Sample records for gtp 2-m probe

  1. 2-M Probe At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  2. 2-M Probe At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  3. 2-M Probe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  4. 2-M Probe At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. 2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information

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  6. Category:2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information

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  7. 2-M Probe At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. 2-M Probe At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  9. 2-M Probe At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  10. 2-M Probe At Desert Peak Area (Sladek, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  11. 2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. 2-M Probe Survey At Chena Geothermal Area (Wescott & Turner, 1982) | Open

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  13. 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  14. 2-M Probe Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Skord, Et Al., 2001) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  15. 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Skord, Et Al., 2011) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  16. GTP energy production from low-temperature resources, coproduced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    GTP energy production from low-temperature resources, coproduced fluids, and geopressured resources. GTP energy production from low-temperature resources, coproduced fluids, and...

  17. 2-M Probe Survey | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. allosteric gtp activation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Translocation of proteins across the endoplasmic reticulum membrane is a GTP-dependent process. The signal recognition particle (SRP) and the SRP receptor both contain subunits...

  19. GTP ARRA Spreadsheet | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Intracellular GTP level determines cell's fate toward differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meshkini, Azadeh; Yazdanparast, Razieh, E-mail: yazdan@ibb.ut.ac; Nouri, Kazem

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the adequate supply of guanine nucleotides is vital for cellular activities, limitation of their syntheses would certainly result in modulation of cellular fate toward differentiation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to set a correlation between the intracellular level of GTP and the induction of relevant signaling pathways involved in the cell's fate toward life or death. In that regard, we measured the GTP level among human leukemia K562 cells exposed to mycophenolic acid (MPA) or 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK) as two potent inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors. Our results supported the maturation of the cells when the intracellular GTP level was reduced by almost 30-40%. Under these conditions, 3-HK and/or MPA caused up-regulation of PKC{alpha} and PI3K/AKT pathways. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with hypoxanthine plus 3-HK or MPA, which caused a reduction of about 60% in the intracellular GTP levels, led to apoptosis and activation of mitochondrial pathways through inverse regulation of Bcl-2/Bax expression and activation of caspase-3. Moreover, our results demonstrated that attenuation of GTP by almost 60% augmented the intracellular ROS and nuclear localization of p21 and subsequently led to cell death. These results suggest that two different threshold levels of GTP are needed for induction of differentiation and/or ROS-associated apoptosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  1. Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. FMI Log At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolis Energy JumpFAC 04-08-DOE GTP) Jump

  3. Magnetotellurics At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details

  4. Magnetotellurics At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther,Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity1988) |New

  5. Magnetotellurics At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Flowing Electrical Conductivity At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open

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  7. Gas Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Structure and Mutational Analysis of the Archaeal GTP:AdoCbi-P Guanylyltransferase (CobY) from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii: Insights into GTP Binding and Dimerization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmister, Sean A.; Otte, Michele M.; Escalante-Semerena, Jorge C.; Rayment, Ivan (UW)

    2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In archaea and bacteria, the late steps in adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) biosynthesis are collectively known as the nucleotide loop assembly (NLA) pathway. In the archaeal and bacterial NLA pathways, two different guanylyltransferases catalyze the activation of the corrinoid. Structural and functional studies of the bifunctional bacterial guanylyltransferase that catalyze both ATP-dependent corrinoid phosphorylation and GTP-dependent guanylylation are available, but similar studies of the monofunctional archaeal enzyme that catalyzes only GTP-dependent guanylylation are not. Herein, the three-dimensional crystal structure of the guanylyltransferase (CobY) enzyme from the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MjCobY) in complex with GTP is reported. The model identifies the location of the active site. An extensive mutational analysis was performed, and the functionality of the variant proteins was assessed in vivo and in vitro. Substitutions of residues Gly8, Gly153, or Asn177 resulted in {ge}94% loss of catalytic activity; thus, variant proteins failed to support AdoCbl synthesis in vivo. Results from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments showed that MjCobY{sup G153D} had 10-fold higher affinity for GTP than MjCobY{sup WT} but failed to bind the corrinoid substrate. Results from Western blot analyses suggested that the above-mentioned substitutions render the protein unstable and prone to degradation; possible explanations for the observed instability of the variants are discussed within the framework of the three-dimensional crystal structure of MjCobY{sup G153D} in complex with GTP. The fold of MjCobY is strikingly similar to that of the N-terminal domain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis GlmU (MtbGlmU), a bifunctional acetyltransferase/uridyltransferase that catalyzes the formation of uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc).

  9. December 11, 2008 11:0 WSPC/INSTRUCTION FILE GTP-PPL SELFISH ROUTING IN THE PRESENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavronicolas, Marios

    December 11, 2008 11:0 WSPC/INSTRUCTION FILE GTP-PPL SELFISH ROUTING IN THE PRESENCE OF NETWORK;December 11, 2008 11:0 WSPC/INSTRUCTION FILE GTP-PPL 2 Parallel Processing Letters created by routers which

  10. M2M Communications | Open Energy Information

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  11. TBC-Domain GAPs for Rab GTPases Accelerate GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Finger Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan,X.; Eathiraj, S.; Lambright, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rab GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by cycling between inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) conformations. The duration of the active state is limited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate the slow intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis. Proteins containing TBC (Tre-2, Bub2 and Cdc16) domains are broadly conserved in eukaryotic organisms and function as GAPs for Rab GTPases as well as GTPases that control cytokinesis. An exposed arginine residue is a critical determinant of GAP activity in vitro and in vivo. It has been expected that the catalytic mechanism of TBC domains would parallel that of Ras and Rho family GAPs. Here we report crystallographic, mutational and functional analyses of complexes between Rab GTPases and the TBC domain of Gyp1p. In the crystal structure of a TBC-domain-Rab-GTPase-aluminium fluoride complex, which approximates the transition-state intermediate for GTP hydrolysis, the TBC domain supplies two catalytic residues in trans, an arginine finger analogous to Ras/Rho family GAPs and a glutamine finger that substitutes for the glutamine in the DxxGQ motif of the GTPase. The glutamine from the Rab GTPase does not stabilize the transition state as expected but instead interacts with the TBC domain. Strong conservation of both catalytic fingers indicates that most TBC-domain GAPs may accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a similar dual-finger mechanism.

  12. Polymerization of proteins actin and tubulin: the role of nucleotides ATP, GTP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polymerization of proteins actin and tubulin: the role of nucleotides ATP, GTP P. Ballone Institut in both requires complexation by a nucleotide (adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and guanosine triphosphate with a cleft containing a bound nucleotide (adenosine triphosphate ATP or diphosphate ADP) and a divalent

  13. Geothermal Energy Production with Co-produced and Geopressured Resources (Fact Sheet), Geothermal Technologies Program (GTP)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  14. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA); O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support structure bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe.

  15. Spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.; O'Rourke, P.E.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A support structure is described bearing at least one probe for making spectrophotometric measurements of a fluid using a source of light and a spectrophotometer. The probe includes a housing with two optical fibers and a planoconvex lens. A sleeve bearing a mirror surrounds the housing. The lens is separated from the mirror by a fixed distance, defining an interior space for receiving a volume of the fluid sample. A plurality of throughholes extending through the sleeve communicate between the sample volume and the exterior of the probe, all but one hole bearing a screen. A protective jacket surrounds the probe. A hollow conduit bearing a tube is formed in the wall of the probe for venting any air in the interior space when fluid enters. The probe is held at an acute angle so the optic fibers carrying the light to and from the probe are not bent severely on emergence from the probe. 3 figs.

  16. Smart M2M Gateway based Architecture for M2M Device and Endpoint Soumya Kanti Datta, Christian Bonnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    of both ETSI and oneM2M standards. The internal structure of such a gateway along with its APIs and endpoints. The architecture is compliant with both ETSI and oneM2M standards recommendations. The resources of the gateway and APIs to manage the M2M devices, endpoints, their discovery and interaction with the mobile

  17. FLIR At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  18. FMI Log At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  19. Field Mapping At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  20. Field Mapping At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  1. Pressure Temperature Log At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Mercury Vapor At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  3. Static Temperature Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  4. Reflection Survey At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  6. Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  8. Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationMccoyFlow

  10. Flow Test At Snake River Plain Region (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)

  11. Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)The Needles Area (DOE

  12. Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt Maui Area (DOE GTP)

  13. Density Log at Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration

  14. Density Log at Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision hasda62829c05bGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP)

  15. M2M for Smart Cities Gerd Ascheid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M2M for Smart Cities Gerd Ascheid #12;Agenda What is a "Smart City"? Cellular System based M2M Cities and Communities Source: http://eu-smartcities.eu 3 #12;What Elements Make a City ,,Smart" ? Smart groups 4 #12;Important Topics for Building a Smart City Infrastructure Intelligent Networks Services

  16. 2-M Probe At Astor Pass Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Hometcdb Home#MarketResearchReportsReference: 10

  17. 2-M Probe At Hawthorne Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Hometcdb Home#MarketResearchReportsReference:Kratt,

  18. 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Hometcdb

  19. 2-M Probe At Teels Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation Teels Marsh Area Exploration

  20. 2-M Probe At Teels Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation Teels Marsh Area

  1. 2-M Probe At The Needles Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation Teels Marsh

  2. 2-M Probe At Tungsten Mountain Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation Teels MarshInformation

  3. 2-M Probe At Winnemucca Dry Lake Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation Teels

  4. 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation TeelsCorrect previously

  5. 2-M Probe Survey At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation TeelsCorrect

  6. 2-M Probe Survey At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind HometcdbInformation TeelsCorrectInformation

  7. 2-M Probe At Alum Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's picture SubmittedSoltech Jump31Et

  8. 2-M Probe At Columbus Salt Marsh Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's picture SubmittedSoltech

  9. 2-M Probe At Gabbs Alkali Flat Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's picture

  10. 2-M Probe At Rhodes Marsh Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwiki Home Jweers's pictureInformation Rhodes

  11. 2-M Probe At Dead Horse Wells Area (Kratt, Et Al., 2010) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource

  12. Import and export of the nuclear protein import receptor transportin by a mechanism independent of GTP hydrolysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreyfuss, Gideon

    Import and export of the nuclear protein import receptor transportin by a mechanism independent of GTP hydrolysis Sara Nakielny and Gideon Dreyfuss Background: Nuclear protein import and export are mediated by receptor proteins that recognize nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) or nuclear export

  13. Function: GTP:-`type/gradedmonom` -define a type 'gradedmonom' Calling Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablamowicz, Rafal

    :with(Clifford):with(GTP): > type(e1 &t e1,gradedmonom),type(Pi*(e1we2 &t e1 &t e2),gradedmonom); Cliplus has been loaded Id &t e1 Id &t e2 Id &t e1we2 e1 &t Id e1 &t e1 e1 &t e2 e1 &t e1we2, , , , , , , ,[:= e2 &t Id e2 &t e1 e2 &t e2 e2 &t e1we2 e1we2 &t Id e1we2 &t e1 e1we2 &t e2, , , , , , , e1we2 &t e1we2] > map

  14. Bounds on 2m/r for static perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mark Heinzle

    2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    For spherically symmetric relativistic perfect fluid models, the well-known Buchdahl inequality provides the bound $2 M/R \\leq 8/9$, where $R$ denotes the surface radius and $M$ the total mass of a solution. By assuming that the ratio $p/\\rho$ be bounded, where $p$ is the pressure, $\\rho$ the density of solutions, we prove a sharper inequality of the same type, which depends on the actual bound imposed on $p/\\rho$. As a special case, when we assume the dominant energy condition $p/\\rho \\leq 1$, we obtain $2 M/R \\leq 6/7$.

  15. A New Use for a Familiar Fold: the X-Ray Crystal Structure of GTP-Bound GTP Cyclohydrolase III From Methanocaldococcus Jannaschii Reveals a Two Metal Ion Catalytic Mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, S.D.; Roberts, S.A.; Zegeer, A.M.; Montfort, W.R.; Bandarian, V.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH) III from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, which catalyzes the conversion of GTP to 2-amino-5-formylamino-6-ribosylamino-4(3H)-pyrimidinone 5'-phosphate (FAPy), has been shown to require Mg{sup 2+} for catalytic activity and is activated by monovalent cations such as K{sup +} and ammonium [Graham, D. E., Xu, H., and White, R. H. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 15074-15084]. The reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by a GCH II ortholog (SCO 6655) from Streptomyces coelicolor; however, SCO 6655, like other GCH II proteins, is a zinc-containing protein. The structure of GCH III complexed with GTP solved at 2 {angstrom} resolution clearly shows that GCH III adopts a distinct fold that is closely related to the palm domains of phosphodiesterases, such as DNA polymerase I. GCH III is a tetramer of identical subunits; each monomer is composed of an N- and a C-terminal domain that adopt nearly superimposible structures, suggesting that the protein has arisen by gene duplication. Three metal ions were located in the active site, two of which occupy positions that are analogous to those occupied by divalent metal ions in the structures of a number of palm domain containing proteins, such as DNA polymerase I. Two conserved Asp residues that coordinate the metal ions, which are also found in palm domain containing proteins, are observed in GCH III. Site-directed variants (Asp{yields}Asn) of these residues in GCH III are less active than wild-type. The third metal ion, most likely a potassium ion, is involved in substrate recognition through coordination of O6 of GTP. The arrangement of the metal ions in the active site suggests that GCH III utilizes two metal ion catalysis. The structure of GCH III extends the repertoire of possible reactions with a palm fold to include cyclohydrolase chemistry.

  16. The 2m <= r property of spherically symmetric static spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc Mars; M. M. Martin-Prats; Jose M. M. Senovilla

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that all spherically symmetric static spacetimes which are both regular at r=0 and satisfying the single energy condition rho + p_r + p_t >= 0 cannot contain any black hole region (equivalently, they must satisfy 2m/r <= 1 everywhere). This result holds even when the spacetime is allowed to contain a finite number of matching hypersurfaces. This theorem generalizes a result by Baumgarte and Rendall when the matter contents of the space-time is a perfect fluid and also complements their results in the general non-isotropic case.

  17. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company have

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o'IUHopper3 Environmental CH2M

  18. Integrated Optical Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Frogget, Douglas DeVore, Vincent Romero, David Esquibel, and David Holtkamp

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical probes used in velocimetry measurements have typically been individual probes that collect data for a single diagnostic at a single point. These probes have been used in diagnostics such as VISAR, PDV, and radiometry, which measure surface velocity, temperature, and other characteristics. When separate probes are used for these measurements, the different diagnostic points measured must be significantly separated. We have developed integrated probes that collect data for multiple optical diagnostics; these probes measure points in close proximity.

  19. Hydrodynamic ultrasonic probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Day, Robert A. (Livermore, CA); Conti, Armond E. (San Jose, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved probe for in-service ultrasonic inspection of long lengths of a workpiece, such as small diameter tubing from the interior. The improved probe utilizes a conventional transducer or transducers configured to inspect the tubing for flaws and/or wall thickness variations. The probe utilizes a hydraulic technique, in place of the conventional mechanical guides or bushings, which allows the probe to move rectilinearly or rotationally while preventing cocking thereof in the tube and provides damping vibration of the probe. The probe thus has lower friction and higher inspection speed than presently known probes.

  20. The Rac GTP Exchange Factor TIAM-1 Acts with CDC-42 and the Guidance Receptor UNC-40/DCC in Neuronal Protrusion and Axon Guidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demarco, Rafael Senos; Struckhoff, Eric Charles; Lundquist, Erik A.

    2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    is understood about how these molecules interact in growth cone outgrowth or how the activities of these molecules are regulated in distinct contexts. UNC-73/Trio is a well-characterized Rac GTP exchange factor in Caenorhabditis elegans axon pathfinding, yet UNC...

  1. EERE Announces up to $2M for Clean Energy Supply Chain and Manufacturi...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    up to 2M for Clean Energy Supply Chain and Manufacturing Competitiveness Analysis for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies EERE Announces up to 2M for Clean Energy Supply Chain...

  2. Sustainability Data and Analytics in Cloud-Based M2M Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    consumption and GHG cal- culation) and maintaining M2M environments [e.g., monitoring failure of chillers

  3. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company- January 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003

  4. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (El Cerrito, CA); Chemla, Daniel S. (Kensington, CA); Ogletree, D. Frank (El Cerrito, CA); Botkin, David (San Francisco, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample.

  5. Ultrafast scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, S.; Chemla, D.S.; Ogletree, D.F.; Botkin, D.

    1995-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultrafast scanning probe microscopy method is described for achieving subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of an observation sample. In one embodiment of the present claimed invention, a single short optical pulse is generated and is split into first and second pulses. One of the pulses is delayed using variable time delay means. The first pulse is then directed at an observation sample located proximate to the probe of a scanning probe microscope. The scanning probe microscope produces probe-sample signals indicative of the response of the probe to characteristics of the sample. The second pulse is used to modulate the probe of the scanning probe microscope. The time delay between the first and second pulses is then varied. The probe-sample response signal is recorded at each of the various time delays created between the first and second pulses. The probe-sample response signal is then plotted as a function of time delay to produce a cross-correlation of the probe sample response. In so doing, the present invention provides simultaneous subpicosecond-temporal resolution and submicron-spatial resolution of the sample. 6 Figs.

  6. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project March 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  7. Directional intraoperative probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Popov, Vladimir; Loutts, Georgii

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An introperative surgical probe incorporating both a fiber optic imaging system and multi-element beta/gamma radiation directional indicating system is described.

  8. Deutsche Telekom and Cinterion Wireless Modules become M2M partners Dec 04, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Rainer

    modules, have forged a strategic partnership. The cooperation focuses on the joint management of M2M in Deutsche Telekom's international M2M- strategy", says Rainer Deutschmann, Senior Vice President Mobile and technology. About Deutsche Telekom AG Deutsche Telekom is one of the world's leading integrated

  9. Latency Requirements in M2M Application Scenarios Project Manager: Raymond Knopp , Eurecom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    communication in LTE/LTE-Advanced Reduce energy consumption for M2M devices Co-existence of M2M/Gaming traffics. Delay Analysis in MTS Network (Operator in Serbia) www.ict-lola.eu Contention-based random access

  10. Carbon nanotube based electromechanical probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaglioglu, Onnik, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromechanical probing applications continuously require smaller pitches, faster manufacturing and lower electrical resistance. Conventional techniques, such as MEMS based cantilever probes have their shortcomings in ...

  11. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex -...

  12. Chemical sensing flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

  13. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  14. The interaction of RNA helicase DDX3 with HIV-1 Rev-CRM1-RanGTP complex during the HIV replication cycle

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahboobi, Seyed Hanif; Javanpour, Alex A.; Mofrad, Mohammad R. K.

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular traffic between the nucleus and the cytoplasm is regulated by the nuclear pore complex (NPC), which acts as a highly selective channel perforating the nuclear envelope in eukaryotic cells. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exploits the nucleocytoplasmic pathway to export its RNA transcripts across the NPC to the cytoplasm. Despite extensive study on the HIV life cycle and the many drugs developed to target this cycle, no current drugs have been successful in targeting the critical process of viral nuclear export, even though HIVs reliance on a single host protein, CRM1, to export its unspliced and partially spliced RNAmoretranscripts makes it a tempting target. Due to recent findings implicating a DEAD-box helicase, DDX3, in HIV replication and a member of the export complex, it has become an appealing target for anti-HIV drug inhibition. In the present research, we have applied a hybrid computational protocol to analyze protein-protein interactions in the HIV mRNA export cycle. This method is based on molecular docking followed by molecular dynamics simulation and accompanied by approximate free energy calculation (MM/GBSA), computational alanine scanning, clustering, and evolutionary analysis. We highlight here some of the most likely binding modes and interfacial residues between DDX3 and CRM1 both in the absence and presence of RanGTP. This work shows that although DDX3 can bind to free CRM1, addition of RanGTP leads to more concentrated distribution of binding modes and stronger binding between CRM1 and RanGTP.less

  15. Small ASM probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, J.N.; Olinger, B.; Vorthman, J.E.; Wilder, L.

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A part of the ongoing effort to miniaturize the adjoint sensitivity method (ASM) probe, six small probes in different configurations were tested on a single experiment. The results of the different configurations are presented. The ASM probe is quite accurate and its performance is well understood in those situations where we have a relatively large area that has 1-D flow. Area is expensive and it is desirable to make measurements using a minimum of this resource. When we confine ourselves to a small area we get electromagnetic effects and perturbations in the hydrodynamic flows that were absent in experiments whose lateral extent was large enough to effectively eliminate these problems. We are forced toward magnet and coil configurations that are not ideal for best accuracy. In the experiment described in this report, we describe and report the results of six ASM probes that approach the goal of using less area. 2 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  17. Multispectral imaging probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandison, D.R.; Platzbecker, M.R.; Descour, M.R.; Armour, D.L.; Craig, M.J.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A multispectral imaging probe delivers a range of wavelengths of excitation light to a target and collects a range of expressed light wavelengths. The multispectral imaging probe is adapted for mobile use and use in confined spaces, and is sealed against the effects of hostile environments. The multispectral imaging probe comprises a housing that defines a sealed volume that is substantially sealed from the surrounding environment. A beam splitting device mounts within the sealed volume. Excitation light is directed to the beam splitting device, which directs the excitation light to a target. Expressed light from the target reaches the beam splitting device along a path coaxial with the path traveled by the excitation light from the beam splitting device to the target. The beam splitting device directs expressed light to a collection subsystem for delivery to a detector. 8 figs.

