power plants. A financially viable demonstration of a large-scale CCUS network requires offsetting the costs of CO2 capture by using the CO2 as an input to the production of market-viable products. As a result, we demonstrate this alternative development path with the example of an integrated CCUS system where CO2 is captured from ethylene producers and used for enhanced oil recovery in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.« less

  18. ECO-LOGICAL: AN ECOSYSTEM APPROACH TO DEVELOPING TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE PROJECTS IN A CHANGING ENVIRONMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacher-Gresock, Bethaney; Schwarzer, Julianne Siegel

    2009-01-01

    gaps for current ecosystem information. Insufficient fundingAlthough new information about the ecosystem may have become

  19. Importance of physical processes on near-surface nutrient distributions in summer in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belabbassi, Leila

    2001-01-01

    As part of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico chemical oceanography and hydrography study, data on salinity, nutrients, and surface chlorophyll were collected three times per year over the northeastern Gulf of Mexico along ...

  20. Marine geophysical study of cyclic sedimentation and shallow sill intrusion in the floor of the Central Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kluesner, Jared W.

    2011-01-01

    Bouma, A.H. , 1962, Sedimentology of some flysch deposits: aGulf of California: sedimentology, mass physical properties

  1. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  2. A model of global net ecosystem production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, C.S.; Matson, P.A. (NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)); Field, C.B.; Randerson, J. (Carnegie Institution of Washington, Stanford, CA (United States)); Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

    1993-06-01

    We present an ecosystem modeling approach to resolve global climate and edaphic controls on seasonal NEP patterns. Global remote sensing, climate and land surface data sets are used as inputs to drive a terrestrial carbon cycle model at 1[degrees]lat/lon resolution. monthly net primary productivity (NPP) is calculated using surface radiation and NDVI to determine photosynthesis, which is subsequently adjusted by temperature, water and nitrogen stress factors. Total nitrogen availability is coupled to net mineralization rates from litter soil carbon pools. Soil respiration and NPP balance one another globally at around 60 Gt C yr[sup [minus]1]. The seasonal amplitude of global NEP is 1.2 Gt C. Although substantial month-to-month variation is observed for tropical forest areas, seasonal amplitude is driven globally by boreal and temperate forest ecosystems between 650 and 30[degrees] N latitude.

  3. Linking ecosystem services, rehabilitation, and river hydrogeomorphology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorp, James H.

    2010-01-01

    to the evaluation of ecosystem services, re - habilitation, and fair asset trading (mitigation and offsets) because (a) appropriate river classification systems were unavailable or inadequately exploited, (b) techniques for evaluating services were underdeveloped... basements or loss of land or house. Asset trading (mitigation and offsets) Environmental mitigation involves minimization of dam- age to sensitive areas and improvement in the quality of other sites through environmental offsets—an approach not yet...

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

  5. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

  6. Z .Journal of Marine Systems 16 1998 283295 Sources and cycling of nitrogen in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    Z .Journal of Marine Systems 16 1998 283­295 Sources and cycling of nitrogen in the Gulf of Maine David W. Townsend ) School of Marine Sciences, 5741 Libby Hall, UniÕersity of Maine, Orono, ME 04469 and nitrogen fluxes in the Gulf of Maine region shows that deep Slope Water that enters the Gulf through

  7. submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    submitted to Deep Sea Research II Transport and retention of dormant copepods in the Gulf of Maine finmarchicus, copepod, dormancy, diapause, Gulf of Maine, interannual variability, zooplankton #12;Abstract and retention of dormant C. finmarchicus in the deep Gulf of Maine, in the northwestern Atlantic. Retention

  8. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Does the Science Support the Plan to Reduce, Mitigate, and Control Hypoxia?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: Does the Science Support the Plan to Reduce, Mitigate the 2001 Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force 2001), incorporating data, publications

  9. Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huerta, Audrey D.

    Wilson cycles, tectonic inheritance, and rifting of the North American Gulf of Mexico continental, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA ABSTRACT The tectonic evolution of the North Amer- ican Gulf of Mexico margin, including the Interior Salt Basin, outboard unextended Wiggins arch, and an unusually

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS TO ENHANCE NMFS'S SEA TURTLE TRACKING PROGRAM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DEVELOPMENT OF A GIS TO ENHANCE NMFS'S SEA TURTLE TRACKING PROGRAM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO by MAURICE available through GIS data bases. Our interests lie in specific information at actual turtle locations, i. 1994. Development of a GIS to enhance NMFS's sea turtle tracking program in the Gulf of Mexico

  11. Water Masses and Nutrient Sources to the Gulf of Maine5 David W. Townsend1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, David W.

    1 2 3 4 Water Masses and Nutrient Sources to the Gulf of Maine5 6 7 8 9 10 11 David W Research33 34 35 36 37 38 39 1 / School of Marine Sciences, University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469;2 47 ABSTRACT48 49 The Gulf of Maine, a semi-enclosed basin on the continental shelf

  12. FACTORS INFLUENCING RECAPTURE PATTERNS OF TAGGED PENAEID SHRIMP IN THE WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACTORS INFLUENCING RECAPTURE PATTERNS OF TAGGED PENAEID SHRIMP IN THE WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO PETERTexas (USA) and Tamaulipas (Mexico) in the western Gulfof Mexico were examined by releasing tagged shrimp, are the dominant species caught by commercial shrimp fisheries of the western Gulf of Mexico. Annual landings

  13. Morganza to the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana Post Authorization Change Report and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement USACE Response to Independent External Peer Review Revised 17 June#12;1 Morganza to the Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana Post Authorization Change Report and Revised of Mexico, Louisiana (Morganza to the Gulf) hurricane and storm damage reduction project for construction

  14. Influence of mesoscale eddies on ichthyoplankton assemblages in the Gulf of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of mesoscale eddies on ichthyoplankton assemblages in the Gulf of Alaska ELIZABETH ATWOOD 98115, USA ABSTRACT Mesoscale eddies (100­200 km in diameter) propa- gating along the shelf in these eddies was examined using data from a cruise in 2005 that sampled three eastern Gulf of Alaska mesoscale

  15. South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    South Florida Sun-Sentinel.com NSU, FAU among schools selected to research Gulf oil spill By Scott in an effort to research the impact of the BP oil spill on the Gulf of Mexico. Florida Atlantic University. Among the projects selected: ·FIU and Nova will use sharks and scavengers to assess the impact of oil

  16. Gulf Currents That Turn Storms Into Monsters By ANDREW C. REVKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Gulf of Mexico would carry it right over an oceanographic phenomenon known as the loop current. Late current, a great ribbon of hot water meandering through the Gulf of Mexico. For a long time it has been a centerpiece of hurricane forecasts. The current is a conveyor belt of banked solar energy, typically with more

  17. Antipatharian Diversity and Habitat Suitability Mapping in the Mesophotic Zone of the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nuttall, Marissa F

    2013-04-03

    Little is known about the distribution of black corals in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Of thirty-nine species of black coral documented in the Western Atlantic, thirty have been previously documented by various studies in the Gulf of Mexico...

  18. Common coastal foraging areas for loggerheads in the Gulf of Mexico: Opportunities for marine conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    (Caretta caretta) from three separate subpopulations in the Gulf of Mexico, USA, revealed migration Peninsula, Mexico. Within 3­35 days, turtles migrated to foraging sites where they all displayed high siteCommon coastal foraging areas for loggerheads in the Gulf of Mexico: Opportunities for marine

  19. Wintertime observations of SubTropical Mode Water formation within the Gulf Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joyce, Terrence M.

