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  1. Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

  2. Western Gulf Coast Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of disruptions in the western Gulf Coast petroleum infrastructure operations on the rest of the country, developed a data model of the petrochemical industry in the region to ...

  3. Gulf Powerbeat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Powerbeat Place: Bahrain Product: Bahrain-based Gulf Powerbeat manufactures long life batteries and was acquired by Time Technoplast, through Time's subsidiary NED Energy....

  4. Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf Ethanol Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Ethanol Corp Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77055 Sector: Biomass Product: Focused on developing biomass preprocessing...

  5. Gulf Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Wind Farm Facility Gulf Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Pattern Energy...

  6. Gulf Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf Power Co Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-225-5797 Website: www.gulfpower.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comGulfPowerCompany Outage Hotline: 1-800-487-6937 Outage Map:...

  7. Gulf Petro Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  8. Upper Pleistocene-to-Holocene depositional sequences in the north-central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowland, C. ); Wood, L.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Upper Quaternary depositional sequences and their systems tracts can be delineated in the Main Pass area using minisparker seismic data. Core collected by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Shelf/Slope Research Consortium (Amoco, ARCO, BP, Chevron, Elf-Aquitaine, Exxon, Marathon, Mobil, and Texaco) sampled these systems tracts on one site in Main Pass 303. At the shelfbreak, a distinct change in depositional style occurs across the latest Wisconsinan sequence boundary. Widespread progradational systems (late highstand systems tract) below become focused into discrete depocenters with predominantly aggradational deposits (lowstand systems tract) above. Focusing was probably a result of localized high subsidence rates due to salt movement, progradation into rapidly deepening water, and, possibly, stabilization of sediment transport paths on the exposed shelf. No age-equivalent submarine canyons are present in this area. The oldest mappable systems tract is a highstand systems tract deposited during stage 3 interstadial and the early-to-middle stage 2 glacial. The overlying transgressive systems tract was deposited coeval with the stage 2-stage 1 transition. It thins in a land-ward direction, except where an updip depocenter was present. At the corehole site, the transgressive systems tract consists of fining-upward deposits ranging from medium-grained sands to clays. The transgressive systems tract includes small slope-front-fill lenses deposited on the uppermost slope above and adjacent to lowstand deltaic depocenters. These lenses likely comprise silt and clay derived from either reworking of lowstand deltas or sediment bypassing the outer shelf.

  9. Learning from Gulf Coast Community Leaders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After hearing the stories about the work that leaders from the gulf coast and their organizations have done, it’s clear to me that they are changing the paradigm of gulf coast recovery -- changing the way buildings are developed in the gulf and creating a generation of green builders in New Orleans who work closely with low-income communities.

  10. A Path Forward for the Gulf Coast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our country has made a promise to the people and small businesses of the Gulf Coast to restore their environment, economy and health, and continue a conversation with the fisherman, environmental workers, elected officials, health officials, scientists and Gulf residents on how to restore the Gulf.

  11. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM ...

  12. Gulf Coast Green Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Coast Green Energy Place: Bay City, Texas Zip: 77414 Product: The Texas-based company is the exclusive distributor of...

  13. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry Natural Gas Production ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry ... Natural Gas Dry Production Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  14. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas ... Natural Gas Used for Repressuring Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross ...

  15. Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 ...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate ...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Natural Gas Reserves ...

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated ...

  19. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ...

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves ... Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana ...

  1. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated ...

  2. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas ...

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved ...

  4. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Associated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and AlabamaAssociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated-Dissolved ...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Crude...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease ...

  7. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil Reserves in...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - ... Proved Nonproducing Reserves of Crude Oil Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Proved ...

  9. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab ... for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and ...

  10. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama ...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal ... Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana ...

  12. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ...

  13. Gulf Cooperation Council: search for security in the Persian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kechichian, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    This study purports to analyze the conservative Arab monarchies' search for regional security in the Persian Gulf. It speculates on the GCC's future prospects as a vehicle of cooperation in the field of security. Threats to the member states of the GCC stem from the policies pursued by revolutionary Iran, Israel, the Soviet Union and its proxies, and a regime in Iraq. The proposition is developed that these sources of threat present an overwhelming challenge to the security and stability of GCC states. Second, it examines the capabilities of the GCC member states for coping with threats. Conceived broadly, both military and non-military capabilities are examined. Security relations of the GCC states with external powers as a means of enhancing their abilities to cope more effectively with both internal and external threats are examined. Particular attention is devoted to the domestic consequences of these special relations. Third, it discusses the GCC's reactions to perceived regional threats. These include the Iran-Iraq War, the Arab-Israeli conflict, the Soviet threat, and potential political sources of dissidence in member states. It is argued that although GCC states have adopted a number of joint policies, they did not respond to or initiate action on either the Iranian Revolution, the Palestine conflict, the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan, the Gulf war or the recent Israeli invasion of Lebanon.

  14. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  15. A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    along its eastern margin. The most promising areas for geothermal development in the NW Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift system are locations along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez...

  16. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  17. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per...

  18. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 PDF icon ...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal ... Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry ...

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas ...

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ... as of Dec. 31 Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of ...

  2. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet ...

  3. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas ...

  4. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings July 26, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis By replacing T-12 lights with ...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet - Energy Information Administration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet Overview Data Petroleum and Other Liquids Crude Oil, Condensate and NGL Proved Reserves Natural Gas Natural Gas Proved Reserves Refinery Capacity Natural Gas Processing Plants The Gulf of Mexico area, both onshore and offshore, is one of the most important regions for energy resources and infrastructure. Gulf of Mexico federal offshore oil production accounts for 17% of total U.S. crude oil production and federal offshore natural gas production in the Gulf accounts for

  6. Niugini Gulf tackles New Guinea Wildcat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, S.D.

    1983-08-01

    Niugini Gulfs Juha No. 1 well in the Southern Highlands of Papua New Guinea exemplifies the challenges of drilling a remote location wildcat. Although the future for oil developments in New Guinea is still in question, the tremendous technological and logistic planning for a remote wildcat should not be overlooked. The ability of Niugini Gulfs engineers and management team to drill and operate a well like Juha No. 1 within budget is in itself a significant achievement. Located in the approximate center of this Southeast Asian country, the Juha well is surrounded by dense jungle and is virtually inaccessible by surface transportation. As a result, Niugini Gulf had to move rig, equipment, and manpower to the well site entirely by helicopter.

  7. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillingham, Gavin

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  8. Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8,515 8,460 8,445 8,597 8,548 8,488 1983-2016 Lower 48 8,033 8,033 8,020 8,120 8,065 8,015 2003-2016 Alaska 482 427 425 477 483 473 2003

    Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf January - December 2015 | Release Date: February 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: September 2016 2015 Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Highlights It should be noted that several factors influence the source of a company's crude oil imports. For example, a company like Motiva, which is partly owned by Saudi Refining Inc.,

  9. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  10. DOE_Gulf_Response.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GulfResponse.pdf DOEGulfResponse.pdf (98.71 KB) More Documents & Publications DeepwaterResponse.pdf UDAC Meeting - September 2012 April 30, 2010 Situation Report

  11. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  12. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06302009"...

  13. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  14. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014...

  15. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  16. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  17. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981" ,"Release...

  18. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981"...

  19. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

  20. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  1. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOPRESSURED...

  2. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross ...

  3. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals ...

  4. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release Date: 06302016 Next Release Date: 07292016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross ...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0...

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels)...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels)...

  9. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than...

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  13. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  14. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent)...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200...

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million...

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent)...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  9. EIA - Gulf of Mexico Energy Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

    Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet

  10. EIA - Gulf of Mexico Energy Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Sandy Overview Map Gasoline Updates Petroleum Terminal Survey Petroleum and Other Liquids Natural Gas Refinery Capacity Natural Gas Processing Plants Release Date: August 7, 2012 Energy Data all tables + EXPAND ALL U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels Facts for 2011 million barrels per day Share of Total U.S. Liquid Fuels Consumed Liquid Fuels Production 10.3 55% U.S. Crude Oil Production 5.7 30% Total U.S. Federal Offshore 1.4 7% Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore 1.3 7% Natural Gas Plant Liquids

  11. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Dry Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 24,689 22,059 18,812 17,007 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Depth Less Than 200 Meters 14,423 12,224 10,433 8,964 8,033 NA 1992-2007 Depth Greater Than 200 Meters 10,266 9,835 8,379 8,043 6,516 NA 1992-2007 Percentage from Depth Greater

  12. 3-D seismology in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Husseini, M.; Chimblo, R.

    1995-08-01

    Since 1977 when Aramco and GSI (Geophysical Services International) pioneered the first 3-D seismic survey in the Arabian Gulf, under the guidance of Aramco`s Chief Geophysicist John Hoke, 3-D seismology has been effectively used to map many complex subsurface geological phenomena. By the mid-1990s extensive 3-D surveys were acquired in Abu Dhabi, Oman, Qatar and Saudi Arabia. Also in the mid-1990`s Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai were preparing to record surveys over their fields. On the structural side 3-D has refined seismic maps, focused faults and fractures systems, as well as outlined the distribution of facies, porosity and fluid saturation. In field development, 3D has not only reduced drilling costs significantly, but has also improved the understanding of fluid behavior in the reservoir. In Oman, Petroleum Development Oman (PDO) has now acquired the first Gulf 4-D seismic survey (time-lapse 3D survey) over the Yibal Field. The 4-D survey will allow PDO to directly monitor water encroachment in the highly-faulted Cretaceous Shu`aiba reservoir. In exploration, 3-D seismology has resolved complex prospects with structural and stratigraphic complications and reduced the risk in the selection of drilling locations. The many case studies from Saudi Arabia, Oman, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates, which are reviewed in this paper, attest to the effectiveness of 3D seismology in exploration and producing, in clastics and carbonates reservoirs, and in the Mesozoic and Paleozoic.

  13. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved

  14. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  15. Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: Name The Gulf of California rift zone is a complex transition zone between the dextral (right-lateral) motion of the San Andreas transform...

  16. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov ...

  17. Entergy Gulf States Louisiana LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    States Louisiana LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Entergy Gulf States Louisiana LLC Place: Louisiana Phone Number: 1-800-368-3749 Website: www.entergy-louisiana.com Twitter:...

  18. Gulf Stream, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gulf Stream is a town in Palm Beach County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 22nd...

  19. Gulf Coast Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Coast Electric Coop, Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-568-3667 Website: www.gcec.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-568-3667...

  20. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SOUTHERN LNG COMPANY - FE DKT. NO. 12-54-LNG - ORDER 3106 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT. NO. ...

  1. Gulf of Mexico -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  2. Gulf County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Gulf County, Florida Port St. Joe, Florida Wewahitchka, Florida Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian Gulf. In addition, a forecast of the required reserve development and associated costs to meet the expected demand through the year 2010 is presented.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

  7. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's...

  8. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  9. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Million...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's...

  10. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Louisiana (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Less...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  13. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 267 266...

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  18. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production (Billion...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

  4. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 1,317,031...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  7. Microsoft Word - Accessing Gulf Resources article.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gulf, plays some key role in 16-18% of the nation's total oil supply and is connected by pipelines to 50% of the country's refining capacity. It is very clear in my mind that the...

  8. Entergy (Louisiana and Gulf States)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential customers of Entergy Louisiana, and Entergy Gulf States Louisiana can participate in energy efficiency programs designed to help offset cost of installing energy efficient equipment and...

  9. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Louisiana, paving the way for thousands of new construction and domestic natural gas production jobs in Louisiana, Texas, and

  10. AAPG-SEPM Gulf of Mexico type-well project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatt, R.M.; Christopher, R.C. ); Katz, B.J. ); Hutchinson, P.J. ); Zucker, S.M. ); Eslinger, E.V. ); Glasmann, J.R.; Billman, H.G.

    1992-12-01

    In 1991, The American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) published a regional stratigraphic cross section and accompanying seismic line that extends from the south flank of the Ouachita tectonic belt in southern Arkansas (lat. 34.15'N) to south of the 28th parallel in the High Island area, South Addition Block of offshore Gulf of Mexico. The cross section shows chronostratigraphic correlations, lithostratigraphy, and generalized structural relations common to the central Gulf Coast and mid-continent region. The section has been published in three large sheets, each representing approximately 425 statue mi of geographic coverage. As an outgrowth of this project, AAPG, jointly with the Society of Sedimentary Geology (SEPM), organized and sponsored a project through their respective Research Committees on biostratigraphic, lithostratigraphic, and organic geochemical analyses of cuttings from key wells tied to the cross section. Separate splits of samples were sent to volunteers for the following analyses: (1) binocular microscope lithology analysis, (2) detailed biostratigraphy, (3) organic geochemistry, and (4) clay mineralogy by x-ray diffraction (XRD).

  11. Tectonic boundaries of the eastern Gulf Coast of North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, C. Jr.; Phillips, R.R. )

    1993-09-01

    Two Precambrian extensional fault episodes, recorded in mapping from central Arkansas across Mississippi, central Alabama, southern Georgia, and into the Atlantic Ocean affected later Pennsylvanian and Triassic tectonics. This interpretation is from magnetic anomaly data and is supported by seismic, gravity, core, and well-log data. The fault system was first suspected from an anomalous magnetic high, representing a feature that affected tectonism during the Ouachita and the Alleghenian orogenies of the eastern Gulf Coast and southeastern United States. The northernmost upthrown block is considered part of an ancient passive continental margin developed during the late Precambrian. The southern downthrown block is deformed by left-lateral transverse faults active during the Ouachita Orogeny. The Ouachita Orogeny may have deformed terrain farther east than the Black Worrior basin. These transverse fault blocks were buttressed by the footwall of the extensional fault system. These left-lateral faults extending from Florida and Georgia into Alabama, Mississippi, and southern Arkansas.

  12. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  13. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Vented and Flared Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas ...

  14. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the ...

  15. Arms and oil: US military strategy and the Persian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaugher, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    In the oil-rich Persian Gulf, a region crucial to the world's security and economic health, the United States confronts major challenges to its military and diplomatic skills. The Iranian revolution, the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, and unpredictable turbulence have contributed to declining US influence in the area. In the United States, military questions about force size and strategy have sparked controversy over the proper US role in the Gulf. In this book Thomas L. McNaugher offers a military strategy for the Gulf that seeks to balance the risks of overinvolvement against the risks of neglect. The author, a research associate in the Brookings Foreign Policy Studies program, believes that the United States must cultivate the traditional security mechanisms of the states on the Arabian Peninsula, and he encourages cooperation with allies like Great Britain and France that historically have been involved in Gulf security. He argues that the United States should focus on protecting the Gulf states from external attack and on deterring further Soviet encroachment in the region, leaving internal security largely to the states themselves. 19 figs., 13 tabs.

  16. Gulf of Mexico pipelines heading into deeper waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1987-06-08

    Pipeline construction for Gulf of Mexico federal waters is following drilling and production operations into deeper waters, according to U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS) records. Review of MMS 5-year data for three water depth categories (0-300 ft, 300-600 ft, and deeper than 600 ft) reveals this trend in Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction. Comparisons are shown between pipeline construction applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed. This article is the first of annual updates of MMS gulf pipeline data. Future installments will track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. These figures will also be evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data.

  17. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 9,793 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Gulf of

  18. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,954 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Egypt

  19. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,820 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG

  20. Geological evaluation of Gulf Coast salt domes: overall assessment of the Gulf Interior Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-10-01

    The three major phases in site characterization and selection are regional studies, area studies, and location studies. This report characterizes regional geologic aspects of the Gulf Coast salt dome basins. It includes general information from published sources on the regional geology; the tectonic, domal, and hydrologic stability; and a brief description the salt domes to be investigated. After a screening exercise, eight domes were chosen for further characterization: Keechi, Oakwood, and Palestine Domes in Texas; Vacherie and Rayburn's domes in North Louisiana; and Cypress Creek and Richton domes in Mississippi. A general description of each, maps of the location, property ownership, and surface geology, and a geologic cross section were presented for each dome.

  1. Proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association spring conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association cogeneration conference held March 23, 1993. The topics of the papers contained in the conference proceedings include planning for additional capacity by electric utilities, fuel selection, fuel supply, competition and market pressures, power transmission and access to power transmission facilities, case studies of successful cogeneration projects.

  2. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  3. A story of revival: United Coal's East Gulf preparation plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-04-15

    Some say beauty is in the eye of the beholder, but when United Coal purchased the assets of White Mountain Mining in late 2005, the attractiveness of the acquired assets did not require much debate. Whilst the Pocahontas Coal reserves included in the acquisition were very desirable for producing coke, the East Gulf preparation plant was in poor condition. In order to minimize cost, maintenance and manpower whilst increasing production, the circuits in the existing plant were modified and the Barvoy Vessel was replaced with a single, pump fed, 30-inch Krebs HM cyclone. A spiral circuit was added as were screen bowl centrifuges. Finally the plant was given a structural upgrade and a new siding was installed. With the East Gulf restoration project complete, the United Coal Co. (UCC) and Pocahontas Coal are now considering expanding the Affinity complex. 2 figs., 6 photos.

  4. Pipelines following exploration in deeper Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1988-07-04

    Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction has been falling of sharply to shallow-water (less than 300 ft) areas, while construction for middle depth (300 - 600 ft) and deepwater (600 + ft) areas as been holding steady. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data compiled by the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS). This article continues a series of updates based on MMS gulf pipeline data (OGJ, June 8, 1987, p. 50). These installments track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. The figures are also evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data published in Oil and Gas Journal's annual Pipeline Economics Reports.

  5. MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Ocean test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  6. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

  7. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wells (Number of Elements) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) Federal Offshore ...

  8. Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 102 1,179,714 4.6 Gulf of Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Dry Production: Table S12. Summary statistics for natural gas - Gulf of Mexico, 2010-2014 Gulf of Mexico - Table S12 Federal Offshore Production trillion cubic feet 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

  9. Biggest oil spill tackled in gulf amid war, soft market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-02-04

    Industry is scrambling to cope with history's biggest oil spill against the backdrop of a Persian Gulf war and a softening oil market. U.S. and Saudi Arabian officials accused Iraq of unleashing an oil spill of about 11 million bbl into the Persian Gulf off Kuwait last week by releasing crude from the giant Sea Island tanker loading terminal at Mina al Ahmadi. Smart bombs delivered by U.S. aircraft hit two onshore tank farm manifold stations, cutting off the terminal's source of oil flow Jan. 26. A small volume of oil was still leaking from 13 mile feeder pipelines to the terminal at presstime. Press reports quoted U.S. military and Saudi officials as estimating the slick at 35 miles long and 10 miles wide but breaking up in some areas late last week. Meantime, Iraq reportedly opened the valves at its Mina al Bakr marine terminal at Fao to spill crude into the northern gulf. BBC reported significant volumes of crude in the water off Fao 24 hr after the terminal valves were opened. Mina al Bakr is a considerably smaller terminal than Sea Island, suggesting that the resulting flow of oil would be smaller than that at Sea Island.

  10. Paleoecologic and biostratigraphic models for pleistocene through miocene foraminiferal assemblages of the Gulf Coast Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breard, S.Q.; Callender, A.D.; Nault, M.J. )

    1993-09-01

    We have developed operationally oriented paleoecologic models used in hydrocarbon exploration of the Gulf Coast basin for Pleistocene through Miocene foraminifera and an updated, refined biostratigraphic chart. We also present estimated paleoecologic tolerances for major benthic and planktic foraminiferal markers, and discuss a number of rules and problems encountered in oil industry paleoenvironmental reconstruction. Key benthic paleoenvironmental markers for particular depth zones are graphically presented for the Pleistocene through Miocene. Improvements over previous models include greater use of calcareous and arenaceous foraminiferal species not used or recognized in earlier studies. Finer subdivisions of bathyal paleoenvironments are of particular significance due to current Gulf of Mexico deep-water exploration. Operationally, the abyssal environmental is difficult to recognize due to a reliance of faunal abundance to delineate abyssal from bathyal and the lack of abyssal zone markers. A number of genera and species are identified as having changed habitat preference through time. Some forms have moved progressively into deeper water (Ceratobulimina Cyclammina cancellata and Nonion pompiloides). Conversely, the movement of species into progressively shallower occurrences through time (Pullenia bullodies) appears to be less common. The widespread occurrence of known Gulf of Mexico foraminiferal species from countries such as Mexico, Venezuela, Ecuador, Jamaica, Trinidad, and the Dominican Republic, suggest that these; models have direct application to Neogene studies in Central America, South America, the Caribbean, and the U.S. Gulf Coast. We introduce a variety of deep-water benthic marker foraminifera, many for the first time. These taxa help fill gaps for deeper-water sections where standard benthic marker foraminifera do not occur, helping debunk the popular myth that benthic foraminifera are useless as markers in the exploration of deep-water sections.

  11. Recent Gulf of Mexico pipeline activity reflects industry's recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1990-08-27

    Pipeline construction in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico has improved considerably in recent years, especially activity in shallow water (less than 300 ft). Construction for middle depths (300-600 ft) has been flat, while deepwater (600+ ft) projects have held firm or increased slightly. Overall pipeline mileage constructed in federal waters 1985-89 period showed a strengthening industry, especially during the 1988-89 period. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data. The author tracks comparisons between applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed.

