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  1. Gyeongnam Renewable Energy Co Ltd GRE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gyeongnam Renewable Energy Co Ltd GRE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gyeongnam Renewable Energy Co. Ltd. (GRE) Place: Seoul, Korea (Republic) Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind...

  2. Global Renewable Energy Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Network (GReEN) Name: Global Renewable Energy Network (GReEN) Address: P.O. Box 1999 Place: Massapequa, NY Zip: 11758 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Number...

  3. PP-62 Central Maine Power Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presidential Permit authorizing Central Maine Power Company to construct, operate, and maintain transmission facilities at the U.S. -Ca nada Border.

  4. Clean Energy Economy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Portal Linkedin.jpg CleanTech Cleantech Venture Capital Global Renewable Energy Network (GReEN) MIT Club of Northern California CleanTech Renewable Energy Business...

  5. SunE CPA CDC2 LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: SunE CPA CDC2 LLC -- SunEdison Ironwood State Prison Place: California Phone Number: 866-786-3347 Website: www.cdcr.ca.govCDCRGoingGre...

  6. SunE CPA CDC1 LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: SunE CPA CDC1 LLC -- Chuckawalla Valley State Prison Place: California Phone Number: 866-786-3347 Website: www.cdcr.ca.govCDCRGoingGre...

  7. CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duke, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Introduction, Argentina, Bangladesh, Benin, Bolivia, Botswana, Bourkina (Upper Volta), Brazil, Burma, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, French Guiana, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jamaica, Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields, Appendix II, Phytomass Files, and References.

  8. Fire water systems in composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundt, J.L.

    1993-12-31

    Due to corrosion problems in fire water systems offshore there is a need for a corrosion resistant material to improve the reliability of onboard fire fighting systems. Glass Reinforced Epoxy (GRE) pipe is seen as a cost effective and light weight alternative to metals. Through a test program run by AMAT, Advanced Materials a/s in collaboration with the Norwegian Fire and Research Laboratory (NBL, SINTEF), GRE pipes have proved to be viable materials for offshore fire water systems. The test program included furnace testing, jetfire testing and simulated explosion testing. GRE pipes (2--12 inches) from two suppliers were fire tested and evaluated. Both adhesively bonded joints and flange connections were tested. During the course of the project, application methods of passive fire protection and nozzle attachments were improved.

  9. Jefferson Lab: Student Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    User Liaison Office HEP Home Student Affairs Calendar print version Student Information New Student Checklist Graduate Student Survey Users Group Education Opportunities Employment Opportunities Graduate Student Contacts GRE Practice Tests JLab Life Insider (Internal News) Computer Center Stockroom User Liaison Library & Publications On the Menu Local Community Local Restaurants Newport News Events Hampton Roads Events Hampton AMC Theater Student Opportunities Graduate Students

  10. BPA-2010-02000-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wiring a gre tomorrow '10u0 p f '''* k+ 5 BeW LOCAL 280 32969 Hwy 99E PO Box 404 Tangent, OR 97389 Ph: 541.812.1771 Fax: 5411.812.1766 local280 @p ibew280.org www.ibew26O.org...

  11. South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deal, C.

    1981-10-01

    Summaries of oil and gas drillings, well completions, production, exploratory wells, exploration activity and wildcat drilling were given for South America, Central America, the Caribbean, and Mexico. The countries, islands, etc. included Argentina, Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Leeward and Windward Islands, Mexico, Netherlands Antilles, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, El Salvador, Surinam, Trinidad and Venezuela. 16 figures, 120 tables. (DP)

  12. Prediction of Peak Hydrogen Concentrations for Deep Sludge Retrieval in Tanks AN-101 and AN-106 from Historical Data of Spontaneous Gas Release Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, Beric E.; Cooley, Scott K.; Meacham, Joseph E.

    2013-10-21

    Radioactive and chemical wastes from nuclear fuel processing are stored in large underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The Tank Operations Contractor is continuing a program of moving solid wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) to double-shell tanks (DSTs) and preparing for waste feed delivery (WFD). A new mechanism for a large spontaneous gas release event (GRE) in deep sludge sediments has been postulated. The creation of this potential new GRE hazard, deep sludge gas release events (DSGREs), is the retrieval of sludge waste into a single DST that results in a sediment depth greater than operating experience has demonstrated is safe. The Tank Operations Contractor program of moving solid wastes from SSTs to DSTs and preparing for WFD is being negatively impacted by this sediment depth limit.