    Wintertime observations of SubTropical Mode Water formation within the Gulf Stream Terrence M) within the eastward-flowing Gulf Stream as it forms during strong winter cooling. Shipboard observations that the deepest wintertime mixed layers (MLs) of EDW were found immediately south of the GS, and the distribution

  20. Research papers Oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico in July 2010, during the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) drilling rig at the Macondo MC252 well on April 20, 2010, the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) was subjectedResearch papers Oceanographic conditions in the Gulf of Mexico in July 2010, during the Deepwater, while oil was still flowing from the Macondo well following the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) platform

  1. MEXUS-Gulf Remote Sensing and Technology Research 1977-84

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MEXUS-Gulf Remote Sensing and Technology Research 1977-84 ANDREW J. KEMMERER, THOMAS D. LEMING, and WALTER F. GANDY Introduction The Remote Sensing Working Group of MEXUS-Gulf was organized because of an interest in remote sensing shared by the fisheries organizations of Mex ico and the United States

  2. MARINE MAGNETOTELLURIC AND MARINE SEISMIC STUDY IN GULF OF KUTCH REGION,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    MARINE MAGNETOTELLURIC AND MARINE SEISMIC STUDY IN GULF OF KUTCH REGION, GUJARAT, INDIA PROJECT OF OCEANOGRAPHY Dona Paula, Goa­403 004, INDIA 2008 #12;Technical Report No: NGRI-2008-EXP-656 MARINE MAGNETOTELLURIC AND MARINE SEISMIC STUDY IN GULF OF KUTCH REGION, GUJARAT, INDIA Project Coordinator: Dr. T

  3. AGING OF GULF MENHADEN, BREVOORTIA PATRONUS WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON AND WILLIAM E. SCHAAF'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AGING OF GULF MENHADEN, BREVOORTIA PATRONUS WILLIAM R. NICHOLSON AND WILLIAM E. SCHAAF' ABSTRACT% of Gulf menhaden, Brevoortia patronus, caught in the purse seine fishery are ages 1 and 2. Few fish survive to age 3. About 50% ofthe fish examined for the years 1971-73 could be aged by scale annuli. Those

  4. Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Field Testing Protocol Western Mountains, Valleys and Coast Regional Supplement Organization and oversee the field testing of the draft Regional Supplement. Field testing will be done in cooperation, the District coordinator will provide team members with an introduction to the Regional Supplement

  5. Establishing a Eucalyptus Energy Plantation on the Central Coast of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Establishing a Eucalyptus Energy Plantation on the Central Coast of California1 Norman H. Pillsbury examined in trial plantings in the United States include Alnus, Eucalyptus, Platanus, and Populus. 1 Presented at the Workshop on Eucalyptus in California, June 14-16, 1983, Sacramento, California 2

  6. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  7. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Eureka Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    4 p. PSMFC. 2000. 1999 Marine Fuel Price Summary. FisheriesWest Coast and Alaska Marine Fuel Prices 2005-2007 Economicannual West Coast Marine Fuel Price Survey, average pretax

  8. Crude Injustice in the Gulf: Why Categorical Exclusions for Deepwater Drilling in the Gulf of Mexico are Inconsistent with U.S. International Ocean Law and Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Eric V.

    2011-01-01

    Percentage of Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200and 2010, monthly crude oil production in the Gulf more thanof Mexico Field Production of Crude Oil, U.S. ENERGY INFO.

  9. he U.S. Coast Guard expects all of its Sikorsky Aircraft MH-60T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    ;2 VERTIFLITE May/June 2013 money by helping fleet managers buy parts more efficiently.The Coast Guard vibration

  10. Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved Corps Navy & Coast Guard WarrantOfficers No Warrant Officer Rank Warrant Officer 1 Chief Warrant Officer Warrant Officer 5 Air Force Army Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard E-9 Chief Master Sergeant of the Air

  11. FISH LARVAE OF THE ESTUARIES AND COAST OF CENTRAL MAINE STANLEY B. CHENOWETH'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FISH LARVAE OF THE ESTUARIES AND COAST OF CENTRAL MAINE STANLEY B. CHENOWETH' ABSTRACT Seasonal sampling of fish larvae in the central Maine coast took 22 kinds of larvae; 17 were identified to species and bays of the coast of Maine. During the past 10 years (1961-70) samples of larval herring have been

  12. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Crescent City Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    PSMFC. 2000. 1999 Marine Fuel Price Summary. FisheriesWest Coast and Alaska Marine Fuel Prices 2005-2007 Economicannual West Coast Marine Fuel Price Survey, average pretax

  13. A COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED AND BACKGROUND SUBSIDENCE RATES IN TEXAS-LOUISIANA GEOPRESSURED GEOTHERMAL AREAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    eds. , Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference, 2nd,Conference, Geopressured-Geothermal Energy, U.S. Gulf Coast,Geopressured-Geothermal Energy, U S . Gulf Coast, Baton

  14. DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast DOE Providing Additional Supercomputing Resources to Study Hurricane Effects on Gulf Coast...

  15. Stability versus Sustainability: Energy Policy in the Gulf Monarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krane, Jim

    2013-02-07

      this  misuse  of  resources.  Rent  distribution  was  a  pre?oil  political  tool  even  before  the  formation  of  independent  states  in  the  Gulf,  as  Foley  (2010)  and  Davidson  (2005)  have  shown.4  The  arrival of oil revenues into...  bands at unchanged prices. By the mid?2000s,  these (by then) subsidized prices were seen as a convenient way to distribute oil rents and  maintain  regime  legitimacy.  In  Kuwait,  power  that  costs  nearly  14  US  cents  per  kWh  to  generate and deliver is still sold for less than 1...

  16. Recent Gulf of Mexico pipeline activity reflects industry's recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1990-08-27

    Pipeline construction in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico has improved considerably in recent years, especially activity in shallow water (less than 300 ft). Construction for middle depths (300-600 ft) has been flat, while deepwater (600+ ft) projects have held firm or increased slightly. Overall pipeline mileage constructed in federal waters 1985-89 period showed a strengthening industry, especially during the 1988-89 period. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data. The author tracks comparisons between applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed.

  17. Subsea technology progress buoys Gulf of Mexico deepwater action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-09-02

    This paper reviews the technological advances in subsea oil and gas equipment to drive a new era of exploration and development in the outer continental shelf and other areas considered to complex to economically pursue. As subsea technology expands into deep waters, operators in the Gulf are using subsea production systems based on template and well cluster designs. Subsea cluster systems are gaining favor among operators because they allow more flexibility with shallow water flow which occurs during the first 1,000 feet of clay formations below the seabed. The paper also provides insight into deep water drilling, remote operated vehicles, deep water umbilicals, and other deep water production equipment.

  18. A climatic heat budget study of the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etter, Paul Courtney

    1975-01-01

    the Gulf of Hexico. The radiation balance at the sea surface (QH) is based on direct measurements of incoming solar radia- tion, as presented by LSf, Duffie and Sm1th (1955) [cited in de Jong (1973)]. The evaporation rate (E) is calculated by use of bulk... work. However, verifica- tion based on aerological data has been obtained from the evaporation- minus-precipitation (E-P) values of' Cummings (1958) and good estimates of P. The sensible heat flux (E ) is calculated by use of Bowen's ratio. The rate...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves AdjustmentsDecadeSign up forHoliday29 1.921Gulf

  20. Shrubs as ecosystem engineers in a coastal dune: influences on plant populations, communities and ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman, J. Hall

    Shrubs as ecosystem engineers in a coastal dune: influences on plant populations, communities the landscape? Location: Coastal hind-dune system, Bodega Head, northern California. Methods: In each of 4 years dune. At landscape level, the two shrubs ­ and their distinctive vegetation and soils ­ frequently had

  1. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    S, Thomas RQ. 2011. How do we improve Earth system models?Integrating Earth system models, ecosystem models,scales and ultimately earth system models (ESMs; Table 2).

  2. Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species Ecosystem Deep Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arkin, Adam P.

    2014-01-01

    Environmental Genomics Reveals a Single-Species EcosystemTechnology Program, DOE Joint Genomics Institute, Berkeley,and Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program through

  3. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking" Telescopes: An...

  4. Ecosystem-level controls on root-rhizosphere respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Integrating Earth system models, ecosystem models,S, Thomas RQ. 2011. How do we improve Earth system models?scales and ultimately earth system models (ESMs; Table 2).

  5. The ecosystem study on Rongelap Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, R.B.; Gessel, S.P.; Held, E.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    1997-07-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Laboratory of Radiation Biology at the University of Washington carried out an intensive study of this Atoll, which was contaminated with radioactive fallout from the {open_quotes}Bravo shot{close_quotes} in 1954. This study involved many aspects of the environment and the plant and animal life: soils, land plants, marine life, birds, geology and hydrology, and human diets as well. In much of the research, the fortuitiously present radioactive isotopes, especially {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr, were tracers. Although the term {open_quotes}ecosystem study{close_quotes} was not in vogue at that time, it is clear that this was an early use of the ecosystem approach. Soil types and their development, the distribution of mineral elements in plants and soils, including predominant radionuclides, distribution and growth of native terrestrial plants in relation to topography and salinity, some aspects of the human diets, micronutrient nutrition of the coconut palm, island and islet development and stability, were given attention in the studies. Some of the findings in the various areas of study will be presented and discussed. 32 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macalady, Jenn

    ANCHIALINE ECOSYSTEMS Microbial hotspots in anchialine blue holes: initial discoveries from+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract Inland blue holes of the Bahamas are anchialine ecosystems with distinct fresh and geomicrobiology exploration of blue holes are providing a first glimpse of the geochemistry and microbial life