  12. Subsea technology progress buoys Gulf of Mexico deepwater action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-09-02

    This paper reviews the technological advances in subsea oil and gas equipment to drive a new era of exploration and development in the outer continental shelf and other areas considered to complex to economically pursue. As subsea technology expands into deep waters, operators in the Gulf are using subsea production systems based on template and well cluster designs. Subsea cluster systems are gaining favor among operators because they allow more flexibility with shallow water flow which occurs during the first 1,000 feet of clay formations below the seabed. The paper also provides insight into deep water drilling, remote operated vehicles, deep water umbilicals, and other deep water production equipment.

  13. A multidiscipline study offshore Texas, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Land, J.P.; Curtis, C.E. ); Bird, D.A. ); Behrman, R.G.; Jamison, L.A.

    1993-09-01

    In a 500 mi[sup 2] area of the Gulf of Mexico off the Texas coast, we closely examined geologic, gravity, magnetic, seismic, and surface geochemical data and produced an integrated interpretation in an effort to better understand the information contribution of each method and to attempt to improve the visualization of the physical makeup of the subsurface, thereby increasing exploration efficiency in the region. The various data are presented in profile and contour form along with the integrated interpretation and a discussion of survey parameters, procedures, results and conclusions.

  14. World tanker industry maintains momentum from Persian Gulf war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-10

    The world tanker industry has managed to maintain the momentum generated during the Persian Gulf War. Freight rates for large vessels have regained the high levels seen during the first 2 months of this year, while the expected postwar decline in use of tankers has not materialized. The health of the tanker industry is linked closely with the volume of long haul crude oil from the Middle East, a spot charter from the gulf to Europe, an owner would only break even on the cost of building and operating a new tanker to the highest environmental standards. Owners currently can expect spot rates of about $40,000/day, excellent by the standards of the late 1980s and early 1990s but still below the level needed to justify new buildings. And there are many in the industry who think $40,000/day will be just a happy memory later in the year. Owners are facing pressure for major changes in the industry. Governments and the public want better operating standards and new environmentally sound tankers to reduce the risk of oil spills. At the same time, the industry has to learn to live with repercussion in the 1990 Oil Pollution Act in the U.S., which has opened the way for unlimited liability against tanker owners involved in spills off the U.S. The search also is on for improved profits to make investments required by the changing world of seaborne oil transportation.

  15. Miocene sequence biostratigraphy of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Miocene floral pulse model of Jiang and Watkins is revised. The new revision suggests that the Gulf of Mexico Miocene floral pulses, corresponding to the traditional foraminiferal tops, are transgression surfaces of the fourth-order sequences. These pulses show diverse magnitudes and when they are plotted on a depth (or time) tract, their relative magnitudes show an orderly wavy pattern comparable to the Haq et al.'s third-order cycles in the Miocene. After iterative comparison, the condensed intervals of these Miocene third-order sequences have been determined as, in descending order, Cyclammina 3, the second Cibicides carstensi, the second Textularia W, Cristellaria I, Robulus 43, Discorbis B, the third Marginulina A, and Textularia panamensis (= fauna unit II). The least prominent pulses suggesting the third-order cycle highstands (or shelf-margin wedges) are suggested as, in descending order, Textularia X, Bolivina thalmanni, Globorotalia fohsi robusta, Bigenerina humblei, Cibicides opima, Saracenaria schencki, Marginulina A (= second Robulus chambersi), and Siphonina davisi. Redeposited Cretaceous nanno species are an important component in the Gulf of Mexico middle and lower Miocene. Significant concentrations of these species are found primarily in the third-order cycle highstands, one exception being the Marginulina A third-order cycle highstand that in the High Island and West Cameron areas contained only rare redeposited Cretaceous nannos.

  16. Increased activity expected in Permian basin, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagar, R.

    1988-03-14

    Exploration and development activities in two of the most important petroleum provinces in the U.S. are mixed, but the outlook is bright. There has been a steady increase in drilling in oil plays of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico and in the Permian basin of West Texas and New Mexico. But natural gas drilling has not seen much of an increase, although activity involving Miocne sands in the shallow water portion of the gulf is starting to pick up. Deep gas drilling, stalled by the 1986 spot price collapse, has not yet shown signs of new life, even though production is scheduled to begin this year from the Jurassic Norphlet deep gas play off Alabama. There should be continued increases this year in deepwater and Permian basin drilling if oil prices remain in the $18-20/bbl range. And gas drilling is expected to pick up considerably if spot prices strengthen. An important factor in the drilling outlook is an expectation that major interstate transmission companies this year will resume buying long term gas supplies for resale. Long term contracts reduce producer uncertainty in project economics.

  17. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  18. DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild January 20, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis ROBINSONVILLE, MS - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced three Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives to help the people in the Gulf coast region recover from the hurricanes in 2005, as well as prevent loss of life and damage in the future. During his speech to the Energy Leadership Forum, the

  19. A coastal hazards data base for the US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C.; Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US Gulf Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. To allow for the identification of coastlines at risk from sea-level rise, 7 of the 22 original data variables in this data base were classified by vulnerability and used to create 7 relative risk variables. These relative risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a coastal vulnerability index for each grid cell and/or line segment. The data for these 29 variables (i.e., the 22 original variables and 7 risk variables) have been placed into the following data formats: (1) Gridded polygon data for the 22 original data variables. Data include elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. (2) Gridded polygon data for the seven classified risk variables. The risk variables are classified versions of: mean coastal elevation, geology, geomorphology, local subsidence trend, mean shoreline displacement, maximum tidal range, and maximum significant wave height. (3) 1:2,000,000 line segment data containing the 29 data variables (the 22 original data variables and the seven classified risk variables). (4) Supplemental point data for the stations used in calculating the sea-level trend and tidal range data sets. (5) Supplemental line segment data containing a 1:2,000,000 digitized coastline of the US Gulf Coast as defined by this document.

  20. Recent ooids from Mesopotamian shallow shelf, northwest Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aqrawi, A.A.M.; Sadooni, F.N.

    1987-05-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical analyses of available oolitic samples from Khor Abdulla and Khor Al-Umaya, Mesopotamian shallow shelf of the northwest Arabian Gulf, showed that the ooids exhibit extensive variations in their forms according to their nuclei shapes. The ooids cortices are usually of radial structure and are formed mainly of high magnesium calcite. The sediment distribution of the studied area revealed the existence of an oolitic zone extending NW-SE from east of Bubiyan Island toward the open sea. It is believed that these ooids are usually formed in sheltered environments by direct precipitation of high magnesium-calcite around any available nuclei. Then they are concentrated by agitation on small shoal-margins located to the east of Bubiyan Island. At these shoals they attained their final shapes and then dispersed through the studied area. It is thought that these ooids represent a peculiar example of ooid formation in quiet shallow-water environments.

  1. Tanker-based production eyed for Gulf of Mexico use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karve, S.

    1986-05-01

    The new oil price environment is sending industry engineers back to the drawing board. The search is on for cost effective and perhaps unconventional deepwater production systems. One candidate for Gulf of Mexico deepwater tracts is a tanker-based floating production, storage, and offloading (FPSO) system. Substantial experience with tanker-based FPSO systems has proven them to be cost effective when the field is remote from existing production facilities and pipelines. A tanker-based system offers the unique feature of integrating production, storage, and offloading capabilities into a single unit. Such systems can be installed in 12 to 15 months and can even be leased, significantly improving an operator's cash flow.

  2. DOE Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate Deposits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has established that gas hydrate can and does occur at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  4. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  5. Geologic development and characteristics of continental margins, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf basin covers more than 500,000 km/sup 2/ and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200-m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise at a depth of 2800 m. The most complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 km/sup 2/ and in which bottom slopes range from less than 1/sup 0/ to greater than 20/sup 0/ around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope is a function of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depocenters throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often exceeding 15-20 km/m.y. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Slope oversteepening, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments, and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landslides and debris flows. Large-scale features such as shelf-edge separation scars and landslide-related canyons often result from such processes.

  6. Land subsidence associated with hydrocarbon production, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitler, C.W.; White, W.A.; Akhter, M.S.

    1988-01-01

    Although ground-water withdrawal has been the predominant cause of land subsidence in the Texas Gulf Coast, localized subsidence and faulting have also resulted from hydrocarbon production. Subsidence was documented as early as the 1920s over the Goose Creek field. Since then, subsidence and/or faulting have been identified over the Saxet, South Houston, Chocolate Bayou, Hastings, Alco-Mag, Clinton, Mykawa, Blue Ridge, Webster, and Caplen oil fields. Oil-production-related subsidence over these fields generally creates few environmental or engineering problems. One exception is the subsidence and faulting over the Caplen oil field on Bolivar Peninsula, where more than 1,000 ac of saltwater marsh has been replaced by subaqueous flats. Subsidence may be occurring over other fields but has not been identified because of limited releveled benchmark data. An evaluation of drill-stem and bottom-hole pressure data for the Frio Formation in Texas indicates extensive depressurization presumably from hydrocarbon production. Nearly 12,000 measurements from a pressure data base of 17,000 measurements indicate some depressurization. Some of the Frio zones have pressure declines of more than 1,500 psi from original hydrostatic conditions. Subsidence and faulting may be associated with these fields in the Frio as well as other Tertiary formations where extensive hydrocarbon production and subsequent depressurization have occurred.

  7. Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strongin, O.

    1980-09-30

    As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

  8. Sea Water Radiocarbon Evolution in the Gulf of Alaska: 2002 Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Roark, E B; Quay, P D; Flood-Page, S R; Moy, C

    2005-04-08

    Oceanic uptake and transport of bomb radiocarbon as {sup 14}CO{sub 2} created by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s and 1960s has been a useful diagnostic to determine the carbon transfer between the ocean and atmosphere. In addition, the distribution of radiocarbon in the ocean can be used as a tracer of oceanic circulation. Results obtained from samples collected in the Gulf of Alaska in the summer of 2002 provide a direct comparison with results in the 1970s during GEOSECS and in the early 1990s during WOCE. The open gyre values are 20-40{per_thousand} more negative than those documented in 1991 and 1993 (WOCE) although the general trends as a function of latitude are reproduced. Surface values are still significantly higher than pre-bomb levels ({approx}-105{per_thousand} or lower). In the central gyre, we observe {Delta}{sup 14}C-values that are lower in comparison to GEOSECS (stn 218) and WOCE P16/P17 to a density of {approx}26.8{sigma}t. This observation is consistent with the overall decrease in surface {Delta}{sup 14}C values, and reflects the erosion of the bomb-{sup 14}C transient. We propose that erosion of the bomb-{sup 14}C transient is accomplished by entrainment of low {sup 14}C water via vertical exchange within the Gulf of Alaska and replenishment of surface and sub-thermocline waters with waters derived from the far northwest Pacific.

  9. Evolution of Pre-Jurassic basement beneath northern Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Siclen, D.C.

    1990-09-01

    Data from the northern Gulf Coast region reveal a late Paleozoic wrench fault system along which North America (NA) moved southeast (present directions) alongside the northeastern edge of future South America (SA), to where collision with that continent converted a broad continental embankment off the Southern Oklahoma aulacogen into the Ouachita thrust belt. At the same time, Africa farther east, to which protruding SA was firmly joined, was continuing to advance the Appalachian thrusts on the opposite side of these faults. This relationship left no space between the American continents for the conventional remnant ocean or microcontinents. By Late Triassic time, however, extension south of the Ouachita Mountains was forming the series of Interior rift basins, at both ends of which new wrench faults transferred the extension southward to the DeSoto Canyon and South Texas rift basins. Genetically, the Ouachita thrusts are part of the subduction zone along the front of a former SA forearc basin, which continued to receive marine sediments into middle Permian. The Wiggins arch southeast of it is a sliver of that continent, left with NA when the Interior basin rifting jumped from that forearc basin southward across bordering outer basement highs to begin opening the deep Gulf of Mexico (GOM) basin. The Late Triassic crustal extension resulted from right-lateral translation of NA around the bulge of northwestern Africa. About 200 mi of this placed Cape Hatteras against Africa's Cap Blanc, in the configuration from which the magnetic data indicate spreading began in the Central North Atlantic Ocean. The reality of this translation is confirmed by widespread rifting at the same time in western North Africa and between all three northern Atlantic continents; this drew the tip of the Tethys sea southward to Cape Hatteras and led to deposition of voluminous Late Triassic red beds and evaporites along it.

  10. Petroleum source potential of miocene and eocene shales from the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffans, G. )

    1993-09-01

    From 1965 through 1968, 80 core holes were drilled by the M/V Eureka above shallow salt bodies on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico (offshore Texas and Louisiana) in water depths of 660-5280 ft. (An additional 13 deep-water core holes were drilled in the north-central gulf of Mexico.) Approximately 40,000 ft of sediment and small amounts of diapiric salt and/or associated cap rock were penetrated by these 80 Eureka core holes, from which more than 18,000 ft of core subsequently was recovered. Although most core holes penetrated only Pleistocene sediments, allochthonous sequences of older sediments (Pliocene-Upper Cretaceous) emplaced during salt diapirism were penetrated at eight drill sites in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. We have determined the petroleum source potential of Miocene and Eocene shales from four deep-water Eureka core holes (water depths of 1890-2350 ft) in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. All of these samples have attained only moderate levels of thermal maturity (VR [approx] 0.4-0.6). Two samples of Miocene shale obtained from the East Break 672 Block are relatively lean (containing only 0.37-0.54 wt.% total organic carbon) and their kerogen is enriched in gas prone or inert macerals. Eocene shales penetrated in the Alaminos Canyon 970 and 971 blocks are slightly richer (0.68-0.95 wt.% total organic carbon), principally because they contain migrated petroleum-aliquots extracted with a strong organic solvent contain only 0.31 0.48 wt.% total organic carbon. The leanest sample is an Eocene shale obtained from the boundary between the Garden Banks 332 and 333 blocks, approximately 18 mi northwest of the deep-water Auger oil and gas discovery. This sample contains only 0.33 wt% total organic carbon, and its kerogen also consists predominantly of gas-prone or inert macerals. We conclude these Tertiary shale samples are not the source of the oil that has been generated in the deepwater realm of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

  11. Fact #933: July 11, 2016 Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of Mexico

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Account for Two-Thirds of U.S. Crude Oil Production | Department of Energy 3: July 11, 2016 Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of Mexico Account for Two-Thirds of U.S. Crude Oil Production Fact #933: July 11, 2016 Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of Mexico Account for Two-Thirds of U.S. Crude Oil Production SUBSCRIBE to the Fact of the Week In 2015, the United States produced a total of 9.4 million barrels of crude oil per day (mmbd) from state and federal offshore operations. Texas produced

  12. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  13. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  14. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  15. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  16. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","6/2016","01/15/1997" ,"Release Date:","08/31/2016" ,"Next Release

  17. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas

  18. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.93 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural

  19. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 7,442 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Gulf of Mexico-Alabama

  20. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 51,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Gulf of Mexico-Louisia

  1. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Texas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 7,404 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Gulf of Mexico-Texas

  2. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  3. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  4. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  5. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.93 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural

  6. Biogenic silica fluxes and accumulation rates in the Gulf of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thunell, R.C.; Pride, C.J.; Tappa, E. ); Muller-Karger, F.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Gulf of California, though small in size, plays an important role in the global silica cycle. The seasonal pattern of biogenic silica flux in the gulf is closely related to that of phytoplankton biomass levels and is controlled by changes in weather and hydrographic conditions. The highest opal fluxes ([approximately] 0.35 g[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) occur during winter and spring, and they are comparable to those measured in some of the most productive ecosystems of the world. Approximately 15%-25% of the biogenic silica produced in surface waters is preserved in gulf sediments, a figure significantly higher than the average global ocean preservation rate. However, the flux of opal at 500 m water depth is less than 25% of that being produced at the surface, suggesting that most of the recycling of biogenic silica in the Gulf of California occurs in the upper water column. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  8. H. R. 5441: A Bill to establish a Gulf of Mexico environmental and economic restoration and protection program. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, June 18, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Gulf of Mexico Environmental and Economic Restoration and Protection Act of 1992[close quotes]. The purpose of this Bill is to establish a Gulf of Mexico environmental and economic restoration and protection program. Definitions used in this Bill are presented. The findings and purposes and provisions for the Gulf of Mexico Program; Gulf of Mexico program office; Gulf of Mexico executive board; functions, powers, and duties of the Board; coordinated comprehensive joint plan; funding of the Gulf Restoration Project; grant program; and authorization of appropriations are described.

  9. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1997-11-24

    Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved continued data analysis and report writing. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) was issued as a final report during the previous reporting period. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities included the preparation of the final report. There were no Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities to report. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  10. Williston Basin. Gulf's CO/sub 2/ mini-test at Little Knife being evaluated

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, T.

    1981-10-01

    The Gulf Oil Exploration and Production Co. nonproducing CO/sub 2/ mini-test at Little Knife field is complete and under evaluation. Although Gulf and the Department of Energy, cosponsors of the $5.62-million project in Billings County, North Dakota, say it is premature to draw conclusions, it appears field test results mirror those achieved in laboratory tests. CO/sub 2/ and tracers have shown up in the observation wells. The objective was to show that CO/sub 2/ miscible displacement is potentially a commercial method of recovering crude oil from high-saturation carbonate reservoirs that have not been extensively waterflooded. The mini-test site, 3-144N-98W in Little Knife field, was appropriate because it was representative of the field.

  11. Cleaning of the ocean floor near offshore platforms in the Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.S.; Smith, S.A. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    For decades in offshore drilling, the drill cuttings were separated from the circulating drilling fluid by the shale shaker and hydrocyclone, and discharged to the ocean. The drilling fluid itself was discharged to the ocean intermittently to maintain its required properties during the drilling process. These discharges contain many environmentally undesirable chemicals, such as hydrocarbons chemical additives and heavy metals. As a result, the ocean floor near some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are covered by contaminated sediment. Ocean current is not as effective in washing out the discarded ocean muds as previously believed. An attempt was made to clean some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The quantity and characteristics of the drilling discharges are estimated the technology used to clean the ocean floor near platforms is described, and advanced treatments for hydrocarbon removal, chemical oxidation and activated carbon adsorption, are discussed. 8 references.

  12. Coal underlying Federal lands in the Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex W. Karlsen; John R. SanFilipo; Peter D. Warwick

    2002-09-01

    About 6% of the total coa resource was selected for assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain region of the NCRA project underlies federally proclaimed management areas. Of the approximately 11 billion short tons of coal in this category, approximately 37 percent are estimated to be federally owned. Much of the coal in these categories may not be available for mining, and much of it is probably not economically recoverable. The dispersed nature of Federal holdings, the complicated nature of surface and mineral estate ownership, and the existence of various legal and technological restrictions may remove a significant portion of this coal resource from consideration for development. Continuing work by USGS scientists suggests that potentially viable energy resources of coal-bed methane are present within both Federal and non-Federal areas of the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain coal-bearing region. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  14. Gupco's experience in treating Gulf of Suez seawater for waterflooding the El Morgan oil field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Hattab, M.I.

    1982-07-01

    Pressure maintenance by waterflooding in some reservoirs may be considered essential for satisfactory oil recovery. The main objective of waterflooding is to place water into a rock formation at both the desired rate and pressure with minimal expense and trouble. This objective, however, cannot be achieved unless this water has certain characteristics. The water, therefore, should be treated and conditioned before injection. This study addresses the treatment phases adopted to improve seawater quality before injection, and to control problems associated with untreated seawater. Also discussed are GUPCO'S (Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co.) experience in seawaterfloods, problems encountered, and corrective actions taken to overcome these problems. The chemical treatment programs adopted are presented along with final conclusions and recommendations that can be applied to similar floods in Egypt with (Gulf of Suez) GOS. 47 refs.

  15. Measurements under salt sheets in the Gulf of Mexico: Observations and inferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, J.J. ); Lerche, I.; Yu, Z. )

    1993-09-01

    Four wells in the offshore Gulf of Mexico have penetrated through four different salt sheets and into the underlying formations. Interpretations of sonic and density logs, together with mud weight variations, imply highly overpressured regimes below each of the four salt sheets. Models of the development with time of sediments and salt sheets show the estimates of timing and magnitude of this buildup of overpressure. Investigations of both horizontal and tilted sand sheets, together with sheets having a sub-salt thief sand, provide estimates of (1) thermal focusing by the highly conductive salt, (2) timing and magnitude of pressure buildup and bleed off in formations underlying the impermeable salt sheet, and (3) porosity retention by formations below the salt. Importance of salt sheets as an impermeable seal for hydrocarbon retention and high porosity due to overpressure development are significant to exploration assessments in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the

  17. Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea completion -- A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company`s (GUPCO) first remotely controlled subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the Gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was utilized to economically justify development of this one well marginal field which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low cost subsea tree was utilized to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez many fields have been discovered by have not been developed due to low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if any economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible due to reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. Capturing the experience of Amoco in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Dutch North Sea, GUPCO was able to build a low cost subsea system which would allow for the economic development of the marginal fields discovered in the past. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints which will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore the actual field installation of Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls,and offshore installation operations.

  18. Fact #933: July 11, 2016 Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of Mexico Account for Two-Thirds of U.S. Crude Oil Production- Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file and dataset for Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of Mexico Account for Two-Thirds of U.S. Crude Oil Production

  19. Egypt`s first subsea completion: A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co.`s (Gupco) first subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for Well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was used to economically justify development of this one-well marginal field, which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low-cost subsea tree was used to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez, many fields have been discovered but have not been developed because of low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if an economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible because of reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints that will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore, the actual field installation of Egypt`s first subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls and offshore installation operations.