  18. Probing Mercury's Partnering Preferences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange . .ProbingProbing

  19. Smart Insulating Container with Anti-Theft Features by M2M Tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Smart Insulating Container with Anti-Theft Features by M2M Tracking Cheng-Ting Lee, Chun-Min ChangChen, Brucelai, TroyChiu}@itri.org.tw, pai.chou@gmail.com Abstract--This paper describes a smart insulating and responsive but also of low overhead. I. INTRODUCTION Smart insulating shipping containers are an important

  20. INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    899 INELASTIC NEUTRON SCATTERING SELECTION RULES OF 03B1 HgI2 M. SIESKIND Laboratoire de The inelastic neutron scattering selection rules of 03B1 HgI2 in the directions 0394, 03A3 and 039B are derived Abstracts 63.20D Introduction. - Inelastic neutron scattering is a powerful technique for the determination

  1. Logarithmic Fermi-liquid breakdown in NbFe2 M. Brando,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    temperature dependence of the Sommerfeld coefficient = C/T of the specific heat capacity, C, over nearly two temperature dependences of the resistivity and of the heat capacity over extended ranges in temperatureLogarithmic Fermi-liquid breakdown in NbFe2 M. Brando,1, W. J. Duncan,1 D. Moroni-Klementowicz,1 C

  2. Regulation of Cdc25C by ERK-MAP Kinases during the G2/M Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Marc W.

    Regulation of Cdc25C by ERK-MAP Kinases during the G2/M Transition Ruoning Wang,1,4 Guangan He,1 of ERK2, is a major Cdc25 phosphorylating kinase in extracts of M phase- arrested Xenopus eggs. In a mammalian cell line, ERK1/2 interacts with Cdc25C in interphase and phosphorylates Cdc25C at T48 in mitosis

  3. Experimental probes of axions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Aaron S.; /Fermilab

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental searches for axions or axion-like particles rely on semiclassical phenomena resulting from the postulated coupling of the axion to two photons. Sensitive probes of the extremely small coupling constant can be made by exploiting familiar, coherent electromagnetic laboratory techniques, including resonant enhancement of transitions using microwave and optical cavities, Bragg scattering, and coherent photon-axion oscillations. The axion beam may either be astrophysical in origin as in the case of dark matter axion searches and solar axion searches, or created in the laboratory from laser interactions with magnetic fields. This note is meant to be a sampling of recent experimental results.

  4. Probing metal solidification nondestructively

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm ExchangeSynchrotronProbing

  5. Cybersecurity Capability Maturity Model (C2M2) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014Contributing DataDepartment of EnergyC2M2 Program »

  6. hnRNP L binds to CA repeats in the 3'UTR of bcl-2 mRNA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Dong-Hyoung; Lim, Mi-Hyun; Youn, Dong-Ye [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Seung Eun [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Medical Science, The Graduate School, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Soo [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Brain Research Institute, Department of Pharmacology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Tsujimoto, Yoshihide [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Medical Genetics, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, Osaka University Medical School, Osaka (Japan); Lee, Jeong-Hwa, E-mail: leejh@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 505 Banpo-Dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We previously reported that the CA-repeat sequence in the 3'-untranslated region (3'UTR) of bcl-2 mRNA is involved in the decay of bcl-2 mRNA. However, the trans-acting factor for the CA element in bcl-2 mRNA remains unidentified. The heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L), an intron splicing factor, has been reported to bind to CA repeats and CA clusters in the 3'UTR of several genes. We reported herein that the CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA have the potential to form a distinct ribonuclear protein complex in cytoplasmic extracts of MCF-7 cells, as evidenced by RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays (REMSA). A super-shift assay using the hnRNP L antibody completely shifted the complex. Immunoprecipitation with the hnRNP L antibody and MCF-7 cells followed by RT-PCR revealed that hnRNP L interacts with endogenous bcl-2 mRNA in vivo. Furthermore, the suppression of hnRNP L in MCF-7 cells by the transfection of siRNA for hnRNP L resulted in a delay in the degradation of RNA transcripts including CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA in vitro, suggesting that the interaction between hnRNPL and CA repeats of bcl-2 mRNA participates in destabilizing bcl-2 mRNA.

  7. M2M Platform-as-a-Service for Sustainability Hong-Linh Truong and Schahram Dustdar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    sustainability measurements (e.g., electricity consumption and GHG calculation). Research effort so far has beenM2M Platform-as-a-Service for Sustainability Governance Hong-Linh Truong and Schahram Dustdar-based M2M systems. We describe a Platform-as-a-Service for sustainability governance that implements

  8. CCT: Connect and Control Things A Novel Mobile Application to Manage M2M Devices and Endpoints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gesbert, David

    -to-Machine (M2M) market [1, 2]. IoT has also opened new vistas in smart metering, smart grid, smart city applications for IoT ecosystems totally indispensable. For example, in smart homes, M2M devices [6] are able

  9. Probing Multiparton Correlations at CEBAF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianwei Qiu

    1998-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk, I explore the possibilities of probing the multiparton correlation functions at CEBAF at its current energy and the energies with its future upgrades.

  10. Structural and Magnetic Properties of MCl2 (M = Fe, Mn, Co): Acetonitrile Solvates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhodnya,K.; Bonner, M.; DiPasquale, A.; Rheingold, A.; Her, J.; Stephens, P.; Park, J.; Kennon, B.; Arif, A.; Miller, J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M{sup II}Cl{sub 2} (M = Mn, Fe, Co) as their acetonitrile solvates were isolated, and their structural, spectroscopic, and magnetic properties were studied. MCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} (M = Fe, Mn) form 1-D chains of octahedral M{sup II} ions with four bridging chlorides and two axial MeCN's. The presence of an axial distortion for MFe causes a significant magnetic anisotropy that increases significantly below 150 K; however, {chi}{sub av} [=({chi}{sub {parallel}} + 2{chi}{sub {perpendicular}})/3] almost coincides with the value obtained on a polycrystalline sample. MnCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} is a paramagnet with a weak antiferromagnetic coupling. Annealing FeCl{sub 2}(NCMe){sub 2} at 55 {sup o}C forms the monosolvate of FeCl{sub 2}(NCMe) composition in which two chains collapse into a double chain with formation of Fe-Cl bonding such that half of the {mu}-Cl's becomes {mu}{sub 3}-Cl's. This material orders magnetically below {Tc} = 4.3 K. For M = Co, paramagnetic tetrahedral [CoCl{sub 3}(NCMe)]{sup -} anions are isolated.

  11. Heat transfer probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Jeffrey I.; Rosengart, Axel J.; Kasza, Ken; Yu, Wenhua; Chien, Tai-Hsin; Franklin, Jeff

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses, systems, methods, and computer code for, among other things, monitoring the health of samples such as the brain while providing local cooling or heating. A representative device is a heat transfer probe, which includes an inner channel, a tip, a concentric outer channel, a first temperature sensor, and a second temperature sensor. The inner channel is configured to transport working fluid from an inner inlet to an inner outlet. The tip is configured to receive at least a portion of the working fluid from the inner outlet. The concentric outer channel is configured to transport the working fluid from the inner outlet to an outer outlet. The first temperature sensor is coupled to the tip, and the second temperature sensor spaced apart from the first temperature sensor.

  12. Cosmological Probes for Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khlopov, Maxim

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-parameter character of supersymmetric dark-matter models implies the combination of their experimental studies with astrophysical and cosmological probes. The physics of the early Universe provides nontrivial effects of non-equilibrium particles and primordial cosmological structures. Primordial black holes (PBHs) are a profound signature of such structures that may arise as a cosmological consequence of supersymmetric (SUSY) models. SUSY-based mechanisms of baryosynthesis can lead to the possibility of antimatter domains in a baryon asymmetric Universe. In the context of cosmoparticle physics, which studies the fundamental relationship of the micro- and macro-worlds, the development of SUSY illustrates the main principles of this approach, as the physical basis of the modern cosmology provides cross-disciplinary tests in physical and astronomical studies.

  13. Rotating concave eddy current probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Dennis P. (Albuquerque, NM); Walkington, Phil (Albuquerque, NM); Rackow, Kirk A. (Albuquerque, NM); Hohman, Ed (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotating concave eddy current probe for detecting fatigue cracks hidden from view underneath the head of a raised head fastener, such as a buttonhead-type rivet, used to join together structural skins, such as aluminum aircraft skins. The probe has a recessed concave dimple in its bottom surface that closely conforms to the shape of the raised head. The concave dimple holds the probe in good alignment on top of the rivet while the probe is rotated around the rivet's centerline. One or more magnetic coils are rigidly embedded within the probe's cylindrical body, which is made of a non-conducting material. This design overcomes the inspection impediment associated with widely varying conductivity in fastened joints.

  14. A Review of Early-Time Optical Follow-ups with 2-m Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; C. Guidorzi; C. G. Mundell; A. Melandri; A. Monfardini; D. Bersier; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; S. Kobayashi; C. J. Mottram; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarise recent deep, rapid GRB follow-up observations using the RoboNet-1.0 network which comprises three fully-robotic 2-m telescopes, the Liverpool Telescope and the Faulkes Telescopes North and South. Observations begin automatically within minutes of receipt of a GRB alert and may continue for hours or days to provide well-sampled multi-colour light curves or deep upper limits. Our light curves show a variety of early afterglow behaviour, from smooth, simple or broken power laws to 'bumpy', for a wide range of optical brightness (from the unprecedented faint detections of GRB 060108 and GRB 060510B to classical bright ones). We discuss GRB 051111 as an example of how the combination of optical and X-ray light curves can provide insight into the circumburst environment, in particular the role played by intrinsic extinction soon after the burst.

  15. GRB optical and IR rapid follow-up with the 2 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope, owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. We plan to use the LT in conjunction with Gamma Ray Observatories (HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift) to study GRB physics. A special over-ride mode will enable observations commencing less than a minute after the GRB alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. These observations, together with systematic monitoring of the burst through the afterglow, will help to unravel the nature of prompt optical flashes, short bursts, optically dark bursts, redshift distribution, GRB - supernova connection and other questions related to the GRB phenomenon. In particular, the combination of aperture, instrumentation and rapid automated response makes the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to the investigation of optically dark bursts and currently optically unstudied short bursts.

  16. Fiberoptic probe and system for spectral measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, S.; Young, J.P.

    1998-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A fused fiberoptic probe, a system, method and embodiments thereof for conducting spectral measurements are disclosed. The fused fiberoptic probe comprises a probe tip having a specific geometrical configuration, an exciting optical fiber and at least one collection optical fiber fused within a housing, preferably silica. The specific geometrical configurations in which the probe tip can be shaped include a slanted probe tip with an angle greater than 0{degree}, an inverted cone-shaped probe tip, and a lens head. 12 figs.

  17. Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probe AFM Compound Microscope Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope The atomic force microscope (AFM) compound microscope is designed primarily for fluorescence imaging in the...

  18. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, J.P.; McCollor, D.P.; Selle, S.J.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during soot blowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon. 8 figs.

  19. Long duration ash probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurley, John P. (Grand Forks, ND); McCollor, Don P. (Grand Forks, ND); Selle, Stanley J. (Grand Forks, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long duration ash probe includes a pressure shell connected to a port in a combustor with a sample coupon mounted on a retractable carriage so as to retract the sample coupon within the pressure shell during sootblowing operation of the combustor. A valve mounted at the forward end of the pressure shell is selectively closeable to seal the sample coupon within the shell, and a heating element in the shell is operable to maintain the desired temperature of the sample coupon while retracted within the shell. The carriage is operably mounted on a pair of rails within the shell for longitudinal movement within the shell. A hollow carrier tube connects the hollow cylindrical sample coupon to the carriage, and extends through the carriage and out the rearward end thereof. Air lines are connected to the rearward end of the carrier tube and are operable to permit coolant to pass through the air lines and thence through the carrier tube to the sample coupon so as to cool the sample coupon.

  20. Optic probe for semiconductor characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

  1. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  2. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  3. The Automatic Real-Time GRB Pipeline of the 2-m Liverpool Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Guidorzi; A. Monfardini; A. Gomboc; C. J. Mottram; C. G. Mundell; I. A. Steele; D. Carter; M. F. Bode; R. J. Smith; S. N. Fraser; M. J. Burgdorf; A. M. Newsam

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2-m Liverpool Telescope (LT), owned by Liverpool John Moores University, is located in La Palma (Canary Islands) and operates in fully robotic mode. In 2005, the LT began conducting an automatic GRB follow-up program. On receiving an automatic GRB alert from a Gamma-Ray Observatory (Swift, INTEGRAL, HETE-II, IPN) the LT initiates a special override mode that conducts follow-up observations within 2-3 min of the GRB onset. This follow-up procedure begins with an initial sequence of short (10-s) exposures acquired through an r' band filter. These images are reduced, analyzed and interpreted automatically using pipeline software developed by our team called "LT-TRAP" (Liverpool Telescope Transient Rapid Analysis Pipeline); the automatic detection and successful identification of an unknown and potentially fading optical transient triggers a subsequent multi-color imaging sequence. In the case of a candidate brighter than r'=15, either a polarimetric (from 2006) or a spectroscopic observation (from 2007) will be triggered on the LT. If no candidate is identified, the telescope continues to obtain z', r' and i' band imaging with increasingly longer exposure times. Here we present a detailed description of the LT-TRAP and briefly discuss the illustrative case of the afterglow of GRB 050502a, whose automatic identification by the LT just 3 min after the GRB, led to the acquisition of the first early-time (< 1 hr) multi-color light curve of a GRB afterglow.

  4. Genetic Control of the Trigger for the G2/M Checkpoint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Eric J. [Columbia University] [Columbia University; Smilenov, Lubomir B. [Columbia University] [Columbia University; Young, Erik F. [Columbia University] [Columbia University

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work undertaken in this project addressed two seminal areas of low dose radiation biology that are poorly understood and controversial. These areas are the challenge to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) paradigm at low doses of radiation and, the fundamental elements of radiation bystander effect biology Genetic contributions to low dose checkpoint engagement: The LNT paradigm is an extrapolation of known, measured cancer induction endpoints. Importantly, data for lower doses is often not available. Debatably, radiation protection standards have been introduced which are prudently contingent on the adherence of cancer risk to the established trend seen at higher doses. Intriguing findings from other labs have hinted at separate DNA damage response programs that engage at low or high levels of radiation. Individual radiation sensitivity commensurate with hemizygosity for a radiation sensitivity gene has been estimated at 1-2% in the U.S.. Careful interrogation of the DNA damage response at low doses of radiation became important and served as the basis for this grant. Several genes were tested in combinations to determine if combined haploinsufficiency for multiple radiosensitizing genes could render a cell more sensitive to lower levels of acute radiation exposure. We measured a classical radiation response endpoint, cell cycle arrest prior to mitosis. Mouse embryo fibroblasts were used and provided a uniform, rapidly dividing and genetically manipulable population of study. Our system did not report checkpoint engagement at acute doses of gamma rays below 100 mGy. The system did report checkpoint engagement reproducibly at 500 mGy establishing a threshold for activation between 100 and 500 mGy. Engagement of the checkpoint was ablated in cells nullizygous for ATM but was otherwise unperturbed in cells combinatorially haploinsufficient for ATM and Rad9, ATM and PTEN or PTEN and Rad9. Taken together, these experiments tell us that, in a sensitive fibroblast culture system, the engagement of the G2/M checkpoint only occurs at doses where most of the cells are bound for mitotic catastrophe. Further, compound haploinsufficiency of various radiosensitizing genes does not impact the threshold of activation. The experiments confirm a threshold of activation for the G2/M checkpoint, hinting at two separate radiation response programs acting below and above this threshold. Small RNA transfer in bystander effect biology: Small regulatory RNA molecules have now risen in prominence and utility. Specific examples are small interfering RNAs (siRNA) which are employed in cell level expression ablation projects and micro-RNAs (miRNA) which are a pool of short transcription products which serve to modulate the expression of other transcripts emerging from the genome in a meta-regulatory fine tuning of gene expression. The existing tenets of bystander effect radiation biology involve the communication of inflammatory mediators or direct intercellular communication of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in cell-to-cell communicative organelles called gap junctions. By ablating gap junctions, reducing the ROS/inflammatory cytokine expression one can attenuate bystander effect signaling in cell culture systems. We hypothesized that miRNAs are a competent intercellular communication molecule and therefore a possible component of the bystander response. This view is supported by the observation that miRNA are secreted from cells in exosomes found in the circulation. This circulating pool reports disease type and severity in humans. We proposed use of microbeam irradiation technology at our facilities and enhancement of this capability with a new sorting technology which would allow us to sort irradiated and non-irradiated cells with absolute fidelity. Pursuing direct quantitative transfer assessment, we succeeded in designing and constructing a new add-on sorting appliance which harmonized with our existing instruments. The sorter allowed us to gently sort single fluorescently labeled cells. The plans for this appliance were published and are now

  5. Long-range spatial correlations in the turbulent edge plasma of the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasilkov, D. G., E-mail: vasilkov@fpl.gpi.ru; Kholnov, Yu. V.; Shchepetov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-range spatial correlations in the turbulent plasma of the L-2M stellarator were revealed experimentally, and their relation to the geometry of magnetic surfaces was analyzed (Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50, 045001 (2008)). The operation modes of the facility in which fast transport transitions in plasma are possible were studied. Upon these transitions, the turbulence level is found to decrease substantially. It is shown that long-range spatial correlations are typical of relatively narrow frequency ranges. In particular, before a transport transition, such frequency ranges are f ? 3040 kHz and f ? 13 kHz. After the transition, long-range spatial correlations in the frequency range of f ? 3040 kHz disappear due to a significant decrease in the turbulence level in this frequency range. At the same time, correlations in the low frequency range are retained and new correlations at frequencies of f ? 6-12 kHz occur. It is found that global electromagnetic oscillations in the frequency range of f ? 13 kHz are related to the m/n = 0/0 perturbation and its toroidal satellites (here, m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). It is also shown that, after the transport transition, a three-dimensional localized electromagnetic mode at the frequency of the geodesic acoustic mode governed by the average magnetic field curvature is excited. At higher frequencies typical of a geodesic acoustic mode related to the three-dimensional curvature of the magnetic field, no long-range spatial correlations were observed both before and after the transport transition.

  6. Recent results from the CMD-2 detector at the VEPP-2M collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solodov, E.P. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general-purpose detector CMD-2 is taking data at the Novosibirsk VEPP-2M e{sup -}e{sup -} collider in the energy range 360-1400 MeV, with luminosity of {approx} 5.0 x 10{sup 30} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for the {phi} resonance region. Data from {approx} 1500 nb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity around 1.02 GeV and {approx}500 nb{sup -1} in the 600-1000 MeV range have been collected and preliminary analyses performed. We present progress in studies of the {phi} meson and K{sub S}K{sub L} systems: (a) measurement of the {phi} meson parameters; (b) searches for {phi} rare decays. The new upper limits B({phi}{yields}{eta}{prime} {gamma}) < 2.4 x 10{sup -4}, B({phi} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) < 1.0 x 10{sup -4}, and B({phi} {yields} f{sub 0}{gamma}) < 8 x 10{sup -4} have been obtained; (c) the study of the K{sub L} interactions in the CsI calorimeter; (d) with the help of 32,340 tagged K{sub S}, the semi-rare decay of K{sub S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{gamma} has been observed with a branching ratio of (1.82 {+-} 0.49)x10{sup -3}; and (e) selection of events with K{sub S}K{sub L} coupled decays and interactions. The regeneration cross section of the low moments K{sub L} was found to be {sigma}{sub reg}{sup Be} = 63 {+-} 19 mb. Data from the 600-1000 MeV energy range are used for high-accuracy measurement of the e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation cross section, and the preliminary analysis is presented in this paper.

  7. Hand-held survey probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Hungate, Kevin E. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include an optical sensor to generate data corresponding to a position of the detection probe with respect to a surface; a microprocessor to receive the data; a software medium having code to process the data with the microprocessor and pre-programmed parameters, and making a comparison of the data to the parameters; and an indicator device to indicate results of the comparison. A method of providing operational feedback to a user of a detection probe may include generating output data with an optical sensor corresponding to the relative position with respect to a surface; processing the output data, including comparing the output data to pre-programmed parameters; and indicating results of the comparison.

  8. Nuclear Physics with Electroweak Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omar Benhar

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, the italian theoretical Nuclear Physics community has played a leading role in the development of a unified approach, allowing for a consistent and fully quantitative description of the nuclear response to electromagnetic and weak probes. In this paper I review the main achievements in both fields, point out some of the open problems, and outline the most promising prospects.

  9. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  10. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D; Sulchek, Todd A; Feigin, Stuart C

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  11. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D. (Reno, NV); Sulchek, Todd A. (Oakland, CA); Feigin, Stuart C. (Reno, NV)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  12. Cantilevered probe detector with piezoelectric element

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D.; Sulchek, Todd A.; Feigin, Stuart C.

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A disclosed chemical detection system for detecting a target material, such as an explosive material, can include a cantilevered probe, a probe heater coupled to the cantilevered probe, and a piezoelectric element disposed on the cantilevered probe. The piezoelectric element can be configured as a detector and/or an actuator. Detection can include, for example, detecting a movement of the cantilevered probe or a property of the cantilevered probe. The movement or a change in the property of the cantilevered probe can occur, for example, by adsorption of the target material, desorption of the target material, reaction of the target material and/or phase change of the target material. Examples of detectable movements and properties include temperature shifts, impedance shifts, and resonant frequency shifts of the cantilevered probe. The overall chemical detection system can be incorporated, for example, into a handheld explosive material detection system.

  13. Handheld force-controlled ultrasound probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbertson, Matthew Wright

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An hand-held force controlled ultrasound probe has been developed. The controller maintains a prescribed contact force between the probe and a patient's body. The device will enhance the diagnostic capability of free-hand ...

  14. Electron probe microanalysis in geoscience: a tutorial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gooley, R.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tutorial on the history, theory and use of electron probe microanalysis in the geosciences is presented. (ACR)

  15. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation Dynamics using Correalted AFM and Confocal Ultramicroscopy. Probing Nanoscale Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Fluctuation...

  16. 2015 GTP GTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability andStandardsDepartment ofProjected

  17. 2015 GTP GTO Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability andStandardsDepartment

  18. Low-energy U(1) x USp(2M) gauge theory from simple high-energy gauge group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sven Bjarke Gudnason; Kenichi Konishi

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We give an explicit example of the embedding of a near BPS low-energy (U(1) x USp(2M))/Z_2 gauge theory into a high-energy theory with a simple gauge group and adjoint matter content. This system possesses degenerate monopoles arising from the high-energy symmetry breaking as well as non-Abelian vortices due to the symmetry breaking at low energies. These solitons of different codimensions are related by the exact homotopy sequences.