  13. Experiences from the offshore installation of a composite materials firewater system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciaraldi, S.W.

    1993-12-31

    A prototype 300 m composite dry deluge firewater system was installed in December 1991 at the Valhall Field in the southern North Sea Norwegian offshore sector. This installation followed successful safety verification of the explosion and fire resistant design concept consisting of glass-fiber reinforced epoxy (GRE) piping components protected with a reinforced intumescent epoxy fire insulation. The installation was based primarily on the use of prefabricated GRE piping spools and fire insulation cast onto the piping or applied in the form of cast half shells. Significant experiences gained from the project are described. These experiences involve pre-engineering activities, detailed engineering, onshore fabrication, shipping, offshore hook-up, quality assurance, safety and economics. Although the overall installation was successful and the system is functioning as intended, areas of possible optimization and cost reduction for future composite firewater systems were identified. These findings are also briefly reviewed.

  14. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  15. The Gremlin Framework

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-26

    The Gremlin sofrware package is a performance analysis approach targeted to support the Co-Design process for future systems. It consists of a series of modules that can be used to alter a machine's behavior with the goal of emulating future machine properties. The modules can be divided into several classes; the most significant ones are detailed below. PowGre is a series of modules that help explore the power consumption properties of applications and to determinemore » the impact of power constraints on applications. Most of them use low-level processor interfaces to directly control voltage and frequency settings as well as per nodes, socket, or memory power bounds. MemGre are memory Gremlins and implement a new performance analysis technique that captures the application's effective use of the storage capacity of different levels of the memory hierarchy as well as the bandwidth between adjacent levels. The approach models various memory components as resources and measures how much of each resource the application uses from the application's own perspective. To the application a given amount of a resource is "used" if not having this amount will degrade the application's performance. This is in contrast to the hardware-centric perspective that considers "use" as any hardware action that utilizes the resource, even if it has no effect on performance. ResGre are Gremlins that use fault injection techniques to emulate higher fault rates than currently present in today's systems. Faults can be injected through various means, including network interposition, static analysis, and code modification, or direct application notification. ResGre also includes patches to previously released LLNL codes that can counteract and react to injected failures.« less

  16. Jefferson Lab - Student Affairs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Graduate Student Association HEP Home Student Affairs Calendar print version Student Information New Student Checklist Graduate Student Survey Users Group Education Opportunities Employment Opportunities Graduate Student Contacts GRE Practice Tests JLab Life Insider (Internal News) Computer Center Stockroom User Liaison Library & Publications On the Menu Local Community Local Restaurants Newport News Events Hampton Roads Events Hampton AMC Theater Graduate Student Survey One goal of the JLab

  17. Lignite Fuel Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Bullinger; Nenad Sarunac

    2010-03-31

    Pulverized coal power plants which fire lignites and other low-rank high-moisture coals generally operate with reduced efficiencies and increased stack emissions due to the impacts of high fuel moisture on stack heat loss and pulverizer and fan power. A process that uses plant waste heat sources to evaporate a portion of the fuel moisture from the lignite feedstock in a moving bed fluidized bed dryer (FBD) was developed in the U.S. by a team led by Great River Energy (GRE). The demonstration was conducted with Department of Energy (DOE) funding under DOE Award Number DE-FC26-04NT41763. The objectives of GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project were to demonstrate reduction in lignite moisture content by using heat rejected from the power plant, apply technology at full scale at Coal Creek Station (CCS), and commercialize it. The Coal Creek Project has involved several stages, beginning with lignite drying tests in a laboratory-scale FBD at the Energy Research Center (ERC) and development of theoretical models for predicting dryer performance. Using results from these early stage research efforts, GRE built a 2 ton/hour pilot-scale dryer, and a 75 ton/hour prototype drying system at Coal Creek Station. Operated over a range of drying conditions, the results from the pilot-scale and prototype-scale dryers confirmed the performance of the basic dryer design concept and provided the knowledge base needed to scale the process up to commercial size. Phase 2 of the GRE's Lignite Fuel Enhancement project included design, construction and integration of a full-scale commercial coal drying system (four FBDs per unit) with Coal Creek Units 1 and 2 heat sources and coal handling system. Two series of controlled tests were conducted at Coal Creek Unit 1 with wet and dried lignite to determine effect of dried lignite on unit performance and emissions. Wet lignite was fired during the first, wet baseline, test series conducted in September 2009. The second test series was performed