  7. Food web complexity and higher-level ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel

    LETTER Food web complexity and higher-level ecosystem services Jose´ M. Montoya1,2 *, Miguel A of herbivores in 19 plant-herbivore-parasitoid food webs influence the service supplied by natural enemies producers have shown that species richness provides and promotes fundamental ecosystem services. However, we

  8. Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and Biological Diversity in the Eastern United States Threats CITATION Lovett, G.M., and T.H. Tear. 2008. Threats from Above: Air Pollution Impacts on Ecosystems and nitrogen pollution. © Eric Middelkoop/BigStockPhoto.com Botom: A newly hatched common loon chick is watched

  9. Nitrogen Fluxes and Retention in Urban Watershed Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland 21227, USA; 4 US Geological Survey, Baltimore, Maryland 21237, USA, forested, and agricultural watersheds. The work is a product of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a long- term of these areas (Pickett and others 2001). Two urban ecosystem research sites (Baltimore and Central Ar- izona

  10. Understanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, James

    the information needs of domain scientists, software component producers, infrastructure providers, and ecosystemUnderstanding the scientific software ecosystem and its impact: current and future measures James,909 (10,153 excluding table text) *Corresponding Author Address: Information School University of Texas

  11. A Quantitative Analysis of Developer Information Needs in Software Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jäger, Gerhard

    A Quantitative Analysis of Developer Information Needs in Software Ecosystems Nicole Haenni, Mircea popular tools developers use to satisfy their ecosystem-related information needs. Categories and Subject present the results of an investigation into the nature of information needs of software developers who

  12. Building an Information Ecosystem for Public Transport in Rural Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Pete

    Building an Information Ecosystem for Public Transport in Rural Areas Peter Edwards, David Corsar, to con- struct an information ecosystem upon which a range of ap- plications and services can be built.beecroft,jeff.z.pan,yaji.sripada}@abdn.ac.uk ABSTRACT Passenger information systems (PISs) providing real-time information are valuable tools for public

  13. Ecosystem services provided by palms in SE Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schierup, Mikkel Heide

    important in forest ecosystems and include some 600 species in SEA. Rural communities depend on palms provided by ecosystems and research into the value of these resources should: - Include rural communities of rural communities' harvest of palm products - Evaluate the potential of developing new palm products

  14. Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Locatelli Carbon sequestration is recognised as a global ecosystem service (see box on next page such as the global climate (through carbon sequestration), the quantity and quality of water and the force of windsS Global ecosystem services With their ability to capture and store carbon, forests contribute

  15. The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    introduction of contaminants into water-ways. Although counter-intuitive, water itself has become a pollutant549 The Impact of Imported Water on Hardwoods Range Ecosystems1 Thomas Scott2 Abstract Water Pollution is defined as the corruption of ecosystems, human health, and local economies by the inappropriate

  16. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 3/2/2008 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on - DMA Transfer Using get and put Buffer Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell

  17. IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanterman, Aaron

    IBM Systems & Technology Group Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement Cell Programming Workshop 3/2/2008 © 2007 IBM Corporation1 Hands-on - DMA Transfer Using Control Block Cell Programming Workshop Cell/Quasar Ecosystem & Solutions Enablement #12;IBM Systems & Technology Group ­ Cell

  18. NREL Today: Symposium and Distinguished Ecosystem Ecologist Lecture and Awards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Lee

    NREL Today: Symposium and Distinguished Ecosystem Ecologist Lecture and Awards Thursday, November Student Center For more information about the event, visit http://www.nrel.colostate.edu/ecosystem-award.html or email Laurie.Richards@colostate.edu. NREL Today: Symposium Program 1:00-1:05 Introduction from Director

  19. Exploration of a Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystem in Lake Huron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exploration of a Submerged Sinkhole Ecosystem in Lake Huron Bopaiah A. Biddanda,1 * Dwight F in the bedrock (sinkholes), through which groundwater emerges onto the lake floor. During September 2003, we explored a recently discovered submerged sinkhole ecosystem (55 m · 40 m · 1 m) located at a depth of 93 m

  20. TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEXAS&STATEWIDE&ASSESSMENT&& OF&FOREST&ECOSYSTEM&SERVICES& A&comprehensive&analysis&of®ulating& and&cultural&services&provided&by&Texas'&forests& & & & & & October&2013 June 2009 #12;#12;Texas&Statewide&Assessment&of&& Forest&Ecosystem&Services& A&comprehensive&analysis&of&the®ulating&and&& cultural&services&provided&by&Texas

  1. Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate Change in Mountain Ecosystems Areas of Current Research · Glacier Research · Snow Initiative Glacier Research A Focus on Mountain Ecosystems Climate change is widely acknowledged to be having in the western U.S. and the Northern Rockies in particular are highly sensitive to climate change. In fact

  2. Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Software Platforms for Smart Building Ecosystems: Understanding the Key Architectural-ready software platform for the smart building domain. We analyzed the type of contributors that may exist in a smart building ecosystem, the quality attributes that those roles are concerned with, and the key

  3. Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Understanding the relationships between ecosystem services and poverty and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework' Ecosystem Services, vol 7, pp. 34­45., 10.1016/j.ecoser.2013 services and poverty alleviation: A conceptual framework$ Janet A. Fisher a,n , Genevieve Patenaude

  4. Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Pieter

    Biomass and productivity of trematode parasites in pond ecosystems Daniel L. Preston*, Sarah A often measure the biomass and productivity of organisms to understand the importance of populations and dissections of over 1600 aquatic invertebrate and amphib- ian hosts, we calculated the ecosystem-level biomass

  5. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period: one in April, one in June, one in September. April's effort was dedicated to surveying the mound at MC118 with the Surface-Source-Deep-Receiver (SSDR) seismic surveying system. This survey was completed in June and water column and bottom samples were collected via box coring. A microbial filtering system developed by Consortium participants at the University of Georgia was also deployed, run for {approx}12 hours and retrieved. The September cruise, designed to deploy, test, and in some cases recover, geochemical and microbial instruments and experiments took place aboard Harbor Branch's Seward Johnson and employed the Johnson SeaLink manned submersible. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in a previously submitted report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs. In addition, Barrodale Computing Services Ltd. (BCS) completed their work; their final report is the bulk of the semiannual report that precedes (abstract truncated)

  6. Species-specific phenological responses to winter temperature and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazer, SJ; Gerst, KL; Gerst, KL; Matthews, ER; Matthews, ER; Evenden, A

    2015-01-01

    and precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem S USAN J. Mand precipitation in a water-limited ecosystem. Ecosphere 6(information is available from water-limited ecosystems. In

  7. Migration and Global Environmental DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    .....................................................................................................9 Cultural and information ecosystem services1 Migration and Global Environmental Change DR7a: Changes in ecosystem services and migration .............................................................................................................................................5 Ecosystem services in low-lying coastal areas

  8. From population dynamics to ecoinformatics: Ecosystems as multilevel information processing systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    From population dynamics to ecoinformatics: Ecosystems as multilevel information processing systems which lead to viewing ecosystems in terms of local multilevel information processing and evolution. We of information processing, and under which circumstances these modes may be favored. Ecosystem diversity

  9. Classification of surficial sediments: North-Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, William

    2003-01-01

    The surface sediments in the North-Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico can be appropriately characterized by physical property analysis, especially by comparison of wet-bulk density. Two hundred and eighty, 1-5 meter cores ...

  10. Potential of Development and Application of Wave Energy Conversion Technology in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiberteau, K. L.; Liu, Y.; Lee, J.; Kozman, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on the potential and application of developing wave energy technology in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). The conditions (weather, wave climate, activity of the oil industry, etc.) in the GOM are assessed and the attributes of wave...

  11. Evolution of depositional and slope instability processes on Bryant Canyon area, Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripsanas, Efthymios

    2005-02-17

    Bryant and Eastern Canyon systems are located on the northwest Gulf of Mexico, and they are characterized by a very complex sedimentological history related to glacioeustatic cycles, river discharges, and interactions of depositional and halokinetic...

  12. The Lure of the West : analyzing the domination of Western firms in the Gulf Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sartawi, Mais Mithqal

    2010-01-01

    For the past three decades, architecture in the gulf region has undergone a wide ranging-amount of transformations. The discovery of oil during the mid 20th century transformed countries with in the region from small, ...

  13. Sulfide distribution in chemosynthetic communities at hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escorcia, Susie Patricia

    2000-01-01

    Dense macrofaunal communities around hydrocarbon seeps in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) are supported by the activity of chemoautotrophic microorganisms that couple the oxidation of sulfide (H?S) or methane with the fixation ...