  19. 2M : un Espace de Conception pour l'Interaction Bi-Manuelle Gilles Bailly, Laurence Nigay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailly, Gilles

    2M : un Espace de Conception pour l'Interaction Bi-Manuelle Gilles Bailly, Laurence Nigay Lab @ # 9G: @ 2 # 0 2 # 0 # # 1 0 H ;.-!4. I8 ! >A J > II8 * ? " # II8 +"! K KKKKK KKK KHKKHKKKK L8 II #12 ? # > # & 3 2 ' ## & 3 ' ! !( ( V # V V V 9AA: 3 3 ( # ! !( W 9X: # # W W # F & ' 1 # 9X: 3 · * 7 3 C

  20. Optical probe with reference fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Da Silva, Luiz B. (Danville, CA); Chase, Charles L. (Dublin, CA)

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing tissue includes the steps of generating an emission signal, generating a reference signal, directing the emission signal to and from the tissue, directing the reference signal in a predetermined manner relative to the emission signal, and using the reference signal to compensate the emission signal. In one embodiment compensation is provided for fluctuations in light delivery to the tip of the probe due to cable motion.

  1. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  2. Probes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints ofJanoschek

  3. Entangled quantum probes for dynamical environmental noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo A. C. Rossi; Matteo G. A. Paris

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the use of entangled qubits as quantum probes to characterize the dynamical noise induced by complex environments. In particular, we show that entangled probes improve estimation of the correlation time for a broad class of environmental noises compared to any sequential strategy involving single qubit preparation. The effect is present when the noise is faster than a threshold value, a regime which may always be achieved by tuning the coupling between the quantum probe and the environment inducing the noise. Our scheme exploits time-dependent sensitivity of quantum systems to decoherence and does not require dynamical control on the probes. We derive the optimal interaction time and the optimal probe preparation, showing that it corresponds to multiqubit GHZ states when entanglement is useful. We also show robustness of the scheme against depolarization or dephasing of the probe, and discuss simple measurements approaching optimal precision.

  4. INNOVATIVE EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR MICRO DEFECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, Telmo G.; Vilaca, Pedro; Quintino, Luisa [IDMEC, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Santos, Jorge dos [GKSS, Max-Planck-Street 1, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Rosado, Luis [IST, UTL, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports the development of an innovative eddy current (EC) probe, and its application to micro-defects on the root of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW). The new EC probe presents innovative concept issues, allowing 3D induced current in the material, and a lift-off independence. Validation experiments were performed on aluminium alloys processed by FSW. The results clearly show that the new EC probe is able to detect and sizing surface defects about 60 microns depth.

  5. PROBING DENSE NUCLEAR MATTER VIA NUCLEAR COLLISIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stocker, H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    University of California. LBL-12095 Probing Dense NuclearMatter Nuclear Collisions* v~a H. Stocker, M.Gyulassy and J. Boguta Nuclear Science Division Lawrence

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: scanning probe microscopy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focus on stainless steels. Dr. An is an internationally recognized expert on scanning probe microscopy, such as atomic force microscopy and scanning ... Last Updated:...

  7. MERIT Pump/Probe Data OutlineOutline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MERIT Pump/Probe Data Analysis OutlineOutline The pump/probe program Particle detector response correction Pump/probe analysis results NFMCC Collaboration Meeting , LBNL, January 26, 2009 Ilias Efthymiopoulos - CERN #12;The pump/probe program #12;The pump/probe program Use of the CERN PS flexibility

  8. In-situ spectrophotometric probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prather, W.S.

    1992-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrophotometric probe is described for in situ absorption spectra measurements comprising a first optical fiber carrying light from a remote light source, a second optical fiber carrying light to a remote spectrophotometer, the proximal ends of the first and second optical fibers parallel and co-terminal, a planoconvex lens to collimate light from the first optical fiber, a reflecting grid positioned a short distance from the lens to reflect the collimated light back to the lens for focusing on the second optical fiber. The lens is positioned with the convex side toward the optical fibers. A substrate for absorbing analyte or an analyte and reagent mixture may be positioned between the lens and the reflecting grid. 5 figs.

  9. Millimeter-wave active probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majidi-Ahy, Gholamreza (Sunnyvale, CA); Bloom, David M. (Portola Valley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A millimeter-wave active probe for use in injecting signals with frequencies above 50GHz to millimeter-wave and ultrafast devices and integrated circuits including a substrate upon which a frequency multiplier consisting of filter sections and impedance matching sections are fabricated in uniplanar transmission line format. A coaxial input and uniplanar 50 ohm transmission line couple an approximately 20 GHz input signal to a low pass filter which rolls off at approximately 25 GHz. An input impedance matching section couples the energy from the low pass filter to a pair of matched, antiparallel beam lead diodes. These diodes generate odd-numberd harmonics which are coupled out of the diodes by an output impedance matching network and bandpass filter which suppresses the fundamental and third harmonics and selects the fifth harmonic for presentation at an output.

  10. Optically pumped whispering-gallery mode lasing from 2-?m GaN micro-disks pivoted on Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yiyun; Ma, Zetao; Zhang, Xuhui; Choi, H. W., E-mail: hwchoi@hku.hk [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong); Wang, T. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    2-?m micro-disks containing InGaN/GaN quantum wells supported on a tiny Si nanotip are fabricated via microsphere lithography followed by dry and wet etch processes. The micro-disks are studied by photoluminescence at both room-temperature and 10?K. Optically pumped blue lasing at room-temperature is observed via whispering-gallery modes (WGMs) with a lasing threshold as low as 8.43 mJ/cm{sup 2}. Optical resonances in the micro-disks are studied through numerical computations and finite-difference time-domain simulations. The WGMs are further confirmed through the measured broadband transmission spectrum, whose transmission minima coincide well with predicted WGM frequencies.

  11. The Liverpool Telescope: Rapid follow-up observation of Targets of opportunity with a 2 m robotic telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gomboc; M. F. Bode; D. Carter; C. G. Mundell; A. M. Newsam; R. J. Smith; I. A. Steele

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Liverpool Telescope, situated at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, La Palma, Canaries, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. It recently began observations. Among Liverpool Telescope's primary scientific goals is to monitor variable objects on all timescales from seconds to years. An additional benefit of its robotic operation is rapid reaction to unpredictable phenomena and their systematic follow up, simultaneous or coordinated with other facilities. The Target of Opportunity Programme of the Liverpool Telescope includes the prompt search for and observation of GRB and XRF counterparts. A special over-ride mode implemented for GRB/XRF follow-up enables observations commencing less than a minute after the alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. In particular, the moderate aperture and rapid automated response make the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to help solving the mystery of optically dark GRBs and for the investigation of currently unstudied short bursts and XRFs.

  12. Thermodynamics of D-brane Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Kiritsis; T. R. Taylor

    1999-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dynamics and thermodynamics of particle and D-brane probes moving in non-extremal black hole/brane backgrounds. When a probe falls from asymptotic infinity to the horizon, it transforms its potential energy into heat, $TdS$, which is absorbed by the black hole in a way consistent with the first law of thermodynamics. We show that the same remains true in the near-horizon limit, for BPS probes only, with the BPS probe moving from AdS infinity to the horizon. This is a quantitative indication that the brane-probe reaching the horizon corresponds to thermalization in gauge theory. It is shown that this relation provides a way to reliably compute the entropy away from the extremal limit (towards the Schwarzschild limit).

  13. Rugged fiber optic probe for raman measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Patrick E. (Martinez, GA); Toole, Jr., William R. (Aiken, SC); Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical probe for conducting light scattering analysis is disclosed. The probe comprises a hollow housing and a probe tip. A fiber assembly made up of a transmitting fiber and a receiving bundle is inserted in the tip. A filter assembly is inserted in the housing and connected to the fiber assembly. A signal line from the light source and to the spectrometer also is connected to the filter assembly and communicates with the fiber assembly. By using a spring-loaded assembly to hold the fiber connectors together with the in-line filters, complex and sensitive alignment procedures are avoided. The close proximity of the filter assembly to the probe tip eliminates or minimizes self-scattering generated by the optical fiber. Also, because the probe can contact the sample directly, sensitive optics can be eliminated.

  14. Protective shield for an instrument probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Howard A.; Ross, James R.; Birtola, Sal R.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A shield is disclosed that is particularly useful for protecting exposed optical elements at the end of optical probes used in the analysis of hazardous emissions in and around an industrial environment from the contaminating effects of those emissions. The instant invention provides a hood or cowl in the shape of a right circular cylinder that can be fitted over the end of such optical probes. The hood provides a clear aperture through which the probe can perform unobstructed analysis. The probe optical elements are protected from the external environment by passing a dry gas through the interior of the hood and out through the hood aperture in sufficient quantity and velocity to prevent any significant mixing between the internal and external environments. Additionally, the hood is provided with a cooling jacket to lessen the potential for damaging the probe due to temperature excursions.

  15. RT in situ PCR detection of MART-1 and TRP-2 mRNA in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of melanoma and nevi.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itakura, Eijun; Huang, Rong-Rong; Wen, Duan-Ren; Paul, Eberhard; Wnsch, Peter H; Cochran, Alistair J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cochran AJ. Detection of tyrosinase mRNA in formalin-fixed,PM, Hearing VJ. A second tyrosinase- related protein, TRP-2,mRNA isoforms of the tyrosinase-related protein-2/DOPAchrome

  16. Probing Signal Design for Power System Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hauer, John F.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mittelstadt, William

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the design of effective input signals for low-level probing of power systems. In 2005, 2006, and 2008 the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) conducted four large-scale system wide tests of the western interconnected power system where probing signals were injected by modulating the control signal at the Celilo end of the Pacific DC intertie. A major objective of these tests is the accurate estimation of the inter-area electromechanical modes. A key aspect of any such test is the design of an effective probing signal that leads to measured outputs rich in information about the modes. This paper specifically studies low-level probing signal design for power-system identification. The paper describes the design methodology and the advantages of this new probing signal which was successfully applied during these tests. This probing input is a multi-sine signal with its frequency content focused in the range of the inter-area modes. The period of the signal is over two minutes providing high-frequency resolution. Up to 15 cycles of the signal are injected resulting in a processing gain of 15. The resulting system response is studied in the time and frequency domains. Because of the new probing signal characteristics, these results show significant improvement in the output SNR compared to previous tests.

  17. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial Layers on Silicon Nanoparticles for Lithium Ion In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Probing of Native Oxide and Artificial...

  18. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Quantitatively Probing the Al Distribution in Zeolites. Abstract: The degree of substitution of Si4+ by Al3+ in the...

  19. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne Particle Analysis. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne...

  20. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Scanning Probe Direct-Write of Germanium Nanostructures. Abstract: Bottom-up nanostructure synthesis has played a pivotal role in...

  1. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  2. CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. Standards and Requirements Identification Document (SRID) Requirements Management System and Requirements Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JOHNSON, A.L.

    2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Tank Farm Contractor (TFC) for the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection (ORP), River Protection Project (RPP), CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG), will use a computer based requirements management system. The system will serve as a tool to assist in identifying, capturing, and maintaining the Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) requirements and links to implementing procedures and other documents. By managing requirements as one integrated set, CHG will be able to carry out its mission more efficiently and effectively. CHG has chosen the Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System (DOORS{trademark}) as the preferred computer based requirements management system. Accordingly, the S/RID program will use DOORS{trademark}. DOORS{trademark} will replace the Environmental Requirements Management Interface (ERMI) system as the tool for S/RID data management. The DOORS{trademark} S/RID test project currently resides on the DOORSTM test server. The S/RID project will be migrated to the DOORS{trademark} production server. After the migration the S/RID project will be considered a production project and will no longer reside on the test server.

  3. Modulated microwave microscopy and probes used therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lai, Keji; Kelly, Michael; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave microscope including a probe tip electrode vertically positionable over a sample and projecting downwardly from the end of a cantilever. A transmission line connecting the tip electrode to the electronic control system extends along the cantilever and is separated from a ground plane at the bottom of the cantilever by a dielectric layer. The probe tip may be vertically tapped near or at the sample surface at a low frequency and the microwave signal reflected from the tip/sample interaction is demodulated at the low frequency. Alternatively, a low-frequency electrical signal is also a non-linear electrical element associated with the probe tip to non-linearly interact with the applied microwave signal and the reflected non-linear microwave signal is detected at the low frequency. The non-linear element may be semiconductor junction formed near the apex of the probe tip or be an FET formed at the base of a semiconducting tip.

  4. Self-referencing remote optical probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.; Livingston, R.R.

    1991-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A probe is described for remote spectrometric measurements of fluid samples having a hollow probe body with a sliding reflective plug therein and a lens at one end, ports for admitting and expelling the fluid sample and a means for moving the reflector so that reference measurement can be made with the reflector in a first position near the lens and a sample measurement can be made with the reflector away from the lens and the fluid sample between the reflector and the lens. Comparison of the two measurements will yield the composition of the fluid sample. The probe is preferably used for remote measurements and light is carried to and from the probe via fiber optic cables. 3 figures.

  5. Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

  6. Catheter based magnetic resonance compatible perfusion probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toretta, Cara Lynne

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neurosurgeons are using a thermal based technique to quantify brain perfusion. The thermal diffusion probe (TDP) technology measures perfusion in a relatively small volume of brain tissue. The neurosurgeon chooses the ...

  7. Scanning Probe AFM Compound Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a dye-sensitization system,... Tip-Enhanced Near-Field Raman Spectroscopy Probing Single Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Nanoparticles. The correlated metallic tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy...

  8. Single Molecule Probes of Lipid Membrane Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livanec, Philip W.

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological membranes are highly heterogeneous structures that are thought to use this heterogeneity to organize and modify the function of membrane constituents. Probing membrane organization, structure, and changes therein ...

  9. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, Stanley E. (Evans, GA); Livingston, Ronald R. (Aiken, SC); Prather, William S. (Augusta, GA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman-scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  10. Fiber optic probe for light scattering measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nave, S.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is comprised of a fiber optic probe and a method for using the probe for light scattering analyses of a sample. The probe includes a probe body with an inlet for admitting a sample into an interior sample chamber, a first optical fiber for transmitting light from a source into the chamber, and a second optical fiber for transmitting light to a detector such as a spectrophotometer. The interior surface of the probe carries a coating that substantially prevents non-scattered light from reaching the second fiber. The probe is placed in a region where the presence and concentration of an analyte of interest are to be detected, and a sample is admitted into the chamber. Exciting light is transmitted into the sample chamber by the first fiber, where the light interacts with the sample to produce Raman-scattered light. At least some of the Raman- scattered light is received by the second fiber and transmitted to the detector for analysis. Two Raman spectra are measured, at different pressures. The first spectrum is subtracted from the second to remove background effects, and the resulting sample Raman spectrum is compared to a set of stored library spectra to determine the presence and concentration of the analyte.

  11. Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Gregory Duane

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served...

  12. Evaluation of probes used to detect alpha radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sackett, Gregory Duane

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    such probes were evaluated in this study, the 350A Alpha Probe of Dosimeter Corporation and the AB100 Scintillator Probe produced by Harshaw Bicron. As an additional comparison, a Ludlum Model 44-9 (Pancake) GM Probe was also evaluated, since it has served...

  13. Holographic backgrounds from D-brane probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha Moskovic

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the derivation of holographic backgrounds from the field theory side, without using any supergravity equations of motion. Instead, we rely on the addition of probe D-branes to the stack of D-branes generating the background. From the field theory description of the probe branes, one can compute an effective action for the probes (in a suitable low-energy/near-horizon limit) by integrating out the background branes. Comparing this action with the generic probe D-brane action then allows to determine the holographic background dual to the considered field theory vacuum. In the first part, the required pre-requisites of field and string theory are recalled and this strategy to derive holographic backgrounds is explained in more detail on the basic case of D3-branes in flat space probed by a small number of D-instantons. The second part contains our original results, which have already appeared in arXiv:1301.3738, arXiv:1301.7062 and arXiv:1312.0621. We first derive the duals to three continuous deformations (Coulomb branch, $\\beta$ and non-commutative deformations) of N=4 super-Yang-Mills. We then derive the enhan\\c{c}on mechanism in a simple N=2 quiver gauge theory setup by using a fractional D-instanton as a probe and exploiting recent exact results on the Coulomb branch of N=2 quivers. Finally, we obtain the near-horizon D4-brane geometry by probing the D4-branes with a small number of D0-branes.

  14. Quantum probes for fractional Gaussian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo G. A. Paris

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the characterization of classical fractional random noise via quantum probes. In particular, we focus on estimation and discrimination problems involving the fractal dimension of the trajectories of a system subject to fractional Brownian noise. We assume that the classical degree of freedom exposed to the environmental noise is coupled to a quantum degree of freedom of the same system, e.g. its spin, and exploit quantum limited measurements on the spin part to characterize the classical fractional noise. More generally, our approach may be applied to any two-level system subject to dephasing perturbations described by fractional Brownian noise, in order to assess the precision of quantum limited measurements in the characterization of the external noise. In order to assess the performances of quantum probes we evaluate the Bures metric, as well as the Helstrom and the Chernoff bound, and optimize their values over the interaction time. We find that quantum probes may be successfully employed to obtain a reliable characterization of fractional Gaussian process when the coupling with the environment is weak or strong. In the first case decoherence is not much detrimental and for long interaction times the probe acquires information about the environmental parameters without being too much mixed. Conversely, for strong coupling, information is quickly impinged on the quantum probe and can effectively retrieved by measurements performed in the early stage of the evolution. In the intermediate situation, none of the two above effects take place: information is flowing from the environment to the probe too slowly compared to decoherence, and no measurements can be effectively employed to extract it from the quantum probe. The two regimes of weak- and strong-coupling are defined in terms of a threshold value of the coupling, which itself increases with the fractional dimension.

  15. Corrosion monitoring with hydrogen probes in the oilfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomason, W.H.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the application of hydrogen probes for corrosion monitoring in the oilfield is presented. The three basic types of hydrogen probes are described and their relative merits discussed. The construction and installation of a simple and inexpensive electrochemical hydrogen probe is described. Experiences with hydrogen probes in oilfield operations are discussed, and it is concluded from these experiences that production systems where hydrogen probes can provide useful corrosion data are limited.

  16. Gamma-ray blind beta particle probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weisenberger, Andrew G. (Grafton, VA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intra-operative beta particle probe is provided by placing a suitable photomultiplier tube (PMT), micro channel plate (MCP) or other electron multiplier device within a vacuum housing equipped with: 1) an appropriate beta particle permeable window; and 2) electron detection circuitry. Beta particles emitted in the immediate vicinity of the probe window will be received by the electron multiplier device and amplified to produce a detectable signal. Such a device is useful as a gamma insensitive, intra-operative, beta particle probe in surgeries where the patient has been injected with a beta emitting radiopharmaceutical. The method of use of such a device is also described, as is a position sensitive such device.

  17. Remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmucker, John E. (Hurt, VA); Blasi, Raymond J. (Harrison City, PA); Archer, William B. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A remote adjustable focus Raman spectroscopy probe allows for analyzing Raman scattered light from a point of interest external probe. An environmental barrier including at least one window separates the probe from the point of interest. An optical tube is disposed adjacent to the environmental barrier and includes a long working length compound lens objective next to the window. A beam splitter and a mirror are at the other end. A mechanical means is used to translated the prove body in the X, Y, and Z directions resulting in a variable focus optical apparatus. Laser light is reflected by the beam splitter and directed toward the compound lens objective, then through the window and focused on the point of interest. Raman scattered light is then collected by the compound lens objective and directed through the beam splitter to a mirror. A device for analyzing the light, such as a monochrometer, is coupled to the mirror.

  18. Scintillation probe with photomultiplier tube saturation indicator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruch, Jeffrey F. (Bethel Park, PA); Urban, David J. (Glassport, PA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photomultiplier tube saturation indicator is formed by supplying a supplemental light source, typically an light emitting diode (LED), adjacent to the photomultiplier tube. A switch allows the light source to be activated. The light is forwarded to the photomultiplier tube by an optical fiber. If the probe is properly light tight, then a meter attached to the indicator will register the light from the LED. If the probe is no longer light tight, and the saturation indicator is saturated, no signal will be registered when the LED is activated.

  19. FLOW SOURCES AND FORMATION LAWS OF SOLAR WIND N. A. LOTOVA1, V. N. OBRIDKO1, K. V. VLADIMIRSKII2, M. K. BIRD3 and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Janardhan

    FLOW SOURCES AND FORMATION LAWS OF SOLAR WIND STREAMS N. A. LOTOVA1, V. N. OBRIDKO1, K. V. VLADIMIRSKII2, M. K. BIRD3 and P. JANARDHAN3, 1IZMIRAN, Troitsk, Moscow Region, 142190, Russia (e-mail: nlotova structure of the solar wind flow is studied in the main acceleration zone from 10 to 40 solar radii from

  20. Probing nuclear matter with jet conversions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, W.; Fries, Rainer J.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the flavor of leading jet partons as a valuable probe of nuclear matter. We point out that the coupling of jets to nuclear matter naturally leads to an alteration of jet chemistry even at high transverse momentum PT. In particular...

  1. Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current produced the "bays" (decreases in the ground-level geomagnetic field) measured in magnetogram current" around Earth and its association with geomagnetic storms began in the early days of the twentieth Storm Probes (RBSP) spacecraft is the magnetosphere ring current instrument that will provide data

  2. Vertically aligned nanostructure scanning probe microscope tips

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guillorn, Michael A.; Ilic, Bojan; Melechko, Anatoli V.; Merkulov, Vladimir I.; Lowndes, Douglas H.; Simpson, Michael L.

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for cantilever structures that include a vertically aligned nanostructure, especially vertically aligned carbon nanofiber scanning probe microscope tips. An apparatus includes a cantilever structure including a substrate including a cantilever body, that optionally includes a doped layer, and a vertically aligned nanostructure coupled to the cantilever body.

  3. Probe and method for DNA detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, Hsin-Chih; Werner, James Henry; Sharma, Jaswinder Kumar; Martinez, Jennifer Suzanne

    2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybridization probe containing two linear strands of DNA lights up upon hybridization to a target DNA using silver nanoclusters that have been templated onto one of the DNA strands. Hybridization induces proximity between the nanoclusters on one strand and an overhang on the other strand, which results in enhanced fluorescence emission from the nanoclusters.