  20. Source and dispersal of silt on northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, M.; Mazzullo, J.

    1988-01-01

    The surficial sediment on the continental shelf of the northern Gulf of Mexico is characterized by abundant silty clay which was deposited during the late Pleistocene lowstand and reworked during and after the Holocene transgression. The purposes of this study were to determine the sources of the silt fraction in this surficial sediment by quartz grain roundness and surface texture analysis, and to determine the effects of modern shelf currents upon the distribution of silt. Areal variations in quartz grain roundness and surface texture define six silt provinces on the northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf. The Mississippi province is the largest province and stretches from the Chandeleur Islands to Matagorda Bay. It is characterized by a mixture of rounded grains that were derived from the sedimentary rocks of the Gulf coastal plain and the Mid-Continent, and angular, fractured grains that were derived from glacial deposits in the northern United States. A comparison of the areal distribution of these six provinces with the late Pleistocene paleogeography of the continental shelf shows evidence for varying degrees of shore-parallel transport of silt by modern shelf currents.

  1. Energy investment advisory series No. 3: Investment opportunities in the Persian Gulf energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadgen, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Sometimes the greatest investment opportunities are in those areas where the least progress seems to be taking place. This report describes energy-based developments taking place in the Persian/Arabian Gulf. The 8 Gulf states are building their nations; each has large minority groups and swelling populations; their economies are built on one product (hydrocarbons). Large expatriate populations, being integrated into local societies and economies, have led to hostility and guarded access to contacts with the outside world. Gulf nations cannot benefit from any oil price rise as they did in the past, as their populations have grown too rapidly. Policies change daily and can be changed back to original ones as well as into new ones. Since the oil and gas industries are the primary source of government revenue, oil and gas are likely to remain longest under government control. A breakdown of energy-base investment potentials in the Middle East is tabulated: upstream oil, refining, domestic oil marketing, upstream gas, LNG, electricity, petrochemical.

  2. Predicted impacts from offshore produced water discharges on hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, V. J.; Hinz, S.C.; Justic, D.; Scavia, D.; Veil, J. A.; Satterlee, K.; Parker, M. E.; Wilson, S.; Environmental Science Division; LimnoTech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ of Michigan; Shell E&P Co.; Exxon Mobil Production Co.; U.S. EPA

    2008-06-01

    Summer hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L) in the bottom waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico has received considerable scientific and policy attention because of potential ecological and economic impacts. This hypoxic zone forms off the Louisiana coast each summer and has increased from an average of 8,300 km{sup 2} in 1985-1992 to over 16,000 km{sup 2} in 1993-2001, reaching a record 22,000 km{sup 2} in 2002. The almost threefold increase in nitrogen load from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) to the Gulf since the middle of the last century is the primary external driver for hypoxia. A goal of the 2001 Federal Action Plan is to reduce the 5-year running average size of the hypoxic zone to below 5,000 km{sup 2} by 2015. After the Action Plan was developed, a new question arose as to whether sources other than the MRB may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding substances. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone, many of which discharge varying volumes of produced water. The objectives of this study were to assess the incremental impacts of produced water discharges on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and to evaluate the significance of these discharges relative to loadings from the MRB. Predictive simulations were conducted with three existing models of Gulf hypoxia using produced water loads from an industry study. Scenarios were designed that addressed loading uncertainties, settleability of suspended constituents, and different assumptions on delivery locations for the produced water loads. Model results correspond to the incremental impacts of produced water loads, relative to the original model results, which included only loads from the MRB. The predicted incremental impacts of produced water loads on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico from all three models were small. Even considering the predicted ranges between lower- and

  3. Labor, nationalism, and imperialism in eastern Arabia: Britain, the Shaikhs, and the Gulf oil workers in Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar, 1932-1956

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saleh, H.M.A.

    1991-01-01

    This study examines the lack of a noticeable indigenous labor movement in the contemporary Gulf Arab countries of Bahrain, Kuwait and Qatar; it focuses on the emergence, after the discovery of oil, of an industrial Gulf labor force, and on the evolution of the British policy towards oil and Gulf oil workers. The period examined begins with the discovery of oil in Bahrain in 1932 (the first such discovery on the Arab side of the Gulf), and ends with the Suez Crisis of 1956. The latter is a watershed event in Gulf history. It is argued that the Suez Crisis was in large part responsible for the long-term defeat of the indigenous labor movement in the Gulf. Attention is given to the parts played by the British Government of India, the Foreign Office, the local Shaikhs, the Gulf nationalists, and by the workers themselves. Policies towards workers passed through two different periods. In the first, 1932-1945, the Government of India had no direct interest in the Gulf labor situation; in the second, 1946-1956, the Foreign Office took increased interest in the welfare of local oil workers, primarily because of the importance of oil to reconstruction of the British economy after the war. However, the Suez Crisis in 1956 convinced the British to withdraw their support for the workers.

  4. S. 83: A Bill to ensure the preservation of the Gulf of Mexico by establishing within the Environmental Protection Agency a Gulf of Mexico Program. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 21, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    S. 83 may be cited as the [open quotes]Gulf of Mexico Preservation Act of 1993.[close quotes] This Bill discusses findings pertaining to resources in the Gulf of Mexico, describes the establishment of the Gulf of Mexico Program, defines the establishment and duties of the Gulf of Mexico Program Office, and proposes a study of international issues. This Bill also includes an assessment to be prepared by the Administrator, a monitoring, management, protection and restoration plan, a grant program, authorization of appropriations, administrative provisions, and the relationship of the Bill to existing federal and state laws and international treaties.

  5. Ogaden Basin subsidence history: Another key to the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden tectonic puzzle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigott, J.D.; Neese, D.; Carsten, G.

    1995-08-01

    Previous work has attempted to understand the tectonic evolution of the Red Sea-Gulf of Aden region through a focus upon plate kinematics and reconstruction of plate interactions in a two dimensional sense. A significant complement to the three dimensional puzzle can be derived from a critical examination of the vertical component, tectonic subsidence analysis. By removing the isostatic contributions of sediment loading and unloading, and fluctuations in sea level, the remaining thermal-mechanical contribution to a basin`s subsidence can be determined. Such an analysis of several Ogaden Basin wells reveals multiple pulses of tectonic subsidence and uplift which correspond to far-field tectonic activities in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. One of the more dramatic is a Jurassic tectonic pulse circa 145-130 m.a., and a later extensional event which correlates to a major subsidence event ubiquitous through-out the Gulf of Aden, related to Gondwana Land breakup activities. Tectonic uplift during the Tertiary coincides with early Red Sea rifting episodes. Such activities suggest the Ogaden Basin has been a relatively stable East African cratonic basin, but with heating-extension events related to nearby plate interactions. In terms of hydrocarbon generation, the use of steady state present day geothermal gradients, coupled with subsidence analysis shows that potential Paleozoic and Mesozoic source rocks initiated generation as early as the Jurassic. The generating potential of Paleozoic source rocks would only be exacerbated by later heating events. Furthermore, cooling and tectonic uplift during the Tertiary would tend to arrest on-going hydrocarbon generation for Jurassic source rocks in the Ogaden area.

  6. Oil, shrimp, mangroves: an evaluation of contingency planning for the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filho, I.P.

    1983-10-01

    The possibility of finding oil in the Gulf of Guayaquil has led several Ecuadorian agencies to prepare contingency plans to deal with the eventuality of an oil spill in the area. This report characterizes the importance of the oil and fisheries industries to the Ecuadorian economy, and describes the region where these activities may conflict. It also elaborates on the biological effects of oil in tropical environments, and on aspects of prevention, control/clean- up and oil spill contingency planning. Compensation for oil pollution damages and methods for damage assessment are also discussed herein.

  7. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  8. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  9. Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 9.47 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas

  10. Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 7.31 7.30 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring

  11. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 8.87 7.31 8.36 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied

  12. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Malaysia (Nominal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Malaysia (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Malaysia (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 6.67 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of

  13. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Nominal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 11.11 -- 8.29 -- -- 2010's -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  14. Pipeline transportation of natural gas from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp.'s national gas pipeline system from the Gulf Coast producing area (where 75% of its supply lies offshore) extends for 1832 mi along the Gulf Coast through the southeastern Piedmont and north to terminate in New York City. It serves high-priority markets in 11 southern and Atlantic seaboard states with a daily flowing capacity of 3.0 billion cu ft/day and an additional 1.5 billion cu ft/day available from storage. Also discussed are gas conditioning for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, water vapor and entrained salt water and solids, and measurement of gas volume with a meter and gravitometer and of heating value with a calorimeter; gas transmission through 9,295 mi of pipeline, made up mostly of four, 30-42 in. dia parallel pipelines with 1,062,452 hp of compression capacity; LNG storage, including unique facilities at the Eminence, Miss., Salt Dome Storage facility and the Carlstadt, N.J., LNG plant; odorization; operations; and pipeline protection against third-party damage and against corrosion.

  15. Emerging energy security issues: Natural gas in the Gulf Nations, An overview of Middle East resources, export potentials, and markets. Report Series No. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-09-01

    This paper proceeds with a presentation of the natural gas resource base of the Gulf nations of the Middle East. The resource base is put in the context of the world natural gas resource and trade flows. This is followed by a discussion of the existing and planned project to move Gulf natural gas to consuming regions. Then a discussion of the source of demand in the likely target markets for the Gulf resource follows. Next, the nature of LNG pricing is discussed. A brief summary concludes the paper.

  16. Scientific Objectives of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate JIP Leg II Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, E.; Latham, T.; McConnell, D.; Frye, M.; Hunt, J.; Shedd, W.; Shelander, D.; Boswell, R.M.; Rose, K.K.; Ruppel, C.; Hutchinson, D.; Collett, T.; Dugan, B.; Wood, W.

    2008-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Methane Hydrate Joint Industry Project (JIP) has been performing research on marine gas hydrates since 2001 and is sponsored by both the JIP members and the U.S. Department of Energy. In 2005, the JIP drilled the Atwater Valley and Keathley Canyon exploration blocks in the Gulf of Mexico to acquire downhole logs and recover cores in silt- and clay-dominated sediments interpreted to contain gas hydrate based on analysis of existing 3-D seismic data prior to drilling. The new 2007-2009 phase of logging and coring, which is described in this paper, will concentrate on gas hydrate-bearing sands in the Alaminos Canyon, Green Canyon, and Walker Ridge protraction areas. Locations were selected to target higher permeability, coarser-grained lithologies (e.g., sands) that have the potential for hosting high saturations of gas hydrate and to assist the U.S. Minerals Management Service with its assessment of gas hydrate resources in the Gulf of Mexico. This paper discusses the scientific objectives for drilling during the upcoming campaign and presents the results from analyzing existing seismic and well log data as part of the site selection process. Alaminos Canyon 818 has the most complete data set of the selected blocks, with both seismic data and comprehensive downhole log data consistent with the occurrence of gas hydrate-bearing sands. Preliminary analyses suggest that the Frio sandstone just above the base of the gas hydrate stability zone may have up to 80% of the available sediment pore space occupied by gas hydrate. The proposed sites in the Green Canyon and Walker Ridge areas are also interpreted to have gas hydrate-bearing sands near the base of the gas hydrate stability zone, but the choice of specific drill sites is not yet complete. The Green Canyon site coincides with a 4-way closure within a Pleistocene sand unit in an area of strong gas flux just south of the Sigsbee Escarpment. The Walker Ridge site is characterized by a sand

  17. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally

  18. The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience (Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Berkeley Lab microbial ecologist Terry Hazen delivers a keynote on "The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011.

  19. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  20. The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience (Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL] [LBNL

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Berkeley Lab microbial ecologist Terry Hazen delivers a keynote on "The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011.

  1. Radiocarbon-Based Ages and Growth Rates of Bamboo Corals from the Gulf of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Flood-Page, S; Dunbar, R B; Ingram, B L; Fallon, S J; McCulloch, M

    2004-12-12

    Deep-sea coral communities have long been recognized by fisherman as areas that support large populations of commercial fish. As a consequence, many deep-sea coral communities are threatened by bottom trawling. Successful management and conservation of this widespread deep-sea habitat requires knowledge of the age and growth rates of deep-sea corals. These organisms also contain important archives of intermediate and deep-water variability, and are thus of interest in the context of decadal to century-scale climate dynamics. Here, we present {Delta}{sup 14}C data that suggest that bamboo corals from the Gulf of Alaska are long-lived (75-126 years) and that they acquire skeletal carbon from two distinct sources. Independent verification of our growth rate estimates and coral ages is obtained by counting seasonal Sr/Ca cycles and probable lunar cycle growth bands.

  2. Prospecting with pressures, temperatures, and velocities in the northwest Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enciso, G. ); Griffith, D.P. )

    1993-09-01

    In the northwest Gulf of Mexico, an empirical relationship exists between subsurface pressure, bottom-hole temperature, and seismic velocity. The pressure, velocity, and temperature patterns are controlled by sedimentation and faulting. Hydrologic fluid pressures and resulting fluid flow can be predicted and mapped by making use of mud weights, seismic velocities, and bottom-hole temperatures. Pressure, velocity, and temperature data have been compiled into extensive computer databases. This has allowed us to manipulate the data for the preparation of regional hydrodynamic head, seismic interval velocity, and isotherm maps. The application of this pressure-velocity-temperature relationship has led to the detection of an underpressured reservoir in the Oligocene's clastic section of southwest Louisiana. The prediction of the sandy underpressured zone with interval velocity analysis provides a useful tool to explore seismically for the fluviodeltaic sands in this area.

  3. Inversion of salt diapirs and sedimentary bed observations: Gulf Coast case histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.; Lerche, I. )

    1993-09-01

    An inverse procedure is used to remove sediments from around salt diapirs in a manner consistent with evolution of the salt diapir, which also is determined self-consistently by the inverse procedure. The corresponding evolving stress and strain of the sediments are then calculated from use of specified Lame constants, and the times and spatial domains identified where the Coulomb-Mohr rock failure criterion is satisfied, thereby yielding estimates of fault and fracture locations. In addition, the combined evolutionary picture is used to assess thermal focusing by the highly conductive evolving salt, so that thermal anomalies in relation to hydrocarbon maturation around the evolving salt and structural development of sediment bed upturning and salt overhang evolution can be timed better relative to hydrocarbon emplacement. Several examples from the Gulf of Mexico are analyzed using this new inversion procedure.

  4. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  5. Summary Report on Information Technology Integration Activities For project to Enhance NASA Tools for Coastal Managers in the Gulf of Mexico and Support Technology Transfer to Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulbransen, Thomas C.

    2009-04-27

    Deliverable to NASA Stennis Space Center summarizing summarizes accomplishments made by Battelle and its subcontractors to integrate NASA's COAST visualization tool with the Noesis search tool developed under the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative project.

  6. Evaluation of oil tanker routing per section 4111(b)(7) Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Part 2. Atlantic and Florida Gulf coasts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate oil tanker routing along the east coast and Florida Gulf Coast. It discusses whether areas of navigable waters and the Exclusive Economic Zone should be restricted to oil tankers.

  7. Permeability and porosity of hydrate-bearing sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    Hydrate-bearing sands are being actively explored because they contain the highest concentrations of hydrate and are the most economically recoverable hydrate resource. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms or timescales of hydrate formation, which are related to methane supply, fluid flux, and host sediment properties such as permeability. We used logging-while-drilling data from locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico to develop an effective medium theory-based model for predicting permeability based on clay-sized sediment fraction. The model considers permeability varying between sand and clay endpoint permeabilities that are defined from laboratory data. We verified the model using permeabilitymore » measurements on core samples from three boreholes, and then used the model to predict permeability in two wells drilled in Walker Ridge Block 313 during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II expedition in 2009. We found that the cleanest sands (clay-sized fraction <0.05) had intrinsic (hydrate-free) permeability contrasts of 5-6 orders of magnitude with the surrounding clays, which is sufficient to provide focused hydrate formation due to advection of methane from a deep source or diffusion of microbial methane from nearby clay layers. In sands where the clay-sized fraction exceeds 0.05, the permeability reduces significantly and focused flow is less pronounced. In these cases, diffusion of dissolved microbial methane is most likely the preferred mode of methane supply for hydrate formation. In conclusion, our results provide important constraints on methane supply mechanisms in the Walker Ridge area and have global implications for evaluating rates of methane migration and hydrate formation in hydrate-bearing sands.« less

  8. Permeability and porosity of hydrate-bearing sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    Hydrate-bearing sands are being actively explored because they contain the highest concentrations of hydrate and are the most economically recoverable hydrate resource. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms or timescales of hydrate formation, which are related to methane supply, fluid flux, and host sediment properties such as permeability. We used logging-while-drilling data from locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico to develop an effective medium theory-based model for predicting permeability based on clay-sized sediment fraction. The model considers permeability varying between sand and clay endpoint permeabilities that are defined from laboratory data. We verified the model using permeability measurements on core samples from three boreholes, and then used the model to predict permeability in two wells drilled in Walker Ridge Block 313 during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II expedition in 2009. We found that the cleanest sands (clay-sized fraction <0.05) had intrinsic (hydrate-free) permeability contrasts of 5-6 orders of magnitude with the surrounding clays, which is sufficient to provide focused hydrate formation due to advection of methane from a deep source or diffusion of microbial methane from nearby clay layers. In sands where the clay-sized fraction exceeds 0.05, the permeability reduces significantly and focused flow is less pronounced. In these cases, diffusion of dissolved microbial methane is most likely the preferred mode of methane supply for hydrate formation. In conclusion, our results provide important constraints on methane supply mechanisms in the Walker Ridge area and have global implications for evaluating rates of methane migration and hydrate formation in hydrate-bearing sands.

  9. Review of the NURE Assessment of the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Susan M.

    2013-09-15

    Historic exploration and development were used to evaluate the reliability of domestic uranium reserves and potential resources estimated by the U.S. Department of Energy national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province. NURE estimated 87 million pounds of reserves in the $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cost category in the Coast Plain uranium resource region, most in the Gulf Coast Uranium Province. Since NURE, 40 million pounds of reserves have been mined, and 38 million pounds are estimated to remain in place as of 2012, accounting for all but 9 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the reserve or production categories in the NURE estimate. Considering the complexities and uncertainties of the analysis, this study indicates that the NURE reserve estimates for the province were accurate. An unconditional potential resource of 1.4 billion pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 600 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the forward cost category of $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1980 prices), was estimated in 106 favorable areas by the NURE program in the province. Removing potential resources from the non-productive Houston embayment, and those reserves estimated below historic and current mining depths reduces the unconditional potential resource 33% to about 930 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and that in the $30/lb cost category 34% to 399 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Based on production records and reserve estimates tabulated for the region, most of the production since 1980 is likely from the reserves identified by NURE. The potential resource predicted by NURE has not been developed, likely due to a variety of factors related to the low uranium prices that have prevailed since 1980.

  10. Catagenesis of organic matter of oil source rocks in Upper Paleozoic coal formation of the Bohai Gulf basin (eastern China)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, R.X.; Li, Y.Z.; Gao, Y.W.

    2007-05-15

    The Bohai Gulf basin is the largest petroliferous basin in China. Its Carboniferous-Permian deposits are thick (on the average, ca. 600 m) and occur as deeply as 5000 m. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Carboniferous Taiyuan Formation formed in inshore plain swamps. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are fluorescent vitrinite, exinite, alginite, etc. Coal and carbonaceous shale of the Permian Shanxi Formation were deposited in delta-alluvial plain. Their main hydrocarbon-generating macerals are vitrinite, exinite, etc. The carbonaceous rocks of these formations are characterized by a high thermal maturity, with the vitrinite reflectance R{sub 0} > 2.0%. The Bohai Gulf basin has been poorly explored so far, but it is highly promising for natural gas.

  11. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  12. Summary of Training Workshop on the Use of NASA tools for Coastal Resource Management in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Chaeli; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gulbransen, Thomas C.; Thom, Ronald M.

    2009-03-01

    A two-day training workshop was held in Xalapa, Mexico from March 10-11 2009 with the goal of training end users from the southern Gulf of Mexico states of Campeche and Veracruz in the use of tools to support coastal resource management decision-making. The workshop was held at the computer laboratory of the Institute de Ecologia, A.C. (INECOL). This report summarizes the results of that workshop and is a deliverable to our NASA client.

  13. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2015 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2014 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  15. Selectively reducing offshore royalty rates in the Gulf of Mexico could increase oil production and federal government revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1985-05-10

    The US government leases large areas in the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico for the development of oil resources and receives royalties on the oil produced. Conventional methods of oil recovery have recovered or are expected to recover about half of the 16 billion barrels of oil discovered in this area. Other oil recovery methods, collectively known as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), could potentially increase production by about 1 billion barrels of oil. EOR in the Gulf is expensive and does not appear to be economically justified in most cases. Under existing economic conditions and federal policies, GAO's review indicates that utilizing EOR methods will probably produce only about 10 percent of the additional recoverable oil. However, financial incentives in the form of royalty reductions could increase both oil production and federal government revenue if applied on a project-by-project basis. Universal applications of royalty reduction for EOR, however, while achieving increased oil production, would not increase federal government revenue. GAO recommends that the Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service initiate action that would allow for selective royalty reductions for EOR projects in the Gulf in instances where both total oil production and federal government revenue will increase. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Characteristics of produced water discharged to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxiczone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Kimmell, T. A.; Rechner, A. C.