  14. Multiple species of Phoreiobothrium from the blacktip shark, Carcharhinus limbatus, in the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Owens, Hannah L.

    2008-01-01

    During a survey of the adult tapeworm fauna of sharks from the Gulf of Mexico, the blacktip shark, Carcharhinus limbatus (Müller and Henle, 1839), was found to host cestodes in the genus Phoreiobothrium. Carcharhinus ...

  15. Spatial and temporal distributions of particulate matter and particulate organic carbon, Northeast Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Christina Estefana

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of particulate matter (PM) and particulate organic carbon (POC) was determined during the Northeast Gulf of Mexico Chemical Oceanography and Hydro-graphy program (NEGOM). The hydrography and physical forcing ...

  16. Empirical vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Current, Carole Louise

    1993-01-01

    Climatological vertical structure of density anomaly in the Gulf of Mexico is realistically characterized in a form useful for calibration and/or verification of numerical circulation models, employing a new method that ...

  17. Extreme wave height estimation for ocean engineering applications in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Chan Kwon

    2012-07-16

    updated estimates of the 100-year extreme wave conditions for the entire Gulf of Mexico using a more comprehensive approach. First, the applicability of standard parametric wind models was examined and appropriate adjustments to the Rankine vortex model...

  18. Coral Isotope Record of Environmental Change in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miner, Adrian

    2013-08-30

    Variations in the density banding and chemical composition of the skeletal material of long-lived corals in the Gulf of Mexico preserve records of past environmental conditions. To better interpret these records, the controlling mechanisms governing...

  19. Photographic monitoring of benthic biota at Stetson Bank, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhardt, Sarah Praeger

    2000-01-01

    . In addition, this was the first application of coral reef monitoring techniques to a hard bottom reef dominated by sponges in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Individual photostations were found to be significantly different, indicating complex microstucture...

  20. Nutrient Limitation in Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): Phytoplankton Communities and Photosynthesis Respond to Nutrient Pulse 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yan; Quigg, Antonietta

    2014-02-14

    Although the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system exports large amounts of nutrients to the Northern Gulf of Mexico annually, nutrient limitation of primary productivity still occurs offshore, acting as one of the major ...

  1. Phytoplankton Dynamics in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM): Field and Laboratory Experiments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Yan

    2014-12-08

    The freshwater inflow of the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River system and the local circulation patterns result in nutrient enriched waters in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) in spring, which fuels phytoplankton blooms, ...

  2. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  3. Stochastic Programming Approach to Hydraulic Fracture Design for the Lower Tertiary Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podhoretz, Seth

    2013-07-27

    In this work, we present methodologies for optimization of hydraulic fracturing design under uncertainty specifically with reference to the thick and anisotropic reservoirs in the Lower Tertiary Gulf of Mexico. In this analysis we apply a stochastic...

  4. A review of Oil production capacity expansion costs for the Persian Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. Energy Information Agency has recently published a report prepared by Petroconsultants, Inc. that addresses the cost of expanding crude oil production capacity in the Persian Gulf. A study on this subject is much ...

  5. A study of wind waves in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway near the Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hershberger, Darla Anne

    1993-01-01

    The Aransas National Wildlife Refuge has been experiencing extensive erosion along the bank of the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. A project was initiated to study the wave conditions in the channel in order to evaluate the respective energies...

  6. Preliminary Report on the Feeding Habits of Tunas in the Gulf of Guinea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and 72 skipjack tuna ( Katsuwonus pelamis ), captured in the Gulf of Guinea, contained mostly fishes ( Katsuwonus pelamis) are shown in figure 1. During the surveys, 171 yellowfin and 72 skipjack tunas were

  7. Risk assessment and evaluation of the conductor setting depth in shallow water, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Yong B.

    2006-08-16

    Factors related to operations of a well that impact drilling uncertainties in the shallow water region of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) can be directly linked to the site specific issues; such as water depth and local geological ...

  8. Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ exchanger-2 in the gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grosell, Martin

    Esophageal desalination is mediated by Na+ , H+ exchanger-2 in the gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta Intestinal water transport Osmoregulation Chloride Esophageal desalination is a crucial step (-subunit), suggesting that esophageal desalination is less flexible in response to osmotic stress than

  9. The entrainment and homogenization of tracers within the cyclonic gulf stream recirculation gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickart, Robert S

    1987-01-01

    The various distributions of tracer associated with the Northern Recirculation Gyre of the Gulf Stream (NRG) are studied to try to obtain information about the flow. An advective-diffusive numerical model is implemented ...

  10. Prey consumption and energy transfer by marine birds in the Gulf of Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, GL; Drew, GS; Jahncke, J; Piatt, JF

    2005-01-01

    Prey consumption and energy transfer by marine birds in thebut they do remove energy from the marine system throughTo determine energy demand by marine birds in the Gulf of

  11. Late Holocene hurricane activity and climate variability in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lane, Daniel Philip

    2011-01-01

    Hurricane activity in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico and its relationship to regional and large-scale climate variability during the Late Holocene is explored. A 4500-year record of hurricane-induced storm surges is ...

  12. Characterization of Sea Turtle Nesting on the Upper Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Christi Lynn

    2014-05-06

    extensive unconstrained dune ecosystems stabilized by native coastal vegetation (McAtee & Drawe 1981, Márquez 1994). As such, data regarding the short- and long-term ramifications of common habitat alterations currently inflicted upon increasingly... by Texas General Land Office Coastal Management Program grants, Houston lawyer Joe Jamail (a private donor instrumental in facilitating the 2009 patrols), and SEATURTLE.ORG. The deployment of beachfront sea turtle signage was funded by HEART (Help...

  13. An investigation of extratropical cyclogenesis in the Gulf of Mexico using geosynchronous satellite information 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heckman, Brian Eugene

    1978-01-01

    AN INVESTIGATION OF EXTRATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN 'IHE GULF OF MEXICO USlNG GEOSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE INFORJ'JATION A Thesis by BRIAN EUGENF. HECKMAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AAJ! University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the u . gree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1978 Major Subject: FJeteorology AN INVESTIGATION OF EXTHATROPICAL CYCLOGENESIS IN TYE GULF OF NEXICO USING GEOSYNCNRONOUS SATELLITE INFORMATION A Thesis by BRIAIS EUGENE HECKNAN Approved...

  14. The feeding biomechanics of juvenile red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) from the northwestern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case, Janelle Elaine

    2009-05-15

    BIOMECHANICS OF JUVENILE RED SNAPPER (LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS) FROM THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by JANELLE ELAINE CASE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2007 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences THE FEEDING BIOMECHANICS OF JUVENILE RED SNAPPER (LUTJANUS CAMPECHANUS) FROM THE NORTHWESTERN GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis...

  15. Technical aspects associated with the disposal of domestic sludge into the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baskin, Charles Henry

    1979-01-01

    TECHNICAL ASPECTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISPOSAL OF DOMESTIC SLUDGE INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis CHARLES HENRY BASKIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering TECHNICAL ASPECTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DISPOSAL OF DOMESTIC SLUDGE INTO THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by CHARLES HENRY BASKIN Approved as to style and content by: ( irman of Commit ee...

  16. Energy balance of the atmosphere over the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiss, Nathan Morris

    1970-01-01

    on the right side of (21), m y be neglected. Thus, (21) becomes dH V 'j7- qV3 ( ? + gz + c T) - ~V3 ' F dt 2 (22) Integrating (22) over a volume, of, , which extends vertically from he sea surface to the top of the atmosphere, we obtain s dII V C = Vg p... A, such as that of the Gulf of Mexico, yields 1 ?1 Q((w) 7. (~V) dA + ? ? dA = O A Qz (3) The first term of (3) may be transformed into a line integral th. ough use of Gzeen's theorem in the plane, as given by Kreyszig (1967). Thc second Cern...

  17. Deepwater production drives design of new Gulf gas plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, R.A. [Amoco Corp., Houston, TX (United States); Petty, L.; Elliot, D.; Chen, R. [International Process Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1998-03-16

    Exploration and production success in deepwater, eastern Gulf of Mexico has created the need for additional gas-transmission and processing infrastructure. The Destin pipeline and the Pascagoula gas-processing plant are being built to serve this need. The Destin pipeline originates at a junction platform at Main Pass 260 and, after coming ashore near Pascagoula, Miss., will connect with five interstate gas-transmission pipelines, by-passing gas-transportation bottlenecks in Louisiana and Alabama. The Pascagoula plant will be built near the point the pipeline comes ashore and immediately before the first compressor station. The paper discusses handling condensate, design goals, achieving objectives, low life-cycle cost, and project schedule.