  4. Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam Probes of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam Probes of Dark Energy using Cosmological Simulations Nonlinear component, called dark energy. This unknown energy causes the expansion of the universe to accelerate theoretical model of dark energy has been developed. Instead a number of models have been proposed that range

  5. Organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Jr., Marcel (Albany, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source or a particle beam; and (2) at least one linking agent, having a first portion linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal and a second portion capable of linking to an affity molecule. The compound is linked to an affinity molecule to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance. Subsequent exposure to excitation energy will excite the semiconductor nanocrystal in he probe, causing the emission of electromagnetic radiation. Further described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  6. Organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Jr., Marcel (Albany, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source or a particle beam; and (2) at least one linking agent, having a first portion linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal and a second portion capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound is linked to an affinity molecule to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance. Subsequent exposure to excitation energy will excite the semiconductor nanocrystal in the probe, causing the emission of electromagnetic radiation. Further described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  7. Semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Bruchez, Marcel; Alivisatos, Paul

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound and probe are described. The compound is capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. The compound comprises (1) one or more semiconductor nanocrystals capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy, and (2) one or more linking agents, having a first portion linked to the one or more semiconductor nanocrystals and a second portion capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. One or more semiconductor nanocrystal compounds are linked to one or more affinity molecules to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with one or more detectable substances in a material being analyzed, and capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy. Also described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and treating materials with the probe.

  8. Semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Marcel (Newark, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound and probe are described. The compound is capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. The compound comprises (1) one or more semiconductor nanocrystals capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy, and (2) one or more linking agents, having a first portion linked to the one or more semiconductor nanocrystals and a second portion capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. One or more semiconductor nanocrystal compounds are linked to one or more affinity molecules to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with one or more detectable substances in a material being analyzed, and capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy. Also described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and treating materials with the probe.

  9. Semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Marcel (Newark, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound and probe are described. The compound is capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. The compound comprises (1) one or more semiconductor nanocrystals capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy, and (2) one or more linking agents, having a first portion linked to the one or more semiconductor nanocrystals and a second portion capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. One or more semiconductor nanocrystal compounds are linked to one or more affinity molecules to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with one or more detectable substances in a material being analyzed, and capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy. Also described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and treating materials with the probe.

  10. Organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Bruchez, Jr., Marcel; Alivisatos, Paul

    2005-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source or a particle beam; and (2) at least one linking agent, having a first portion linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal and a second portion capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound is linked to an affinity molecule to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance. Subsequent exposure to excitation energy will excite the semiconductor nanocrystal in the probe causing the emission of electromagnetic radiation. Further described are processes for respectively: making the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  11. Organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Bruchez, Jr., Marcel; Alivisatos, Paul

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source or a particle beam; and (2) at least one linking agent, having a first portion linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal and a second portion capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound is linked to an affinity molecule to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance. subsequent exposure to excitation energy will excite the semiconductor nanocrystal in the probe causing the emission of electromagnetic radiation. Further described are processes for respectively: making the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  12. Semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Bruchez, Marcel; Alivisatos, Paul

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound and probe are described. The compound is capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. The compound comprises (1) one or more semiconductor nanocrystals capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy, and (2) one or more linking agents, having a first portion linked to the one or more semiconductor nanocrystals and a second portion capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. One or more semiconductor nanocrystal compounds are linked to one or more affinity molecules to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with one or more detectable substances in a material being analyzed, and capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy. Also described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and treating materials with the probe.

  13. Ultrafast pump-probe force microscopy with nanoscale resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cerullo, Confocal ultrafast pump-probe spectroscopy: A newand H. J. Maris, Time-resolved pump-probe experiments withand U. Keller, Femtosecond pump-porbe near-field optical

  14. acceleration probe studying: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Supernova Acceleration Probe: Studying Dark Energy with Type Ia Supernovae Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Supernova Acceleration Probe...

  15. Probing Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics. Probing Single-Molecule Protein Conformational Dynamics. Abstract: Protein conformational fluctuations and dynamics, often...

  16. Test probe for surface mounted leadless chip carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, Kerry L. (Raytown, MO); Topolewski, John (Lenexa, KS)

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A test probe for a surface mounted leadless chip carrier is disclosed. The probed includes specially designed connector pins which allow size reductions in the probe. A thermoplastic housing provides spring action to ensure good mechanical and electrical contact between the pins and the contact strips of a leadless chip carrier. Other features include flexible wires molded into the housing and two different types of pins alternately placed in the housing. These features allow fabrication of a smaller and simpler test probe.

  17. WIRELESS EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR ENGINE HEALTH , B. Graubard1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Julie A.

    WIRELESS EDDY CURRENT PROBE FOR ENGINE HEALTH MONITORING M. Reid1 , B. Graubard1 , R. J. Weber1 , J. The first prototype wireless eddy current (EC) probe for on-wing inspection was demonstrated in a F100 PW of safety significant propulsion system malfunctions. Data from 2 MHz Eddy Current probes was transmitted

  18. Can a Pump-probe Experiment be Simulated Efficiently?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kosloff, Ronnie

    Can a Pump-probe Experiment be Simulated Efficiently? Thesis Submitted for the Degree Doctor things in the world. #12;i ABSTRACT Measuring a quantum system disturbs its evolution. A pump-probe exper measurements. Modeling the evolution of observables in the pump-probe experiment is an essential ingredient

  19. Link between laboratory and astrophysical radiative C Michaut1, E Falize1,2, C Cavet1, S Bouquet1,2, M Koenig3, T

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    the radiative precursor, but the cooling function is slightly modified. In future experiments we will probe], we switch the cooling function by a equivalent system which represents the hal-00287806,version1. The equations including a cooling function P x are solved for any values of the exponents

  20. Probing Nano-Mechanical QED Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. B. Gao; S. Yang; Yu-xi Liu; C. P. Sun; Franco Nori

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and study an "intrinsic probing" approach, without introducing any external detector, to mimic cavity QED effects in a qubit-nanomechanical resonator system. This metallic nanomechanical resonator can act as an intrinsic detector when a weak driving current passes through it. The nanomechanical resonator acts as both the cavity and the detector. A cavity QED-like effect is demonstrated by the correlation spectrum of the electromotive force between the two ends of the nanomechanical resonator. Using the quantum regression theorem and perturbation theory, we analytically calculate the correlation spectrum. In the weak driving limit, we study the effect on the vacuum Rabi splitting of both the strength of the driving as well as the frequency-detuning between the charge qubit and the nanomechanical resonator. Numerical calculations confirm the validity of our intrinsic probing approach.

  1. Non-Contact Gaging with Laser Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clinesmith, Mike

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A gage has been constructed using conventional (high end) components for the application of measuring fragile syntactic foam parts in a non-contact mode. Success with this approach has been achieved through a novel method of transferring (mapping) high accuracy local measurements of a coated aluminum master, taken on a Leitz Coordinate Measurement Machine (CMM), to the gage software system. The mapped data is then associated with local voltage readings from two (inner and outer) laser triangulating probes. This couples discreet laser probe offset and linearity characteristics to the measured master geometry. The gage software compares real part measured data against the master data to provide non-contact part inspection that results in a high accuracy and low uncertainty performance. Uncertainty from the part surface becomes the prevailing contributor to the gaging process. The gaging process provides a high speed, hands off measurement with nearly zero impedance.

  2. Regenerable activated bauxite adsorbent alkali monitor probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, S.H.D.

    1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A regenerable activated bauxite adsorber alkali monitor probe for field applications to provide reliable measurement of alkali-vapor concentration in combustion gas with special emphasis on pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) off-gas. More particularly, the invention relates to the development of a easily regenerable bauxite adsorbent for use in a method to accurately determine the alkali-vapor content of PFBC exhaust gases. 6 figs.

  3. Dielectric covered hairpin probe for its application in reactive plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M. [NCPST, School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University, Dublin 9 (Ireland); Karkari, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research Center, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India)

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The hairpin probe is a well known technique for measuring local electron density in low temperature plasmas. In reactive plasmas, the probe characteristics are affected by surface sputtering, contamination, and secondary electron emission. At higher densities, the plasma absorbs the entire electromagnetic energy of hairpin and hence limits the density measurements. These issues can be resolved by covering the hairpin surface with a thin layer of dielectric. In this letter, the dielectric contribution to the probe characteristics is incorporated in a theory which is experimentally verified. The dielectric covering improves the performance of probe and also allows the hairpin tip to survive in reactive plasma where classical electrical probes are easily damaged.

  4. Design and analysis of mismatch probes for long oligonucleotide microarrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Ye; He, Zhili; Van Nostrand, Joy D.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonspecific hybridization is currently a major concern with microarray technology. One of most effective approaches to estimating nonspecific hybridizations in oligonucleotide microarrays is the utilization of mismatch probes; however, this approach has not been used for longer oligonucleotide probes. Here, an oligonucleotide microarray was constructed to evaluate and optimize parameters for 50-mer mismatch probe design. A perfect match (PM) and 28 mismatch (MM) probes were designed for each of ten target genes selected from three microorganisms. The microarrays were hybridized with synthesized complementary oligonucleotide targets at different temperatures (e.g., 42, 45 and 50 C). In general, the probes with evenly distributed mismatches were more distinguishable than those with randomly distributed mismatches. MM probes with 3, 4 and 5 mismatched nucleotides were differentiated for 50-mer oligonucleotide probes hybridized at 50, 45 and 42 C, respectively. Based on the experimental data generated from this study, a modified positional dependent nearest neighbor (MPDNN) model was constructed to adjust the thermodynamic parameters of matched and mismatched dimer nucleotides in the microarray environment. The MM probes with four flexible positional mismatches were designed using the newly established MPDNN model and the experimental results demonstrated that the redesigned MM probes could yield more consistent hybridizations. Conclusions: This study provides guidance on the design of MM probes for long oligonucleotides (e.g., 50 mers). The novel MPDNN model has improved the consistency for long MM probes, and this modeling method can potentially be used for the prediction of oligonucleotide microarray hybridizations.

  5. Sampling probe for microarray read out using electrospray mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Berkel, Gary J.

    2004-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated electrospray based sampling system and method for analysis obtains samples from surface array spots having analytes. The system includes at least one probe, the probe including an inlet for flowing at least one eluting solvent to respective ones of a plurality of spots and an outlet for directing the analyte away from the spots. An automatic positioning system is provided for translating the probe relative to the spots to permit sampling of any spot. An electrospray ion source having an input fluidicly connected to the probe receives the analyte and generates ions from the analyte. The ion source provides the generated ions to a structure for analysis to identify the analyte, preferably being a mass spectrometer. The probe can be a surface contact probe, where the probe forms an enclosing seal along the periphery of the array spot surface.

  6. Cone penetrometer fiber optic raman spectroscopy probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kyle, Kevin R. (Brentwood, CA); Brown, Steven B. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemically and mechanically robust optical Raman spectroscopy probe assembly that can be incorporated in a cone penetrometer (CPT) for subsurface deployment. This assembly consists of an optical Raman probe and a penetrometer compatible optical probe housing. The probe is intended for in-situ chemical analysis of chemical constituents in the surrounding environment. The probe is optically linked via fiber optics to the light source and the detection system at the surface. A built-in broadband light source provides a strobe method for direct measurement of sample optical density. A mechanically stable sapphire window is sealed directly into the side-wall of the housing using a metallic, chemically resistant, hermetic seal design. This window permits transmission of the interrogation light beam and the resultant signal. The spectroscopy probe assembly is capable of accepting Raman, Laser induced Fluorescence, reflectance, and other optical probes with collimated output for CPT deployment.

  7. Use of Ultrafast Dispersed Pump-Dump-Probe and Pump-Repump-Probe Spectroscopies to Explore the Light-Induced Dynamics of Peridinin in Solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Use of Ultrafast Dispersed Pump-Dump-Probe and Pump-Repump-Probe Spectroscopies to Explore Form: NoVember 14, 2005 Optical pump-induced dynamics of the highly asymmetric carotenoid peridinin in methanol was studied by dispersed pump-probe, pump-dump-probe, and pump-repump-probe transient absorption

  8. gtp_flow_power_estimator.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This simple spreadsheet model estimates either the flow rate required to produce a specified level of power output, or the power output that can be produced from a specified flow rate.

  9. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  10. Organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Jr., Marcel (Albany, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source or a particle beam; and (2) an affinity molecule linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal. The semiconductor nanocrystal is linked to an affinity molecule to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance. Exposure of the semiconductor nanocrystal to excitation energy will excite the semiconductor nanocrystal causing the emission of electromagnetic radiation. Further described are processes for respectively: making the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  11. Eddy current probe with foil sensor mounted on flexible probe tip and method of use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viertl, John R. M. (Niskayuna, NY); Lee, Martin K. (Niskayuna, NY)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pair of copper coils are embedded in the foil strip. A first coil of the pair generates an electromagnetic field that induces eddy currents on the surface, and the second coil carries a current influenced by the eddy currents on the surface. The currents in the second coil are analyzed to obtain information on the surface eddy currents. An eddy current probe has a metal housing having a tip that is covered by a flexible conductive foil strip. The foil strip is mounted on a deformable nose at the probe tip so that the strip and coils will conform to the surface to which they are applied.

  12. Mass Measurements of AGN from Multi-Lorentzian Models of X-ray Variability. I. Sampling Effects in Theoretical Models of the rms^2-M_BH Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin E. Pessah

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent X-ray variability studies suggest that the log of the square of the fractional rms variability amplitude, rms^2, seems to correlate with the log of the AGN black-hole mass, M_BH, with larger black holes being less variable for a fixed time interval. This has motivated the theoretical modeling of the rms^2-M_BH correlation with the aim of constraining AGN masses based on X-ray variability. A viable approach to addressing this problem is to assume an underlying power spectral density with a suitable mass dependence, derive the functional form of the rms^2-M_BH correlation for a given sampling pattern, and investigate whether the result is consistent with the observations. For simplicity, previous studies, inspired by the similarities shared by the timing properties of AGN and X-ray binaries, have explored model power spectral densities characterized by broken power laws. and ignored, in general, the distorting effects that the particular sampling pattern imprints in the observed power spectral density. Motivated by the latest timing results from X-ray binaries, obtained with RXTE, we propose that AGN broad-band noise spectra consist of a small number of Lorentzian components. This assumption allows, for the first time, to fully account for sampling effects in theoretical models of X-ray variability in an analytic manner. We show that, neglecting sampling effects when deriving the fractional rms from the model power spectral density can lead to underestimating it by a factor of up to 80% with respect to its true value for the typical sampling patterns used to monitor AGN. We discuss the implications of our results for the derivation of AGN masses using theoretical models of the rms^2-M_BH correlation. (Abridged)

  13. Ballistic performance comparison of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenide MX{sub 2} (M = Mo, W; X = S, Se, Te) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Jiwon; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K. [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the transport properties of monolayer MX{sub 2} (M?=?Mo, W; X?=?S, Se, Te) n- and p-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) using full-band ballistic non-equilibrium Green's function simulations with an atomistic tight-binding Hamiltonian with hopping potentials obtained from density functional theory. We discuss the subthreshold slope, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL), as well as gate-induced drain leakage (GIDL) for different monolayer MX{sub 2} MOSFETs. We also report the possibility of negative differential resistance behavior in the output characteristics of nanoscale monolayer MX{sub 2} MOSFETs.

  14. Nondegenerate parametric generation of 2.2-mJ, few-cycle 2.05-?m pulses using a mixed phase matching scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Guibao; Wandel, Scott F.; Jovanovic, Igor, E-mail: ijovanovic@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the production of 2.2-mJ, ?6 optical-cycle-long mid-infrared laser pulses with a carrier wavelength of 2.05 ?m in a two-stage ?-BaB{sub 2}O{sub 4} nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier design with a mixed phase matching scheme, which is pumped by a standard Ti:sapphire chirped-pulse amplification system. It is demonstrated that relatively high pulse energies, short pulse durations, high stability, and excellent beam profiles can be obtained using this simple approach, even without the use of optical parametric chirped-pulse amplification.

  15. Probing New Physics with Astrophysical Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicole F. Bell

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review the prospects for probing new physics with neutrino astrophysics. High energy neutrinos provide an important means of accessing physics beyond the electroweak scale. Neutrinos have a number of advantages over conventional astronomy and, in particular, carry information encoded in their flavor degree of freedom which could reveal a variety of exotic neutrino properties. We also outline ways in which neutrino astrophysics can be used to constrain dark matter properties, and explain how neutrino-based limits lead to a strong general bound on the dark matter total annihilation cross-section.

  16. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  17. Tao Probing the End of the World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sung-Soo Kim; Masato Taki; Futoshi Yagi

    2015-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new IIB 5-brane description for the E-string theory which is the world-volume theory on M5-brane probing the end of the world M9-brane. The E- string in the new realization is depicted as spiral 5-branes web equipped with the cyclic structure which is a key to uplifting to 6 dimensions. Utilizing the topological vertex to the 5-brane web configuration enables us to write down a combinatorial formula for the generating function of the E-string elliptic genera, namely the full partition function of topological strings on local 1/2 K3 surface.

  18. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)]. E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Jaroudi, Said S. [Saudi Aramco, P.O. Box 65, Tanajib 31311 (Saudi Arabia); Abbas, Nureddin M. [Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, P.O. Box 1073, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  19. Probing the time dependence of dark energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barboza Edsio Jr, M. [Departamento de Fsica, Universidade do Estado do Rio Grande do Norte, Rua Professor Antnio Campos s/n, Mossor (Brazil); Alcaniz, J.S., E-mail: edesiobarboza@uern.br, E-mail: alcaniz@on.br [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatrio Nacional, Rua General Jos Cristino 77, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method to investigate a possible time-dependence of the dark energy equation of state w is proposed. We apply this methodology to a combination of data involving one of the most recent type Ia supernova sample (SNLS3) along with the current baryon acoustic oscillation and H(z) measurements. We show that current observations cannot rule out a non-evolving dark energy component (dw/dz = 0). The approach developed here reduces considerably the so-called smearing effect on w determinations and may be useful to probe a possible evolving dark energy component when applied to upcoming observational data.

  20. Probes for anionic cell surface detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments of the present invention are generally directed to compositions comprising a class of molecular probes for detecting the presence of anionic cell surfaces. Embodiments include compositions that are enriched for these compositions and preparations, particularly preparations suitable for use as laboratory/clinical reagents and diagnostic indicators, either alone or as part of a kit. An embodiment of the invention provides for a highly selective agent useful in the discernment and identification of dead or dying cells, such as apoptotic cells, in a relatively calcium-free environment. An embodiment of the invention provides a selective agent for the identification of bacteria in a mixed population of bacterial cells and nonbacterial cells.

  1. Ionization probes of molecular structure and chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, P.M. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various photoionization processes provide very sensitive probes for the detection and understanding of the spectra of molecules relevant to combustion processes. The detection of ionization can be selective by using resonant multiphoton ionization or by exploiting the fact that different molecules have different sets of ionization potentials. Therefore, the structure and dynamics of individual molecules can be studied even in a mixed sample. The authors are continuing to develop methods for the selective spectroscopic detection of molecules by ionization, and to use these methods for the study of some molecules of combustion interest.

  2. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  3. MJC Probe Inc MPI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLu an Group Jump to: navigation,LushuiLyme,MDL JumpMJMJC Probe Inc

  4. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43Probing Organic Transistors

  5. Probing Organic Transistors with Infrared Beams

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43Probing Organic

  6. Probing the Proton's Weak Side | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br BromineProbing the Proton's Weak Side

  7. Use of a fiber optic probe for organic species determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic probe is described for remotely detecting the presence and concentration organic species in aqueous solutions. The probe includes a cylindrical housing with an organic species indicator, preferably diaminonaphthyl sulfonic acid adsorbed in a silica gel (DANS-modified gel), contained in the probe`s distal end. The probe admits aqueous solutions to the probe interior for mixing within the DANS-modified gel. An optical fiber transmits light through the DANS-modified gel while the indicator reacts with organic species present in the solution, thereby shifting the location of the fluorescent peak. The altered light is reflected to a receiving fiber that carries the light to a spectrophotometer or other analysis device. 5 figs.

  8. Electrical probe diagnostics for the laminar flame quenching distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karrer, Maxime; Makarov, Maxime [Renault Technocentre, 78288 Guyancourt Cedex (France); Bellenoue, Marc; Labuda, Sergei; Sotton, Julien [Laboratoire de Combustion et de Detonique, CNRS, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil (France)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified theory, previously developed for the general case of weakly ionized gas flow, is used to predict electrical probe response when the flame is quenched on the probe surface. This theory is based on the planar model of space charge sheaths around the measuring electrode. For the flame quenching case, by assuming that the sheath thickness is comparable with the thermal boundary layer thickness, probe current can be related to flame quenching distance. The theoretical assumptions made to obtain the analytical formulation of probe current were experimentally proved by using direct visualization and high-frequency PIV. The direct visualization method was also used to validate the results of flame quenching distance values obtained with electrical probe. The electrical probe diagnostics have been verified for both head-on and sidewall flame quenching regimes and for stoichiometric methane/air and propane/air mixtures in a pressure range of 0.05-0.6 MPa. (author)

  9. Organo Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon (Pinole, CA); Bruchez, Jr., Marcel (Albany, CA); Alivisatos, Paul (Oakland, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound is described which is capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The compound comprises (1) a semiconductor nanocrystal capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation (luminescing) in a narrow wavelength band and/or absorbing energy, and/or scattering or diffracting electromagnetic radiation--when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source (of narrow or broad bandwidth) or a particle beam; and (2) at least one linking agent, having a first portion linked to the semiconductor nanocrystal and a second portion capable of linking to an affinity molecule. The luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound is linked to an affinity molecule to form an organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with a detectable substance in a material being analyzed, and capable of emitting electromagnetic radiation in a narrow wavelength band and/or absorbing, scattering, or diffracting energy when excited by an electromagnetic radiation source (of narrow or broad bandwidth) or a particle beam. The probe is stable to repeated exposure to light in the presence of oxygen and/or other radicals. Further described is a process for making the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound and for making the organo luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal probe comprising the luminescent semiconductor nanocrystal compound linked to an affinity molecule capable of bonding to a detectable substance. A process is also described for using the probe to determine the presence of a detectable substance in a material.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) dosimeter and probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dosimeter and probe for measuring exposure to chemical and biological compounds is disclosed. The dosimeter or probe includes a collector which may be analyzed by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. The collector comprises a surface-enhanced Raman scattering-active material having a coating applied thereto to improve the adsorption properties of the collector. The collector may also be used in automated sequential devises, in probe array devices.