    2005-08-24

    Each summer, an area of low dissolved oxygen (the hypoxic zone) forms in the shallow nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters from the Mississippi River Delta westward to near the Texas/Louisiana border. Most scientists believe that the leading contributor to the hypoxic zone is input of nutrients (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate growth of phytoplankton. As the phytoplankton subsequently die, they fall to the bottom waters where they are decomposed by microorganisms. The decomposition process consumes oxygen in the bottom waters to create hypoxic conditions. Sources other than the two rivers mentioned above may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding pollutants. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone. Many of these platforms discharge varying volumes of produced water. However, only limited data characterizing oxygen demand and nutrient concentration and loading from offshore produced water discharges have been collected. No comprehensive and coordinated oxygen demand data exist for produced water discharges in the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the results of a program to sample 50 offshore oil and gas platforms located within the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. The program was conducted in response to a requirement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for offshore oil and gas discharges. EPA requested information on the amount of oxygen-demanding substances contained in the produced water discharges. This information is needed as inputs to several water quality models that EPA intends to run to estimate the relative contributions of the produced water discharges to the occurrence of the hypoxic zone. Sixteen platforms were sampled 3 times each at approximately one-month intervals to give an estimate of

  17. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of amore » section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 × 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in a clear seal rupture. The next step

  18. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of a section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 × 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in

  19. Geologic development and characteristics of the continental margins, Gulf of Mexico. Research report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf Basin covers more than 500,000 sq km and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200 m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise, at a depth of 2800 m. The most-complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 sq km and in which bottom slopes range from < 1 deg to > 20 deg around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope are functions of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depo-centers throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often in excess of 15-20 km/my. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Oversteeping, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landsliding and debris flows. Large scale features such as shelf edge separation scars and landslide related canyons often results from such processes.

  20. Business and technical overview of the Gulf of Mexico deep-water play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Den Berg, A.N.; Dirks, W.K. )

    1993-09-01

    A steadily growing volume of publicly available data (well logs, speculative seismic surveys, press releases, etc.) strongly suggests that the deep-water part of the Gulf of Mexico contains large reserves of recoverable hydrocarbons. Well logs available through the minerals management Service Order 4 Release Program indicate at least 25 potentially developable accumulations have been found, some 14 of which had been publicized at the time of this paper. We estimate that industry has spent more than $4 billion nominal to discover at least 1.5 billion bbl of oil equivalent, of which only a small fraction has been developed and produced. Most volumetrically significant deep-water discoveries can be geographically grouped into six [open quotes]corridors[close quotes] in which industry collaboration in terms of shared infrastructure, operating principles, service company support, etc., seems inevitable. Given the tremendous technical challenges and uncertainties associated with the play, coupled with the high cost of building, installing, and operating deep-water production systems, industry cooperation similar to that found in some international arenas will be critical to achieving production in this promising new area of an established basin.

  1. Using landscape typologies to model socioecological systems: Application to agriculture of the United States Gulf Coast

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Preston, Benjamin L.; King, Anthony Wayne; Mei, Rui; Nair, Sujithkumar Surendran

    2016-02-11

    Agricultural enterprises are vulnerable to the effects of climate variability and change. Improved understanding of the determinants of vulnerability and adaptive capacity in agricultural systems is important for projecting and managing future climate risk. At present, three analytical tools dominate methodological approaches to understanding agroecological vulnerability to climate: process-based crop models, empirical crop models, and integrated assessment models. A common weakness of these approaches is their limited treatment of socio-economic conditions and human agency in modeling agroecological processes and outcomes. This study proposes a framework that uses spatial cluster analysis to generate regional socioecological typologies that capture geographic variance inmore » regional agricultural production and enable attribution of that variance to climatic, topographic, edaphic, and socioeconomic components. This framework was applied to historical corn production (1986-2010) in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico region as a testbed. The results demonstrate that regional socioeconomic heterogeneity is an important driving force in human dominated ecosystems, which we hypothesize, is a function of the link between socioeconomic conditions and the adaptive capacity of agricultural systems. Meaningful representation of future agricultural responses to climate variability and change is contingent upon understanding interactions among biophysical conditions, socioeconomic conditions, and human agency their incorporation in predictive models.« less

  2. An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Albert Christian

    2005-07-01

    The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

  3. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  4. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  5. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  6. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; et al

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicatesmore » a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.« less

  7. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Kostka, Joel E.; Holmes, Charles W.; Hollander, David; Chin, Wei -Chun

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  8. Reservoir facies architecture in a micro-tidal barrier system, Frio formation, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1984-04-01

    Barrier-bar sand bodies are a complex mosaic of barrier-core, shore-face, inlet-fill, tidal-delta, and back-barrier facies. In addition, sandbody stratigraphy and internal depositional architecture are determined by the progradational, aggradational, or transgressive origin of the barrier complex. The Frio barrier/strandplain system of the middle Texas Gulf Coast has produced more than 3 billion bbl of oil. Examination of the Greta, Glasscock, and 41-A sands in West Ranch field illustrates the variability of barrier reservoirs. Each reservoir is a mosaic of variably interconnected compartments having sheet, tab, pod, or channel geometries. Conventional facies analysis (isolith and log-pattern mapping and limited core examination) combined with semiquantitative delineation of hydrocarbon-saturation distribution using resistivity logs defined the facies components of each reservoir. The 41-A sand consists of juxtaposed progradational barrier-core, inlet-fill, and flood tidal-delta units. The Glasscock sand is largely a transgressive barrier-flat and washover-fan deposit. The Greta sand is a complex of aggradational barrier-core and inlet-fill facies. Productive attributes of each reservoir are influenced by its facies architecture and attendant relative permeabilities. Natural water drive is ineffective in the volumetrically restricted transgressive Glasscock reservoir. Permeability distribution in the 41-A reservoir is facies defined. Erratic injection response, irregular oil-water contact advance, and variable water/oil ratios observed during the productive history of individual reservoirs document localized facies effects on fluid flow. Spatial variation of the gas/oil ratio may also reflect facies distribution.

  9. Land subsidence along the northeastern Texas Gulf coast: Effects of deep hydrocarbon production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, J.M. Jr.; Hill, D.W.

    1995-04-01

    The Texas Gulf of Mexico coast is experiencing high (5-11 mm/yr) rates of relative sea level (RSL) rise that are the sum of subsidence and eustatic sea level (ESL) rise. Even higher rates are associated with areas of ground-water pumping from confined aquifers. We investigate the possibility of deep petroleum production as a cause for the high regional rates of subsidence. The northeast Texas coast was chosen for the study because it has a high rate of RSL rise, very limited groundwater production, and a long history of petroleum production. We examine in detail the Big Hill and Fannett fields, for which adequate bottom hole pressure (BHP) and well log data are available. The hypothesis of deep petroleum production is tested in three ways. First, industry BHP tests show many of the fields are depressurized to far below hydrostatic pressures. Second, analysis of BHP data over time in the Big Hill and Fannett fields indicates that some zones in these fields were below hydrostatic when production commenced. This indicates that depressurization from production in neighboring fields or zones within the same filed is not limited to the production zone. Third, three models for subsidence (a general 1-D regional model, an intra-reservoir model, and a reservoir bounding layer model), using reasonable hydrogeological parameters, predict subsidence within the inferred range of data. The latter two models use data from the Big Hill and Fannett fields. Additional verification of the hypothesis that deep petroleum production is causing or accelerating regional subsidence will require the collection and analysis of data on the subsurface hydrogeological parameters and detailed measure ments of the spatial and temporal distribution of subsidence along the Texas Coast.

  10. Deep seismic reflection study of a passive margin, southeatern Gulf of Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosendahl, B.R.; Groschel-Becker, H.; Meyers, J.; Kaczmarick, K. )

    1991-04-01

    A large grid of deep-imaging, marine seismic reflection data has been acquired in the Gulf of Guinea. The data show that the architecture of old Atlantic igneous crust and upper mantle is highly variable, particularly if reflection Moho is taken to be the base of the crust. Most abrupt changes in oceanic basement thickness and depth to Moho can be correlated with fracture-zone crossings, but significant variations can occur between fracture zones and along flow lines, especially near the ocean-continent transition. Reflection Moho is usually continuous from ocean to continent and does not display any systematic changes in character, continuity, or reflection time even beneath the innermost shelf areas. There are several varieties of intracrustal reflectors, including those that mark different levels within the oceanic gabbroic complex and events that diagonally link the top of oceanic seismic layer 2 and Moho. Different types of sub-Moho dipping reflections also are observed. Some are associated with fracture zones, some originate within continental crust and dip toward the ocean, dissecting Moho without offsetting it, and still others originate at the oceanic Moho and dip toward the continent. The transition from oceanic to continental crust is generally quite sharp north of lat 1{degree}S, but the exact nature of the transition ranges from rift-block geology to abrupt juxtapositions of oceanic and continental crustal rocks. South of about lat 1{degree}S, the transition to continental crust is more gradual, involving a progressive thickening of oceanic crust toward land. This difference may relate to the occurrence of much more oblique initial rifting north of 1{degree}S.

  11. Steam Dryer Segmentation and Packaging at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station - 13577

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Sirianni, Steve R.; Pillard, Mark M.

    2013-07-01

    Entergy recently performed an Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) on their Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. To support the EPU, a new Steam Dryer Assembly was installed during the last refueling outage. Due to limited access into the containment, the large Replacement Steam Dryer (RSD) had to be brought into the containment in pieces and then final assembly was completed on the refueling floor before installation into the reactor. Likewise, the highly contaminated Original Steam Dryer (OSD) had to be segmented into manageable sections, loaded into specially designed shielded containers, and rigged out of containment where they will be safely stored until final disposal is accomplished at an acceptable waste repository. Westinghouse Nuclear Services was contracted by Entergy to segment, package and remove the OSD from containment. This work was performed on critical path during the most recent refueling outage. The segmentation was performed underwater to minimize radiation exposure to the workers. Special hydraulic saws were developed for the cutting operations based on Westinghouse designs previously used in Sweden to segment ABB Reactor Internals. The mechanical cutting method was selected because of its proven reliability and the minimal cutting debris that is generated by the process. Maintaining stability of the large OSD sections during cutting was accomplished using a custom built support stand that was installed into the Moisture Separator Pool after the Moisture Separator was installed back in the reactor vessel. The OSD was then moved from the Steam Dryer Pool to the Moisture Separator Pool for segmentation. This scenario resolved the logistical challenge of having two steam dryers and a moisture separator in containment simultaneously. A water filtration/vacuum unit was supplied to maintain water clarity during the cutting and handling operations and to collect the cutting chips. (authors)

  12. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  13. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel

  14. The erosion-corrosion of copper-based and nickel-based alloys in warm polluted Arabian Gulf seawater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carew, J.A.; Islam, M.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the erosion-corrosion behavior of copper-nickel alloys (90:10 Cu/Ni and 7030 Cu/Ni), nickel-copper alloy UNS N04400 and nickel-based alloys (UNS N06022, N06030 and UNS S32550) used as heat exchanger tubes, in warm flowing Arabian Gulf seawater containing up to 5 ppm of sulphide ions. Visual and optical examinations of the internal surfaces of the tubes were carried out to compare the susceptibilities to erosion-corrosion attack of the different alloys, taking into consideration the nature of the product films formed.

  15. Design and operating characteristics of cathodic protection systems associated with large seawater intake reinforced concrete structures in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.; Chaudhary, Z.; Al-Muhid, T.M.M.

    1999-07-01

    The large reinforced concrete seawater intake structures, which are part of a cooling system in several petrochemical plants located in the Arabian Gulf, have been catholically protected to arrest chloride-induced corrosion of the steel reinforcement. The cathodic protection systems have an operating history of 1--5 years. The design and operating features of the cathodic protection systems are described and discussed. Monitoring data of each system collected over the years since commissioning of the systems are described and discussed to evaluate performance of each system.

  16. Volume and accessibility of entrained (solution) methane in deep geopressured reservoirs - tertiary formations of the Texas Gulf Coast. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, A.R.; Dodge, M.M.; Posey, J.S.; Morton, R.A.

    1980-10-01

    The objective of this project was to appraise the total volume of in-place methane dissolved in formation waters of deep sandstone reservoirs of the onshore Texas Gulf Coast within the stratigraphic section extending from the base of significant hydrocarbon production (8000 ft)* to the deepest significant sandstone occurrence. The area of investigation is about 50,000 mi/sup 2/. Factors that determine the total methane resource are reservoir bulk volume, porosity, and methane solubility; the latter is controlled by the temperature, pressure, and salinity of formation waters. Regional assessment of the volume and the distribution of potential sandstone reservoirs was made from a data base of 880 electrical well logs, from which a grid of 24 dip cross sections and 4 strike cross sections was constructed. Solution methane content in each of nine formations or divisions of formations was determined for each subdivision. The distribution of solution methane in the Gulf Coast was described on the basis of five reservoir models. Each model was characterized by depositional environment, reservoir continuity, porosity, permeability, and methane solubility.

  17. Why the Gulf War still matters: Foreign perspectives on the war and the future of international security. Report No. 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, P.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) project that examined how a number of nations other than the United States have reacted to the course and outcome of the Persian Gulf War of 1991. The project was built around studies of key countries on which the Gulf War might reasonably be expected to have had a significant impact: Argentina, the ASEAN states, Brazil, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Libya, North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Spain, Syria, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Vietnam, and the states of the former Yugoslavia. These country studies were written by well-recognized independent experts following a common set of guidelines provided by CNSS. When the country studies were completed, they were reviewed and supplemented through a series of peer assessments and workshops. The report represents a synthesis of material generated through this process, and is intended to stimulate thought and further analysis on the critical topics discussed herein.

  18. CHARACTERIZING NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEP WATER GULF OF MEXICO: APPLICATIONS FOR SAFE EXPLORATION AND PRODUCTION ACTIVITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2003-01-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deep water Gulf of Mexico (GOM). These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. During the first six months of operation, the primary activities of the JIP were to conduct and plan Workshops, which were as follows: (1) Data Collection Workshop--March 2002 (2) Drilling, Coring and Core Analyses Workshop--May 2002 (3) Modeling, Measurement and Sensors Workshop--May 2002.

  19. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  20. Environmental characterization report for the Gulf Interior Region, Texas study area. [Oakwood, Palestine and Keechi salt domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01

    This report is published as a product of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program. The objective of this program is the development of terminal waste storage facilities in deep, stable geologic formations for high-level nuclear waste, including spent fuel elements from commercial power reactors and transuranic nuclear waste for which the federal government is responsible. The report is part of the area study phase and contains environmental information for the Texas Study Area of the Gulf Interior Region acquired from federal, state, and regional agencies. The data in this report meet the requirements of predetermined survey plans and will be used in determining locations of approximately 80 square kilometers (30 square miles) that will be further characterized. Information on surface water, atmosphere, background radiation, natural ecosystems, agricultural systems, demography, socioeconomics, land use, and transportation is presented. The environmental characterization will ensure that data on environmental values required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 are available.

  1. Final Project Closeout Report for Sprint Hydrogen Fuel Cell (HFC) Deployment Project in California, Gulf Coast and Eastern Seaboard Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenny, Kevin; Bradley, Dwayne

    2015-09-01

    Sprint is one of the telecommunications industry leaders in the deployment of hydrogen fuel cell (HFC) systems to provide backup power for their mission critical wireless network facilities. With several hundred fuel cells commissioned in California, states in the gulf coast region, and along the upper eastern seaboard. A strong incentive for advancing the integration of fuel cells into the Sprint network came through the award of a Department of Energy (DOE) grant focused on Market Transformation activities for project (EE0000486). This grant was funded by the 2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The funding provided by DOE ($7.295M) was allocated to support the installation of 260 new HFC systems, equipped with an on-site refillable Medium Pressure Hydrogen Storage Solution (MPHSS), as well as for the conversion of 21 low pressure hydrogen systems to the MPHSS, in hopes of reducing barriers to market acceptance.

  2. DEEPWATER SUBSEA LIQUID/GAS SEPARATION PROCESS UNDER LIVE OIL PRODUCTION CONDITIONS IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. T. Cousins

    2003-04-24

    This report includes technical progress made during the period October 2001 to October 2002. At the end of the first technical progress report the project was moving from feasibility of equipment design work to application of this equipment to the actual site for potential demonstration. The effort focuses on reservoir analysis cost estimations of not only the sub-sea processing unit but also the wells, pipelines, installation costs, operating procedures and economic modeling of the development scheme associated with these items. Geologic risk analysis was also part of the overall evaluation, which is factored into the probabilistic economic analysis. During this period two different potential sites in the Gulf of Mexico were analyzed and one site in Norway was initiated but not completed during the period. A summary of these activities and results are included here.

  3. Natural sulfur flux from the Gulf of Mexico: dimethyl sulfide, carbonyl sulfide, and sulfur dioxide. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Valin, C.C.; Luria, M.; Wellman, D.L.; Gunter, R.L.; Pueschel, R.F.

    1987-06-01

    Atmospheric measurements of natural sulfur compounds were performed over the northern Gulf of Mexico during the late summer months of 1984. Air samples were collected with an instrumented aircraft at elevations of 30-3500 m, during both day and night. Most air samples were representative of the clean maritime atmosphere, although some were from continental contaminated air during periods of offshore flow at the coastline. In all samples, carbonyl sulfide concentrations were within the range of 400-500 pptv. Conversely, the dimethyl sulfide concentrations showed significant variability: during clean atmospheric conditions the average of all measurements was 27 pptv, whereas under polluted conditions the average was 7 pptv. Measureable quantities of dimethyl sulfide (>5 pptv) were not observed above the boundary layer. The average sulfur dioxide concentration measured in the marine (clean) atmosphere was 215 pptv, which is consistent with the oxidation of dimethyl sulfide being its major source.

  4. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-05-18

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being

  5. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2007-03-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many

  6. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Summary of results. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, D.W.; Staple, B.D.; Daniel, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    During 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry and Grand Gulf, were selected as the plants to be studied by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). This report documents the work performed during the analysis of the Grand Gulf plant. A phased approach was used for the overall study. In Phase 1, the objectives were to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenario frequencies and risks, and to provide a foundation for a detailed Phase 2 analysis. It was in Phase 1 that the concept of plant operational states (POSs) was developed to allow the analysts to better represent the plant as it transitions from power operation to nonpower operation than was possible with the traditional technical specification divisions of modes of operation. This phase consisted of a coarse screening analysis performed for all POSs, including seismic and internal fire and flood for some POSs. In Phase 2, POS 5 (approximately cold shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications) during a refueling outage was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the Phase 1 study. The scope of the Level 1 study includes plant damage state analysis and uncertainty analysis and is documented in a multi-volume NUREG/CR report (i.e., NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4, respectively. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. The Level 2/3 study of the traditional internal events is documented in Volume 6, and a summary of the results for all analyses is documented in Volume 1.

  7. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  8. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

    2008-05-31

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency

  9. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 23 June 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1992-11-10

    A Sampling and Analysis Plan was prepared and submitted to a Scientific Review Committee for comment. Substantial comments relative to study objectives, sampling design, and sampling periods coupled with the passage of Hurricane Andrew precluded the scheduled initiation of sampling at offshore and coastal sites (Tasks 3 -- Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics and 4 -- Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas). A proposed revised schedule has been prepared for Tasks 3 and 4. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region), activities have involved identification and collection of the necessary data for the economic analysis. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Region Consumption and Use Patterns), activities have included near completion of the literature review and a reevaluation of the data collection efforts relative to the wholesaler, process plant, and restaurant components. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan), work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting.

  10. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-10-31

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. This report represents the thirteenth quarterly technical summary for the study ``Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.`` Activities associated with Tasks 3 through 8 are discussed in this report.

  11. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  12. Assessment of economic impact of offshore and coastal discharge requirements on present and future operations in the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsey, R.

    1996-06-01

    The high potential costs of compliance associated with new effluent guidelines for offshore and coastal oil and gas operations could significantly affect the economics of finding, developing, and producing oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico. This report characterizes the potential economic impacts of alternative treatment and discharge regulations for produced water on reserves and production in Gulf of Mexico coastal, territorial and outer continental shelf (OCS) waters, quantifying the impacts of both recent regulatory changes and possible more stringent requirements. The treatment technologies capable of meeting these requirements are characterized in terms of cost, performance, and applicability to coastal and offshore situations. As part of this analysis, an extensive database was constructed that includes oil and gas production forecasts by field, data on existing platforms, and the current treatment methods in place for produced water treatment and disposal on offshore facilities. This work provides the first comprehensive evaluation of the impacts of alternative regulatory requirements for produced water management and disposal in coastal and offshore areas of the Gulf of Mexico.