  18. Intern experience at Gulf States Utility Company: an internship report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laub, Thomas William, 1958-

    2013-03-13

    -chairman Student?s Advisory Committee Dr. D.A. Dubofsky, F; Committee Member / 2 L(/ J.E.Mr/J.E Booker, GSU Internship Supervisor Dr\\ L.s. Fletcher, Asso. Dean College of Engineering ABSTRACT Internship Experience at Gulf States Utilities Company (May 1985... cd ?H rH ?H ? ? CQ 0 ? ? cd -P ? 3 Q Q 0 ?H h0 0 T3 -P Q w P I ? ? O ? ? cd S ? 0 O M S -P -p ?P 0 > 0 0 0 ?p rH ?H TJ TJ T3 rH rH rH T3 M 0 ?P cd cd cd rH i?1 rH 0 S3 O rH rH rH 0 0 0 - 0...

  19. Recent ooids from Mesopotamian shallow shelf, northwest Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aqrawi, A.A.M.; Sadooni, F.N.

    1987-05-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical analyses of available oolitic samples from Khor Abdulla and Khor Al-Umaya, Mesopotamian shallow shelf of the northwest Arabian Gulf, showed that the ooids exhibit extensive variations in their forms according to their nuclei shapes. The ooids cortices are usually of radial structure and are formed mainly of high magnesium calcite. The sediment distribution of the studied area revealed the existence of an oolitic zone extending NW-SE from east of Bubiyan Island toward the open sea. It is believed that these ooids are usually formed in sheltered environments by direct precipitation of high magnesium-calcite around any available nuclei. Then they are concentrated by agitation on small shoal-margins located to the east of Bubiyan Island. At these shoals they attained their final shapes and then dispersed through the studied area. It is thought that these ooids represent a peculiar example of ooid formation in quiet shallow-water environments.

  20. Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone avian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockwell, Robert F.

    Rapid environmental degradation in a subarctic ecosystem influences resource use of a keystone). Keystone herbivores in Arctic ecosystems are especially susceptible to the effects of environmental change

  1. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  2. Harnessing the Power of a Western Boundary Current: Kuroshio off the1 Eastern Coast of Taiwan and Gulf Stream in the Straits of Florida1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    boundary currents (WBC's) can potentially be harnessed10 to produce clean and sustainable energy. However, the engineering requirements and costs for placing an25 offshore barrier can be expected to be enormous, however this power depend on various oceanographic43 environmental parameters? Could harnessing the Kuroshio energy

  3. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  4. Measuring the Measure: A Multi-dimensional Scale Model to Measure Community Disaster Resilience in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayunga, Joseph S.

    2010-07-14

    .2 suggests that the trends for hurricane related deaths has been consistent with the empirical observation that, because of improved forecasting and warning systems, deaths have been decreasing over the past decades. However, in 2004 and 2005 the trend...................................................................................... 191 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION 1.1. Background Coastal areas in the United States and throughout the world are increasingly becoming more vulnerable to a wide range of natural hazards including hurricanes, tropical storms, tsunamis...

  5. Energy loss of coasting gold ions and deuterons in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Butler, J.J.; FischW; Harvey, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-06-23

    The total energy loss of coasting gold ion beams was measured at RHIC at two energies, corresponding to a gamma of 75.2 and 107.4. We describe the experiment and observations and compare the measured total energy loss with expectations from ionization losses at the residual gas, the energy loss due to impedance and synchrotron radiation. We find that the measured energy losses are below what is expected from free space synchrotron radiation. We believe that this shows evidence for suppression of synchrotron radiation which is cut off at long wavelength by the presence of the conducting beam pipe.

  6. West Coast Port Closure Enforcement Policy | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About1996HowFOAShowingFuelWeatherize » Air SealingDepartmentWest Coast Port

  7. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

  8. Hindcasts of potential harmful algal bloom transport pathways on the Pacific Northwest coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-01

    Onshore Upwelling Offshore e Year day 2005 Figure 1. Modeldriving southward and offshore near-surface currents oversouth of the river mouth offshore of the Oregon (OR) coast [

  9. Speaking of Places - Disappearing Act: Front-Yard Bricolage along the Pacific Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    their home in Chinook, Washington. Sommer / Disappearing Actalong the Paci?c Coast Robert Sommer For several decades Ibeen used to describe Sommer / Disappearing Act Speaking of

  10. Jumpstarting commercial-scale CO2 capture and storage with ethylene production and enhanced oil recovery in the US Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Levine, Jonathan S.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Carey, J. William; Stauffer, Philip H.

    2015-04-27

    CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technology has yet to be widely deployed at a commercial scale despite multiple high-profile demonstration projects. We suggest that developing a large-scale, visible, and financially viable CCUS network could potentially overcome many barriers to deployment and jumpstart commercial-scale CCUS. To date, substantial effort has focused on technology development to reduce the costs of CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. Here, we propose that near-term investment could focus on implementing CO2 capture on facilities that produce high-value chemicals/products. These facilities can absorb the expected impact of the marginal increase in the cost of production on the price of their product, due to the addition of CO2 capture, more than coal-fired power plants. A financially viable demonstration of a large-scale CCUS network requires offsetting the costs of CO2 capture by using the CO2 as an input to the production of market-viable products. As a result, we demonstrate this alternative development path with the example of an integrated CCUS system where CO2 is captured from ethylene producers and used for enhanced oil recovery in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  11. OPINION PAPER A community-based framework for aquatic ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhonditsis, George B.

    Nielsen · Erik Jeppesen · J. Alex Elliott · Vardit Makler-Pick · Thomas Petzoldt · Karsten Rinke · Mogens. Jeppesen SINO-DANISH Research Centre, Beijing, China J. A. Elliott Algal Modelling Unit, Lake Ecosystem

  12. heavy-snowfall area. The annual NEP (net ecosystem productiv-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heavy-snowfall area. The annual NEP (net ecosystem productiv- ity) observed by eddy covariance and the duration of the growing season were important factors with regards to annual NEP. Additional detailed

  13. Evapotranspiration models compared on a Sierra Nevada forest ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    ranged from simple temperature and solar radiation-driven equations to physically-based combination that measure carbon, water, and energy fluxes into and out of the ecosystems. The evapotranspiration models

  14. Stakeholder value network analysis for the mobile services ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvind, A. S. (Amarnath Sury)

    2009-01-01

    The mobile services ecosystem has evolved and continues to evolve at a rapid pace adjusting to the different players competing to be part of the value creation and capture. This thesis attempts to capture a holistic view ...

  15. Knowledge Management Capabilities of Lead Firms in Innovation Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velu, Chander

    2015-01-01

    , and the symbiotic nature of relationships between the firm and its external stakeholders (Moore 2006) and the firm as resource integrator (Vargo and Lusch 2004). Firms such as Apple and Facebook have offered recent potent examples of innovation ecosystem...

  16. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  17. Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.E. Law; D. Turner; M. Goeckede

    2010-06-01

    GOAL: To develop and apply an approach to quantify and understand the regional carbon balance of the west coast states for the North American Carbon Program. OBJECTIVE: As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance. APPROACH: In performing the regional analysis, the research plan for the bottom-up approach uses a nested hierarchy of observations that include AmeriFlux data (i.e., net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from eddy covariance and associated biometric data), intermediate intensity inventories from an extended plot array partially developed from the PI's previous research, Forest Service FIA and CVS inventory data, time since disturbance, disturbance type, and cover type from Landsat developed in this study, and productivity estimates from MODIS algorithms. The BIOME-BGC model is used to integrate information from these sources and quantify C balance across the region. The inverse modeling approach assimilates flux data from AmeriFlux sites, high precision CO2 concentration data from AmeriFlux towers and four new calibrated CO2 sites, reanalysis meteorology and various remote sensing products to generate statewide estimates of biosphere carbon exchange from the atmospheric point of view.

  18. Sociological adaptation among bacterial populations in an activated sludge ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Robert George

    1970-01-01

    SOCIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AMONG BACTERIAL POPULATIONS IN AN ACT1VATED SLUDGE ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by Robert George Forrest Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARK University in partial flilfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE January, 1970 Major Subject& Microbiology SOCIOLOGICAL ADAPTATION AMONG BACTERIAL POPULkTIONS IN AN ACTIVATE) SLUDGE ECOSYSTEM A Thesis by Robert George Forrest Approved as to style and content by& (Co-Chairman of Committee) (Co...