  11. High-frequency Probing Diagnostic for Hall Current Plasma Thrusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.A. Litvak; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    High-frequency oscillations (1-100 MHz) in Hall thrusters have apparently eluded significant experimental scrutiny. A diagnostic setup, consisting of a single Langmuir probe, a special shielded probe connector-positioner, and an electronic impedance-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall thruster plasma at multiple locations, high-frequency plasma waves have been identified and characterized for various thruster operating conditions.

  12. Energy transfer characteristics of silicate glass doped with Er{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}, and Ho{sup 3+} for ?2 ?m emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ming; Liu, Xueqiang [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China) [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Guo, Yanyan [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Changchun University of Science and Technology, Changchun 130022 (China); Hu, Lili [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials for High Power Laser, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhang, Junjie [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)] [College of Materials Science and Engineering, China Jiliang University, Hangzhou 310 018 (China)

    2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass with good thermal stability is prepared by melt-quenching method. Efficient ?2 ?m emission is observed under 808 nm laser excitation. It is found that the 2.0 ?m emission of Ho{sup 3+} can be enhanced under the excitation at 808 nm by incorporating Er{sup 3+} and Tm{sup 3+}. Based on the measurement of absorption spectra, the JuddOfelt intensity parameters, radiation emission probability, and branching ratio are calculated to evaluate the spectroscopic properties simultaneously. The maximum value of emission cross section of Ho{sup 3+} is 3.54 10{sup ?21} cm{sup 2} at 2008 nm. Additionally, the phonon assistance and the micro-parameters in the energy transfer process are quantitatively analyzed by using Dexter model. The energy transfer coefficient from Tm{sup 3+} to Ho{sup 3+} can reach as high as 21.44 10{sup ?40} cm{sup 6}/s, respectively. The emission property together with good thermal property indicates that Er{sup 3+}/Tm{sup 3+}/Ho{sup 3+} tri-doped silicate glass is a potential kind of laser glass for efficient 2 ?m laser.

  13. Constraining torsion with Gravity Probe B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao Yi; Guth, Alan H.; Cabi, Serkan [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Tegmark, Max [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-entrenched folklore that all torsion gravity theories predict observationally negligible torsion in the solar system, since torsion (if it exists) couples only to the intrinsic spin of elementary particles, not to rotational angular momentum. We argue that this assumption has a logical loophole which can and should be tested experimentally, and consider nonstandard torsion theories in which torsion can be generated by macroscopic rotating objects. In the spirit of action=reaction, if a rotating mass like a planet can generate torsion, then a gyroscope would be expected to feel torsion. An experiment with a gyroscope (without nuclear spin) such as Gravity Probe B (GPB) can test theories where this is the case. Using symmetry arguments, we show that to lowest order, any torsion field around a uniformly rotating spherical mass is determined by seven dimensionless parameters. These parameters effectively generalize the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism and provide a concrete framework for further testing Einstein's general theory of relativity (GR). We construct a parametrized Lagrangian that includes both standard torsion-free GR and Hayashi-Shirafuji maximal torsion gravity as special cases. We demonstrate that classic solar system tests rule out the latter and constrain two observable parameters. We show that Gravity Probe B is an ideal experiment for further constraining nonstandard torsion theories, and work out the most general torsion-induced precession of its gyroscope in terms of our torsion parameters.

  14. Three-axis particle impact probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV); Smith, Jr., Nelson S. (Morgantown, WV); Utt, Carroll E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-axis particle impact probes detect particle impact vectors along x-, y-, and z-axes by spherical probe head mounted on the outer end of a shaft that is flexibly mounted in silicone rubber at the top of a housing so as to enable motion imparted to the head upon impact to be transmitted to a grounded electrode secured to the shaft within the housing. Excitable electrodes are mounted in the housing in a fixed position, spaced apart from the ground electrode and forming, with the ground electrode, capacitor pairs. Movement of the ground electrode results in changes in capacitance, and these difference in capacitance are used for measurement or derivation of momentum vectors along each of the three axes. In one embodiment, the ground electrode is mounted at the base of the shaft and is secured to a silicone rubber layer at the top of the housing, providing for cantilevered movement. In another embodiment, the shaft is mounted at its mid point in a flexible bushing so that it undergoes pivotal movement around that point.

  15. New Atomic Force Microscope Spectroscopy Probes Local Elasticity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization New Atomic Force Microscope Spectroscopy Probes Local Elasticity March 04, 2015 Shown is a contact resonance frequency image after nano-oxidation of a...

  16. Fiber delivered probe for efficient CARS imaging of tissues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balu, Mihaela; Liu, Gangjun; Chen, Zhongping; Tromberg, Bruce J; Potma, Eric O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    probe based on microelectromechanical system mirror forbased on a microelectromechanical systems scanning mirror,based on a microelectromechanical systems two-dimensional

  17. Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy . Probing the Dynamics of a Protein Hydrophobic Core by Deutron Solid-State...

  18. Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Ruthenium Complexes The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain Modifying Proteins to Combat Disease Higher...

  19. anisotropy probe wmap1: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

  20. anisotropy probe wmapobservations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

  1. anisotropy probe 5-yr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

  2. Advanced Imaging and Ultra-fast Material Probing With Inverse...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging and Ultra-fast Material Probing With Inverse Compton Scattering A proposal to the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility Gerard Andonian, Alberto Bacci, Ubaldo...

  3. Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a Joint Field Measurement Strategic Environmental Research and Probing Emissions of Military Cargo Aircraft: Description of a...

  4. New probe at EMSL observes interface kinetics | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    catalyze electrode surfaces and shuttle electrons externally, as in a microbial fuel cell. The E probe is available at EMSL. Read more from the PNNL Fundamental and...

  5. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for Li-ion Batteries by In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy. Probing the Degradation Mechanisms in Electrolyte Solutions for...

  6. Probing attosecond electron dynamics at solid surfaces | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Probing attosecond electron dynamics at solid surfaces Wednesday, May 13, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Jrg Osterwalder, Department of Physics,...

  7. Development Of 2-Meter Soil Temperature Probes And Results Of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temperature Probes And Results Of Temperature Survey Conducted At Desert Peak, Nevada, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  8. atom probe study: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    using both APT and correlative microscopy techniques, a more complete understanding... Bennett, Samantha 2011-02-08 2 ATOM-PROBE TOMOGRAPHIC STUDY OF THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL...

  9. atom probe investigation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of both coherent and squeezed light. The stochastic master equations used in the analysis are expressed in terms of the Hamiltonian of the probed system and the interaction...

  10. Test probe for surface mounted leadless chip carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, K.L.; Topolewski, J.

    1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A test probe for a surface mounted leadless chip carrier is disclosed. The probe includes specially designed connector pins which allow size reductions in the probe. A thermoplastic housing provides spring action to ensure good mechanical and electrical contact between the pins and the contact strips of a leadless chip carrier. Other features include flexible wires molded into the housing and two different types of pins alternately placed in the housing. These features allow fabrication of a smaller and simpler test probe. 1 fig.

  11. Probing Uranium's Mysteries | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43ProbingProbingProbingProbing

  12. Chemical sensor with oscillating cantilevered probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adams, Jesse D

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides a method of detecting a chemical species with an oscillating cantilevered probe. A cantilevered beam is driven into oscillation with a drive mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A free end of the oscillating cantilevered beam is tapped against a mechanical stop coupled to a base end of the cantilevered beam. An amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured with a sense mechanism coupled to the cantilevered beam. A treated portion of the cantilevered beam is exposed to the chemical species, wherein the cantilevered beam bends when exposed to the chemical species. A second amplitude of the oscillating cantilevered beam is measured, and the chemical species is determined based on the measured amplitudes.

  13. Probing neutrinoless double beta decay with SNO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evelina Arushanova; Ashley R. Back

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probing neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the primary goals for SNO+, SNOLAB's multi-purpose neutrino detector. In order to achieve this goal the SNO detector has been adapted so that it can be filled with Te-loaded liquid scintillator. During the initial double beta phase the target loading is 0.3% natural Te, which equates to $\\sim790$ kg of double beta isotope. Estimating the sensitivity to neutrinoless double beta decay requires a well understood background model. For SNO+ this is provided by a comprehensive study considering all possible background contributions, whether they originate from within the liquid scintillator cocktail, the surrounding parts of the detector or other irreducible backgrounds. Given these considerations, for five years running in the initial phase, the expected sensitivity is $T_{1/2}^{0\

  14. Probing neutrinoless double beta decay with SNO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arushanova, Evelina

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probing neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the primary goals for SNO+, SNOLAB's multi-purpose neutrino detector. In order to achieve this goal the SNO detector has been adapted so that it can be filled with Te-loaded liquid scintillator. During the initial double beta phase the target loading is 0.3% natural Te, which equates to $\\sim790$ kg of double beta isotope. Estimating the sensitivity to neutrinoless double beta decay requires a well understood background model. For SNO+ this is provided by a comprehensive study considering all possible background contributions, whether they originate from within the liquid scintillator cocktail, the surrounding parts of the detector or other irreducible backgrounds. Given these considerations, for five years running in the initial phase, the expected sensitivity is $T_{1/2}^{0\

  15. Synthesis and characterization of redox polymers of (M(4-vinyl-4 prime -methyl-2,2 prime -bipyridine) sub 3 )(PF sub 6 ) sub 2 (M = Ru, Os)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bommarito, S.L.; Lowery-Bretz, S.P.; Abruna, H.D. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have prepared polymers of (M(vbpy){sub 3}(PF{sub 6}){sub 2}) (M = Ru, Os) (vbpy = 4-vinyl-4{prime}-methyl-2,2{prime}-bipyridine) in solution via free-radical polymerization and fractionated them according to molecular weight using size exclusion chromatography. Different fractions have been characterized by electrochemical and spectroscopic means. The authors find that whereas for the osmium containing polymers the relative polymer size varies in proportion to the number of vinyl groups consumed during the polymerization reaction, the same is not true for the analogous ruthenium polymers. In addition, the emission energy of both the ruthenium and osmium polymers is also related to the concentration of residual vinyl groups in the polymer. Upon polymerization, there is a shift in the emission toward higher energies. Electrochemically determined diffusion coefficients are consistent with the relative size of the various fractions.

  16. Novel rotating field probe for inspection of tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xin, J.; Tarkleson, E.; Lei, N.; Udpa, L.; Udpa, S. S. [Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 48824 (United States)

    2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspection of steam generator tubes in nuclear power plants is extremely critical for safe operation of the power plant. In the nuclear industry, steam generator tube inspection using eddy current techniques has evolved over the years from a single bobbin coil, to rotating probe coil (RPC) and array probe, in an attempt to improve the speed and reliability of inspection. The RPC probe offers the accurate spatial resolution but involves complex mechanical rotation. This paper presents a novel design of eddy current probes based on rotating fields produced by three identical coils excited by a balanced three-phase supply. The sensor thereby achieves rotating probe functionality by electronic means and eliminates the need for mechanical rotation. The field generated by the probe is largely radial that result in induced currents that flow circularly around the radial axis and rotating around the tube at a synchronous speed effectively producing induced eddy currents that are multidirectional. The probe will consequently be sensitive to cracks of all orientations in the tube wall. The finite element model (FEM) results of the rotating fields and induced currents are presented. A prototype probe is being built to validate simulation results.

  17. Parylene Coated Silicon Probes for Neural Prosthesis Ray Huang1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard

    Parylene Coated Silicon Probes for Neural Prosthesis Ray Huang1* , Changlin Pang1 , Yu-Chong Tai1 electrodes. Keywords - parylene cable; neural prosthesis; silicon probe I. INTRODUCTION An important component of silicon neural prosthesis is the electrode array capable of recording neural activity from

  18. A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A new acoustic three dimensional intensity and energy density probe F. Aymea , C. Carioub , M is a great advantage. In this frame, a new intensity acoustic probe has been developed to compute acoustic quantities which can be input data for energetic identification methods. 1 Introduction Noise matters

  19. Using relational databases to analyze Microarray probes and single nucleotide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rouchka, Eric

    Using relational databases to analyze Microarray probes and single nucleotide Polymorphisms Abhijit probes and sin- gle nucleotide polymorphisms Abhijit W. Phatak1 , and Eric C. Rouchka1,* 1 Department valuable in the study of single nucleotide polymor- phisms (SNPs). Aside from the physical use

  20. Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Extreme conditions during multibubble cavitation: Sonoluminescence as a spectroscopic probe Kenneth Cavitation MBSL Plasma a b s t r a c t We review recent work on the use of sonoluminescence (SL) to probe spectroscopically the conditions created during cavitation, both in clouds of collapsing bubbles (multibubble

  1. Structural Dynamics of a Catalytic Monolayer Probed by Ultrafast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    REPORTS Structural Dynamics of a Catalytic Monolayer Probed by Ultrafast 2D IR Vibrational Echoes in solutions. Here, we extend the technique to probing the interfacial dynamics and structure of a silica. The structural dynamics, as reported on by a carbonyl stretch vibration of the surface-bound complex, have

  2. A Novel Flexible Sinusoidal Probe for Chronic Extracellular Brain Recording

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohal, Harbaljit S; Jackson, Andrew; Baker, Stuart N; O'Neill, Anthony

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current microelectrodes designed to record chronic neural activity suffer from recording instabilities due to the modulus mismatch between the electrode materials and the brain. We sought to address this by microfabricating a novel flexible neural probe. Our probe was fabricated from parylene-C with a WTi metal, using contact photolithography and reactive ion etching, with three design features to address this modulus mismatch: a sinusoidal shaft, a rounded tip and a polyimide anchoring ball. The anchor restricts movement of the electrode recording sites and the shaft accommodates the brain motion. We successfully patterned thick metal and parylene-C layers, with a reliable device release process leading to high functional yield and were able to sample stable neural activity for over 2 years with this probe. We have successfully optimized the fabrication process to produce a reliable probe with high functional yield. This novel reliably microfabricated probe can record stable neural activity for up to two yea...

  3. Shelving and Probe Efficiency in Trapped Ion Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schacht, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A generalized probe sequence typical of trapped ion experiments using shelving is studied. Detection efficiency is analyzed for finite shelved state lifetimes and using multi-modal count distributions. Multi-modal distributions are more appropriate for measurements that use a small number of ions than the simple Poisson counting statistics usually considered and have a larger variance that may be significant in determining uncertainties and in making weighted fits. Optimal probe times and the resulting state detection efficiency and sensitivity are determined for arbitrary cooling rates, initial states and shelved state lifetimes, in terms of a probe coherence time {\\tau}p. A universal optimal probe time of tp ~ 0.43{\\tau}p is shown to give an almost optimal probe sensitivity for most systems.

  4. 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta -Fragmentation to probe transversity 41 Two-pion fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 41 Two-pion fragmentation M -- -- ++ 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 42 Interference Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 43 Asymmetry for interference

  5. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Hui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    eds. ), Zeng et al. : Data mining for probes Excerpta330. Zeng et al. : Data mining for probes 31. Fung J, WeierZeng et al. : Data mining for probes Data Mining Empowers

  6. Development of a Scanning Probe Microscope and Studies of Graphene Grown on Copper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasool, Haider Imad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1: INTRODUCTION 1.1. BRIEF DISCUSSION OF SCANNING PROBEhighly stable electrochemical scanning probe microscope forincorporated it into a scanning probe microscope, performed

  7. Constraining Torsion with Gravity Probe B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Mao; Max Tegmark; Alan Guth; Serkan Cabi

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-entrenched folklore that torsion gravity theories predict observationally negligible torsion in the solar system, since torsion (if it exists) couples only to the intrinsic spin of elementary particles, not to rotational angular momentum. We argue that this assumption has a logical loophole which can and should be tested experimentally. In the spirit of action=reaction, if a rotating mass like a planet can generate torsion, then a gyroscope should also feel torsion. Using symmetry arguments, we show that to lowest order, the torsion field around a uniformly rotating spherical mass is determined by seven dimensionless parameters. These parameters effectively generalize the PPN formalism and provide a concrete framework for further testing GR. We construct a parametrized Lagrangian that includes both standard torsion-free GR and Hayashi- Shirafuji maximal torsion gravity as special cases. We demonstrate that classic solar system tests rule out the latter and constrain two observable parameters. We show that Gravity Probe B (GPB) is an ideal experiment for further constraining torsion theories, and work out the most general torsion-induced precession of its gyroscope in terms of our torsion parameters

  8. Complete information acquisition in scanning probe microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belianinov, Alex [ORNL; Kalinin, Sergei V [ORNL; Jesse, Stephen [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last three decades, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) has emerged as a primary tool for exploring and controlling the nanoworld. A critical part of the SPM measurements is the information transfer from the tip-surface junction to a macroscopic measurement system. This process reduces the many degrees of freedom of a vibrating cantilever to relatively few parameters recorded as images. Similarly, the details of dynamic cantilever response at sub-microsecond time scales of transients, higher-order eigenmodes and harmonics are averaged out by transitioning to millisecond time scale of pixel acquisition. Hence, the amount of information available to the external observer is severely limited, and its selection is biased by the chosen data processing method. Here, we report a fundamentally new approach for SPM imaging based on information theory-type analysis of the data stream from the detector. This approach allows full exploration of complex tip-surface interactions, spatial mapping of multidimensional variability of material s properties and their mutual interactions, and SPM imaging at the information channel capacity limit.

  9. LISA as a dark energy probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K G Arun; Chandra Kant Mishra; Chris Van Den Broeck; B R Iyer; B S Sathyaprakash; Siddhartha Sinha

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently it was shown that the inclusion of higher signal harmonics in the inspiral signals of binary supermassive black holes (SMBH) leads to dramatic improvements in parameter estimation with the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). In particular, the angular resolution becomes good enough to identify the host galaxy or galaxy cluster, in which case the redshift can be determined by electromagnetic means. The gravitational wave signal also provides the luminosity distance with high accuracy, and the relationship between this and the redshift depends sensitively on the cosmological parameters, such as the equation-of-state parameter $w=p_{\\rm DE}/\\rho_{\\rm DE}$ of dark energy. With a single binary SMBH event at $z < 1$ having appropriate masses and orientation, one would be able to constrain $w$ to within a few percent. We show that, if the measured sky location is folded into the error analysis, the uncertainty on $w$ goes down by an additional factor of 2-3, leaving weak lensing as the only limiting factor in using LISA as a dark energy probe.

  10. Methods of and apparatus for levitating an eddy current probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stone, William J. (Kansas City, MO)

    1988-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An eddy current probe is supported against the force of gravity with an air earing while being urged horizontally toward the specimen being examined by a spring and displaced horizontally against the force of the spring pneumatically. The pneumatic displacement is accomplished by flowing air between a plenum chamber fixed with respect to the probe and the surface of the specimen. In this way, the surface of the specimen can be examined without making mechanical contact therewith while precisely controlling the distance at which the probe stands-off from the surface of the specimen.

  11. Broadband extreme ultraviolet probing of transient gratings in vanadium dioxide

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sistrunk, Emily; Grilj, Jakob; Jeong, Jaewoo; Samant, Mahesh G.; Gray, Alexander X.; Drr, Hermann A.; Parkin, Stuart S. P.; Ghr, Markus

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear spectroscopy in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) and soft x-ray spectral range offers the opportunity for element selective probing of ultrafast dynamics using core-valence transitions (Mukamel et al., Acc. Chem. Res. 42, 553 (2009)). We demonstrate a step on this path showing core-valence sensitivity in transient grating spectroscopy with EUV probing. We study the optically induced insulator-to-metal transition (IMT) of a VO? film with EUV diffraction from the optically excited sample. The VO? exhibits a change in the 3p-3d resonance of V accompanied by an acoustic response. Due to the broadband probing we are able to separate the two features.

  12. Development progress of the Materials Analysis and Particle Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia, M., E-mail: mlucia@pppl.gov; Kaita, R.; Majeski, R.; Boyle, D. P.; Schmitt, J. C.; Onge, D. A. St. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Bedoya, F.; Allain, J. P. [Department of Nuclear, Plasma, and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Analysis and Particle Probe (MAPP) is a compact in vacuo surface science diagnostic, designed to provide in situ surface characterization of plasma facing components in a tokamak environment. MAPP has been implemented for operation on the Lithium Tokamak Experiment at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), where all control and analysis systems are currently under development for full remote operation. Control systems include vacuum management, instrument power, and translational/rotational probe drive. Analysis systems include onboard Langmuir probes and all components required for x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, low-energy ion scattering spectroscopy, direct recoil spectroscopy, and thermal desorption spectroscopy surface analysis techniques.

  13. On the design of heat-transfer probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brich, M.A.; Ganzha, V.L.; Saxena, S.C. [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Univ. of Illinois, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Saxena and coworkers have reported heat-transfer coefficient values for magnetofluidized beds using electrically heated heat-transfer probes. Here, a two-dimensional heat-transfer model is employed to investigate the influence of significant design features on measured parameters. Numerical calculations reveal that the thermal conductivity of the probe material has an insignificant contribution but the material of end caps and relative sizes and locations of the probe and heater appreciably influence the heat-transfer rates through end-conduction.

  14. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43Probing OrganicProbingProbing

  15. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43ProbingProbingProbing

  16. Young Red Spheroidal Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Fields: Evidence for a Truncated IMF at ~2M_solar and a Constant Space Density to z~2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Broadhurst; Rychard J. Bouwens

    1999-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical-IR images of the Northern and Southern Hubble Deep Fields are used to measure the spectral and density evolution of early-type galaxies. The mean optical SED is found to evolve passively towards a mid F-star dominated spectrum by z ~ 2. We demonstrate with realistic simulations that hotter ellipticals would be readily visible if evolution progressed blueward and brightward at z > 2, following a standard IMF. The colour distributions are best fitted by a `red' IMF, deficient above ~2 M_solar and with a spread of formation in the range 1.5 3 Gyrs independent of its formation redshift. Regarding density evolution, we demonstrate that the sharp decline in numbers claimed at z > 1 results from a selection bias against distant red galaxies in the optical, where the flux is too weak for morphological classification, but is remedied with relatively modest IR exposures revealing a roughly constant space density to z ~ 2. We point out that the lack of high mass star-formation inferred here and the requirement of metals implicates cooling-flows of pre-enriched gas in the creation of the stellar content of spheroidal galaxies. Deep-field X-ray images will be very helpful to examine this possibility.