  13. Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carol Lutken

    2006-09-30

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The CMRET has conducted several research cruises during this reporting period

  14. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

    2006-03-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The group is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently received increased attention and the group of researchers working on the station has expanded to include several microbial biologists. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments are planned for fall 2005 and center about the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles. The subs will be used to effect bottom surveys, emplace sensors and sea floor experiments and make connections between sensor data loggers and the integrated data power unit (IDP). Station/observatory completion is anticipated for 2007 following the

  15. Data collection for cooperative water resources modeling in the Lower Rio Grande Basin, Fort Quitman to the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passell, Howard David; Pallachula, Kiran; Tidwell, Vincent Carroll; Villalobos, Joshua; Piccinni, Giovanni; Brainard, James Robert; Gerik, Thomas; Morrison, Wendy; Serrat-Capdevila, Aleix; Valdes, Juan; Sheng, Zhuping; Lovato, Rene; Guitron, Alberto; Ennis, Martha Lee; Aparicio, Javier; Newman, Gretchen Carr; Michelsen, Ari M.

    2004-10-01

    Water resource scarcity around the world is driving the need for the development of simulation models that can assist in water resources management. Transboundary water resources are receiving special attention because of the potential for conflict over scarce shared water resources. The Rio Grande/Rio Bravo along the U.S./Mexican border is an example of a scarce, transboundary water resource over which conflict has already begun. The data collection and modeling effort described in this report aims at developing methods for international collaboration, data collection, data integration and modeling for simulating geographically large and diverse international watersheds, with a special focus on the Rio Grande/Rio Bravo. This report describes the basin, and the data collected. This data collection effort was spatially aggregated across five reaches consisting of Fort Quitman to Presidio, the Rio Conchos, Presidio to Amistad Dam, Amistad Dam to Falcon Dam, and Falcon Dam to the Gulf of Mexico. This report represents a nine-month effort made in FY04, during which time the model was not completed.

  16. Hydrocarbon exploration through remote sensing and field work in the onshore Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, Gulf province, Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dekker, F.; Balkwill, H.; Slater, A. ); Herner, R. ); Kampschuur, W. )

    1990-05-01

    Over the years several types of remote sensing surveys have been acquired of the Eastern Papuan Fold Belt, in the Gulf Province of Papua New Guinea. These include aerial photographs, Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS), and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). Each has been used by Petro-Canada Inc. for interpreting the geologic structure and stratigraphy of onshore hydrocarbon prospects. Analysis of available remotely sensed imagery reveals greater structural complexity than is shown on published geologic maps. Foremost among the images is SAR because of its low, artificial sun angle. Hence, a comprehensive view of the area has been acquired revealing many structural elements previously not appreciated. A distinct difference in structural style is found between the northern and southern segment of the Eastern Papuan fold belt in the study area. The northern segment shows discontinuous, open folds with widely separated anticlines set in featureless valleys. The southern segment is tightly folded, possessing few anticlines and synclines clearly recognizable on the imagery. However, structural components can be traced easily for tens of miles. Recent field work supports an SAR structural interpretation suggesting most, if not all, anticlines in the northern segment are overturned. The combination of remote sensing and field work proved invaluable in understanding the fold belt tectonics and has aided considerably in the selection of drilling locations.

  17. Land subsidence caused by withdrawal of oil and gas in the Gulf coastal plain - The Houston, Texas, case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzer, T.L. )

    1990-09-01

    The extensive network of geodetic leveling lines in the Houston-Galveston, Texas, area, where at least 110 oil and gas fields have been developed, provides the most comprehensive opportunity in the Gulf Coast to search for the occurrence of land subsidence caused by withdrawal of oil and gas. Although the evaluation is complicated by regional subsidence caused by a decline of ground-water level in aquifers beneath the area, subsidence caused by oil and gas withdrawal can be examined by searching for local increases of subsidence at oil and gas fields crossed by leveling lines. Twenty-nine fields are crossed by lines with repeated leveling surveys. Subsidence profiles across these fields indicate local increases of subsidence at six fields-Alco-Mag, Chocolate Bayou, Goose Creek, Hastings, Mykawa, and South Houston. Although ground-water withdrawal is undoubtedly the most important factor contributing to the total subsidence at each field, oil and gas withdrawal may be partly responsible for the local increases. Except for Chocolate Bayou, the volume of petroleum production at each field was sufficient to account for the increase. The volume of petroleum production, however, in general is not a reliable index for predicting the local increase because land within many fields with significant production did not show local increases of subsidence. With the exception of the 1 m subsidence caused by petroleum withdrawal at Goose Creek (1917-1925), local increases of subsidence were less than 0.3 m.

  18. Jumpstarting commercial-scale CO2 capture and storage with ethylene production and enhanced oil recovery in the US Gulf

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Levine, Jonathan S.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Carey, J. William; Stauffer, Philip H.

    2015-04-27

    CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technology has yet to be widely deployed at a commercial scale despite multiple high-profile demonstration projects. We suggest that developing a large-scale, visible, and financially viable CCUS network could potentially overcome many barriers to deployment and jumpstart commercial-scale CCUS. To date, substantial effort has focused on technology development to reduce the costs of CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. Here, we propose that near-term investment could focus on implementing CO2 capture on facilities that produce high-value chemicals/products. These facilities can absorb the expected impact of the marginal increase in the cost of production onmore » the price of their product, due to the addition of CO2 capture, more than coal-fired power plants. A financially viable demonstration of a large-scale CCUS network requires offsetting the costs of CO2 capture by using the CO2 as an input to the production of market-viable products. As a result, we demonstrate this alternative development path with the example of an integrated CCUS system where CO2 is captured from ethylene producers and used for enhanced oil recovery in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.« less

  19. Successful revegetation of a gas pipeline right-of-way in a Gulf Coast barrier island ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinchman, R.R.; George, J.F.; Gaynor, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    This study evaluates the revegetation of a 30-m-wide right-of-way (ROW) following construction of a 76-cm-diameter natural gas pipeline across Padre Island, Texas, a Gulf Coast barrier island. ROW construction activities were completed in 1979 and included breaching of the foredunes, grading, trenching, pipeline installation, and leveling - which effectively removed all existing vegetation from the full length of the ROW. Following construction, the foredunes were rebuilt, fertilized, and sprigged with Panicum amarum, a native dune grass known as bitter panicum. The remainder of the ROW across the mid-island flats was allowed to revegetate naturally. Plant cover by species and total vegetative cover was measured on paired permanent transects on the ROW and in the adjacent undisturbed vegetation. These cover data show that the disturbed ROW underwent rapid vegetative recovery during the first two growing seasons, attaining 54% of the cover on the undisturbed controls. By 1984, the percent vegetative cover and plant species diversity on the ROW and the adjacent undisturbed control area were not significantly different and the ROW vegetation was visually indistinguishable from the surrounding plant communities. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will be used to refine estimates of the nature, distribution and concentration of gas ... "Understanding the nature and setting of deepwater gas hydrates is central to the National ...

  1. Operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, Dockets Nos. 50-416 and 50-417: Mississippi Power and Light Company, Middle South Energy, Inc. , South Mississippi Electric Power Association. Final environmental statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The information in this Final Environmental Statement is the second assessment of the environmental impacts associated with the construction and operation of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Mississippi River in Claiborne County, Mississippi. The Draft Environmental Statement was issued in May 1981. The first assessment was the Final Environmental Statement related to construction, which was issued in August 1973 prior to issuance of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station construction permits. In September 1981 Grand Gulf Unit 1 was 92% complete and Unit 2 was 22% complete. Fuel loading for Unit 1 is scheduled for December 1981. The present assessment is the result of the NRC staff review of the activities associated with the proposed operation of the Station, and includes the staff responses to comments on the Draft Environmental Statement.

  2. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Main report and appendices, Volume 6, Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.D.; Kmetyk, L.N.; Whitehead, D.; Miller, L.; Forester, J.; Johnson, J.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAS) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Recent studies and operational experience have, however, implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. In response to this concern, in 1989 the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The program consists of two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (Surry) and Sandia National Laboratories (Grand Gulf). The program objectives include assessing the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and comparing the estimated risks with the risk associated with accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program is that of a Level-3 PRA. The subject of this report is the PRA of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1. The Grand Gulf plant utilizes a 3833 MWt BUR-6 boiling water reactor housed in a Mark III containment. The Grand Gulf plant is located near Port Gibson, Mississippi. The regime of shutdown analyzed in this study was plant operational state (POS) 5 during a refueling outage, which is approximately Cold Shutdown as defined by Grand Gulf Technical Specifications. The entire PRA of POS 5 is documented in a multi-volume NUREG report (NUREG/CR-6143). The internal events accident sequence analysis (Level 1) is documented in Volume 2. The Level 1 internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Vols 3 and 4, respectively.

  3. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1993-01-18

    Tasks 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics) and 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities have included the narrowing of the list of potential offshore platforms for study off Louisiana and Texas and a preliminary selection of three coastal sites in Louisiana. After an extensive search effort, it was concluded that no coastal sites are available in Texas. A meeting was held between the contractor, Department of Energy (DOE), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) personnel to discuss potential sites and sampling designs. A letter was sent to the Scientific Review Committee (SRC) providing a general description of the revised site selection process and sampling designs. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included continued evaluation of data types available for the economic analysis. Historical field basis data were acquired. The identification of permitted discharge points was also initiated. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) activities have involved the completion of the literature review. Drafts of the fisherman and wholesaler surveys were prepared. It was determined with DOE and BNL personnel that the retailer survey would be eliminated and a subsistence fisherman survey would be added. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service (MMS) Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities have involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  4. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  5. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-07-31

    Progress is described on the determination of environmental impacts from waste discharges to the aquatic ecosystems from oil and gas operations. Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved revisions and additions to the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of water, sediment, and tissue samples as well as data management. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and conducting field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report and review by the Scientific Review Committee (SRC). Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the preparation of the draft final report and review by the SRC. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities involved the presentation of four papers. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  6. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  7. Assist in the recovery of bypassed oil from reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico. Summary annual report, February 18, 1992--February 18, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenewerk, P.A.

    1993-03-17

    The objective of this research is to assist the recovery of non-contacted oil from known reservoirs on the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico. Thus far, research has consisted of data collection from Minerals Management Service (MMS); literature and operators; screening of reservoirs for detailed studies; modification of two public domain simulators; development of a predictive model; and design of several laboratory experiments for studying attic oil recovery. The methodology for data collection from MMS, literature and operators is keyed on 208 sands containing 1,289 reservoirs, representing 60% of the original oil in place (OOIP) in the Gulf of Mexico. This data collection is presently in progress after several delays concerning confidentiality agreements between MMS, DOE, and LSU and its subcontractors. Modifications on two public domain computer reservoir simulators, BOAST II and MASTER, is underway. Modifications will consist of developing a code to handle steeply dipping oil reservoirs and a radial grid format for near wellbore studies. Modifications for steeply dipping reservoirs have been successfully implemented. At present, modifications to BOAST II for radial grid systems are producing acceptable results in a reasonable, though long, period of time. Research of all phases listed above are in progress; therefore, no results or conclusions can be reported at this time.

  8. The impact of rising energy prices on household energy consumption and expenditure patterns: The Persian Gulf crisis as a case example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, L.J. ); Poyer, D.A.; Teotia, A.P.S. . Energy Systems Div.)

    1992-09-01

    The Iraqi invasion of Kuwait and the subsequent war between Iraq and an international alliance led by the United States triggered immediate increases in world oil prices. Increases in world petroleum prices and in US petroleum imports resulted in higher petroleum prices for US customers. In this report, the effects of the Persian Gulf War and its aftermath are used to demonstrate the potential impacts of petroleum price changes on majority, black, and Hispanic households, as well as on poor and nonpoor households. The analysis is done by using the Minority Energy Assessment Model developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The differential impacts of these price increases and fluctuations on poor and minority households raise significant issues for a variety of government agencies, including DOE. Although the Persian Gulf crisis is now over and world oil prices have returned to their prewar levels, the differential impacts of rising energy prices on poor and minority households as a result of any future crisis in the world oil market remains a significant long-term issue.

  9. Studying methane migration mechanisms at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico, via 3D methane hydrate reservoir modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nole, Michael; Daigle, Hugh; Mohanty, Kishore; Cook, Ann; Hillman, Jess

    2015-12-15

    We have developed a 3D methane hydrate reservoir simulator to model marine methane hydrate systems. Our simulator couples highly nonlinear heat and mass transport equations and includes heterogeneous sedimentation, in-situ microbial methanogenesis, the influence of pore size contrast on solubility gradients, and the impact of salt exclusion from the hydrate phase on dissolved methane equilibrium in pore water. Using environmental parameters from Walker Ridge in the Gulf of Mexico, we first simulate hydrate formation in and around a thin, dipping, planar sand stratum surrounded by clay lithology as it is buried to 295mbsf. We find that with sufficient methane being supplied by organic methanogenesis in the clays, a 200x pore size contrast between clays and sands allows for a strong enough concentration gradient to significantly drop the concentration of methane hydrate in clays immediately surrounding a thin sand layer, a phenomenon that is observed in well log data. Building upon previous work, our simulations account for the increase in sand-clay solubility contrast with depth from about 1.6% near the top of the sediment column to 8.6% at depth, which leads to a progressive strengthening of the diffusive flux of methane with time. By including an exponentially decaying organic methanogenesis input to the clay lithology with depth, we see a decrease in the aqueous methane supplied to the clays surrounding the sand layer with time, which works to further enhance the contrast in hydrate saturation between the sand and surrounding clays. Significant diffusive methane transport is observed in a clay interval of about 11m above the sand layer and about 4m below it, which matches well log observations. The clay-sand pore size contrast alone is not enough to completely eliminate hydrate (as observed in logs), because the diffusive flux of aqueous methane due to a contrast in pore size occurs slower than the rate at which methane is supplied via organic methanogenesis

  10. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station

  11. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-09-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP

  12. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2004-03-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors

  13. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient

  14. Long-term monitoring of reef corals at the Flower Garden Banks (northwest Gulf of Mexico): Reef coral population changes and historical incorporation of barium in Montastrea annularis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deslarzes, K.J.P.

    1992-01-01

    Reef coral populations were monitored from 1988 to 1991 at the Flower Garden Banks located in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. The status of reef coral populations, and natural or man-made factors potentially affecting their well-being were determined. Man-made chronic disturbances are degrading coral reef resources on a global scale. Yet, the Flower Garden coral reefs seem to have been sheltered from the effects of regional stresses generated by population growth and increased industrial activity. Since 1974, reef coral population levels have remained unchanged in the Montastrea-Diploria Zones at the Flower Garden Banks. Live coral cover ranges between 46 and 46.5%. Montastrea annularis and Diploria strigosa comprise 80% of the coral cover on either bank. The remainder of the cover is mostly shared by eight other taxa. Coral taxa appear to be more homogeneously distributed on the West Bank. The relatively greater number of Agaricia spp., Madracis decastis, and P. astreoides colonies on the East Bank may be the source of a decreased evenness. The health of reef corals was assessed using repetitive and non-repetitive photographic methods, and accretionary growth measurements of M. annularis. Reef corals have undergone small scale changes at the Flower Gardens probably reflecting natural disturbance, predation, disease, and inter-specific competition. White mat disease (ridge disease) is shown to generate more tissue loss than any of the three bleaching events that took place at the Flower Gardens (1989, 1990, and 1991). Advance to retreat linear ratios of encrusting growth revealed a net tissue gain on the East Bank and a net tissue loss on the West Bank. Growth rates of M. annularis were highly variable. The annual barium content from 1910 in 1989 in a M. annularis colony from the West Flower Garden did not reveal trends associated with the extensive oil and gas exploration in the northern Gulf of Mexico.

  15. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1993-07-26

    Continental Shelf Associates, Inc. (CSA) was contracted to conduct a three-year study of the environmental and health related impacts of produced water and sand discharges from oil and gas operations. Data on naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), heavy metals, and hydrocarbons in water, sediment, and biota will be collected and evaluated. Health related impacts will be studied through field collections and analyses of commercially- and recreationally-important fish and shellfish tissues. Additionally, information on seafood catch, consumption, and use patterns for the Gulf of Mexico will be gathered and analyzed. The facilities to be studied will include both offshore and coastal facilities in the Gulf of Mexico. Coastal sites will be additionally studied to determine ecological recovery of impacted wetland and open bay areas. The economic impact of existing and proposed effluent federal and state regulations will also be evaluated. The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of four terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana and Texas; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  16. Deep structure of the Texas Gulf passive margin and its Ouachita-Precambrian basement: Results of the COCORP San Marcos arch survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culotta, R.; Latham, T.; Oliver, J.; Brown, L.; Kaufman, S. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)); Sydow, M. (Pennzoil, Houston, TX (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This COCORP deep seismic survey provides a comprehensive image of the southeast-Texas part of the Gulf passive margin and its accreted Ouachita arc foundation. Beneath the updip limit of the Cenozoic sediment wedge, a prominent antiformal structure is imaged within the interior zone of the buried late Paleozoic Ouachita orogen. The structure appears to involve Precambrian Grenville basement. The crest of the antiform is coincident with the Cretaceous-Tertiary Luling-Mexia-Talco fault zone. Some of these faults dip to the northwest, counter to the general regional pattern of down-to-the-basin faulting, and appear to sole into the top of the antiform, suggesting that the Ouachita structure has been reactivated as a hingeline to the subsiding passive margin. The antiform may be tied via this fault system and the Ouachita gravity gradient to the similar Devils River, Waco, and Benton uplifts, interpreted as Precambrian basement-cored massifs. Above the Paleozoic sequence, a possible rift-related graben is imaged near the updip limit of Jurassic salt. Paleoshelf edges of the major Tertiary depositional sequences are marked by expanded sections disrupted by growth faults and shale diapirs. Within the Wilcox Formation, the transect crosses the mouth of the 900-m-deep Yoakum Canyon, a principal pathway of sediment delivery from the Laramide belt to the Gulf. Beneath the Wilcox, the Comanchean (Lower Cretaceous) shelf edge, capped by the Stuart City reef, is imaged as a pronounced topographic break onlapped by several moundy sediment packages. Because this segment of the line parallels strike, the topographic break may be interpreted as a 2,000-m-deep embayment in the Cretaceous shelf-edge, and possibly a major submarine canyon older and deeper than the Yoakum Canyon.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 2, Part 1C: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for plant operational State 5 during a refueling outage, Main report (Sections 11--14)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehead, D.; Darby, J.; Yakle, J.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as it operates in the Low Power and Shutdown Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. The report documents the methodology used during the analysis, describes the results from the application of the methodology, and compares the results with the results from two full power analyses performed on Grand Gulf.

  18. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-11-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  20. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  1. Strong ground motion synthesis for a M=7.2 earthquake in the Gulf of Corinth, Greece using Empirical Green`s functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchings, L.; Stavrakakis, G.N.; Ioannidou, E.; Wu, F.T.; Jarpe, S.; Kasameyer, P.

    1998-01-01

    We synthesize strong ground motion at three sites from a M=7.2 earthquake along the MW-trending Gulf of Cornith seismic zone. We model rupture along an 80 segment of the zone. The entire length of the fault, if activated at one time, can lead to an event comparable to that of the 1995 Kobe earthquake. With the improved digital data now routinely available, it becomes possible to use recordings of small earthquakes as empirical Green`s functions to synthesize potential ground motion for future large earthquakes. We developed a suite of 100 rupture scenarios for the earthquake and computed the commensurate strong ground motion time histories. We synthesized strong ground motion with physics-based solutions of earthquake rupture and applied physical bounds on rupture parameters. The synthesized ground motions obtained are source and site specific. By having a suite of rupture scenarios of hazardous earthquakes for a fixed magnitude and identifying the hazard to a site from the statistical distribution of engineering parameters, we have introduced a probabilistic component to the deterministic hazard calculation. The time histories suggested for engineering design are the ones that most closely match either the average or one standard deviation absolute accelerations response values.

  2. Proximal impact deposits at the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary in the Gulf of Mexico: A restudy of DSDP Leg 77 Sites 536 and 540

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez, W.; Asaro, F. ); Smit, J. ); Lowrie, W. ); Asaro, F. ); Margolis, S.V.; Claeys, P. ); Kastner, M. ); Hildebrand, A.R. )

    1992-08-01

    Restudy of Deep Sea Drilling Project Sites 536 and 540 in the southeast Gulf of Mexico gives evidence for a giant wave at Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary time. Five units are recognized: (1) Cenomanian limestone underlies a hiatus in which the five highest Cretaceous stages are missing, possibly because of catastrophic K-T erosion. (2) Pebbly mudstone, 45 m thick, represents a submarine landslide possibly of K-T age. (3) Current-bedded sandstone, more than 2.5 m thick, contains anomalous iridium, tektite glass, and shocked quartz; it is interpreted as ejecta from a nearby impact crater, reworked on the deep-sea floor by the resulting tsunami. (4) A 50-cm interval of calcareous mudstone containing small Cretaceous planktic foraminifera and the Ir peak is interpreted as the silt-size fraction of the Cretaceous material suspended by the impact-generated wave. (5) Calcareous mudstone with basal Tertiary forams and the uppermost tail of the Ir anomaly overlies the disturbed interval, dating the impact and wave event as K-T boundary age. Like Beloc in Haiti and Mimbral in Mexico, Sites 536 and 540 are consistent with a large K-T age impact at the nearby Chicxulub crater.

  3. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  4. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  5. Jumpstarting commercial-scale CO2 capture and storage with ethylene production and enhanced oil recovery in the US Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Middleton, Richard S.; Levine, Jonathan S.; Bielicki, Jeffrey M.; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Carey, J. William; Stauffer, Philip H.