  18. Study Finds DOE-Funded Research in Energy Storage Provides a Vital Foundation for Success of Today's Hybrid and Electric Vehicles

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    r ams Number of Citations Office of Planning, Budget and Analysis U.S. Department of Energy * Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy May 2 0 0 9 � EERERe eS d y B - De mo at gRe sAc h i db y EERE e v e t l s u i n t n sr if re t u i v t t r o s p e c Study Finds DOE-funded Research in Energy Storage Provides a Vital Foundation for Success of Today's Hybrid & Electric Vehicles ‹ Hybrid and electric vehicles are showing great developmental and commercial market progress. ‹

  19. Progress in two major CCPI projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-07-01

    Two projects under the US Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Clean Coal Power initiative have made significant progress in demonstrating new technologies to remove mercury from coal and enhance use of low-Btu lignite coals while increasing energy efficiency. The Wisconsin Electricity Power Company is demonstrating the TOXECON{trademark} mercury control process at its Presque Isle Power Plant near Marquette, Michigan, while Great River Energy (GRE) is showing the viability of lignite fuel enhancement at its Coal Creek Station in Underwood, North Dakota. Both projects were awarded in 2004 under Round I of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. Elsewhere in the program, six projects are in various phases of planning or operation. Plans for a third round under the CCPI were announced on May 23, 2007. 2 figs.

  20. Sampling strategies for subsampled segmented EPI PRF thermometry in MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oden, Henrik Diakite, Mahamadou; Todd, Nick; Minalga, Emilee; Payne, Allison; Parker, Dennis L.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate k-space subsampling strategies to achieve fast, large field-of-view (FOV) temperature monitoring using segmented echo planar imaging (EPI) proton resonance frequency shift thermometry for MR guided high intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU) applications. Methods: Five different k-space sampling approaches were investigated, varying sample spacing (equally vs nonequally spaced within the echo train), sampling density (variable sampling density in zero, one, and two dimensions), and utilizing sequential or centric sampling. Three of the schemes utilized sequential sampling with the sampling density varied in zero, one, and two dimensions, to investigate sampling the k-space center more frequently. Two of the schemes utilized centric sampling to acquire the k-space center with a longer echo time for improved phase measurements, and vary the sampling density in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Phantom experiments and a theoretical point spread function analysis were performed to investigate their performance. Variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions was also implemented in a non-EPI GRE pulse sequence for comparison. All subsampled data were reconstructed with a previously described temporally constrained reconstruction (TCR) algorithm. Results: The accuracy of each sampling strategy in measuring the temperature rise in the HIFU focal spot was measured in terms of the root-mean-square-error (RMSE) compared to fully sampled truth. For the schemes utilizing sequential sampling, the accuracy was found to improve with the dimensionality of the variable density sampling, giving values of 0.65?C, 0.49?C, and 0.35?C for density variation in zero, one, and two dimensions, respectively. The schemes utilizing centric sampling were found to underestimate the temperature rise, with RMSE values of 1.05?C and 1.31?C, for variable density sampling in zero and two dimensions, respectively. Similar subsampling schemes with variable

  1. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE GROUPS FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARKER, S.A.

    2006-07-27

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 5 is the annual update of the methodology and calculations of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  2. METHODOLOGY & CALCULATIONS FOR THE ASSIGNMENT OF WASTE FOR THE LARGE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANKS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TU, T.A.