  17. Rigid spine reinforced polymer microelectrode array probe and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tabada, Phillipe; Pannu, Satinderpall S

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A rigid spine-reinforced microelectrode array probe and fabrication method. The probe includes a flexible elongated probe body with conductive lines enclosed within a polymeric material. The conductive lines connect microelectrodes found near an insertion end of the probe to respective leads at a connector end of the probe. The probe also includes a rigid spine, such as made from titanium, fixedly attached to the probe body to structurally reinforce the probe body and enable the typically flexible probe body to penetrate and be inserted into tissue, such as neural tissue. By attaching or otherwise fabricating the rigid spine to connect to only an insertion section of the probe body, an integrally connected cable section of the probe body may remain flexible.

  18. Probing the Electronic Structures of Low Oxidation-State Uranium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluoride Molecules UFx- (x2-4). Probing the Electronic Structures of Low Oxidation-State Uranium Fluoride Molecules UFx- (x2-4). Abstract: We report the experimental observation...

  19. Probing the electronic structures of low oxidation-state uranium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    molecules UFx- (x2-4) . Probing the electronic structures of low oxidation-state uranium fluoride molecules UFx- (x2-4) . Abstract: We report the experimental observation...

  20. Scanning probe microscopy with inherent disturbance suppression using micromechanical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Andrew William, 1977-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All scanning probe microscopes (SPMs) are affected by disturbances, or mechanical noise, in their environments which can limit their imaging resolution. This thesis introduces a general approach for suppressing out-of-plane ...

  1. Probing Valance and Core Excitons in Molecules by Coherent Multidimens...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are simulated. Time-domain experiments that employ sequences of attosecond x-ray pulses in order to probe electronic and nuclear dynamics in molecules are made possible by...

  2. Application of FRET probes in the analysis of neuronal plasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueda, Yoshibumi

    Breakthroughs in imaging techniques and optical probes in recent years have revolutionized the field of life sciences in ways that traditional methods could never match. The spatial and temporal regulation of molecular ...

  3. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielawski, John C. (Scotia, NY); Outwater, John O. (Cambridge, MA); Halbfinger, George P. (Schenectady, NY)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  4. Dynamic study of tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vega Gonzlez, Myraida Anglica

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the dynamic characteristics of the in-plane tunable stiffness scanning microscope probe for an atomic force microscope (AFM). The analysis was carried out using finite element analysis (FEA) methods for ...

  5. Multi-probe robotic positioner for cryoablation in MRI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Faye Y

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the design of a guidance device for faster and more accurate targeting of multiple probes during cryoablation and other percutaneous interventions performed in closed bore magnetic resonance (MR) ...

  6. Title of Document: NANOSCALE MANIPULATION, PROBING, AND ASSEMBLY USING MICROFLUIDIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of Document: NANOSCALE MANIPULATION, PROBING, AND ASSEMBLY USING MICROFLUIDIC FLOW along the wire. Together, these experiments illustrate the versatility of microfluidics MICROFLUIDIC FLOW CONTROL By Chad Ropp Dissertation submitted to the Faculty of the Graduate School

  7. Weak lensing flexion as a probe of galaxy cluster substructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cain, Benjamin Martin

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring galaxy cluster total masses and the amount of dark matter substructure within galaxy cluster haloes is a fundamental probe of the ACDM model of structure formation, as well as the interactions between baryonic ...

  8. Neural network calibration for miniature multi-hole pressure probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayagopal, Rajesh

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robust and accurate neural network based algorithm phics. for the calibration of miniature multi-hole pressure probes has been developed and a detailed description of its features and use is presented. The code that was developed was intended...

  9. Embrittlement of RPV steels; An atom probe tomography perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Russell, Kaye F [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atom probe tomography has played a key role in the understanding of the embrittlement of neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels through the atomic level characterization of the microstructure. Atom probe tomography has been used to demonstrate the importance of the post weld stress relief treatment in reducing the matrix copper content in high copper alloys, the formation of {approx}-nm-diameter copper-, nickel-, manganese- and silicon-enriched precipitates during neutron irradiation in copper containing RPV steels, and the coarsening of these precipitates during post irradiation heat treatments. Atom probe tomography has been used to detect {approx}2-nm-diameter nickel-, silicon- and manganese-enriched clusters in neutron irradiated low copper and copper free alloys. Atom probe tomography has also been used to quantify solute segregation to, and precipitation on, dislocations and grain boundaries.

  10. Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots. Probing the size and environment induced phase transformation in CdSe quantum dots. Abstract: The...

  11. Magnetic nanowire based high resolution magnetic force microscope probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    -resolution magnetic force microscope probes using preformed magnetic nanowires. Nickel and cobalt nanowires produced by electrodeposition were directly assembled onto the tip of a commercial atomic force microscope cantilever

  12. Development of Micromachined Probes for Bio-Nano Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapici, Murat K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of providing very fine, micro/nano scale interaction with matter; along with a broad range of applications made possible by incorporating MEMS sensing and actuation techniques. Micromachined probes consist of a well-defined tip structure that determines...

  13. Microfabricated Optical Sensor Probe for the Detection of Esophageal Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinna Balareddy, Karthik Reddy

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometry. The sensor probe consists of a lithographically patterned polymer waveguides chip and three micromachined positioning substrates and source/collection fibers to achieve 45 degree light incidence and collection of spatially resolved diffuse...

  14. Standard Quantum Limit for Probing Mechanical Energy Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbitt, Thomas R.

    We derive a standard quantum limit for probing mechanical energy quantization in a class of systems with mechanical modes parametrically coupled to external degrees of freedom. To resolve a single mechanical quantum, it ...

  15. Probing SZ Source Detection with Gasdynamical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Richard Bond; Marcelo I. Ruetalo; James W. Wadsley; Michael D. Gladders

    2002-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The huge worldwide investment in CMB experiments should make the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect a key probe of the cosmic web in the near future. For the promise to be realized, substantial development of simulation and analysis tools to relate observation to theory is needed. The high nonlinearity and dissipative/feedback gas physics lead to highly non-Gaussian patterns that are much more difficult to analyze than Gaussian primary anisotropies for which the procedures are reasonably well developed. Historical forecasts for what CMB experiments might see used semi-analytic tools, including large scale map constructions, with localized and simplified pressure structures distributed on a point process of (clustered) sources. Hydro studies beyond individual cluster/supercluster systems were inadequate, but now large-volume simulations with high resolution are beginning to shift the balance. We illustrate this by applying ``Gasoline'' (parallelized Tree+SPH) computations to construct SZ maps and derive statistical measures. We believe rapid Monte Carlo simulations using parameterized templates centered on point processes informed by optical and other means on the observational side, and by hydro simulations on the theory side, should play an important role in pipelines to analyze the new SZ field data. We show that localized sources should dominate upcoming SZ experiments, identify sources in the maps under filtering and noise levels expected for these experiments, use the RCS photometric optical survey as an example of redshift localization, and discuss whether cosmic web patterns such as superclusters can be enhanced when such extra source information is supplied.

  16. Free vibrations of U-shaped atomic force microscope probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaei, E.; Turner, J. A., E-mail: jaturner@unl.edu [Mechanical and Materials Engineering, W342 Nebraska Hall, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Contact resonance atomic force microscope (AFM) methods have been used to quantify the elastic and viscoelastic properties of a variety of materials such as polymers, ceramics, biological materials, and metals with spatial resolution on the order of tens of nanometers. This approach involves measurement of the resonant frequencies of the AFM probe both for the free case and the case for which the tip is in contact with a sample. Vibration models of the probe and tip-sample contact models are then used to determine the sample properties from the frequency behavior and to create images of the sample properties. This work has been primarily focused on rectangular, single-beam probes for which the vibration models are relatively simple. Recently, U-shaped AFM probes have been developed to allow local heating of samples and the resonances of these probes are much more complex. In this article, a simplified analytical model of these U-shaped probes is described. This three beam model includes two beams clamped at one end and connected with a perpendicular cross beam at the other end. The beams are assumed only to bend in flexure and twist but their coupling allows a wide range of possible dynamic behavior. Results are presented for the first ten modes and the mode shapes are shown to have complex coupling between the flexure and twisting of the beams, particularly for the higher modes. All resonant frequency results are in good agreement with finite element results for the three probe designs and two values of thickness considered (all wavenumbers are within 3.0%). This work is anticipated to allow U-shaped probes to be used eventually for quantitative measurements of sample material properties during heating using a contact resonance approach.

  17. Probing Compositeness with Higgs Boson Decays at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maria Hoffmann; Anna Kaminska; Rosy Nicolaidou; Stathes Paganis

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is proposed to directly probe the Higgs boson compositeness using the unique characteristics of a boosted Higgs boson produced in association with a weak gauge boson ($W^{\\pm},Z$). The discovery potential for the upcoming LHC running is presented, showing that compositeness scales up to 3 TeV can be probed at the LHC with an integrated luminosity of $\\mathcal{L}=3000$ fb$^{-1}$ collected at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV.

  18. Complex quantum networks as structured environments: engineering and probing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Nokkala; Fernando Galve; Roberta Zambrini; Sabrina Maniscalco; Jyrki Piilo

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider structured environments modeled by bosonic quantum networks and investigate the control and probing of their spectral density. We demonstrate how to engineer a desired spectral density by changing the network structure. We show that the spectral density can be very accurately detected via a locally immersed probe system for virtually any network configuration. We illustrate our findings presenting examples of spectral densities for networks of genuine complexity.

  19. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  20. Band excitation method applicable to scanning probe microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Kalinin, Sergei V. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for scanning probe microscopy. A method includes generating a band excitation (BE) signal having finite and predefined amplitude and phase spectrum in at least a first predefined frequency band; exciting a probe using the band excitation signal; obtaining data by measuring a response of the probe in at least a second predefined frequency band; and extracting at least one relevant dynamic parameter of the response of the probe in a predefined range including analyzing the obtained data. The BE signal can be synthesized prior to imaging (static band excitation), or adjusted at each pixel or spectroscopy step to accommodate changes in sample properties (adaptive band excitation). An apparatus includes a band excitation signal generator; a probe coupled to the band excitation signal generator; a detector coupled to the probe; and a relevant dynamic parameter extractor component coupled to the detector, the relevant dynamic parameter extractor including a processor that performs a mathematical transform selected from the group consisting of an integral transform and a discrete transform.

  1. Filename: FVB Invo2 Forced 121061.CHP Probe Array Type: MG_U74Av2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, William J.

    121061.CHP Probe Array Type: MG_U74Av2 Algorithm: Statistical Probe Pair Thr: 8 Controls: Antisense.13 ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________ Filename: FVB Invo2 Forced 121062.CHP Probe Array Type: MG_U74Av2 Algorithm: Statistical Probe Pair Thr: 8

  2. Revisiting plasma hysteresis with an electronically compensated Langmuir probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, P. K.; Singh, S. K.; Awasthi, L. M.; Mattoo, S. K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of electron temperature in plasma by Langmuir probes, using ramped bias voltage, is seriously affected by the capacitive current of capacitance of the cable between the probe tip and data acquisition system. In earlier works a dummy cable was used to balance the capacitive currents. Under these conditions, the measured capacitive current was kept less than a few mA. Such probes are suitable for measurements in plasma where measured ion saturation current is of the order of hundreds of mA. This paper reports that controlled balancing of capacitive current can be minimized to less than 20 {mu}A, allowing plasma measurements to be done with ion saturation current of the order of hundreds of {mu}A. The electron temperature measurement made by using probe compensation technique becomes independent of sweep frequency. A correction of {<=}45% is observed in measured electron temperature values when compared with uncompensated probe. This also enhances accuracy in the measurement of fluctuation in electron temperature as {delta}T{sub pk-pk} changes by {approx}30%. The developed technique with swept rate {<=}100 kHz is found accurate enough to measure both the electron temperature and its fluctuating counterpart. This shows its usefulness in measuring accurately the temperature fluctuations because of electron temperature gradient in large volume plasma device plasma with frequency ordering {<=}50 kHz.

  3. Laser fluorescence EEM probe for cone penetrometer pollution analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J.; Hart, S.J.; Taylor, T.A.; Kenny, J.E. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) probe has been developed in the laboratory, and installed and tested in a cone penetrometer. The laser excitation system uses the fourth harmonic of a flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser (at 266 nm) to pump a Raman shifter. Up to ten laser beams (in the wavelength region of 257 to 400 nm) from the Raman shifter are launched into optical fibers that are connected to the optical fibers of the cone penetrometer probe through standard connectors. In the probe head, the laser radiation is focused onto the outer surface of sapphire windows that are in contact with the soils. The fluorescence emission is collected by ten collection fibers that take the fluorescence to a detection system consisting of a spectrograph and a CCD detector. This probe allows real-time collection of LIF-EEMs of pollutants adsorbed on solids or dissolved in groundwater. LIF-EEMs provide a substantial amount of spectral information that can be used to determine the composition and quantity of pollutants in soils. This probe can be used to measure POL (petroleum, oil, lubricants), PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and other fluorescent pollutants. The LIF-EEM instrument has been developed in the laboratory, and installed in a cone penetrometer truck for a field test at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The experience of the test will be discussed.

  4. Analysis of cylindrical Langmuir probe using experiment and different theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassouba, M. A., E-mail: hassouba@yahoo.com [Benha University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt); Galaly, A. R. [Umm Al-Qura University, Engineering Science Department, Faculty of Community (Saudi Arabia)] [Umm Al-Qura University, Engineering Science Department, Faculty of Community (Saudi Arabia); Rashed, U. M. [Alazhar University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)] [Alazhar University, Physics Department, Faculty of Science (Egypt)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cylindrical probe data have been analyzed using different theories in order to determine some plasma parameters (electron temperature and electron and ion densities). Langmuir probe data are obtained in a cylindrical DC glow discharge in the positive column plasma at argon gas pressures varied from 0.5 to 6 Torr and at constant discharge current equal to 10 mA. The electron density has calculated from the electron current at the space potential and from Orbital Motion Limited (OML) collisionless theory. Ion density has obtained from the OML analysis of the ion saturation currents. In addition, the electron temperature has measured by three different methods using probe and electrons currents. The electron temperature T{sub e}, plasma density n{sub e}, and space potential V{sub s}, have been obtained from the measured single cylindrical probe I-V characteristic curves. The radial distribution of the electron temperature and plasma density along the glow discharge are measured and discussed. Using the collisionless theories by Langmuir cylindrical probe and up to several Torr argon gas pressures the differences between the values of electron temperature and electron and ion densities stay within reasonable error limits.

  5. A split-beam probe-pump-probe scheme for femtosecond time resolved protein X-ray crystallography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    van Thor, Jasper J.; Madsen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to exploit the femtosecond pulse duration of X-ray Free-Electron Lasers (XFEL) operating in the hard X-ray regime for ultrafast time-resolved protein crystallography experiments, critical parameters that determine the crystallographic signal-to-noise (I/?I) must be addressed. For single-crystal studies under low absorbed dose conditions, it has been shown that the intrinsic pulse intensity stability as well as mode structure and jitter of this structure, significantly affect the crystallographic signal-to-noise. Here, geometrical parameters are theoretically explored for a three-beam scheme: X-ray probe, optical pump, X-ray probe (or probe-pump-probe) which will allow experimental determination of the photo-induced structure factor amplitude differences, ?F,morein a ratiometric manner, thereby internally referencing the intensity noise of the XFEL source. In addition to a non-collinear split-beam geometry which separates un-pumped and pumped diffraction patterns on an area detector, applying an additional convergence angle to both beams by focusing leads to integration over mosaic blocks in the case of well-ordered stationary protein crystals. Ray-tracing X-ray diffraction simulations are performed for an example using photoactive yellow protein crystals in order to explore the geometrical design parameters which would be needed. The specifications for an X-ray split and delay instrument that implements both an offset angle and focused beams are discussed, for implementation of a probe-pump-probe scheme at the European XFEL. We discuss possible extension of single crystal studies to serial femtosecond crystallography, particularly in view of the expected X-ray damage and ablation due to the first probe pulse.less

  6. Probe of New Physics using Precision Measurement of the Electron Magnetic Moment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin Aboubrahim; Tarek Ibrahim; Pran Nath

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the electron is determined experimentally with an accuracy of $2.8\\times 10^{-13}$ and the uncertainty may decrease by an order of magnitude in the future. While the current data is in excellent agreement with the standard model, the possible future improvement in the error in $\\Delta a_e= a_e^{\\text{exp}}- a_e^{\\text{theory}}$ has recently drawn interest in the electron anomalous magnetic moment as a possible probe of new physics beyond the standard model. In this work we give an analysis of such physics in an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with a vector multiplet. In the extended model the electroweak contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron include loop diagrams involving in addition to the exchange of W and Z, the exchange of charginos, sneutrinos and mirror sneutrinos, and the exchange of neutralinos, sleptons and mirror sleptons. The analysis shows that a contribution to the electron magnetic moment much larger than expected by $m_e^2/m_\\mu^2$ scaling of the deviation of the muon anomalous magnetic moment over the standard model prediction, i.e., $\\Delta a_\\mu = 3 \\times 10^{-9}$ as given by the Brookhaven experiment, can be gotten within the MSSM extension. Effects of CP violating phases in the extended MSSM model on the corrections to the supersymmetric electroweak contributions to $a_e$ are also investigated. The analysis points to the possibility of detection of new physics effects with modest improvement on the error in $\\Delta a_e= a_e^{\\text{exp}} - a_e^{\\text{theory}}$.

  7. Empirical tight-binding model for titanium phase transformations D. R. Trinkle,1,2 M. D. Jones,3,2 R. G. Hennig,4 S. P. Rudin,2 R. C. Albers,2 and J. W. Wilkins4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, John

    Empirical tight-binding model for titanium phase transformations D. R. Trinkle,1,2 M. D. Jones,3 published study of the titanium hexagonal close packed to omega transformation, a tight-binding model was developed for titanium that accurately reproduces the structural energies and elec- tron eigenvalues from

  8. Very high energy probes of the quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludlam, T.; Paige, F.; Madansky, L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the penetrating probes of nuclear matter the most frequently discussed have been those which involve the detection of photons or leptons with m/sub T/ approx. = P/sub T/ < 3 GeV. This is the expected range of emission from a hot, thermalized plasma of quarks and gluons. The suggestion has been made that in very high energy collisions of nuclei the properties of high P/sub T/ jets may also reflect the characteristics of the nuclear medium through which the parent partons have propagated just after the collision. In this note we expand on the possible uses of such a probe.

  9. Top polarization as a probe of new physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohini M Godbole; Saurabh D Rindani; Kumar Rao; Ritesh K Singh

    2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the effects of new physics scenarios containing a high mass vector resonance on top pair production at the LHC, using the polarization of the produced top. In particular we use kinematic distributions of the secondary lepton coming from top decay, which depends on top polarization, as it has been shown that the angular distribution of the decay lepton is insensitive to the anomalous tbW vertex and hence is a pure probe of new physics in top quark production. Spin sensitive variables involving the decay lepton are used to probe top polarization. Some sensitivity is found for the new couplings of the top.

  10. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43Probing OrganicProbing

  11. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43ProbingProbing Strain-Induced

  12. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43ProbingProbing

  13. ECO2M: A TOUGH2 Fluid Property Module for Mixtures of Water, NaCl, and CO2, Including Super- and Sub-Critical Conditions, and Phase Change Between Liquid and Gaseous CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ECO2M is a fluid property module for the TOUGH2 simulator (Version 2.0) that was designed for applications to geologic storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers. It includes a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics and thermophysical properties of H{sub 2}O - NaCl - CO{sub 2} mixtures, that reproduces fluid properties largely within experimental error for temperature, pressure and salinity conditions in the range of 10 C {le} T {le} 110 C, P {le} 600 bar, and salinity from zero up to full halite saturation. The fluid property correlations used in ECO2M are identical to the earlier ECO2N fluid property package, but whereas ECO2N could represent only a single CO{sub 2}-rich phase, ECO2M can describe all possible phase conditions for brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. This allows for seamless modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage. Flow processes can be modeled isothermally or non-isothermally, and phase conditions represented may include a single (aqueous or CO{sub 2}-rich) phase, as well as two-and three-phase mixtures of aqueous, liquid CO{sub 2} and gaseous CO{sub 2} phases. Fluid phases may appear or disappear in the course of a simulation, and solid salt may precipitate or dissolve. TOUGH2/ECO2M is upwardly compatible with ECO2N and accepts ECO2N-style inputs. This report gives technical specifications of ECO2M and includes instructions for preparing input data. Code applications are illustrated by means of several sample problems, including problems that had been previously solved with TOUGH2/ECO2N.

  14. Measurement of effective sheath width around cutoff probe in low-pressure plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, D. W.; Oh, W. Y. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J., E-mail: sjyou@kriss.re.kr; Kim, J. H. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies indicated that the measurement results of microwave probes can be improved by applying the adequate sheath width to their measurement models, and consequently the sheath width around the microwave probe tips has become very important information for microwave probe diagnostics. In this paper, we propose a method for measuring the argon plasma sheath width around the cutoff probe tips by applying the circuit model to the cutoff probe phase spectrum. The measured sheath width of the cutoff probe was found to be in good agreement with the floated sheath width calculated from the Child-Langmuir sheath law. The physical reasons for a discrepancy between the two measurements are also discussed.