    2015-04-27

    CO2 capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) technology has yet to be widely deployed at a commercial scale despite multiple high-profile demonstration projects. We suggest that developing a large-scale, visible, and financially viable CCUS network could potentially overcome many barriers to deployment and jumpstart commercial-scale CCUS. To date, substantial effort has focused on technology development to reduce the costs of CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants. Here, we propose that near-term investment could focus on implementing CO2 capture on facilities that produce high-value chemicals/products. These facilities can absorb the expected impact of the marginal increase in the cost of production on the price of their product, due to the addition of CO2 capture, more than coal-fired power plants. A financially viable demonstration of a large-scale CCUS network requires offsetting the costs of CO2 capture by using the CO2 as an input to the production of market-viable products. As a result, we demonstrate this alternative development path with the example of an integrated CCUS system where CO2 is captured from ethylene producers and used for enhanced oil recovery in the U.S. Gulf Coast region.

  6. Gulf Coast Salt Domes geologic Area Characterization Report, East Texas Study Area. Volume II. Technical report. [Contains glossary of geological terms; Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine domes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-07-01

    The East Texas Area Characterization Report (ACR) is a compilation of data gathered during the Area Characterization phase of the Department of Energy's National Waste Terminal Storage program in salt. The characterization of Gulf Coast Salt Domes as a potential site for storage of nuclear waste is an ongoing process. This report summarizes investigations covering an area of approximately 2590 km/sup 2/ (1000 mi/sup 2/). Data on Oakwood, Keechi, and Palestine Domes are given. Subsequent phases of the program will focus on smaller land areas and fewer specific salt domes, with progressively more detailed investigations, possibly culminating with a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The data in this report are a result of drilling and sampling, geophysical and geologic field work, and intensive literature review. The ACR contains text discussing data usage, interpretations, results and conclusions based on available geologic and hydrologic data, and figures including diagrams showing data point locations, geologic and hydrologic maps, geologic cross sections, and other geologic and hydrologic information. An appendix contains raw data gathered during this phase of the project and used in the preparation of these reports.

  7. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Evaluation of severe accident risks for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage. Supporting MELCOR calculations, Volume 6, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kmetyk, L.N.; Brown, T.D.

    1995-03-01

    To gain a better understanding of the risk significance of low power and shutdown modes of operation, the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research at the NRC established programs to investigate the likelihood and severity of postulated accidents that could occur during low power and shutdown (LP&S) modes of operation at commercial nuclear power plants. To investigate the likelihood of severe core damage accidents during off power conditions, probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) were performed for two nuclear plants: Unit 1 of the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, which is a BWR-6 Mark III boiling water reactor (BWR), and Unit 1 of the Surry Power Station, which is a three-loop, subatmospheric, pressurized water reactor (PWR). The analysis of the BWR was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories while the analysis of the PWR was performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This multi-volume report presents and discusses the results of the BWR analysis. The subject of this part presents the deterministic code calculations, performed with the MELCOR code, that were used to support the development and quantification of the PRA models. The background for the work documented in this report is summarized, including how deterministic codes are used in PRAS, why the MELCOR code is used, what the capabilities and features of MELCOR are, and how the code has been used by others in the past. Brief descriptions of the Grand Gulf plant and its configuration during LP&S operation and of the MELCOR input model developed for the Grand Gulf plant in its LP&S configuration are given.

  8. Regional diagenetic variations in Middle Pennsylvanian foreland basin sandstones of the southern Appalachians: Comparison to passive margin Cenozoic sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1992-01-01

    Water/rock interactions recorded by authigenic phases in lithic-rich sandstones of the southern Appalachian basin, in the region of the Pine Mountain Overthrust (PMO), began with early post-depositional burial, extended through deeper burial and temperatures > 100 C during the Alleghenian orogeny, and continued through uplift and exposure at the modern weathering surface. Early-formed carbonate in the form of highly localized calcite concretions preserves IGVs greater than 30% and has widely ranging trace element concentrations. Later-formed calcite is characterized by relative low trace element concentrations in sandstones of low IGV. Precipitation of kaolinite cement and grain replacements partially overlapped formation of early carbonate and quartz cement. Dissolution and albitization of detrital feldspars are the primary types of grain alteration observed. Complete loss of the detrital feldspar assemblage is observed only around the eastern end of the PMO where a portion of the feldspar loss is recorded as quartz-replaced grains. Compaction due to ductile behavior of phyllosilicate-rich rock fragments and pressure solution of detrital quartz has reduced IGV to an average of around 11% below the PMO and 6% above the fault. In general, these foreland basin sandstones manifest authigenic phases and sequences of diagenetic events similar to those observed in the passive margin Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin. The most striking diagenetic differences between the two basins are seen in terms of the comparative amounts of compaction (greater in the foreland basin) and grain alteration (less in the foreland basin) which most likely relate to primary differences in the texture and mineralogy of the sediments.

  9. Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, K.S.

    1984-01-01

    The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

  10. 1,"Victor J Daniel Jr","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",1992 2,"Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1408.5

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" ,"Plant","Primary energy source","Operating company","Net summer capacity (MW)" 1,"Victor J Daniel Jr","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",1992 2,"Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1408.5 3,"Baxter Wilson","Natural gas","Entergy Mississippi Inc",1143.2 4,"Jack Watson","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",998

  11. Aeromagnetic anomalies and discordant lineations beneath the Niger Delta: Implications for new fracture zones and multiple sea-floor spreading directions in the meso-Atlantic' Gulf of Guinea cul-de-sac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babalola, O.O.; Gipson, M. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    An aeromagnetic contour map compiled over shallow water and onshore portions of the Nigerian continental margin, shows several elongate, long-wavelength anomaly closures with some alternating polarity, separated by steep gradient, NE lineations. The lineations are interpreted as new fracture zones or extensions of previously mapped ones. The NE trend in the western delta region is concordant with the fracture zone trends of the deeper Gulf of Guinea. Aeromagnetic lineations of the SE Niger Delta Basin however, discordantly trend ENE. Their termination against the former, is interpreted as evidence of early sea-floor spreading in a ENE-WSW direction in addition to the well documented NE-SW spreading of the Gulf of Guinea and the rest of the meso-Atlantic sea-floor; The geophysical crustal structure indicate the existence of two Early Cretaceous triple junctions beneath the Niger Delta Basin. The two triple-junctions further support the hypothesis that the African continent was a multi-plate system (in the Niger Delta region) during the early opening of the Atlantic.

  12. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and

  13. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 2, Part 3: Internal Events Appendices I and J

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakle, J.; Darby, J.; Whitehead, D.; Staple, B.

    1994-06-01

    This report provides supporting documentation for various tasks associated with the performance of the probablistic risk assessment for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage at Grand Gulf, Unit 1 as documented in Volume 2, Part 1 of NUREG/CR-6143.

  14. Combining Multicomponent Seismic Attributes, New Rock Physics Models, and In Situ Data to Estimate Gas-Hydrate Concentrations in Deep-Water, Near-Seafloor Strata of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bureau of Economic Geology

    2009-04-30

    The Bureau of Economic Geology was contracted to develop technologies that demonstrate the value of multicomponent seismic technology for evaluating deep-water hydrates across the Green Canyon area of the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the methodologies that were developed to create compressional (P-P) and converted-shear (P-SV) images of near-seafloor geology from four-component ocean-bottom-cable (4C OBC) seismic data and the procedures used to integrate P-P and P-SV seismic attributes with borehole calibration data to estimate hydrate concentration across two study areas spanning 16 and 25 lease blocks (or 144 and 225 square miles), respectively. Approximately 200 km of two-dimensional 4C OBC profiles were processed and analyzed over the course of the 3-year project. The strategies we developed to image near-seafloor geology with 4C OBC data are unique, and the paper describing our methodology was peer-recognized with a Best Paper Award by the Society of Exploration Geophysicists in the first year of the project (2006). Among the valuable research findings demonstrated in this report, the demonstrated ability to image deep-water near-seafloor geology with sub-meter resolution using a standard-frequency (10-200 Hz) air gun array on the sea surface and 4C sensors on the seafloor has been the accomplishment that has received the most accolades from professional peers. Our study found that hydrate is pervasive across the two study areas that were analyzed but exists at low concentrations. Although our joint inversion technique showed that in some limited areas, and in some geologic units across those small areas, hydrates occupied up to 40-percent of the sediment pore space, we found that when hydrate was present, hydrate concentration tended to occupy only 10-percent to 20-percent of the pore volume. We also found that hydrate concentration tended to be greater near the base of the hydrate stability zone than it was within the central part of the stability

  15. Evaluation of solitary waves as a mechanism for oil transport in poroelastic media: A case study of the South Eugene Island field, Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Ajit; Appold, Martin S.; Nunn, Jeffrey A.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E?¢????12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E?¢????25 to 1E?¢????24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 105 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E?¢????3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fluid, or where sudden fracturing of overpressured hydrocarbon source sediments would allow the solitary waves to propagate as shock waves. Hydrocarbons

  16. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","applicationvnd.ms-excel","applicationvnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR Boiling Water Reactor."

  17. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on

  18. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic

  19. ARM Southern Great Plains Site Observations of the Smoke Pall Associated with the 1998 Central American Fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peppler, R A.; Bahrmann, C P.; Barnard, James C.); Campbell, J R.; Cheng, M.-D.; Ferrare, R. A.; Halthore, R N.; Heilman, L. A.; Laulainen, Nels S.); Lin, C.-J.; Ogren, J. A.; Poellot, M R.; Remer, L. A.; Sassen, K.; Spinhirne, J D.; Splitt, Mike E.; Turner, David D.)

    2000-11-01

    Drought-stricken areas of Central America and Mexico were victimized in 1998 by forest and brush fires that burned out of control during much of the first half of the year. Wind currents at various times during the episode helped transport smoke from these fires over the Gulf of Mexico and into portions of the U.S. Visibilities were greatly reduced during favorable flow periods from New Mexico to south Florida and northward to Wisconsin as a result of this smoke and haze. In response to the reduced visibilities and increased pollutants, public health advisories and information statements were issued by various agencies in Gulf Coast states and in Oklahoma.

  20. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  1. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  2. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  3. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  4. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-07-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications are in the process of being acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  5. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modelling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  6. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-12-31

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  7. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  8. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  9. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance

  10. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  11. Low-Btu coal-gasification-process design report for Combustion Engineering/Gulf States Utilities coal-gasification demonstration plant. [Natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil to natural gas or No. 2 fuel oil or low Btu gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrus, H E; Rebula, E; Thibeault, P R; Koucky, R W

    1982-06-01

    This report describes a coal gasification demonstration plant that was designed to retrofit an existing steam boiler. The design uses Combustion Engineering's air blown, atmospheric pressure, entrained flow coal gasification process to produce low-Btu gas and steam for Gulf States Utilities Nelson No. 3 boiler which is rated at a nominal 150 MW of electrical power. Following the retrofit, the boiler, originally designed to fire natural gas or No. 2 oil, will be able to achieve full load power output on natural gas, No. 2 oil, or low-Btu gas. The gasifier and the boiler are integrated, in that the steam generated in the gasifier is combined with steam from the boiler to produce full load. The original contract called for a complete process and mechanical design of the gasification plant. However, the contract was curtailed after the process design was completed, but before the mechanical design was started. Based on the well defined process, but limited mechanical design, a preliminary cost estimate for the installation was completed.

  12. Simple approximations for estimating quickly the motion and timing of salt diapir rise, overhang development, and associated thermal anomalies using present-day observations: Case history from the Gulf of Mexico and Danish North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerche, I. ); Thomsen, R.O. )

    1993-09-01

    Estimates of the upward motion of salt, due solely to buoyancy forces, through deposited and depositing sedimentary cover can be split into several parts: the critical thickness of sedimentary cover necessary to cause an underlying salt to become buoyant; the critical thickness of sedimentary cover necessary for a salt diapir to reach the sediment mudline in the absence of an impeding pressure of competent sediments opposing salt rise and in the absence of significant overpressure (both differential impedance and differential overpressure will slow the rise of the salt to the mudline); the effective speed of motion of the salt through the nonimpeding sediments during the salt's buoyant-ascent phase; current observed salt-top depth below mudline versus nonimpeded predicted salt-top depth leading to (a) minimum estimate of mechanical strength of competent resistive layers, and (b) an approximate estimate of buoyancy pressure of salt attempting to penetrate the resistive cover layer; uplift estimate of the overlying competent sediments because of the buoyancy pressure, in relation to observed uplift, leading to an estimate of salt-diapir rise speed since reaching the impeding formation; timing estimates of [open quotes]mushroom cap[close quotes] development of salt since emplacement of the resistive overlying layer and an estimate of the lateral competence of sedimentary beds ahead of the mushroom-salt sheet cap as a consequence of the observed mushroom extent; an estimate of evolving thermal anomalies around the dynamic salt/sediment system as a consequence of high-salt thermal conductivity. Such simple rough estimation methods are important in assessing the local and regional factors influencing the dynamic, thermal, and hydrocarbon retention factors in basinal sediments influenced by salt. Examples from the Gulf of Mexico and the Danish North Sea illustrate how to use both seismic and/or downhole data to perform the simple estimates.

  13. Gulf Hydrocarbon Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Houston, Texas Zip: 77002 Region: Texas Area Sector: Biofuels Product: Wholesale marketing of biodiesel and ethanol to refiners, blenders and petroleum distributors Website:...

  14. Gulf Power- Solar Thermal Water Heating Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A limited amount of funding is still available for 2015. Theprogram website will be updated if more fund become available.

  15. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Imports & Exports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline 2 2 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Reformulated 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Blended with Fuel Ethanol 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008-2016 Other 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010-2016 Conventional 2 2 0 0 0 0 2008-2016...

  16. Gulf Alternative Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Houston, Texas Zip: 77055 Product: Texas-based firm that has developed a cellulosic ethanol processing technology and plans to retrofit existing ethanol plants. Coordinates:...

  17. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #40

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-14

    On 11/12 Florida Power & Light (FPL) announced that crews had essentially completed Hurricane Wilma restoration efforts to all 3.2 million customers in South Florida who had been without power. Electricity restoration efforts are now essentially complete in Florida.

  18. Sandia Energy - Gulf Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Institute...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    topics of nuclear safety, safeguards, and security. Read the rest of the article at AME Info.com. By Todd Heinrichs|2015-05-11T20:43:37+00:00March 7th, 2012|Energy Assurance,...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Federal Offshore Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas. See Definitions, Sources, and Notes link above for more information on this table. Release Date: 12...

  20. Geopressured-geothermal energy, US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    Sixty-five papers are included. Eleven papers were entered into the data base previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for fifty-four. (MHR)

  1. EIA - Gulf of Mexico Energy Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Presentations & Conferences > Conferences > EIA 2008 Energy Conference Energy Information Administration 2008 Energy Conference: 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis Conference Videos now available Click presenter name to download PDF of presentation. Monday, April 7 7:30am- 9:00am Registration 9:00am- 10:30am Opening Session Welcome - Guy Caruso, EIA Administrator Keynote Speakers - Secretary Samuel Bodman (full text of speech), Secretary James Schlesinger Distinguished Guest

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    See full Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Previous Release Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Genealogy of Major U.S. Refiners Release date: September 18, 2013 figre 1. World energy consumption, 1990-2040. The structure of the U.S. petroleum refining industry has changed substantially over the past several years. In the diagram the companies shown on the right side are presently active in U.S. refining. The transactions over the past 25 years that created these companies also are shown. The

  3. Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,317,031 1,002,608 1,000,964 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 60,320 49,143 52,331 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 0 0 0 87,478 70,292 75,648 2007

  4. Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #39

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-11-09

    There are 49,300 customers without power in Florida as of 7:00 AM EST 11/9 due to Hurricane Wilma, down from a peak of about 3.6 million customers. Currently, less than 1 percent of the customers are without power in the state. This is the last report we will due on outages due to Hurricane Wilma.

  5. Final Gulf Coast Hurricanes Situation Report #46

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-26

    According to Entergy New Orleans, electricity has been restored to the vast majority of residents and businesses in the city, except in a few isolated areas that sustained severe devastation from Hurricane Katrina.

  6. World crude output overcomes Persian Gulf disruption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    Several OPEC producers made good on their promises to replace 2.7 MMbpd of oil exports that vanished from the world market after Iraq took over Kuwait. Even more incredibly, they accomplished this while a breathtaking 1.2- MMbopd reduction in Soviet output took place during the course of 1991. After Abu Dhabi, Indonesia, Iran, Libya, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela turned the taps wide open, their combined output rose 2.95 MMbopd. Put together with a 282,000-bopd increase by Norway and contributions from smaller producers, this enabled world oil production to remain within 400,000 bopd of its 1990 level. The 60.5-MMbopd average was off by just 0.7%. This paper reports that improvement took place in five of eight regions. Largest increases were in Western Europe and Africa. Greatest reductions occurred in Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Fifteen nations produced 1 MMbopd or more last year, compared with 17 during 1990.

  7. Central-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Central- ized system Distrib- uted system Both central- ized and distrib- uted systems Central- ized system Distrib- uted system Both central- ized and distrib- uted systems All buildings 5,557 4,423 3,348 690 385 87,093 79,015 47,534 12,688 18,793 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,777 2,032 1,653 322 57 8,041 6,102 4,906 1,011 185 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 992 789 120 82 8,900 7,236 5,731 890 615 10,001 to 25,000 884 775 538 143 93 14,105 12,401 8,549 2,318 1,534 25,001 to 50,000

  8. Geology of the Pavana geothermal area, Departamento de Choluteca, Honduras, Central America: Field report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eppler, D.B.; Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Flores, W.; Paredes, J.R.; Duffield, W.A.

    1987-09-01

    The Pavana geothermal area is located in southern Honduras near the Gulf of Fonseca. This region is underlain by late Tertiary volcanic rocks. Within ranges near the geothermal manifestations, the rock sequences is characterized by intermediate to mafic laharic breccias and lavas overlain by silicic tuffs and lavas, which are in turn overlain by intermediate to mafic breccias, lavas, and tuffs. The nearest Quaternary volcanoes are about 40 km to the southwest, where the chain of active Central American volcanoes crosses the mouth of the Gulf of Fonseca. Structure of the Pavana area is dominated by generally northwest-trending, southwest-dipping normal faults. This structure is topographically expressed as northwest-trending escarpments that bound blocks of bedrock separated by asymmetric valleys that contain thin alluvial deposits. Thermal waters apparently issue from normal faults and are interpreted as having been heated during deep circulation along fault zones within a regional environment of elevated heat flow. Natural outflow from the main thermal area is about 3000 l/min of 60/sup 0/C water. Geothermometry of the thermal waters suggests a reservoir base temperature of about 150/sup 0/C.

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Lease Sale for Offshore Tracts in the Central Gulf of Mexico: On October 3, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) announced that the Central Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Lease Sale for Offshore Tracts in the Central Gulf of Mexico: On October 3, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) announced that the Central Gulf of Mexico Oil and Gas Lease Sale...

  11. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the import and export of natural gas, including LNG, unless it finds that the import or export is not consistent with the public interest. Public Comment Opportunities No events...

  12. Other Locales Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in excess of 1500 W 1m2 during an intense cold air outbreak in the winter (Raman and Riordan 1988; Akkarapuram and Raman 1988). Interestingly, large heat fluxes occur during...

  13. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2013 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2013 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0...

  14. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    response, was critical to a productive effort. Adhering to a common framework for command and control minimized confusion and allowed multiple agencies to work together. At...

  15. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin ... Coalbed Methane Fields, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  16. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Lease Condensate Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

  17. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Lease Condensate Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

  18. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Extensions 1 16 0 31 21 5 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 62 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 16 11 0 14 2 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 55 53 50 72 ...

  19. ,"Henry Hub Gulf Coast Natural Gas Spot Price ($/MMBTU)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...162013" ,"Release Date:","9182013" ,"Next Release Date:","9252013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngwhhdd.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:tonto.eia.govdnav...

  20. Operational testing of geopressure geothermal wells on the Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsberry, F.L.

    1983-01-01

    A combined-cycle electric-power and pipeline-gas production process is proposed for the exploitation of the geopressured geothermal resource. It allows the operator to shift a portion of the production between the electric grid and the gas pipeline markets. On-site equipment and operating labor requirements are minimized. Thermal efficiencies are based upon sound application of thermodynamic principles and are competitive with large-scale plant operations. The economics presented are based upon 1983 avoided power costs and NGPA Section 102 gas prices.

  1. Gulf of Mexico-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 3.82 3.02 3.84 9.80 2.3 per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 3.96 3.74 2012 3.18 3.03 2.70 2.65 2.45 2.74 3.00 3.22 3.11 3.38 4.30 3.76 2013 3.68 3.67 4.06 4.76 4.43 4.22 4.31 3.88 2014 8.82 9.67 28.87 4.98 4.17 2015 3.38 4.68 3.53 2.93 3.10 2.23 1.97 2016 2.29 1.93 1.51 1.70 1.7

    Feet)

    Year Jan Feb Mar

  2. Gulf of Mexico-Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    88,219 719,435 696,242 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 41,882 33,146 35,187 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 51,010

  3. Gulf of Mexico-Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,618 74,637 98,497 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 6,008 5,009 6,741 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 9,793

  4. Gulf of Mexico-Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    119,456 111,949 111,147 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 6,647 5,953 5,298 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 7,404

  5. Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View ...

  6. Gulf Canada donor refined bitumen heavy oil upgrading process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisher, I.P.; Souhrada, F.; Woods, H.J.