    2007-01-04

    Waste stored within tank farm double-shell tanks (DST) and single-shell tanks (SST) generates flammable gas (principally hydrogen) to varying degrees depending on the type, amount, geometry, and condition of the waste. The waste generates hydrogen through the radiolysis of water and organic compounds, thermolytic decomposition of organic compounds, and corrosion of a tank's carbon steel walls. Radiolysis and thermolytic decomposition also generates ammonia. Nonflammable gases, which act as dilutents (such as nitrous oxide), are also produced. Additional flammable gases (e.g., methane) are generated by chemical reactions between various degradation products of organic chemicals present in the tanks. Volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in tanks also produce organic vapors. The generated gases in tank waste are either released continuously to the tank headspace or are retained in the waste matrix. Retained gas may be released in a spontaneous or induced gas release event (GRE) that can significantly increase the flammable gas concentration in the tank headspace as described in RPP-7771, Flammable Gas Safety Isme Resolution. Appendices A through I provide supporting information. The document categorizes each of the large waste storage tanks into one of several categories based on each tank's waste and characteristics. These waste group assignments reflect a tank's propensity to retain a significant volume of flammable gases and the potential of the waste to release retained gas by a buoyant displacement event. Revision 6 is the annual update of the flammable gas Waste Groups for DSTs and SSTs.

  3. Environmental restoration and waste management: An introduction. Student edition; Restauracion ambiental y administracion de residuos nucleares: Introduccion; Edicion estudiantil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    For more than 40 years, the United States has produced nuclear weapons. These production activities generated both radioactive and hazardous waste and often contaminated the environment. For many years, the public was unaware of the problem and unable to do anything about it. All of this has changed. In response to recent public outcry, the former Secretary of Energy, Retired Admiral James D. Watkins, established the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) in November 1989. The creation of EM was the first step toward correcting contamination problems from the past 40 years In this booklet, we at DOE, through the efforts of the students at Oak Hills High School of Cincinnati, Ohio, will introduce you to EM and encourage your involvement in this major program within the Department of Energy. [Espanol] Durante mas de 40 anos, los Estados Unidos fabricaron armamentos nucleares. Esta produccion genero residuos radiactivos y peligrosos y, en muchos casos, contaminaron el medio ambiente. Durante mucho tiempo, el publico norteamericano no tenia conocimiento de este problema y no pudo hacer nada para solucionarlo. Todo esto ha cambiado. Respondiendo a crecientes protestas publicas, el ex Secretario de Energia Almirante James D. Watkins, establecio en noviembre de 1989 la Subsecretaria de Administracion Ambiental. La creacion de esta Subsecretaria fue el primer paso que dio el Departamento de Energia para corregir los problemas de contaminacion ambiental de los ultimos 40 anos. En esta publicacion, los que trabajamos en el Departamento de Energia con la ayuda de los estudiantes de la Escuela Secundaria de Oak Hills, Cincinnati, Ohio, te introduciermos a la administracion ambiental y alentamos tu participacion en este programa de fundamental importancia en el Departamento de Energia.

  4. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-08-15

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, "Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge"). The purpose of this technical

  5. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BE Wells; PE Meyer; G Chen

    2000-05-10

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000.

  6. Process Control Plan for Tank 241-SY-101 Surface Level Rise Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ESTEY, S.D.

    1999-11-01

    The tank 241-SY-101 transfer system was conceived and designed to address the immediate needs presented by rapidly changing waste conditions in tank 241-SY-101. Within approximately the last year, the waste in this tank has exhibited unexpected behavior (Rassat et al. 1999) in the form of rapidly increasing crust growth. This growth has been brought about by a rapidly increasing rate of gas entrapment within the crust. It has been conceived that the lack of crust agitation beginning upon the advent of mixer pump operations may have set-up a more consolidated, gas impermeable barrier when compared to a crust regularly broken up by the prior buoyant displacement events within the tank. The interim goals of the project are to: (1) protect the mixer pump operability (2) begin releasing gas from the crust, and (3) begin dissolving the crust and solids in the slurry layer. The final goals of the project (Final State) are to solve both the level growth and BD-GRE safety issues in this tank by achieving a condition of the waste such that no active measures are required to safely store the waste, i.e., crust and non convective layer are mostly dissolved, and therefore the mixer pump will no longer be needed to prevent BD-GREs in excess of 100% LFL. Transfers (which are designed to create space in the tank) and dilution (which will dissolve the solids) will accomplish this. Dissolution of solids will result in a release of gas retained by those solids and remove that volume of solids as a future retention site.