  15. Spermidine Modulated Ribonuclease Activity Probed by RNA Plasmon Rulers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spermidine Modulated Ribonuclease Activity Probed by RNA Plasmon Rulers Lynell R. Skewis and Bjo1rn distance measurements based on coupled pairs of gold nanoparticles, or plasmon rulers, to individual RNA by ribonuclease A. Time- resolved cleavage experiments of individual RNA plasmon rulers reveal transiently

  16. Active Probing Approach for Fault Localization in Computer Networks*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sethi, Adarshpal

    to develop tools for performing fault localization. We discuss various design issues involved and propose architecture for building such a tool. We describe an algorithm for probe set selection for problem detection a wide range of activities involving network design and operation [7, 9, 17, 18]. Network monitoring can

  17. Nanotube sensors Probing Macrophage Activity with Carbon-Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dekker, Cees

    devices is placed in a home- built flow-cell on top of a Peltier element to maintain the temperature available for single-cell studies with a versatile high-sensitivity probe of nanometer dimension. SWNTs have of singleproteins.Incomparisonwithcurrent electrical probesthat have lateral dimensions comparable to single cells

  18. Compact endocavity diagnostic probes for nuclear radiation detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cui, Yonggang; James, Ralph; Bolotnikov, Aleksey

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to the field of radiation imaging. In particular, the invention relates to an apparatus and a method for imaging tissue or an inanimate object using a novel probe that has an integrated solid-state semiconductor detector and complete readout electronics circuitry.

  19. Construction and testing of a flue-gas corrosion probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Federer, J.I.; McEvers, J.A.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The selection of suitable materials for industrial, waste-heat- recovery systems requires assessment of corrosion of materials in various flue-gas environments. Such assessments involve exposing candidate materials to high-temperature flue gases and analyzing the effects of the exposure conditions. Because corrosion is related to flue-gas chemical composition and temperature, variations in temperature complicate the determination of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. Conversely, a relatively constant temperature allows a more accurate determination of the effects of exposure conditions. For this reason, controlled-temperature flue-gas corrosion probes were constructed and tested for exposure tests of materials. A prototype probe consisted of a silicon carbide tube specimen, supporting hardware, and instrumentation for controlling temperature by internal heating and cooling. An advanced probe included other tubular specimens. Testing of the probes in an industrial-type furnace at a nominal flue-gas temperature of 1200{degree}C revealed that temperature control was inadequate. The cooling mode imposed a substantial axial-temperature gradient on the specimens; while the heating mode imposed a smaller gradient, the heating capacity was very limited. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Espen S

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties like the density and viscosity. The algorithm utilizes a local least-squares modeling technique and has been tested on 4 novel miniature 7-hole probes that have been calibrated at NASA Langley Flow Modeling and Control Branch for the entire...

  1. Steady and unsteady calibration of multi-hole probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Espen S

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discussed. A new type of pressure sensor has been developed with silicon-nitride diaphragm and a characteristic size of only 250 gm. These pressure sensors are small enough to be mounted close to the surface of a miniature hemispherical-tip probe, obtaining...

  2. Probing the Intrinsic Properties of Exfoliated Graphene: Raman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Tony F.

    Probing the Intrinsic Properties of Exfoliated Graphene: Raman Spectroscopy of Free-standing graphene monolayers prepared by mechanical exfoliation of graphite are investigated. The graphene,7 or to solubilize macroscopic quantities of graphene,8 mechanical exfoliation of graphite9 currently remains

  3. Probing and Controlling Photothermal Heat Generation in Plasmonic Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    thermal hotspots. In the present study, new methods for designing and thermally probing thermoplasmonic suitable for heat generation compared with its more well-known complementary structure, the bow-tie antenna. We also demonstrate that highly localized and enhanced thermal hot spots can be realized

  4. Rotary union for use with ultrasonic thickness measuring probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, H.D.

    1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A rotary union for rotatably supporting an ultrasonic probe operable to nondestructively measure the thickness of steam generator tubes to determine the amount of corrosion experienced by the tubes includes a stationary body having a bore therethrough and an outlet drain, and a fitting rotatably mounted within the upper end of the body. The fitting has a bore aligned with the bore of the body. An electrical cable positioned within a water supply tube in an annular arrangement passes through the bore of the body and the bore of the fitting. This annular arrangement, in turn, is positioned within a connector element which extends outwardly from the fitting bore and is connected to the ultrasonic probe. An elastomeric lower bushing seals the annular arrangement to the lower end of the rotary union body and an elastomeric upper bushing seals the connector element to the fitting to permit the connector element and the ultrasonic probe connected thereto to rotate with the fitting relative to the body. The lower and upper bushings permit water to be passed through the annular arrangement and into the ultrasonic probe and thereafter discharged between the annular arrangement and the connector element to the outlet drain of the rotary union body. 5 figs.

  5. Probing sub-eV particles with polarized Helium 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu Guigue

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proceeding of the "Journ\\'{e}es de Rencontre Jeunes Chercheurs" 2013. Measuring the depolarization rate of a $^3$He hyperpolarized gas is a sensitive method to probe hypothetical short-range spin-dependent forces. A dedicated experiment is being set up at the Institute Laue Langevin in Grenoble to improve the sensitivity. The status of the experiment is detailed in this paper.

  6. Methods for making nucleotide probes for sequencing and synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Church, George M; Zhang, Kun; Chou, Joseph

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions and methods for making a plurality of probes for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples are provided. Compositions and methods for analyzing a plurality of nucleic acid samples to obtain sequence information in each nucleic acid sample are also provided.

  7. Development of Micromachined Probes for Bio-Nano Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yapici, Murat K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . A scanning electron micrograph showing the existence of a wear scar on the scanning probe tip after writing. ........................................ 51 Figure 32. Computer images reconstructed from AFM measurement results showing the formation...? tips. .......................................................................................... 56 xi Page Figure 35. An illustration of the controllable process for the formation of variable sized cavities based on bulk micromachining of an SOI...

  8. Dynamic Active Probing of Helpdesk Databases Shenghuo Zhu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tao

    Dynamic Active Probing of Helpdesk Databases Shenghuo Zhu NEC Labs America zsh@sv.nec-labs.com Tao, customers often provide incomplete or even inaccurate infor- mation. Manually preparing a list). Features with question marks are questions being asked by the service team and users' answers

  9. Nanopatterning using NSOM probes integrated with high transmission nanoscale bowtie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Nanopatterning using NSOM probes integrated with high transmission nanoscale bowtie aperture experimental demonstration of field enhancement using such ridge antenna apertures in a bowtie shape integrated with nanoscale bowtie aperture. Consistent lines with width of 59 nm and as small as 24 nm have

  10. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, Alexander (Berkeley, CA); Samoson, Ago (Tallinn, SU)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero.

  11. Probe for high resolution NMR with sample reorientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pines, A.; Samoson, A.

    1990-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved NMR probe and method are described which substantially improve the resolution of NMR measurements made on powdered or amorphous or otherwise orientationally disordered samples. The apparatus mechanically varies the orientation of the sample such that the time average of two or more sets of spherical harmonic functions are zero. 8 figs.

  12. STANDING WAVE PROBES FOR DIMENSIONAL METROLOGY OF LOW DENSITY FOAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seugling, R M; Woody, S C; Bauza, M B

    2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically, parts and geometries of interest to LLNL are made from a combination of complex geometries and a wide array of different materials ranging from metals and ceramics to low density foams and plastic foils. These parts are combined to develop physics experiments for studying material properties, equation of state (EOS) and radiation transport. Understanding the dimensional uncertainty of the parts contained within an experiment is critical to the physical understanding of the phenomena being observed and represents the motivation for developing probe metrology capability that can address LLNL's unique problems. Standing wave probes were developed for measuring high aspect ratio, micrometer scaled features with nanometer resolution. Originally conceived of for the use in the automotive industry for characterizing fuel injector bores and similar geometries, this concept was investigated and improved for use on geometries and materials important to LLNL needs within target fabrication. As part of the original project, detailed understanding of the probe dynamics and interactions with the surface of the sample was investigated. In addition, the upgraded system was utilized for measuring fuel injector bores and micro-lenses as a means of demonstrating capability. This report discusses the use of the standing wave probe for measuring features in low density foams, 55 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} and 982 mg/cc (%6 relative density) copper foam respectively. These two foam materials represent a difficult metrology challenge because of their material properties and surface topography. Traditional non-contact metrology systems such as normal incident interferometry and/or confocal microscopy have difficulty obtaining a signal from the relatively absorptive characteristics of these materials. In addition to the foam samples, a solid copper and plastic (Rexolite{trademark}) sample of similar geometry was measured with the standing wave probe as a reference for both conductive and dielectric materials.

  13. Biasing, Acquisition and Interpretation of a Dense Langmuir Probe Array in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R.; Ruzic, D.

    2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of elec- tronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer (SOL) current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful inter- pretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in comple- mentary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to mid-plane measurements is made. Work is supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CHI1466 and DE-PS02-07ER07-29.

  14. Development of a microfluidic device for patterning multiple species by scanning probe lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivas Cardona, Juan Alberto

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning Probe Lithography (SPL) is a versatile nanofabrication platform that leverages microfluidic ink delivery systems with Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) for generating surface-patterned chemical functionality on the sub-100 nm length scale...

  15. The Architecture of the Qo Site of Cytochrome bc1 Complex Probed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Architecture of the Qo Site of Cytochrome bc1 Complex Probed by Superoxide Production. The Architecture of the Qo Site of Cytochrome bc1 Complex Probed by Superoxide Production....

  16. The Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope in EMSL's Quiet Wing The Ultra-High Vacuum, Low-Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope in EMSL's Quiet Wing This is...

  17. Probing Liquid Surfaces under Vacuum Using SEM and TOF-SIMS....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid Surfaces under Vacuum Using SEM and TOF-SIMS. Probing Liquid Surfaces under Vacuum Using SEM and TOF-SIMS. Abstract: Applying vacuum-based molecular probes of liquid...

  18. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wygant, J. R.

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency ...

  19. Calibration and data reduction algorithms for non-conventional multi-hole pressure probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramakrishnan, Vijay

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the development of calibration and data-reduction algorithms for non-conventional multi-hole pressure probes. The algorithms that have been developed for conventional 5- and 7-hole probes are not optimal ...

  20. Type IIP supernovae as cosmological probes: A SEAM distance to SN 1999em

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, E.; Nugent, Peter E.; Branch, David; Hauschildt, Peter H.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Type IIP Supernovae as Cosmological Probes: A SEAM Distanceintrinsic brightness, supernovae make excellent cosmologicalstars: atmospheres supernovae: 1999em Distances from

  1. An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellan, Paul M.

    An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light Xiang Zhai) An earth-isolated optically coupled wideband high voltage probe powered by ambient light Xiang Zhaia online 9 October 2012) An earth-isolated optically-coupled wideband high voltage probe has been developed

  2. Massively Parallel Scanning Probe Nanolithography Daniel J. Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Massively Parallel Scanning Probe Nanolithography Daniel J. Arbuckle and Aristides A. G. Requicha on Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) are sequential, and therefore have a low throughput. This paper discusses are presented to validate the approach. Keywords-Nanorobotics, Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), Multi-Tip SPM

  3. Transpiring purging access probe for particulate laden or hazardous environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An access probe for remote-sensing access through a viewing port, viewing volume, and access port into a vessel. The physical boundary around the viewing volume is partially formed by a porous sleeve lying between the viewing volume and a fluid conduit. In a first mode of operation, a fluid supplied to the fluid conduit encounters the porous sleeve and flows through the porous material to maintain the viewing volume free of ash or other matter. When additional fluid force is needed to clear the viewing volume, the pressure of the fluid flow is increased sufficiently to slidably translate the porous sleeve, greatly increasing the flow into the viewing volume. The porous sleeve is returned to position by an actuating spring. The access probe thereby provides for alternate modes of operation based on the pressure of an actuating fluid.

  4. Black Holes are neither Particle Accelerators nor Dark Matter Probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean T. McWilliams

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been suggested that maximally spinning black holes can serve as particle accelerators, reaching arbitrarily high center-of-mass energies. Despite several objections regarding the practical achievability of such high energies, and demonstrations past and present that such large energies could never reach a distant observer, interest in this problem has remained substantial. We show that, unfortunately, a maximally spinning black hole can never serve as a probe of high energy collisions, even in principle and despite the correctness of the original diverging energy calculation. Black holes can indeed facilitate dark matter annihilation, but the most energetic photons can carry little more than the rest energy of the dark matter particles to a distant observer, and those photons are actually generated relatively far from the black hole where relativistic effects are negligible. Therefore, any strong gravitational potential could probe dark matter equally well, and an appeal to black holes for facilitating such collisions is unnecessary.

  5. Hard probes of strongly-interacting atomic gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishida, Yusuke [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate properties of an energetic atom propagating through strongly interacting atomic gases. The operator product expansion is used to systematically compute a quasiparticle energy and its scattering rate both in a spin-1/2 Fermi gas and in a spinless Bose gas. Reasonable agreement with recent quantum Monte Carlo simulations even at a relatively small momentum k/kF > 1.5 indicates that our large-momentum expansions are valid in a wide range of momentum. We also study a differential scattering rate when a probe atom is shot into atomic gases. Because the number density and current density of the target atomic gas contribute to the forward scattering only, its contact density (measure of short-range pair correlation) gives the leading contribution to the backward scattering. Therefore, such an experiment can be used to measure the contact density and thus provides a new local probe of strongly interacting atomic gases.

  6. Hybridization-based biosensor containing hairpin probes and use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Benjamin L. (Penfield, NY); Strohsahl, Christopher M. (Rochester, NY)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor chip that includes: a fluorescence quenching surface; a nucleic acid probe that contains first and second ends with the first end bound to the fluorescence quenching surface, and is characterized by being able to self-anneal into a hairpin conformation; and a first fluorophore bound to the second end of the first nucleic acid molecule. When the first nucleic acid molecule is in the hairpin conformation, the fluorescence quenching surface substantially quenches fluorescent emissions by the first fluorophore; and when the first nucleic acid molecule is in a non-hairpin conformation, fluorescent emissions by the fluorophore are substantially free of quenching by the fluorescence quenching surface. Various nucleic acid probes, methods of making the sensor chip, biological sensor devices that contain the sensor chip, and their methods of use are also disclosed.

  7. Integration of Ion Implantation with Scanning ProbeAlignment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persaud, A.; Rangelow, I.W.; Schenkel, T.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a scanning probe instrument which integrates ion beams with imaging and alignment functions of a piezo resistive scanning probe in high vacuum. Energetic ions (1 to a few hundred keV) are transported through holes in scanning probe tips [1]. Holes and imaging tips are formed by Focused Ion Beam (FIB) drilling and ion beam assisted thin film deposition. Transport of single ions can be monitored through detection of secondary electrons from highly charged dopant ions (e. g., Bi{sup 45+}) enabling single atom device formation. Fig. 1 shows SEM images of a scanning probe tip formed by ion beam assisted Pt deposition in a dual beam FIB. Ion beam collimating apertures are drilled through the silicon cantilever with a thickness of 5 {micro}m. Aspect ratio limitations preclude the direct drilling of holes with diameters well below 1 {micro}m, and smaller hole diameters are achieved through local thin film deposition [2]. The hole in Fig. 1 was reduced from 2 {micro}m to a residual opening of about 300 nm. Fig. 2 shows an in situ scanning probe image of an alignment dot pattern taken with the tip from Fig. 1. Transport of energetic ions through the aperture in the scanning probe tip allows formation of arbitrary implant patterns. In the example shown in Fig. 2 (right), a 30 nm thick PMMA resist layer on silicon was exposed to 7 keV Ar{sup 2+} ions with an equivalent dose of 10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} to form the LBL logo. An exciting goal of this approach is the placement of single dopant ions into precise locations for integration of single atom devices, such as donor spin based quantum computers [3, 4]. In Fig. 3, we show a section of a micron size dot area exposed to a low dose (10{sup 11}/cm{sup 2}) of high charge state dopant ions. The Bi{sup 45+} ions (200 keV) were extracted from a low emittance highly charged ions source [5]. The potential energy of B{sup 45+}, i. e., the sum of the binding energies required to remove the electrons, amounts to 36 keV. This energy is deposited within {approx}10 fs when an ion impinges on a target. The highly localized energy deposition results in efficient resist exposure, and is associated with strongly enhanced secondary electron emission, which allows monitoring of single ion impacts [4]. The ex situ scanning probe image with line scan in Fig. 3 shows a single ion impact site in PMMA (after standard development). In our presentation, we will discuss resolution requirements for ion placement in prototype quantum computer structures [3] with respect to resolution limiting factors in ion implantation with scanning probe alignment.

  8. Probing the switching mechanism in ZnO nanoparticle memristors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, C.; Beirne, G. J.; Kamita, G.; Lakhwani, G.; Wang, J.; Greenham, N. C.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a cryostat (Oxford Instruments, Optistat CF). After reflection from the back contact of the sample (45o incident angle), the probe beam was incident on a silicon photodiode connected via a current-to-voltage converter to a dual-channel lock... . In this case, although the height of barrier decreases, the charge injection through the barrier shifts 7 from a tunneling mechanism to thermionic emission.24 Furthermore, the hopping mechanism dominates the charge transport inside the film, due...

  9. Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ?umer, Slobodan

    Gamma-ray Bursts as Probes of Galaxy Evolution Daniele Malesani, Dark Cosmology Centre and the X of the "Universe") #12;What is a gamma-ray burst? Brief (ms - min) and intense (~10-7 erg cm2 s1 ) burst of soft to ongoing star formation "Naked-eye" GRB 080319B GRBs explode within star-forming galaxies Gamma-ray bursts

  10. Bose-Einstein Condensates as a Probe for Lorentz Violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don Colladay; Patrick McDonald

    2006-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of small Lorentz-violating terms on Bose-Einstein condensates are analyzed. We find that there are changes to the phase and shape of the ground-state wave function that vary with the orientation of the trap. In addition, spin-couplings can act as a source for spontaneous symmetry breaking in ferromagnetic condensates making them sensitive probes for fundamental symmetry violation.

  11. An efficient probe of the cosmological CPT violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Xia, Jun-Qing; Li, Mingzhe; Zhang, Xinmin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an efficient method based on the linear regression algorithm to probe the cosmological CPT violation using the CMB polarisation data. We validate this method using simulated CMB data and apply it to recent CMB observations. We find that a combined data sample of BICEP1 and BOOMERanG 2003 favours a nonzero isotropic rotation angle at $2.3\\sigma$ confidence level, ie, $\\Delta\\alpha=-3.3 \\pm1.4$ deg (68% CL) with systematics included.

  12. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  13. An Advanced Ultra-Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Advanced Ultra-Low Temperature Scanning Probe Microscope P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Joseph); Steven Blankenship, Alan Band (NIST) G O A L To develop an ultra-high vacuum, ultra-low temperature, high of subpicometer stability and can operate in ultra-high vacuum at 10 mK, and in magnetic fields up to 15 T

  14. Corrosion probes for fireside monitoring in coal-fired boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Holcomb, Gordon R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion probes are being developed and combined with an existing measurement technology to provide a tool for assessing the extent of corrosion of metallic materials on the fireside in coal-fired boilers. The successful development of this technology will provide power plant operators the ability to (1) accurately monitor metal loss in critical regions of the boiler, such as waterwalls, superheaters, and reheaters; and (2) use corrosion rates as process variables. In the former, corrosion data could be used to schedule maintenance periods and in the later, processes can be altered to decrease corrosion rates. The research approach involves laboratory research in simulated environments that will lead to field tests of corrosion probes in coal-fired boilers. Laboratory research has already shown that electrochemically-measured corrosion rates for ash-covered metals are similar to actual mass loss corrosion rates. Electrochemical tests conducted using a potentiostat show the corrosion reaction of ash-covered probes at 500?C to be electrochemical in nature. Corrosion rates measured are similar to those from an automated corrosion monitoring system. Tests of corrosion probes made with mild steel, 304L stainless steel (SS), and 316L SS sensors showed that corrosion of the sensors in a very aggressive incinerator ash was controlled by the ash and not by the alloy content. Corrosion rates in nitrogen atmospheres tended to decrease slowly with time. The addition of oxygen-containing gases, oxygen and carbon dioxide to nitrogen caused a more rapid decrease in corrosion rate, while the addition of water vapor increased the corrosion rate.

  15. Probing the Temperature Profile of Energy Production in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Grieb; R. S. Raghavan

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The particle kinetic energies of pp fusion in the sun (Gamow Energy) produce small changes in the energies of pp solar neutrinos relative to those due only to exothermal energetics. Observation of this effect may be possible via the unique tools of the upcoming LENS solar neutrino detector. The temperature profile of energy production in the sun may thus be directly probed for the first time.

  16. Probing the Kondo Lattice Model with Alkaline Earth Atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Foss-Feig; Michael Hermele; Ana Maria Rey

    2009-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study transport properties of alkaline-earth atoms governed by the Kondo Lattice Hamiltonian plus a harmonic confining potential, and suggest simple dynamical probes of several different regimes of the phase diagram that can be implemented with current experimental techniques. In particular, we show how Kondo physics at strong coupling, low density, and in the heavy fermion phase is manifest in the dipole oscillations of the conduction band upon displacement of the trap center.

  17. Detecting Weld Zone Over Anticorrosion Painting by Rotating Uniform Eddy Current Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoshikawa, H.; Koyama, K.; Naruse, Y. [Nihon University, Izumicho Narashino Chiba 275-8575 (Japan)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have studied application of rotating uniform eddy current probe to detecting weld zone in steed material over anticorrosion painting. The probe detects not only weld position by the signal level but also weld direction by the signal phase. The experimental results have indicated that the probe provides a signal almost linear to its position with respect to weld zone center over the full width of weld. The signal of the probe is much less influenced by the painting thickness variation than that of the conventional differential pancake-coils probe.

  18. Characteristics of probe current harmonics based on various applied voltage waveforms in low temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Do; Kim, Yu-Sin; Lee, Hyo-Chang; Bang, Jin-Young; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Heangdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of probe currents induced by applying various probe voltage waveforms, such as sinusoidal, sawtooth, square, and triangular, were investigated at a floating potential. It was found that the measured probe currents have many harmonics depending on the voltage waveforms. This was mainly due to the nonlinearity of the sheath in the plasma and was analyzed using the fast Fourier transform and a circuit model. By applying a triangular voltage waveform to a probe, plasma parameters such as electron temperature and plasma density could be obtained and compared to those of a single Langmuir probe and a floating harmonic method.