    1982-09-01

    The method is a moderate-pressure, noncatalytic alternative which has been shown to be applicable to a wide range of bitumens and heavy oils. It offers the potential of efficiency and reliability at a low capitalized investment and operating cost. The raw distillates are separated from the bitumen or heavy oil and the vacuum residuum is blended with an efficient hydrogen donor stream containing a high proportion of substituted tetralins, and is thermally cracking in the liquid phase. The exhausted donor is recovered from the middle distillate reactor product, reactivated by fixed bed hydrogenation before being recycled to the reactor. The process can be self-sufficient in donor and is independent of the metal content of the feed. The products are blanded with the raw distillates and further hydrogenated to high quality petroleum products. While the primary hydrogen consumption is low, the reconstituted naphtha, distillate and gas oil fractions require less hydrogen than the coker liquids to achieve acceptable refinery feed quality. 1 figure, 9 tables.

  7. Iraq cracks a few heads in the Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, J.

    1990-08-20

    Last month Saddam Hussein charged that oil overproduction by his neighbors was costing Iraq dearly. When an OPEC meeting collapsed last week, he sent 100,000 troops to seize Kuwait, which he had accused of stealing oil. The US is scrambling to organize a Western boycott, but some analysts question just how effective such a more would be.

  8. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Lease Condensate Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    92 83 64 51 51 65 1981-2014 Adjustments -3 -1 0 -2 1 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 27 15 26 30 14 32 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 3 9 29 19 4 2 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 4 1 0 ...

  9. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1,822 1,456 1,015 643 535 607 1981-2014 Adjustments 6 -16 1 -65 110 94 1981-2014 Revision Increases 506 240 244 220 103 147 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 379 428 489 345 80 135 ...

  10. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Lease Condensate...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    134 129 129 98 88 108 1981-2014 Adjustments -4 3 0 -3 -1 18 2009-2014 Revision Increases 40 44 30 30 23 23 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 31 28 26 43 14 16 2009-2014 Sales 5 13 8 7 ...

  11. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Natural Gas Reserves...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,451 2,145 1,554 1,497 1,508 1,445 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,822 1,456 1,015 643 535 607 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet ...

  12. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,362 8,896 8,156 7,291 6,482 6,890 1981-2014 Adjustments 2 -106 -28 -429 76 548 1981-2014 Revision Increases 1,637 2,617 2,050 2,229 1,017 1,299 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 1,417 ...

  13. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    629 689 539 854 973 838 1981-2014 Adjustments 4 -1 0 -20 7 2 1981-2014 Revision Increases 90 98 134 389 200 870 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 68 33 223 88 83 890 1981-2014 Sales 0 9 ...

  14. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,802 5,457 4,359 3,346 2,502 3,027 1981-2014 Adjustments -3 -25 72 -296 111 499 1981-2014 Revision Increases 997 1,814 740 866 443 561 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 1,021 1,000 ...

  15. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,863 3,793 4,196 4,358 4,293 4,253 1981-2014 Adjustments 7 -14 -21 -94 -94 135 1981-2014 Revision Increases 693 907 1,410 1,489 623 812 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 442 841 1,152 ...

  16. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9,665 9,250 8,555 7,704 6,795 7,280 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 5,802 5,457 4,359 3,346 2,502 3,027 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet ...

  17. Gulf Power - Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rebates.asp State Florida Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free Energy Select Programmable Thermostat and Time of Use Control: Free HVAC Maintenance:...

  18. Gulf Power - Commercial Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    index.asp State Florida Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Energy Audit: Free HVAC and Hotel Room Occupancy Sensors: 75unit Interior Lighting: 0.15watt Air...

  19. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Summary

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dry Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Proved Reserves as of 12/31 1992-2007 Estimated Production 1992-2007 Production (Million Cubic Feet) Number of Producing Gas Wells 1,852 1,559 1,474 1,146 1,400 1998-2014 Gross Withdrawals 2,259,144 1,830,913 1,527,875 1,326,697 1,275,213 1,351,655 1997-2015 From Gas Wells 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 817,340 706,413 1997-2014 From Oil Wells 559,235 476,984 513,961 509,357 568,801 1997-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

  20. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Summary as of Dec. 31 9,665 9,250 8,555 7,704 6,795 7,280 1981-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 5,802 5,457 4,359 3,346 2,502 3,027 1981-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 3,863 3,793 4,196 4,358 4,293 4,253 1981-2014 Dry Natural Gas 9,362 8,896 8,156 7,291 6,482 6,890 1981-2014 Natural Gas Liquids (Million Barrels) 1981 Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separat

    5,802 5,457 4,359 3,346 2,502 3,027 1981-2014 Adjustments -3 -25

  1. Gulf of Mexico-Alabama Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    117,738 96,587 95,078 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 5,783 5,035 5,105 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 7,442

  2. Gulf of Mexico-Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    88,219 719,435 696,242 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 41,882 33,146 35,187 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 51,010

  3. Gulf of Mexico-Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,618 74,637 98,497 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 6,008 5,009 6,741 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 9,793

  4. Gulf of Mexico-Texas Natural Gas Plant Processing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    119,456 111,949 111,147 2012-2014 Total Liquids Extracted (Thousand Barrels) 6,647 5,953 5,298 2012-2014 NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent (Million Cubic Feet) 7,404

  5. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The natural resources of the Gulf’s ecosystem are vital to many of the region’s industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood...

  6. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31

  7. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    054 2.038 2.052 2.076 2.118 2.113 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.056 2.037 2.053 2.077 2.127 2.113 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.045 2.039 2.046 2.071 2.088 2.115 1994-2016 Regular 1.944 1.928 1.938 1.964 2.009 2.005 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.947 1.928 1.939 1.965 2.018 2.005 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.936 1.928 1.937 1.963 1.980 2.005 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.195 2.179 2.204 2.218 2.259 2.251 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.195 2.174 2.207 2.219 2.267 2.247

  8. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Total Crude Oil and Products Imports

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    MTBE (Oxygenate) Other Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol (Renewable) Biomass-Based Diesel (Renewable) Other Renewable Diesel Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate F.O., 15 ppm and under Distillate F.O., 15 to 500 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 500 ppm Distillate F.O., 501 to 2000 ppm Distillate F.O., Greater than 2000 ppm Kerosene Finished Aviation Gasoline Aviation Gasoline Blending Components Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Special Naphthas Residual Fuel Oil Residual F.O., Less than 0.31% Sulfur Residual F.O., 0.31

  9. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5,242,169 5,110,327 5,052,936 2000's 4,967,694 5,066,015 4,547,627 4,447,348 4,000,685 3,150,818...

  10. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry Natural Gas Production ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA 2000's NA 5,027,623 4,511,942 4,406,450 3,969,450 3,132,089 2,901,969 2,798,718 2,314,342 ...

  11. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    106,086 112,137 108,752 101,117 111,581 102,289 1997-2016 From Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2016 From Oil Wells NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2016 From Shale Gas Wells NA NA NA NA NA ...

  12. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5,242,169 5,110,327 5,052,936 2000's 4,967,694 5,066,015 4,547,627 4,447,348 4,000,685 3,150,818 ...

  13. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5,206,023 5,076,496 5,029,704 2000's 4,934,387 5,027,623 4,511,942 4,406,450 3,969,450 3,132,089 ...

  14. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 429,954 394,104 436,222 420,503 432,864 423,879 431,157 436,557 425,610 437,613 422,552 438,287 1998 441,123 396,059 ...

  15. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. ...

  16. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Proved Nonproducing

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves 2,013 1,595 2,597 2,130 2,406 2,204 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 66 60 57 39 47 42 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 4,446 3,882 4,290 3,466 3,360 3,275 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 2,660 2,367 1,975 1,515 1,238 1,308 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,786 1,515 2,315 1,951 2,122 1,967

  17. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Proved Nonproducing Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    125 102 52 34 33 84 1996-2014 Lease Condensate (million bbls) 35 29 20 8 11 21 1998-2014 Total Gas (billion cu ft) 1,557 874 561 296 320 487 1996-2014 Nonassociated Gas (billion cu ft) 1,096 502 368 235 231 273 1996-2014 Associated Gas (billion cu ft) 461 372 193 61 89 214

  18. Massive Gulf leak ushers in age of tough oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-08-15

    A recent public opinion poll released on June 24, 2010, concluded that 63 percent of those surveyed support the idea that reducing emissions and increasing alternative energy are worth pursuing even if that means increased costs. The Energy Information Administration's latest Annual Energy Outlook shows that the current financial crisis has reduced U.S. oil imports from their all time peak of 60 percent and projects a gradually declining percentage through 2035 under the reference case, and even lower if oil prices remain high -- reaching $210 per barrel by 2035 in 2008 dollars.

  19. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2014 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 ...

  20. Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are located over a series of rifts in the Earth's crust which are filling with sediment from above, chiefly from the Colorado River, and magmatic material from below. The...

  1. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG ...

  2. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    From Gas Wells 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 817,340 706,413 1997-2014 From Oil Wells 559,235 476,984 513,961 509,357 568,801 1997-2014 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 2007-2014 ...

  3. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 52,019 49,269 53,493 51,256 53,139 52,707 52,560 54,991 54,568 58,293 58,223 60,066 1998 61,627 55,316 62,430 61,140 ...

  4. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 660,077 733,270 830,259 2000's 882,336 922,935 828,458 883,465 787,047 677,426 643,556 610,955 ...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update: Gulf South Pipeline Company began scheduled maintenance on the Jackson Compressor Station in central Mississippi on Tuesday, September 12. The maintenance...

  6. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update: Gulf South Pipeline Company began scheduled maintenance on the Jackson Compressor Station in central Mississippi on Tuesday, September 12. The maintenance...

  7. The Alternative Fuel Price Report

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    New England New England New England Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Central Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Lower Atlantic Gulf Coast Gulf Coast Gulf Coast Gulf Coast West Coast West Coast West Coast West Coast Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Rocky Mountain Midwest Midwest Midwest Midwest Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions Map of U.S. Regions THE ALTERNATIVE FUEL PRICE REPORT Alternative Fuel Prices Across the Nation

  8. PADD 1 and PADD 3 Transportation Fuels Markets - Energy Information

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration Regions Overview New England Central Atlantic Southeast Florida North Louisiana-Arkansas Louisiana Gulf Coast Texas Gulf Coast Texas Inland New Mexico PADD 1 and PADD 3 Transportation Fuels Markets Release date: February 3, 2016 Introduction This study examines supply, consumption, and distribution of transportation fuels in Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 1 and 3, or the U.S. East Coast and the Gulf Coast, respectively. The East Coast region includes

  9. Petroleum geology of Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America, from Guatemala to Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scrutton, M.E.; Escalante, G.F.

    1986-07-01

    Exploration for hydrocarbons along the Pacific margin of Central America and northern South America has been limited and spasmodic. Less than 100 exploration wells have been drilled, with nearly 50 of these being in the Santa Elena, Progreso, and Guayas basins in Ecuador. Shows have been reported in some wells, and a few oil seeps are known. The only commercial production established to date has been from the Santa Elena Peninsula in Ecuador in the extreme south of the study area. Understanding of the geology in this part of the continental margin is incomplete at best. This paper reviews present-day knowledge in an attempt to define the sedimentary basins better, to characterize their structure and stratigraphy, and to assess their petroleum prospects. The area of continental margin reviewed is to the north, located northwest of the trench system where oceanic crust of the Cocos plate subducts under the Caribbean plate, and to the south, where the northern part of the Nazca plate collides with the South American plate. This plate tectonic setting forms the framework on which local structural and sedimentary events have created a series of relatively small trench-slope and forearc basins in what is now the coastal plain and adjacent offshore area of Central and South America, south or west of a line of mountain ranges with active volcanism. Sedimentary fill is generally of Tertiary age. The basins and subbasins recognized and described include: in Ecuador - Guayas, Santa Elena, Progreso, Valdivia, Bajo Grande, Manta, Muisne-Esmeraldas, and Borbon; in Colombia - Choco-Pacific; in Panama - Gulf of Panama basin complex (Santiago, Tonosi, Sambu), and Burica-Chiriqui; in Costa Rica - Terraba and Coronado/Tempisque; in Nicaragua - San Juan del Sur; and in the Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala - the Pacific coastal basin.

  10. Gulf Stream Locale P. Michael and M. L. Daum Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Assessment Recommendations | Department of Energy Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment Recommendations Guiding Principles for Successfully Implementing Industrial Energy Assessment Recommendations This implementation guide provides key principles and activities that will lead to the successful implementation of recommendations during energy assessments. Implementation Guidebook (April 2011) (7.11 MB) More Documents & Publications Unveiling the

  11. Assessment of the geothermal/geopressure potential of the Gulf Coastal Plan of Alabama. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, G.V.; Wang, G.C.; Mancini, E.A.; Benson, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    Geothermal and geopressure as well as geologic and geophysical data were studied to evaluate the potential for future development of geothermal resources underlying the Alabama Coastal Plain. Wire-line log data compiled and interpreted from more than 1300 oil and gas test wells included maximum recorded temperatures, mud weights, rock resistivities as related to geopressure, formation tops, fault locations, and depths to basement rock. The Alabama Coastal Plain area is underlain by a conduction dominated, deep sedimentary basin where geothermal gradients are low to moderate (1.0 to 1.8/sup 0/F/100 feet). In some areas of southwest Alabama, abnormally high temperatures are found in association with geopressured zones within the Haynesville Formation of Jurassic age; however, rocks of poor reservoir quality dominate this formation, with the exception of a 200-square-mile area centered in southernmost Clarke County where a porous and permeable sand unit is encased within massive salt deposits of the lower Haynesville. The results of a petrograhic study of the Smackover Formation, which underlies the Haynesville, indicate that this carbonate rock unit has sufficient porosity in some areas to be considered a potential geothermal reservoir. Future development of geothermal resources in south Alabama will be restricted to low or moderate temperature, non-electric applications, which constitute a significant potential energy source for applications in space heating and cooling and certain agricultural and industrial processes.

  12. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  13. Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettleson, David A

    1999-10-28

    The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of three terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. The products of the effort will be a series of technical reports detailing the study procedures, results, and conclusions which contribute to the transfer of technology to the scientific community, petroleum industry, and state and federal agencies.

  14. Assessment and Forecasting Natural Gas Reserve Appreciation in the Gulf Coast Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, E.M.; Fisher, W.L.

    1997-10-01

    Reserve appreciation, also called reserve growth, is the increase in the estimated ultimate recovery (the sum of year end reserves and cumulative production) from fields subsequent to discovery from extensions, infield drilling, improved recovery of in-place resources, new pools, and intrapool completions. In recent years, reserve appreciation has become a major component of total U.S. annual natural gas reserve additions. Over the past 15 years, reserve appreciation has accounted for more than 80 percent of all annual natural gas reserve additions in the U.S. lower 48 states (Figure 1). The rise of natural gas reserve appreciation basically came with the judgment that reservoirs were much more geologically complex than generally thought, and they hold substantial quantities of natural gas in conventionally movable states that are not recovered by typical well spacing and vertical completion practices. Considerable evidence indicates that many reservoirs show significant geological variations and compartmentalization, and that uniform spacing, unless very dense, does not efficiently tap and drain a sizable volume of the reservoir (Figure 2). Further, by adding reserves within existing infrastructure and commonly by inexpensive recompletion technology in existing wells, reserve appreciation has become the dominant factor in ample, low-cost natural gas supply. Although there is a wide range in natural gas reserve appreciation potential by play and that potential is a function of drilling and technology applied, current natural gas reserve appreciation studies are gross, averaging wide ranges, disaggregated by broad natural gas provinces, and calculated mainly as a function of time. A much more detailed analysis of natural gas reserve appreciation aimed at assessing long-term sustainability, technological amenability, and economic factors, however, is necessary. The key to such analysis is a disaggregation to the play level. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of hydrocarbon pools within a basin. Typically, fields within a play share common hydrocarbon type, reservoir genesis, trapping mechanism, and source. Plays provide the comprehensive reference needed to more efficiently develop reservoirs, to extend field limits, and to better assess opportunities for intrafield exploration and development in mature natural gas provinces. Play disaggregation reveals current production trends and highlights areas for further exploration by identifying and emphasizing areas for potential reserve appreciation.

  15. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT....

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PDF icon October 2014 - February 2015 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR PIERIDAE ENERGY (USA), LTD - DKT. NO. ...

  16. Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy This document contains a request for information in support of the Guidelines for Home Energy Professionals Project request_for_information.pdf (110.17 KB) More Documents & Publications The Standard Work Specifications for Single-Family Home Energy Upgrades are now available€ at your fingertips! SWS Online Tool now includes Multifamily Content, plus a How-To Webinar Final Report - Sun Rise New England - Open for Buisness

    STD-3007-2007 February 2007 DOE STANDARD

  17. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To start saving money, Texas City installed more energy efficient lights and applied UV reduction films to windows. Learn more.

  18. Hope for Re-establishing Microbial Populations in the Gulf of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23Germantown Building ... Enlarge Photo jpg image, 202489 bytes Image courtesy of Green Fire Productions under a ...

  19. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Everett, MA Liquefied Natural Gas Imports From Yemen (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,688 5,591 5,465 2,843 5,608 2,865 5,622 5,537 5,424 2012 2,805 2,765 2,721 2,589 2,899 2,837 2013 2,728 2,763 2,806 2,728 2014 2,329 2,806 2,871 2015 2,234 2,373 2,834 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next

  20. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Natural Gas Liquids

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,856 12,120 10,820 9,853 8,567 8,968 1990-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 7,633 6,916 5,374 3,989 3,037 3,634 1990-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 5,223 5,204 5,446 5,864 5,530 5,334 1990-2014 Dry Natural Gas 12,552 11,765 10,420 9,392 8,193 8,527 1990 Lease Separation

    7,633 6,916 5,374 3,989 3,037 3,634 1990-2014 Adjustments 2 -41 73 -361 221 593 1990-2014 Revision Increases 1,511 2,054 984 1,086 546 708 1990-2014 Revision

  1. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves 03 304 252 354 359 352 2009-2014 Adjustments -1 -1 0 -10 6 8 2009-2014 Revision Increases 61 51 80 181 64 399 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 17 27 86 41 19 340 2009-2014 Sales 0 2 0 6 11 5 2009-2014 Acquisitions 2 6 4 5 13 4 2009-2014 Extensions 1 16 0 31 21 5 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 62 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 16 11 0 14 2 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 55 53 50 72 71 78

    2,451 2,145 1,554 1,450 1,450 1,397 1981-2014 Adjustments

  2. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Dec. 31 740 725 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 9 3 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 731 722 711 652 264 243 1979-2014 Dry Natural Gas 739 724 710 651 261 240 Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation

    9 3 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Adjustments -1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Revision Increases 8 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2014 Revision Decreases 0 5 3 0 0 0 1979-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0

  3. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Million Cubic Feet) from Coalbed Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2002 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2003 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2004 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2006 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

  4. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 52,019 49,269 53,493 51,256 53,139 52,707 52,560 54,991 54,568 58,293 58,223 60,066 1998 61,627 55,316 62,430 61,140 64,817 62,487 63,476 66,461 47,550 60,066 61,118 66,781 1999 67,034 59,567 65,543 66,757 69,249 67,635 73,219 71,292 70,051 75,680 72,457 71,777 2000 68,963 64,894 73,588 69,752 74,232 74,705 78,930 76,992 73,849 76,458 73,834 76,139 2001 76,186 65,387 75,140 78,357 81,992 78,635 78,616 73,346

  5. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas (Million Cubic Feet) from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2008 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2014 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2015 NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 2016 NA NA NA NA NA NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. 3-D seismic and reservoir modeling, ram prospect, Viosca Knoll Block 912, offshore Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carew, W.; Ostendorf, P.F. ); Krum, G.K. )

    1993-09-01

    Ram prospect is a large stratigraphic trap located in Viosca Knoll Block 912/956/957, offshore Alabama in 3500-ft water depth. Reservoirs are Pliocene and Miocene gas- and oil-bearing deep-water sands deposited as fan complexes in an intraslope basin. The field has been proved by a total of 12 well penetrations and is nearing the development stage. In an effort to predict reservoir performance and recovery efficiencies, we constructed three-dimensional (3-D) reservoir models Exxon's in-house 3-D modeling program (GEOSET). Reservoir simulation studies will be based upon these 3-D geological models. We used 3-D seismic data to map seismic attributes around the prospect and well control to calibrate the seismic attributes based on known reservoir characteristics, thereby deriving a facies map for the entire field. Top/base structure, gross isopach, facies polygons, porosity, and Vshale were input into GEOSET to define the overall reservoir container and fill. The paucity of well data was compensated by using the 3-D-seismic based facies as a guide to filling polygons and by creating [open quotes]pseudowells[close quotes] from the real well data. These pseudowells aided in correlating within and between polygons. The resulting 3-D models (total porosity, effective porosity, Vsand) faithfully reflect the heterogeneity inferred from both 3-D seismic data and well control and provide visualization of reservoir continuity much better than models derived from well data alone. The models serve as a framework within which one can perform reservoir simulations and run various sensitivities. Additionally, the GEOSET porosity models can provide an alternative reservoir volume calculation.