  19. Research Priorities forTropical Ecosystems Under Climate ChangeWorkshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    ecosystems in Earth system models (ESMs) and that demand immediate field investigations. The results

  20. Satellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries E. Chassot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of information for ecosystem modelling, a key tool for implementing an ecosystem approach to fisheries managementSatellite remote sensing for an ecosystem approach to fisheries management E. Chassot1 *, S and it is a promising tool for conservation issues. In the context of an ecosystem approach to fisheries management

  1. Humpback and Fin Whaling in the Gulf of Maine from 1800 to 1918 RANDALL R. REEVES, TIM D. SMITH, ROBERT L. WEBB, JOOKE ROBBINS, and PHILLIP J. CLAPHAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humpback and Fin Whaling in the Gulf of Maine from 1800 to 1918 RANDALL R. REEVES, TIM D. SMITH, ROBERT L. WEBB, JOOKE ROBBINS, and PHILLIP J. CLAPHAM Introduction The Gulf of Maine is an oceanic body is with the Center for Coastal Studies, Provincetown, MA 02657. ABSTRACT--The history of whaling in the Gulf of Maine

  2. PLANT ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE ON BARRIER ISLAND `PIMPLE' DUNES AT THE VIRGINIA COAST RESERVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    PLANT ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE ON BARRIER ISLAND `PIMPLE' DUNES AT THE VIRGINIA COAST RESERVE LONG ASSEMBLAGE STRUCTURE ON BARRIER ISLAND `PIMPLE' DUNES AT THE VIRGINIA COAST RESERVE LONG-TERM ECOLOGICAL', small, rounded dunes forming along main dune ridges of the barrier islands. There are distinct plant

  3. What Was the Role of Fire in Coast Redwood Forests?1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    What Was the Role of Fire in Coast Redwood Forests?1 Peter M. Brown2 Fire has long been recognized and that effects on forest composition and structure varied depending primarily on fire severity (for example, episodic surface fires were a dominant fire regime in many coast redwood forests, and that loss of surface

  4. Tsunami Damage Detection at the Northwest Coast of Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Tsunami Damage Detection at the Northwest Coast of Sumatra after the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami Mayagüez, Puerto Rico 00681 sully.lebron@upr.edu ABSTRACT. - The 2004 Indian Tsunami caused devastation of this research is to detect the effects of the tsunami in the northwest coast area of Sumatra, Indonesia. Landsat

  5. Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saleska, Scott

    Radon fluxes in tropical forest ecosystems of Brazilian Amazonia: night-time CO2 net ecosystem exchange derived from radon and eddy covariance methods C H R I S T O P H E R S . M A R T E N S *, T H O M 97119.900, Brazil Abstract Radon-222 (Rn-222) is used as a transport tracer of forest canopy

  6. Geography 5: People and the Earth's Ecosystems TR 2:00 to 3:15 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Oceans & Coasts Temperate and Tropical Coasts Coral Reefs Kelp Beds Read: Chapter 10, 11 Week 7: People, endangered species and habitats in Los Angeles, California, and the World. Course Readings The following text

  7. Geography 5: People and the Earth's Ecosystems TR 2:00 to 3:15 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Chapter 6 Week 6: People and Water, Oceans & Coasts Temperate and Tropical Coasts Coral Reefs Kelp Beds, endangered species and habitats in Los Angeles, California, and the World. Course Readings The following text

  8. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M. . Goddard Inst. for Space Studies); White, T.W. ); Daniels, R.C. )

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude [times] 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  9. A coastal hazards data base for the US East Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.; Daniels, R.C.

    1992-08-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) and non-GIS data bases to assess the risk of coastlines to erosion or sea level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US East Coast into 0.250 latitude {times} 0.250 longitude grid cells. Each coastal grid cell contains data on geology, geomorpholog,elevation, wave heights, tidal ranges, shoreline displacement (erosion), and sea-level trends. These data are available as a Numeric Data Package (NDP), from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, consisting of this document and a set of computerized data files. The documentation contains information on the methods used in calculating each variable, detailed descriptions of file contents and formats, and a discussion of the sources, restrictions, and limitations of the data. The data files are available on magnetic tape, on floppy diskettes, or through INTERNET.

  10. Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Myer

    2005-09-29

    Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

  11. A synthetic example of anisotropic P-wave processing for a model from the Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsvankin, Ilya

    A synthetic example of anisotropic P-wave processing for a model from the Gulf of Mexico Baoniu Han, typical for the Gulf of Mexico, has a moderate structural complexity and includes a salt body elastic properties of shale formations and thin-bed sedimentary sequences (Thomsen, 1986; Sayers, 1994

  12. Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat-ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Seismic technology will be of key importance for evaluat- ing gas-hydrate resources, particularly across the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) where many seismic surveys have been acquired and will continue to be acquired. To apply seismic technology to gas-hydrate studies in the gulf in an optimal manner

  13. Many people and organizations are working together to ensure the Morro Bay ecosystem remains healthy: the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    healthy: the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance (SLOSEA), the Morro Bay National Estuary were developed by members of the San Luis Obispo Science and Ecosystem Alliance, the Morro Bay National

  14. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  15. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Fort Bragg/Noyo Harbor Fishing Community Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    30 p. PSMFC. 2000. 1999 Marine Fuel Price Summary. FisheriesWest Coast and Alaska Marine Fuel Prices 2005–2007 Economics annual West Coast Marine Fuel Price Survey, average pretax

  16. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  17. Economic Trade-Offs between Carbon Offset and Timber Opportunities in British Columbia's Central Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; ecosystem-based management (EBM); CBM-CFS3 #12;v Dedication To my parents and my sisters whose unending.......................................................................................................................... iv Dedication.........................................................

  18. A post-glacial sea level hinge on the central Pacific coast of Canada Duncan McLaren a, b, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keywords: Isostatic Eustatic Sea level change Northeast Pacific Rim Central Pacific coast of CanadaA post-glacial sea level hinge on the central Pacific coast of Canada Duncan McLaren a, b dynamics during the last 15,000 calendar years are highly variable along the Pacific coast of Canada

  19. Aspects of the life history of the sand seatrout, Cynoscion arenarius in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlossman, Philip Aaron

    1980-01-01

    ? Length, and Standard Length - Total Length Relationships. . 60 Summary . . 62 Literature Cited. . . 65 Vita. 75 LIST OF TABLES Table 1 Growth data for C. ter~ from the Gulf off Page Freeport, Tex. 2 Growth data for C, M~ from the Gulf off... of C. ah~ were last captured off Freeport and Port Aransas, Texas. , 55 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page 1 Locations of sampling areas 2 Length frequencies (moving averages of three) of immature and female C. rUtencVuub in maturity stages one through...

  20. Abundance and distribution of the western Gulf stone crab (Menippe adina) in Galveston Bay, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boslet, Jane Murray

    1989-01-01

    I BUNDANCE AND DI STRISUT . ON OF THE WESTERN GULF STOiuE CRAB LilFNIL'PC l', Diijil) IN GALVESTON BAY TEXAS Thesis JALXE iiURRAY HOSLET SuL&mitted to th= Office of Graduate Studies of Texa Aai1 University in :. a- Dial fulfullment... of the requirements for the deqree of MAS'I ~ R OI" SCIENCE May 19B9 Major subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences ABUNDANCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE WESTERN GULF STONE CRAB (NENIPPE ADINA) IN GALVESTON BAY, TEXAS A Thesis by JANE MURRAY BOSLET Approved...

  1. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  2. TABLE19.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PAD Dist. PAD Dist. Commodity IV V Texas La. Texas Gulf Gulf N. La., New U.S. Inland Coast Coast Ark. Mexico Total Rocky Mt. West Coast Total Energy Information Administration...

  3. TABLE17.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Texas Gulf Gulf N. La., New U.S. Inland Coast Coast Ark. Mexico Total Rocky Mt. West Coast Total Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2 a...

  4. TABLE15.CHP:Corel VENTURA

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    PAD Dist. PAD Dist. Commodity IV V Texas La. Texas Gulf Gulf N. La., New U.S. Inland Coast Coast Ark. Mexico Total Rocky Mt. West Coast Total January 1998 Natural Gas Liquids...

  5. Ecosystems: Issues and problems. (Latest citations from the ABI/Inform database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning issues and problems relating to ecosystems in different parts of the world. Preservation of resources, environmental protection, industrial impacts on ecosystems, ecological economics, biodiversity of specific ecosystems, and effects of deforestation and erosion are examined. Citations review impacts of human inhabitants, eco-tourism, and alien species on an ecosystem. The relationship to an ecosystem of pests and microbial infections is covered, and long-range planning for ecosystems is cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Energy assessment of Ivory Coast, Morocco, Nigeria, and Senegal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghirardi, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goering, P.