  7. TU-C-12A-02: Development of a Multiparametric Statistical Response Map for Quantitative Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bosca, R; Mahajan, A; Brown, PD; Stafford, RJ; Johnson, VE; Dong, L; Jackson, EF

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging biomarkers (QIB) are becoming increasingly utilized in early phase clinical trials as a means of non-invasively assessing treatment response and associated response heterogeneity. The aim of this study was to develop a flexible multiparametric statistical framework to predict voxel-by-voxel response of several potential MRI QIBs. Methods: Patients with histologically proven glioblastomas (n=11) were treated with chemoradiation (with/without bevacizumab) and underwent one baseline and two mid-treatment (3–4wks) MRIs. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (3D FSPGR, 6.3sec/phase, 0.1 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), dynamic susceptibility contrast (2D GRE-EPI, 1.5sec/phase, 0.2mmol/kg Gd-DTPA), and diffusion tensor (2D DW-EPI, b=0, 1200 s/mm{sup 2}, 27 directions) imaging acquisitions were obtained during each study. Mid-treatment and pre-treatment images were rigidly aligned, and regions of partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD) were contoured in consensus by two experienced radiation oncologists. Voxels in these categories were used to train ordinal (PR

  8. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  9. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Rhudy

    2006-06-30

    This final report presents and discusses results from a mercury control process development project entitled ''Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems''. The objective of this project was to demonstrate at pilot scale a mercury control technology that uses solid honeycomb catalysts to promote the oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal combustion. Oxidized mercury is removed in downstream wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) absorbers and leaves with the FGD byproducts. The goal of the project was to achieve 90% oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas and 90% overall mercury capture with the downstream wet FGD system. The project was co-funded by EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41185. Great River Energy (GRE) and City Public Service (now CPS Energy) of San Antonio were also project co-funders and provided host sites. URS Group, Inc. was the prime contractor. Longer-term pilot-scale tests were conducted at two sites to provide catalyst life data. GRE provided the first site, at their Coal Creek Station (CCS), which fires North Dakota lignite, and CPS Energy provided the second site, at their Spruce Plant, which fires Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. Mercury oxidation catalyst testing began at CCS in October 2002 and continued through the end of June 2004, representing nearly 21 months of catalyst operation. An important finding was that, even though the mercury oxidation catalyst pilot unit was installed downstream of a high-efficiency ESP, fly ash buildup began to plug flue gas flow through the horizontal catalyst cells. Sonic horns were installed in each catalyst compartment and appeared to limit fly ash buildup. A palladium-based catalyst showed initial elemental mercury oxidation percentages of 95% across the catalyst, declining to 67% after 21 months in service. A carbon-based catalyst began with almost 98

  10. Evaluation of MerCAP for Power Plant Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl Richardson

    2008-09-30

    This report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41993, 'Evaluation of EPRI's MerCAP{trademark} Technology for Power Plant Mercury Control'. This project has investigated the mercury removal performance of EPRI's Mercury Capture by Amalgamation Process (MerCAP{trademark}) technology. Test programs were conducted to evaluate gold-based MerCAP{trademark} at Great River Energy's Stanton Station Unit 10 (Site 1), which fired both North Dakota lignite (NDL) and Power River Basin (PRB) coal during the testing period, and at Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 (Site 2) [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company] which fires a low sulfur Eastern bituminous coal. Additional tests were carried out at Alabama Power's Plant Miller, which fires Powder River Basin Coal, to evaluate a carbon-based MerCAP{trademark} process for removing mercury from flue gas downstream of an electrostatic precipitator [Alabama Power is a subsidiary of The Southern Company]. A full-scale gold-based sorbent array was installed in the clean-air plenum of a single baghouse compartment at GRE's Stanton Station Unit 10, thereby treating 1/10th of the unit's exhaust gas flow. The substrates that were installed were electroplated gold screens oriented parallel to the flue gas flow. The sorbent array was initially installed in late August of 2004, operating continuously until its removal in July 2006, after nearly 23 months. The initial 4 months of operation were conducted while the host unit was burning North Dakota lignite (NDL). In November 2004, the host unit switched fuel to burn Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal and continued to burn the PRB fuel for the final 19 months of this program. Tests were conducted at Site 1 to evaluate the impacts of flue gas flow rate, sorbent plate spacing, sorbent pre-cleaning and regeneration, and spray dryer operation on Mer