  7. Sequence stratigraphic and depositional framework of the paleocene lower Wilcox Strata, northwest Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xue, L.; Galloway, W.E. )

    1993-09-01

    The lower Wilcox (LW) strata comprise a single genetic sequence and are subdivided into four subsequences (I-IV, from oldest to youngest) based on regional flooding surfaces. The LW sequence is bounded by maximum flooding surfaces associated with the Big Shale at the top and Midway marine shale at the bottom, and is dated at 56.5 Ma and 59.0 Ma. The LW sequence shows extensive shelf-margin progradation, high sedimentation rate, and thick progradational parasequences. LW depositional systems are outlined on the basis of the net-sandstone isopach maps, which are contoured using a log database of about 500 wells. Subsequence I includes several fluvial-dominated delta systems, reflecting the initial progradation of the LW depositional episode. Subsequence III contains the classic Rockdale delta system, Cotulla barrier-bar system, and strand plain system described by Fisher and McGowen. Subsequence III is the turning point of the depositional styles within the LW genetic sequence. The progradational patterns of sequences I and II were replaced by the retrogradational style of subsequence III, which contain s deposits of wave-dominated delta, strand plain, barrier-bar, lagoon, and shelf-slope systems. Subsequence IV also shows a wave-dominated style. Several wave-dominated delta systems migrated landward. The delta-type evolution in the Houston embayment (major depocenter) from fluvial-dominated through wave-modified, to wave-dominated and backstepping delta systems reflects the progression from progradational subsequences I and II to retrogradational subsequences III and IV.

  8. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 432,713 396,681 438,926 423,131 435,592 426,888 434,325 439,712 428,689 440,668 425,849 441,756 1998 443,757 398,519 448,486 438,144 457,815 435,237 439,093 443,144 336,241 421,315 414,058 434,518 1999 436,171 395,293 435,012 424,724 432,489 414,495 431,981 424,513 408,237 421,312 409,660 419,049 2000 411,264 385,685 418,062 398,966 413,434 405,362 422,701 423,114 411,610 428,272 415,005 434,219 2001 434,184 398,663

  9. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2014 Outlook for Gulf of...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... as well as refineries, gas processing plants, and power generating stations onshore. ... 3 Despite the potential for significant outages if a strong hurricane were to pass ...

  10. Smokes from the oil fires following the Gulf War: A review and new perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radke, L.F.

    1996-12-31

    Emissions resulting from the oil fires in Kuwait and environmental effects from those emissions are described.

  11. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Strategic Petroleum Reserve, Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR), located in Louisiana and Texas, and conducted in two segments from November 30 through December 11, 1987, and February 1 through 10, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by a multidisciplinary team of environmental specialists led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with SPR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involved the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at SPR, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the SPR Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the SPR Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 200 refs., 50 figs., 30 tabs.

  12. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Condensate Proved Reserves ,704 4,043 4,567 4,602 4,591 4,352 2009-2014 Adjustments 2 -3 -2 -93 -265 139 2009-2014 Revision Increases 616 790 1,861 1,077 567 648 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 174 183 1,354 760 322 812 2009-2014 Sales 20 54 42 187 283 67 2009-2014 Acquisitions 14 102 52 245 216 73 2009-2014 Extensions 158 61 29 113 143 82 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 34 10 410 7 181 140 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 57 134 2 20 150 7 2009-2014 Estimated Production 522

  13. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2,451 2,145 1,554 1,450 1,450 1,397 1981-2014 Adjustments 20 -17 1 -131 101 100 1981-2014 Revision Increases 596 338 378 590 292 983 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 447 461 712 419 156 990 1981-2014 Sales 34 139 23 75 170 36 2000-2014 Acquisitions 22 218 70 42 69 67 2000-2014 Extensions 19 140 13 93 83 43 1981-2014 New Field Discoveries 260 0 0 18 0 0 1981-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 77 24 0 55 17 26 1981-2014 Estimated Production 454 409 318 277 236 246

  14. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wells (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,582,092 4,377,057 4,222,677 2000's 4,085,358 4,143,080 3,719,169 3,563,883 3,213,638 2,473,392 2,270,575 2,202,242 1,848,290 1,877,722 2010's 1,699,908 1,353,929 1,013,914 817,340 706,413

  15. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Egypt (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.86 -- -- --

  16. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Egypt (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 12.86

  17. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 13.00 -- -- --

  18. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 13.00

  19. Fact #933: July 11, 2016 Texas, North Dakota, and the Gulf of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0.00 Mississippi 68.02 Missouri 0.38 Montana 78.48 Nebraska 8.12 Nevada 0.77 New Hampshire 0.00 New Jersey 0.00 New Mexico 410.49 New York 0.93 North Carolina 0.00 North ...

  20. Gulf Stream Locale R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    By measuring the upwelling infrared radiation from the earth- atmosphere system in several ... from the GOES V AS. Statistics of cloud cover during this period are also presented. ...

  1. Twenty years of sedimentary change and diagenesis, Qatar Peninsula, Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, E.A.

    1988-02-01

    Re-examination in February 1986 of areas studied by the author in 1966 and 1967 revealed rapid rates of sedimentation and diagenesis along the east coast of the Qatar Peninsula. At Ras Um Sa on the north-east side of Qatar, a series of chenier-like beaches and curved spits is building southward under the influence of longshore currents. Beach and spit growth increasingly protects the shoreline and allows tidal flats to form in their lee. As these spits accrete, they become armored on their lagoonal side by beachrock formation. In the last 20 years a spit approximately 1/2 km long has grown, and beachrock has already armored its recurved lagoonal side. At Umm Said on the southeast side of Qatar, seawardly accreting barchan dunes composed of quartz sand have built a 40-km long, 10-km wide sabkha as thick as 30 m. Aerial and ground photographs show that certain dunes near the seaward edge of the sabkha have migrated into the sea and have contributed to shoreline accretion. The observed rate of dune migration suggests that within approximately 100 years the remaining quartz sands will be depleted and blown into the sea because there is no replenishment of the dune field. Subsequently, the area will revert to one of carbonate deposition. Fine-grained dolomite is presently precipitating in interstitial brines in the landwardmost portions of this unusual sabkha. In the geologic record, such a deposit would be an anomalous, porous and permeable, cross-bedded, linear, 30-m thick, dolomite-cemented sandstone body encased in carbonate sediments. A modern model such as the one at Umm Said can provide useful clues for determining the origin of similar deposits in ancient rocks.

  2. Site Selection for DOE/JIP Gas Hydrate Drilling in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Riedel, M.; Cochran, J.R.; Boswell, R.M.; Kumar, Pushpendra; Sathe, A.V.

    2008-07-01

    Studies of geologic and geophysical data from the offshore of India have revealed two geologically distinct areas with inferred gas hydrate occurrences: the passive continental margins of the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin. The Indian National Gas Hydrate Program (NGHP) Expedition 01 was designed to study the occurrence of gas hydrate off the Indian Peninsula and along the Andaman convergent margin with special emphasis on understanding the geologic and geochemical controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate in these two diverse settings. NGHP Expedition 01 established the presence of gas hydrates in Krishna- Godavari, Mahanadi and Andaman basins. The expedition discovered one of the richest gas hydrate accumulations yet documented (Site 10 in the Krishna-Godavari Basin), documented the thickest and deepest gas hydrate stability zone yet known (Site 17 in Andaman Sea), and established the existence of a fully-developed gas hydrate system in the Mahanadi Basin (Site 19).

  3. U.S. Total Propane (Consumer Grade) Prices by Sales Type

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New England (PADD 1A) Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Midwest (PADD 2) Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) West Coast ...

  4. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Meanwhile, a tropical system in the central Gulf of Mexico could become a tropical depression during the next 24 hours. Energy producers active in the area have been monitoring...

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meanwhile, a tropical system in the central Gulf of Mexico could become a tropical depression during the next 24 hours. Energy producers active in the area have been monitoring...

  6. No. 2 Diesel, Low-Sulfur Prices - Sales to End Users

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) - - - - - - 1994-2016 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) - - - - - - 1994-2016 Midwest (PADD 2) - - - - - - 1994-2016 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) - - - - - - 1994-2016 Rocky Mountain (PADD 4) - - - - - - 1994-2016 West Coast (PADD 5)

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Tuesday, November 22, the availability of Proposed Notice of Lease Sale 196, an offshore oil and gas lease sale in the central Gulf of Mexico. The proposed lease sale, scheduled...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    11, 2005, the availability of the Final Notice of Lease Sales 194 and 197. Both offshore oil and gas lease sales are scheduled to take place on March 16, 2005. Central Gulf Lease...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Leasing. The U. S. Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) held a sale of offshore oil and natural gas leases in the Central Gulf of Mexico on March 20,...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11, 2005, the availability of the Final Notice of Lease Sales 194 and 197. Both offshore oil and gas lease sales are scheduled to take place on March 16, 2005. Central Gulf Lease...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Leasing. The U. S. Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service (MMS) held a sale of offshore oil and natural gas leases in the Central Gulf of Mexico on March 20,...

  12. Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

  13. EA-1792: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to support research on floating offshore wind turbine platforms. This project would support the mission, vision, and goals of DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Wind and Water Power Program to improve performance, lower costs, and accelerate deployment of innovative wind power technologies. Development of offshore wind energy technologies would help the nation reduce its greenhouse gas emissions, diversify its energy supply, provide cost-competitive electricity to key coastal regions, and stimulate revitalization of key sectors of the economy.

  14. Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

  15. The use of nonmarine palynomorphs as correlation tools in rapidly deposited upper tertiary sediments of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ravn, R.L. ); D'Ablaing, J.A. )

    1993-09-01

    Rapidly deposited upper Tertiary sediments can pose significant correlation problems for the biostratigrapher using foraminifera or calcareous nannoplankton because the abundance of marine organisms commonly is greatly diluted. In contrast, such sediments often contain abundant pollen and spores. This palynological population was collected by the proto-Mississippi and perhaps other rivers from a huge hinterland source area probably comparable to that of the Mississippi drainage today. The sediment therefore reflects a general floral population over a large region and may be expected to record important fluctuations in constituent elements of the flora due to climatic changes over time. A secondary overprint of physical sorting also may influence the relative distributions of certain forms. Although not strongly useful as an age-dating tool (the vast majority of forms occurring in Miocene or younger strata represent parent plant types that still exist today), these palynomorph populations do show strong potential as tools for correlation based on quantitative analyses. Palynological [open quotes]logs[close quotes] can be produced using inexpensive standard spreadsheet software and various mathematical evaluation techniques. An example from the Pliocene of offshore Louisiana demonstrates that numerous potential correlation horizons can be defined in a relatively brief time interval in a section in which standard marine microfossils are of little use owing to their scarcity.

  16. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 4: Bibliography (annotated only for all major reports)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    This bibliography contains US Department of Energy sponsored Geopressured-Geothermal reports published after 1984. Reports published prior to 1984 are documented in the Geopressured Geothermal bibliography Volumes 1, 2, and 3 that the Center for Energy Studies at the University of Texas at Austin compiled in May 1985. It represents reports, papers and articles covering topics from the scientific and technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to the social, environmental, and legal considerations of exploiting those reservoirs for their energy resources.

  17. Statement by Secretary W. Bodman on Senate Passage of S. 3711 Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "I would like to commend the leadership of Chairman Domenici and the U.S. Senate for passing legislation that will help strengthen our nation's energy security by expanding the development of crude...

  18. Maps/Directions | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Summary Maps of Selected State Subdivisions Map 1: Alaska Map 2: California Map 3: Louisiana Map 4: New Mexico Map 5: Texas Map 6: Western Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 7: Central Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 8: Eastern Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 1: Alaska AK 50 - North Onshore and Offshore AK 10 - South Onshore AK 05 - South State Offshore AK 00 - South Federal Offshore Map 2: California CA 50 - Coastal Region

  19. EIA - Special Report 8/30/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on Oil Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    August 30, 3:00 pm --SEE MOST RECENT-- According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time August 30, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 1.4 million barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to about 95 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production. The MMS also reported that 8.8 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 88 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico natural gas production. The Louisiana

  20. EIA - Special Report 9/6/05 - Hurricane Katrina's Impact on U.S. Oil &

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Energy Markets September 6, 4:00 pm According to the Minerals Management Service (MMS), as of 11:30 Central Time September 6, Gulf of Mexico oil production was reduced by over 870,000 barrels per day as a result of Hurricane Katrina, equivalent to 58.02 percent of daily Gulf of Mexico oil production (which is 1.5 million barrels per day). The MMS also reported that 4.160 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas production was shut in, equivalent to 41.6 percent of daily Gulf of

  1. Maps of Selected State Subdivisions

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves Summary Maps of Selected State Subdivisions Map 1: Alaska Map 2: California Map 3: Louisiana Map 4: New Mexico Map 5: Texas Map 6: Western Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 7: Central Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 8: Eastern Planning Area, Gulf of Mexico Map 1: Alaska AK 50 - North Onshore and Offshore AK 10 - South Onshore AK 05 - South State Offshore AK 00 - South Federal Offshore Map 2: California CA 50 - Coastal Region

  2. ARM - SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Central Facility SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration...

  3. Department of Energy Launches Website Supporting Energy-Saving...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Website Supporting Energy-Saving Reconstruction in the Gulf Coast Department of Energy Launches Website Supporting Energy-Saving Reconstruction in the Gulf Coast November 22, 2005 ...

  4. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    approval, Other EE, Food Service Equipment, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Gulf Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power offers a program to make...

  5. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Siding, Roofs, Comprehensive MeasuresWhole Building, Insulation, Reflective Roofs Gulf Power- Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power, owned by Southern...

  6. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Gulf Power- Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power, owned by Southern Company, offers programs to make customers' homes more energy efficient through...

  7. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Entergy (Louisiana and Gulf States)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program Residential customers of Entergy Louisiana, and Entergy Gulf States Louisiana can participate in energy...

  8. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermostats, Energy Mgmt. SystemsBuilding Controls, Other EE, LED Lighting Gulf Power- Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power, owned by Southern...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Personal Computing Equipment, Reflective Roofs, Commercial Refrigeration Equipment Gulf Power- Residential Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf Power, owned by Southern...

  10. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SystemsBuilding Controls, Building Insulation, Roofs, CustomOthers pending approval, Food Service Equipment Gulf Power- Commercial Energy Efficiency EarthCents Program Gulf...

  11. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Global Companies Global Petroleum Go-Mart Goodway Refining GP&W Great Island Energy Green Valley Oil Griffith Energy Services Growmark Gulf Oil Gulf Oil Limited Partnership ...

  12. central | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    central Home OpenEI Community Central Description: The central OpenEI community for students, scientists, researchers, enthusiasts, analysts and developers. central OpenEI town...

  13. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||...

  14. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||...

  15. EA-1792: DOE Notice of Availability of the Environmental Assessment and Finding of No Significant Impact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating WInd Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine

  16. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |||||...

  17. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | ||||| 1978...

  18. EA-1792: Finding of No Significant Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine

  19. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Processing Plants along the Gulf of Mexico Coast, by Geographic Location Clusters maps

  20. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela| | | |||...

  1. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | | | || | | Year | | | | | Month | | | Persian | Total | Non | United | | Gulf(1) | OPEC(2) | OPEC | Kingdom | Venezuela | | | |...

  2. EA-1792: Draft Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project, Gulf of Maine

  3. Central Plateau - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Central Plateau, or 200 Area, contains former plutonium fuel processing facilities, waste disposal areas and industrial-sized facilities that once refined plutonium fuel into...

  4. Quantitative evaluation of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC): executive briefing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, E.C.; Pei, R.Y.; Hess, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Documentation is provided of a briefing summarizing the results of an independent quantitative evaluation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) for central station applications. The study concentrated on a central station power plant located in the Gulf of Mexico and delivering power to the mainland United States. The evaluation of OTEC is based on three important issues: resource availability, technical feasibility, and cost.

  5. Central ballast tanker design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER Design. This design is intended to reduce the volume of oil spilled from tankers by giving the crew a tanker properly designed and equipped to allow large quantities of oil from ruptured tank(s) to flow safely to a fully-inerted central ballast tank. In addition to reducing the volume of oil spilled, the design also addresses many of the shortcomings of the DOUBLE HULL DESIGN which are increasingly becoming a concern. The following is a brief review of the development of the CENTRAL BALLAST TANKER. The simple operational features, stability, low cost and ease of maintenance of the single hull tanker were important and can be retained with the CENTRAL BALLAST DESIGN.

  6. SGP Central Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an ideal site for major collaborative field projects. Image from the Total Sky Imager Image from the Total Sky Imager Current sky cover retrievals at the Central Facility, to...

  7. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-04-27

    The principal research efforts for this Continuation Period are the preparation and submittal to DOE of the final report for Phase I of this project, the preparation and submittal of a technical paper for consideration for publication reporting the results of this project, and the evaluation by Pruet Production Co. to continue into Phase II of this project.

  8. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-06

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  9. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, ALABAMA, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-12-13

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is drilling an infill well in the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama. The objectives of the project are to drill and core an infill well in Womack Hill Field; to utilize samples from the core to evaluate further the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the field; and to use the new information resulting from the drilling of the well to revise and modify the 3-D geologic model, to further modify the injection strategy for the existing pressure maintenance program, and to assess whether a second infill well should be drilled using lateral/multilateral well completions.

  10. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  11. Environmental impact of geopressure - geothermal cogeneration facility on wetland resources and socioeconomic characteristics in Louisiana Gulf Coast region. Final report, October 10, 1983-September 31, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, A.M.; Saleh, F.M.S.; Fontenot, M.

    1984-08-01

    Baseline data relevant to air quality are presented. The following are also included: geology and resource assessment, design well prospects in southwestern Louisiana, water quality monitoring, chemical analysis subsidence, microseismicity, geopressure-geothermal subsidence modeling, models of compaction and subsidence, sampling handling and preparation, brine chemistry, wetland resources, socioeconomic characteristics, impacts on wetlands, salinity, toxic metals, non-metal toxicants, temperature, subsidence, and socioeconomic impacts. (MHR)

  12. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  13. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume II (of 4): Task 5, modify publicly available simulators. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    The objective for this portion of the research involved the continuation of the modifications of the public domain simulators BOAST and MASTER. The modifications continued during this project are generic relative to both BOAST and MASTER. BOAST was the primary concern during the research however, because MASTER as well.

  14. Improved Recovery from Gulf of Mexico Reservoirs, Volume 4, Comparison of Methane, Nitrogen and Flue Gas for Attic Oil. February 14, 1995 - October 13, 1996. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolcott, Joanne; Shayegi, Sara

    1997-01-13

    Gas injection for attic oil recovery was modeled in vertical sandpacks to compare the process performance characteristics of three gases, namely methane, nitrogen and flue gas. All of the gases tested recovered the same amount of oil over two cycles of gas injection. Nitrogen and flue gas recovered oil more rapidly than methane because a large portion of the methane slug dissolved in the oil phase and less free gas was available for oil displacement. The total gas utilization for two cycles of gas injection was somewhat better for nitrogen as compared to methane and flue gas. The lower nitrogen utilization was ascribed to the lower compressibility of nitrogen.

  15. Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan: Magma Gulf/Technadril-Dept. of Energy MGT-DOE AMOCO Fee No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Lousiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01

    The following topics are covered: generalized site activities, occupational health and safety, drilling operations, production testing, environmental assessment and monitoring plan, permits, program management, reporting, and schedule. (MHR)

  16. E85/b20 for I-65 AND BEYOND: Putting BioFuels in Your Vehicles from Lake Michigan to the Gulf of Mexico

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    At the May 1, 2008 joint Web conference of DOE's Biomass and Clean Cities programs, Julie Howe (Indiana Office of Energy & Defense Development) described the I-65 Corridor Project.

  17. Sweet Lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco fee. Volume III. Final report. Annual report, February 1982-March 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, C.O. Jr.; O'Brien, F.D.; Rodgers, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    This report presents the results of the testing of Sand 3 (15,245 to 15,280 feet in depth) which occurred from November 1983 to March 1984 and evaluates these new data in comparison to results from the testing of Sand 5 (15,385 to 15,415 feet in depth) which occurred from June 1981 to February 1982. It also describes the reworking of the production and salt water disposal wells preparatory to the Sand 3 testing as well as the plug and abandon procedures requested to terminate the project. The volume contains two parts: Part 1 includes the text and accompanying plates, figures and tables; Part 2 consists of the appendixes including auxiliary reports and tabulations.

  18. Central Exclusive Dijet Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dechambre, A.; Cudell, J. R.; Ivanov, I. P.; Hernandez, O.

    2008-08-29

    The ingredients of central exclusive production cross section include large perturbative corrections and soft quantities that must be parametrized and fitted to data. In this talk, we summarize the results of a study of the uncertainties coming from these ingredients, in the case of exclusive dijet production.

  19. DRAFT Central Plateau Cleanup Strategy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matt McCormick, DOE-RL Hanford Advisory Board Committee of the Whole Meeting May 12, 2010 Proposed Tri-Party Agreement Changes to Central Plateau Cleanup Work 2 Purpose * Provide overview of the proposed TPA change packages - Central Plateau cleanup - Mixed low-level and transuranic mixed waste milestones (M-091 Series) Proposed Central Plateau Cleanup Milestones 3 4 Proposed TPA Changes for Comprehensive Central Plateau Cleanup Approach Overview - Proposed TPA Changes for Comprehensive Central

  20. USAID-Central Asian Republics Climate Activities | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ourwork Country Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan Central Asia, Central Asia, Central Asia, Central Asia, Central Asia References USAID Climate...