    1986-11-01

    This report is an overview of the energy market in four West African countries: The Ivory Coast, Morocco, Nigeria, and Senegal. We feel these countries are representative of the West African region. Together they account for 75% of the total energy use in West Africa, 78% of GDP, and 76% of population. The purpose of the study is to analyze the evolution of energy demand in the context of the general socio-economic background of the region. The study also examines energy supply and trade related to the energy sector. The analysis focuses on the study of commercial fuels. Although we have reviewed studies of wood, solar, wind, and agricultural residues, we leave out detailed discussions of these non-commercial energy forms. The first part of the report is an assessment of the trends in energy demand in the four study countries. We discuss the main factors driving energy demand sector by sector. This is followed by a review of the primary energy resources of the countries, and of the capacity for production of secondary fuels. The last section looks at energy trade, with particular emphasis on the role of the United States.

  7. Navigating Fragmented Ocean Law in the California Current: Tools to Identify and Measure Gaps and Overlaps for Ecosystem-Based Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekstrom, Julia A.

    2008-01-01

    combines ecosystem ecology with information retrievalboundaries of ecosystems based on whatever information isto analyze the information. EAM – see Ecosystem Approach to

  8. Volume Rendering with Animation of Gulf Stream Currents David Ehrens Ramprasad Balasubramanian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, Jürgen P.

    Volume Rendering with Animation of Gulf Stream Currents David Ehrens Ramprasad Balasubramanian data is required. High or low density objects, corresponding to heat-laden currents, can be en- hanced. Introduction Understanding the ocean through computer models is im- portant and numerous models exist. Several

  9. ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF INCREASING COSTS IN THE GULF SHRIMP FLEETI,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of construction, length ofkeel, and index ofeffort. In 1973, class II vessels were the only vessels ableECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS OF INCREASING COSTS IN THE GULF SHRIMP FLEETI,2 WADE L. GRi flow for 1974. Increasing input cost another 10% above the 1974 level, and assuming normal production

  10. SEASONALITY OF FISHES OCCUPYING A SURF ZONE HABITAT IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND STEPHEN T. ROSS2 ABSTRACf The ichthyofauna occupying the surfzone habitat ofHom Island, Mississippi tides), increased metabolic efficiency via heat acquisition, and protection from predation. Surf zone occurrences within the surf zone of Horn Island, Miss., a barrier island in the northern Gulf of Mexico

  11. Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Depths, migration rates and environmental associations of acoustic scattering layers in the Gulf-surface layer with mean daytime bottom depth of 43740 m (night: 61738 m), and a main migrating layer with mean bottom depth of 333776 m (night: 54727 m). Diel vertical migration rates for dusk ascents reached

  12. Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wait, D. Alexander

    Small island biogeography in the Gulf of California: lizards, the subsidized island biogeography the subsidized island biogeography (SIB) hypothesis, which predicts that spatial subsidies may cause insular. Methods To evaluate the SIB hypothesis, we first identified subsidized and unsubsidized islands based

  13. High-amplitude reflection packets (HARPs) of the Mississippi Fan, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis, Jason Michael

    2000-01-01

    Examination of seismic data from the deep-water Gulf of Mexico reveals the presence of High-Amplitude Reflection Packets (HARPs). An analog study conducted by the Ocean Drilling Program Leg 155 identified and described Amazon Fan HARPs as a stacked...

  14. innovate educate improve lives Large areas of land along the Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be installed with lighter equipment which has less environmental impact. Wood offers excellent work- abilityinnovate educate improve lives Large areas of land along the Gulf of Mexico have been flooded the impact of a wide array of insects, wood decay and rot. The most serious pest in this area is the Formosan

  15. Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rooker, Jay R.

    Distribution and Habitat Associations of Billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features additive models (GAMs). Mesoscale features in the NGoM affected the distribution and abundance of billfish and Swordfish Larvae across Mesoscale Features in the Gulf of Mexico. PLoS ONE 7(4): e34180. doi:10.1371/journal

  16. Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    Gulf oil spill's ripples still a worry Warranted or not, disaster fears loom BY JIM WAYMER from the nation's worst-ever oil mess. Oceanographers want to know the paths of underwater oil plumes. Biologists wonder if nesting sea turtles that accidentally gulped oil will lay viable eggs or whether eggs

  17. Oil Spill Detection and Mapping Along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline Based on Imaging Spectrometer Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Meryem Damla

    2013-11-27

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico between April and July 2010 demonstrated the importance of synoptic oil-spill monitoring in coastal environments via remote-sensing methods. This study focuses on terrestrial oil-spill detection...

  18. Observing the cycle of convection and restratification over the Gulf Stream system and the subtropical gyre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    compound spar, which drifted within the southern side of the Gulf Stream. CTD stations were used together of its mooring in February 2007. (Right) The ASIS spar as it appeared after its deployment in February mooring, was recovered near 39N, 60W. In the foreground, the Air Sea Interaction Spar (ASIS) can also

  19. The January 2010 Efpalio earthquake sequence in the western Corinth Gulf (Greece) E. Sokos a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    The January 2010 Efpalio earthquake sequence in the western Corinth Gulf (Greece) E. Sokos a, , J. Serpetsidaki a , G.-A. Tselentis a a University of Patras, Seismological Laboratory, Greece b Charles of Thessaloniki, Department of Geophysics, Greece d Czech Technical University, Faculty of Civil Engineering

  20. STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    STRUCTURE OF A CARBONATE/HYDRATE MOUND IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO T. McGee1* , J. R. Woolsey1 and hydrate outcrops imply that the faults act as migration conduits for hydrocarbons from a deep, hot the mound. Keywords: carbonate/hydrate mound, seismic structures, gas migration, seafloor observatory

  1. Impacts of Vessel Noise Perturbations on the Resident Sperm Whale Population in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azzara, Alyson

    2012-07-16

    The Gulf of Mexico is home to two of the world?s ten busiest ports by cargo volume, the Port of New Orleans and the Port of Houston; and in 2008, these ports hosted a combined 14,000 ships, a number which is likely only to increase. Past research...

  2. Gulf CHMA Update Jan 2013, Cycle 24 Phil Stansly and Moneen Jones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    combined totaled 4,327 MB with 265 n/a for 6% not surveyed. The 24th cycle of the statewide surveyGulf CHMA Update ­ Jan 2013, Cycle 24 Phil Stansly and Moneen Jones As of the 24nd cycle, the total showing a slight decrease from the last cycle. The other Counties have remained flat most likely

  3. A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elston, Kristen Eileen

    2007-04-25

    Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

  4. Sex Recognition via Chemical Cues in the Sex-Role-Reversed Gulf Pipefish (Syngnathus scovelli)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Adam

    Sex Recognition via Chemical Cues in the Sex-Role-Reversed Gulf Pipefish (Syngnathus scovelli to elicit receiver responses (Rowe 1999; Partan & Marler 2005; Chenoweth & Blows 2006). Sex experience stronger sexual selection, except that the constraints on the sexes differ in sex

  5. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  6. TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN NORTHEASTERN PACIFIC OCEAN AND THE GULF OF MEXICO AND NORTHWESTERN ATLANTIC-scale interactions in the tropical Pacific Ocean, especially, processes associated with the EI Nino phenomena. He has of ocean temperatures. He suggests that an anomalously high heat supply in the equatorial Pacific

  7. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Emissions 7.3 Impacts of LNG on Air Quality 8. References 9.El Paso at Blythe. Chapter 3: Air Quality Impact AssessmentRespect to the South Coast Air Quality Management District

  8. Salmon fishing boats of the North American Pacific Coast in the era of oar and sail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Charles David

    1993-01-01

    for small craft identification by archaeologists working on the Pacific Coast. The information gained from studying various salmon fishing boats and their distribution reflects changing hull shape due to local sea conditions, competition amid diminishing...

  9. The U.S. Coast Guard sector construct : A study of organizational culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Catherine W

    2006-01-01

    The U. S. Coast Guard has recently merged the operational forces responsible for maritime security in port and coastal zones into a new organization called the Sector construct. This thesis examines the cultural issues ...

  10. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends: Regional Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    W. L. 1954. California Fishing Ports Fish Bulletin 96,marine/status/ca_comm_fishing_gear.pdf (accessed 7/30/10)California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical

  11. California’s North Coast Fishing Communities Historical Perspective and Recent Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomeroy, Caroline; Thomson, Cynthia J.; Stevens, Melissa M.

    2011-01-01

    PSMFC. 2000. 1999 Marine Fuel Price Summary. FisheriesWest Coast and Alaska Marine Fuel Prices 2005-2007 Economic4 p. PSMFC. 2000. 1999 Marine Fuel Price Summary. Fisheries

  12. Southern/Northern California Coastal Processes Annotated Bibliography: Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, Planning Division, Coastal Resources Branch

    1987-01-01

    tsunami and slope stability studies at the site for the San Onofre Nucleartsunamis California, South Coast Region, Subregion VIII, Subregion IX San Onofre Nucleartsunamis, coastal structures, wave climate California, San Diego Region, Subregion X, Oceanside Cell San Onofre Nuclear

  13. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc

    2012-01-01

    4: Modeling Emissions from Natural Gas-Related Sources 4.1Penetration of Liquefied Natural Gas Table ES2: Impacts ontypical summer demand of natural gas in the South Coast Air

  14. U.S. Coast Guard, Kodiak Island, Alaska | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Coast Guard, Kodiak Island, Alaska October 7, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis Photo of new boiler at Kodiak Island facility The first delivery order included upgrades to the steam...

  15. Characterization of Section 404 Permit Mitigation Plans, Coastal Margin and Associated Watersheds, Upper Texas Coast 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conkey, April A.

    2010-01-14

    A predicted loss of agricultural rice-wetlands and increasing urbanization and development threatens the remaining freshwater wetlands along the upper Texas coast. To avoid, minimize, and mitigate wetland loss, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers...

  16. Using dynamical downscaling to simulate rainfall for East Coast Low events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    adjacent to the Tasman Sea that develop from a variety of synoptic and mesoscale systems (Speer et al. 2009 common synoptic situations on the Australian east coast (Speer et al., 2009) accounting for ~85

  17. Fuel Cell Demonstration at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Mark A.; Chvala, William D.; Herrera, Shawn

    2005-07-30

    Journal article reporting on the 250-kW fuel cell combined heat and power plant located at the U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Cape Code in Bourne, Massachusetts.

  18. A synoptic climatology of the near-surface wind along the west coast of South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahn, David A.; Garreaud, René D.

    2013-05-20

    Prevailing wind along the west coast of South America is equatorward, driven by the southeast Pacific anticyclone. The wind induces strong coastal upwelling that supports one of the most important fisheries in the world. This region lacks a dense...

  19. Aircraft Observations of a Coastally Trapped Wind Reversal off the California Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parish, Thomas R.; Rahn, David A.; Leon, David

    2008-02-01

    The summertime marine atmospheric boundary layer off the California coast is normally characterized by northerly winds associated with the Pacific high. This pattern is occasionally disturbed by episodes of southerly winds and a finger of fog or low...

  20. Abstract--The U.S. East Coast pe-lagic longline fishery has a history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and 2004 Lance P. Garrison Email address: Lance.Garrison@noaa.gov National Marine Fisheries Service, 1997), and longline fish- eries (e.g., Garrison, 2005; Kock et al., 2006). The U.S. East Coast pelagic

  1. Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavity-nesting Bird Use of Nest Boxes in Vineyards of Central-Coast California1 Daniel P. Mummert,2, Robertson and Rendell 1990), lower predation rates (Nilsson 1984, Purcell and others 1997, Robertson

  2. Triangulating Archaeological Landscapes: The US Coast Survey in California, 1850–1895

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byram, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    compounds associated with shipyards, tanner- ies, dairies,houses. Mare Island Naval Shipyard (T-sheet no. 564, 1856)location for this West Coast shipyard in 1850 (T-sheet no.

  3. Using Conceptual Models in Ecosystem Restoration Decision Making: An Example from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    opment, or information on aspects of the ecosystem notfrom other ecosystems. Further information on these criteriainformation from the con- ceptual models into evaluations of worth, risk, reversibility, and opportunity for learning of proposed ecosystem

  4. The Juniper Coast: A Survey of the Medieval Shipwrecks of Novy Svet, Ukraine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertson, John Arthur

    2014-06-19

    THE JUNIPER COAST: A SURVEY OF THE MEDIEVAL SHIPWRECKS OF NOVY SVET, UKRAINE A Thesis by JOHN ARTHUR ALBERTSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... it furnishes to us the history of what was previously unknown…3 ? St. Basil of Caesarea The Bay of Novy Svet, located on the southeast coast of the Crimean peninsula, Ukraine, has proven to be a site of exceptional archaeological value. Since Dr...

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Ecosystem services and hydroelectricity in Central America: modelling service services provided to the Costa Rican and Nicaraguan hydroelectric sectors, which are crucial sectors for the conservation and restoration of forests for the services they provide to the hydroelectric sector. As such

  6. ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vahdat, Amin

    ECOSystem: Managing Energy as a First Class Operating System Resource £ Heng Zeng, Carla S. Ellis design. This paper explores how to support energy as a first-class operating system resource. En- ergy the limited energy resource among competing tasks. 1. INTRODUCTION Traditionally, the operating system plays

  7. Redefinition and global estimation of basal ecosystem respiration rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    at the mean annual 1 College of Global Change and Earth System Science, Beijing Normal University, Beijing Michele all'Adige, Italy. 12 Alterra, Earth System ScienceClimate Change, Wageningen University, is a common and important parameter in empirical models for quantifying ecosystem respiration (ER) globally

  8. INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Nadir

    4010 INTRODUCTION Coastal ecosystems have been exposed to serious pollution for several decades because of increased human activity. Modern agriculture is a major contributor to coastal pollution levels of pollution and potentially harming marine organisms (Banerjee et al., 1996). Some organisms

  9. 2 Valuing ecosystem services Benefits, values, space and time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    ); and global fisheries collapse (Myers and Worm, 2003). These problems are occurring on an unprecedented scale comprehension of the environmental infrastructure upon which human existence and welfare depends (Schroter et al, systematic approaches to measur- ing, modelling and mapping of ecosystem services, governance analysis

  10. Terrestrial Subsidies of Organic Carbon Support Net Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    filled, we monitored net ecosystem production (NEP) on a biweekly basis from 9 April to 27 May 2002. All ponds were consistently net heterotrophic; how- ever, NEP was significantly less negative in re- moval that the difference in NEP between treatments was driven by the change in R. Therefore, it appears that terrestrial

  11. Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    9 Main Ecosystem Characteristics and Distribution of Wetlands in Boreal and Alpine Landscapes influenced while the rest are considered uninfluenced by human impact. Impacts are mainly from machines used or successional shifts to other vegetation types are more evident in such habitats. The main threats

  12. Geography 5: People and Earth's Ecosystems Lecture Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics. 11(So. Cal's flat-tailed horned lizard) 12 Grasslands #12;4 13 Grasslands · Communities Freshwater Ecosystems · Include standing waters of ponds and lakes, and flowing waters of rivers and streams · Vertical stratification is an important aspect of oceans and many ponds/lakes (especially if large and

  13. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  14. Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home / News / People & Ecosystems NEWS RELEASE: Global Alliance Launched to Curb Trade in Illegal forestry lacey act united states The Forest Legality Alliance was launched today to support private sector efforts and policies to reduce trade in illegally harvested wood. The Alliance is a global public

  15. Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Neuse River Basin, North Carolina Ecosystem Restoration Project 5 October 2012 ABSTRACT: The study area encompasses the Neuse River Basin, the third-largest river basin in North Carolina. The Basin, upstream of the city of New Bern, North Carolina. At New Bern the river broadens dramatically and changes

  16. Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Whole Ecosystem Measurements of Biogenic Hydrocarbon Emissions Final Report ARB Award No. 98 the automated in-situ gas chromatograph system for measuring volatile organic compound mixing ratios. Other and Outlook at the Beginning of This Study............... 4 2.0 Field Measurement Site........................................................

  17. Tree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    generation mechanisms. Prior to harvest, K soil- water concentrations were relatively uniform with depthTree Harvest in an Experimental Sand Ecosystem: Plant Effects on Nutrient Dynamics and Solute to determine how trees affect the behavior of these nutrients in soil water, both during growth and after

  18. 1714(1) Winter 2006 Yellowstone Science NY ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    things (plants, animals, etc.)andnon-livingthings (rocks, soil, water, etc.) in a given geographic area at this time. Once photosynthesis converts light energy into biomass, many other organisms, including animals in any of these ecosystems. One of the most important of these exchanged materials is energy. When we

  19. Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie, Heather

    ; however, the contribution of alternative fuel sources to overall energy is still small. In the United are under development in the Northeast, includ- ing Roosevelt Island in New York City's East RiverP A P E R Examining the Impacts of Tidal Energy Capture from an Ecosystem Services Perspective A U

  20. Contrasting Ecosystem-Effects of Morphologically Similar Blake Matthews1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Christian

    ) and shape selection pressures on other organisms (niche construction). Very little is known about how unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source along food chains and the rate of nutrient recycling in the environment [2,8,9]. The ecosystem