  19. Nonlocal probes of thermalization in holographic quenches with spectral methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel; Robert C. Myers; Anton van Niekerk

    2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the application of pseudo-spectral methods to problems of holographic thermal quenches of relevant couplings in strongly coupled gauge theories. We focus on quenches of a fermionic mass term in a strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, and the subsequent equilibration of the system. From the dual gravitational perspective, we study gravitational collapse of a massive scalar field in asymptotically anti-de-Sitter geometry with a prescribed boundary condition for its non-normalizable mode. Access to the full background geometry of the gravitational collapse allows for the study of nonlocal probes of the thermalization process. We discuss the evolution of the apparent and the event horizons, the two-point correlation functions of operators of large conformal dimensions, and the evolution of the entanglement entropy of the system. We compare the thermalization process from the viewpoint of local (the one-point) correlation functions and these nonlocal probes, finding that the thermalization time as measured by the probes is length dependent, and can exceed that of the one-point function. We further discuss how the different energy scales of the problem contribute to its thermalization.

  20. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watjen, J.P.

    1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner. 9 figs.

  1. Eddy current probe and method for flaw detection in metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watjen, John P. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1987-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A flaw detecting system is shown which includes a probe having a pair of ferrite cores with in-line gaps in close proximity to each other. An insulating, non-magnetic, non-conducting holder fills the gaps and supports the ferrite cores in a manner such that the cores form a generally V-shape. Each core is provided with an excitation winding and a detection winding. The excitation windings are connected in series or parallel with an rf port for connection thereof to a radio frequency source. The detection windings, which are differentially wound, are connected in series circuit to a detector port for connection to a voltage measuring instrument. The ferrite cores at the in-line gaps directly engage the metal surface of a test piece, and the probe is scanned along the test piece. In the presence of a flaw in the metal surface the detection winding voltages are unbalanced, and the unbalance is detected by the voltage measuring instrument. The insulating holder is provided with a profile which conforms to that of a prominent feature of the test piece to facilitate movement of the probe along the feature, typically an edge or a corner.

  2. Design and Spacecraft-Integration of RTGs for Solar Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schock, Alfred

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 41st Congress of the IAF, October 6-12, 1990 in Dresden, FRG. The paper describes the design and analysis of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators integrated with JPL's planned Solar Probe spacecraft. The principle purpose of the Solar probe mission is to explore the solar corona by performing in-situ measurements at distances as close as four solar radii or 0.02 AU from the sun. This proximity to the sun imposes some unusual design constraints on the RTG and on its integration with the spacecraft. The results demonstrated that the obstructions result in significant performance penalties for the case of the standard GPHS-RTG design. Finally, the paper describes a simple empirical method for predicting the combined effect of fuel decay and thermoelectric degradation on the RTG's power output, and applies that method to predict the long-term power profile of the obstructed Solar Probe RTGs. The results indicate that the existing GPHS-RTG design, even without modifications can meet the JPL-prescribed EOM power requirement. There is also three copies in the file of an earlier version of this dated 8/3/1990 with the report number of FSC-ESD-217-90-470. The most current one is the IAF version (IAD-90-208) dated October 6-12, 1990.

  3. Array of nucleic acid probes on biological chips for diagnosis of HIV and methods of using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chee, Mark (Palo Alto, CA); Gingeras, Thomas R. (Santa Clara, CA); Fodor, Stephen P. A. (Palo Alto, CA); Hubble, Earl A. (Mountain View, CA); Morris, MacDonald S. (San Jose, CA)

    1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an array of oligonucleotide probes immobilized on a solid support for analysis of a target sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. The array comprises at least four sets of oligonucleotide probes 9 to 21 nucleotides in length. A first probe set has a probe corresponding to each nucleotide in a reference sequence from a human immunodeficiency virus. A probe is related to its corresponding nucleotide by being exactly complementary to a subsequence of the reference sequence that includes the corresponding nucleotide. Thus, each probe has a position, designated an interrogation position, that is occupied by a complementary nucleotide to the corresponding nucleotide. The three additional probe sets each have a corresponding probe for each probe in the first probe set. Thus, for each nucleotide in the reference sequence, there are four corresponding probes, one from each of the probe sets. The three corresponding probes in the three additional probe sets are identical to the corresponding probe from the first probe or a subsequence thereof that includes the interrogation position, except that the interrogation position is occupied by a different nucleotide in each of the four corresponding probes.

  4. Langmuir probe diagnostic suite in the C-2 field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roche, T., E-mail: troche@trialphaenergy.com; Armstrong, S.; Knapp, K.; Slepchenkov, M. [Tri Alpha Energy Inc., PO Box 7010, Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Sun, X. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several in situ probes have been designed and implemented into the diagnostic array of the C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) at Tri Alpha Energy [M. Tuszewski et al. (the TAE Team), Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 255008 (2012)]. The probes are all variations on the traditional Langmuir probe. They include linear arrays of triple probes, linear arrays of single-tipped swept probes, a multi-faced Gundestrup probe, and an ion-sensitive probe. The probes vary from 5 to 7 mm diameter in size to minimize plasma perturbations. They also have boron nitride outer casings that prevent unwanted electrical breakdown and reduce the introduction of impurities. The probes are mounted on motorized linear-actuators allowing for programmatic scans of the various plasma parameters over the course of several shots. Each probe has a custom set of electronics that allows for measurement of the desired signals. High frequency ( > 5MHz) analog optical-isolators ensure that plasma parameters can be measured at sub-microsecond time scales while providing electrical isolation between machine and data acquisition systems. With these probes time-resolved plasma parameters (temperature, density, spatial potential, flow, and electric field) can be directly/locally measured in the FRC jet and edge/scrape-off layer.

  5. A restoration model of distorted electron density in wave-cutoff probe measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jun, Hyun-Su, E-mail: mtsconst@kaist.ac.kr; Lee, Yun-Seong [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates the problem of electron density distortion and how the density can be restored in a wave-cutoff probe. Despite recent plasma diagnostics research using a wave-cutoff probe, the problem of electron density distortion caused by plasma conditions has not been resolved. Experimental results indicate that electron density measured using the wave-cutoff method is highly susceptible to variations in the probe tip gap. This electron density distortion is caused by the bulk plasma disturbance between probe tips, and it must be removed for calculating the absolute electron density. To do this, a detailed analytic model was developed using the power balance equation near probe tips. This model demonstrates the characteristics of plasma distortion in wave-cutoff probe measurement and successfully restored the absolute value of electron density with varying probe tip gaps.

  6. Assessment of the 296-S-21 Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, John A.

    2006-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were performed to assess the suitability of the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack according to the criteria of ANSI N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted most tests on a 3.67:1 scale model of the stack. CH2MHill also performed some limited confirmatory tests on the actual stack. The tests assessed the capability of the air-monitoring probe to extract a sample representative of the effluent stream. The tests were conducted for the practical combinations of operating fans and addressed: (1) Angular Flow--The purpose is to determine whether the velocity vector is aligned with the sampling nozzle. The average yaw angle relative to the nozzle axis should not be more than 20. The measured values ranged from 5 to 11 degrees on the scale model and 10 to 12 degrees on the actual stack. (2) Uniform Air Velocity--The gas momentum across the stack cross section where the sample is extracted should be well mixed or uniform. The uniformity is expressed as the variability of the measurements about the mean, the coefficient of variance (COV). The lower the COV value, the more uniform the velocity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ?20% across the center two-thirds of the area of the stack. At the location simulating the sampling probe, the measured values ranged form 4 to 11%, which are within the criterion. To confirm the validity of the scale model results, air velocity uniformity measurements were made both on the actual stack and on the scale model at the test ports 1.5 stack diameters upstream of the sampling probe. The results ranged from 6 to 8% COV on the actual stack and 10 to 13% COV on the scale model. The average difference for the eight runs was 4.8% COV, which is within the validation criterion. The fact that the scale model results were slightly higher than the actual stack suggests that the other test results on the scale model are conservative relative to the actual stack. (3) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases--A uniform contaminant concentration in the sampling plane enables the extraction of samples that represent the true concentration. This was first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The fan is a good mixer, so injecting the tracer downstream of the fans provides worst-case results. The acceptance criteria are that (1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and (2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. The results on the scale model at the point simulating the sampling probe ranged from 0.3 to 6 %COV, and the maximum single point deviation from the mean was -10%. (4) Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles--Uniformity in contaminant concentration at the sampling probe was further demonstrated using tracer particles large enough to exhibit inertial effects. Particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter were used. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane. The scale model results ranged form 2 to 9%. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe on the 296-S-21 stack meets the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard.

  7. COMBINED FLUORESCENT AND GOLD PROBES FOR MICROSCOPIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.F.

    2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanogold{reg_sign}, a gold cluster with a core of gold atoms 1.4 nm in diameter, has proven to be a superior probe label for electron microscopy (EM), giving both higher labeling density and improved access to previously hindered or restricted antigens. It may be visualized by autometallography (AMG) for use in light microscopy (LM): silver-and gold-amplified Nanogold detection has proven to be one of the most sensitive methods available for the detection of low copy number targets such as viral DNA in cells and tissue specimens. AMG enhancement has also made Nanogold an effective detection label in blots and gels. The following protocols will be described: Labeling of nuclear components in cells. Protocol for in situ hybridization and detection with fluorescein-Nanogold--or Cy3{trademark}-Nanogold-labeled streptavidin. Nanogold is an inert molecule, and generally does not interact with biological molecules unless a specific chemical reactivity is introduced into the molecule. Conjugates are prepared using site-specific chemical conjugation through reactive chemical functionalities introduced during Nanogold preparation, which allows the gold label to be attached to a specific site on the conjugate biomolecule. For example, a maleimido-Nanogold derivative, which is specific for thiol binding, is frequently attached to the hinge region of an antibody at a unique thiol site generated by selective reduction of a hinge disulfide. This site is remote from the antigen combining region, and the Nanogold, therefore, does not compromise target binding. Nanogold may also be prepared with specific reactivity towards amines or other unique chemical groups. This mode of attachment enables the preparation of probes labeled with both Nanogold and fluorescent labels. Different chemical reactivities are used to attach the Nanogold and the fluorescent groups to different sites in the conjugate biomolecule, as shown in Figure 7.1. In this manner, the two labels are spaced sufficiently far apart that fluorescent resonance energy transfer does not quench the fluorescent signal, and the probes may be used to label specimens for fluorescent and EM observation in a single staining procedure. This reduces the complexity of the staining procedure, allowing less specimen perturbation, and also enables a higher degree of correlation between the fluorescence and EM localization of the target, thus increasing the usefulness of the complementary data sets. Since gold and fluorescent-labeled probes are often used at different concentrations under different conditions, optimum procedures for the use of fluorescent and gold probes may entail some degree of compromise between the most appropriate conditions for the two types of probes. However, the chemical stability of the Nanogold label means that it is generally stable to a wide range of use conditions, and the following protocols have been found to be effective for labeling specimens with combined fluorescein and Nanogold-labeled antibody Fab' probes and with combined Cy3 and Nanogold-labeled streptavidin.

  8. Integrated use of burden profile probe and in-burden probe for gas flow control in the blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bordemann, F.; Hartig, W.H. [AG der Dillinger Huettenweke, Dillingen (Germany); Grisse, H.J. [Dango and Dienenthal Siegen (Germany); Speranza, B.E. [Dango and Dienenthal, Inc., Highland, IN (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas flow in the blast furnace is one of the most important factors in controlling a furnace. It not only determines the production but also the fuel consumption and the campaign life. At Nos. 4 and 5 blast furnaces of ROGESA, probes are installed for detection of the burden profiles and of the gas flow distribution. For an optimum use of these probes a program system has been developed by ROGESA and Dango and Dienenthal. With this program system it is possible to analyze the operating condition of a blast furnace by means of a fuzzy logic analysis. In case of deviations from the defined desired condition, recommendations for corrective measures for the material distribution are made. Both furnaces are equipped with a bell-less top, a coal injection system, high-temperature hot blast stoves with heat recovery and a top gas pressure recovery turbine. Most of the time it is impossible to control all the required parameters. For this reason it is meaningful to measure the actual material distribution at the furnace top by means of a burden profile probe which permits quick and repeated measurements without any retroactive effects. The paper describes the instrumentation of the furnace, correlation of measuring methods, and a program system for analysis of measuring data.

  9. 1Electricity from Sunlight: The Van Allen Probes Solar Panels NASA's twin Van Allen Probes spacecraft will be launched in 2012. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1Electricity from Sunlight: The Van Allen Probes Solar Panels NASA's twin Van Allen Probes of the surrounding four solar panel `wings' that provide power to the spacecraft instruments. The small blue rectangles within each of the four solar panels show the location of the solar cells used to power

  10. Design, construction, and calibration of a three-axis, high-frequency magnetic probe ,,B-dot probe... as a diagnostic for exploding plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angles, University of

    Design, construction, and calibration of a three-axis, high-frequency magnetic probe ,,B-dot probe is discussed in detail from its design and construction to its calibration and use as diagnostic of fast transient effects in exploding plasmas. A design and construction method is presented as a means to reduce

  11. NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE AIDS DEVELOPMENT OF NEW THERAPEUTICS Horacio D. Espinosa, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Northwestern University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    NANO FOUNTAIN PROBE AIDS DEVELOPMENT OF NEW THERAPEUTICS Horacio D. Espinosa, Department a novel nanoscale fluid delivery probe, called the Nano Fountain Probe, which enables studies to a dispensing tip. The Nano Fountain Probe has proven capable of delivering a variety of functional materials

  12. Thompson -Dextrous Micromanipulation Based on Two 1 DoF Probes and 3 DoF Translating Stage Dextrous Micromanipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fearing, Ron

    Thompson - Dextrous Micromanipulation Based on Two 1 DoF Probes and 3 DoF Translating Stage Dextrous Micromanipulation Based on Two 1 DoF Probes and 3 DoF Translating Stage Jeff Thompson Department the operation. ProbeX is actually a long probe mounted on a 1 #12;Thompson - Dextrous Micromanipulation Based

  13. High-frequency probing diagnostic for Hall current plasma thrusters A. A. Litvak, Y. Raitses, and N. J. Fisch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is restricted by sputtering of the probe material, which can produce a short circuit between the probe tipsHigh-frequency probing diagnostic for Hall current plasma thrusters A. A. Litvak, Y. Raitses, and N-matching circuit, was successfully built and calibrated. Through simultaneous high-frequency probing of the Hall

  14. Facile synthesis, phase transition, optical switching and oxidation resistance properties of belt-like VO{sub 2}(A) and VO{sub 2}(M) with a rectangular cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yifu; Huang, Yanfen; Zhang, Juecheng; Wu, Weibing; Niu, Fei; Zhong, Yalan [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Xinghai, E-mail: liuxh@whu.edu.cn [School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China)] [School of Printing and Packaging, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Liu, Xin [School of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)] [School of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Huang, Chi, E-mail: chihuang@whu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)] [College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? Belt-like VO{sub 2}(A) with a rectangular cross section was synthesized. ? The formation mechanism of belt-like VO{sub 2}(A) was proposed. ? Belt-like VO{sub 2}(M) was prepared by the irreversible transformation of VO{sub 2}(A). ? VO{sub 2}(A) and VO{sub 2}(M) can be used as the optical switching materials. ? VO{sub 2}(A) and VO{sub 2}(M) have good oxidation resistance below 400 C in air. -- Abstract: Belt-like VO{sub 2}(A) with a rectangular cross section (VA-RCS) was successfully synthesized using V{sub 2}O{sub 5}, H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O as the starting materials by a facile hydrothermal approach. Some synthetic parameters, such as, the reaction time, reaction temperature and concentration of H{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}2H{sub 2}O, were systematically investigated to control the fabrication of belt-like VA-RCS. The formation mechanism of belt-like VA-RCS was proposed. Subsequently, belt-like VO{sub 2}(M) with a rectangular cross section (VM-RCS) was prepared by the irreversible transformation of VA-RCS at 700 C for 2 h under the inert atmosphere. The phase transition temperature (T{sub c}) of VA-RCS and VM-RCS was evaluated by DSC test. The optical switching properties of VA-RCS and VM-RCS were studied by the variable-temperature infrared spectra, and it was found that the as-obtained VA-RCS and VM-RCS could be used as the optical switching materials. Furthermore, the oxidation resistance properties of VA-RCS and VM-RCS were investigated by TGA, indicating that they have good thermal stability and oxidation resistance below 400 C in air.

  15. Using electrical resistance probes for moisture determination in switchgrass windrows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesser Jr., G. D.; Davis, J. D.; Purswell, J. L.; Lemus, R.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining moisture levels in windrowed biomass is important for both forage producers and researchers. Energy crops such as switchgrass have been troublesome when using the standard methods set for electrical resistance meters. The objectives of this study were to i) develop the methodologies needed to measure MC in switchgrass using electrical resistance meters, ii) to determine the effects of pressure and probe orientation on MC measurement and iii) to generate MC calibration equations for electrical resistance meters using switchgrass in the senescence growth stage. Two meters (Meter 1, Farmex HT-PRO; Meter 2, Delmhorst F-2000) were selected based on commercial availability. A forage compression apparatus was designed and constructed with on-farm materials and methods to provide a simple system of applying pressure achievable by any forage producer or researcher in the field. Two trials were performed to test four levels of moisture contents (10, 20, 30, and 40%), five pressures (0, 1.68, 3.11, 4.55, 6.22 kN/m 2; 0, 35, 65, 95, 130 lb/ft 2), and two probe orientations (axial and transverse) in a 4x5x2 factorial design. Results indicated that meter accuracy increased as pressure increased. Regression models accounted for 91% and 81% of the variation for Meter 1 and Meter 2 at a pressure of 4.55 kN/m 2 (95 lb/ft 2) and a transverse probe orientation. Calibration equations were developed for both meters to improve moisture measurement accuracy for farmers and researchers in the field.

  16. Tensiometer, drive probe for use with environmental testing equipment, and methods of inserting environmental testing equipment into a sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of inserting a tensiometer into a sample, comprises providing a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment; supporting a porous member from the drive probe; and driving the drive probe into the sample using a cone penetrometer. A tensiometer comprises a drive probe configured to be engaged by direct push equipment or a cone penetrometer; a porous member supported by the drive probe; and a pressure sensor in pressure sensing relation to the porous member.

  17. Dynamic scanning probe microscopy of adsorbed molecules on graphite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Berdunov; A. J. Pollard; P. H. Beton

    2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a combined dynamic scanning tunneling and atomic force microscope to study the organisation of weakly bound adsorbed molecules on a graphite substrate. Specifically we have acquired images of islands of the perylene derivative molecules. These weakly bound molecules may be imaged in dynamic STM, in which the probe is oscillated above the surface. We show that molecular resolution may be readily attained and that a similar mode of imaging may be realised using conventional STM arrangement. We also show, using tunnelling spectroscopy, the presence of an energy gap for the adsorbed molecules confirming a weak molecule-substrate interaction.

  18. Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier; Lacoste, Thilo D.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical ruler based on ultrahigh-resolution colocalization of single fluorescent probes is described. Two unique families of fluorophores are used, namely energy-transfer fluorescent beads and semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) quantum dots, that can be excited by a single laser wavelength but emit at different wavelengths. A novel multicolor sample-scanning confocal microscope was constructed which allows one to image each fluorescent light emitter, free of chromatic aberrations, by scanning the sample with nanometer scale steps using a piezo-scanner. The resulting spots are accurately localized by fitting them to the known shape of the excitation point-spread-function of the microscope.

  19. Exploring Classically Chaotic Potentials with a Matter Wave Quantum Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gattobigio, G. L. [Laboratoire de Collisions Agregats Reactivite, CNRS UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France); Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Couvert, A. [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75005 Paris (France); Georgeot, B. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique (IRSAMC), Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 31062 Toulouse (France); CNRS, LPT UMR5152 (IRSAMC), 31062 Toulouse (France); Guery-Odelin, D. [Laboratoire de Collisions Agregats Reactivite, CNRS UMR 5589, IRSAMC, Universite de Toulouse (UPS), 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse CEDEX 4 (France)

    2011-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study an experimental setup in which a quantum probe, provided by a quasimonomode guided atom laser, interacts with a static localized attractive potential whose characteristic parameters are tunable. In this system, classical mechanics predicts a transition from regular to chaotic behavior as a result of the coupling between the different degrees of freedom. Our experimental results display a clear signature of this transition. On the basis of extensive numerical simulations, we discuss the quantum versus classical physics predictions in this context. This system opens new possibilities for investigating quantum scattering, provides a new testing ground for classical and quantum chaos, and enables us to revisit the quantum-classical correspondence.

  20. Positive muon and the positron as probes of defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, K G

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The positive muon and the positron are each being used nowadays to investigate defects in condensed matter. A brief summary of the experimental methods employed with each particle is given in this paper. Similarities and differences between the behavior of the two leptons when implanted in consensed matter are pointed out, and by means of a comparison between muon and positron data in Al it is shown that the combination of muon and positron experiments can serve as a useful new probe of defects in solids.

  1. Near field optical probe for critical dimension measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stallard, B.R.; Kaushik, S.

    1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A resonant planar optical waveguide probe for measuring critical dimensions on an object in the range of 100 nm and below is disclosed. The optical waveguide includes a central resonant cavity flanked by Bragg reflector layers with input and output means at either end. Light is supplied by a narrow bandwidth laser source. Light resonating in the cavity creates an evanescent electrical field. The object with the structures to be measured is translated past the resonant cavity. The refractive index contrasts presented by the structures perturb the field and cause variations in the intensity of the light in the cavity. The topography of the structures is determined from these variations. 8 figs.

  2. Neural probe design & MEMS technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeural probe design accelerated with

  3. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange . .Probing

  4. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical News, informationPriority Firm Exchange .TechniquesProbing

  5. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPoints ofJanoschekProbing

  6. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPointsProbing Core-Hole

  7. Probing Core-Hole Localization in Molecular Nitrogen

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPointsProbing

  8. Probing Fukushima with cosmic rays should speed cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43 cPointsProbingplantProbing

  9. Probing Strain-Induced Changes in Electronic Structure with XMCD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70 Hg Mercury 35 Br Bromine 43Probing

  10. Cell diameter measurements obtained with a handheld cell counter could be used as a surrogate marker of G2/M arrest and apoptosis in colon cancer cell lines exposed to SN-38

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tahara, Makiko [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan) [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan); Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan); Inoue, Takeshi [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan)] [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan); Miyakura, Yasuyuki; Horie, Hisanaga; Yasuda, Yoshikazu [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan)] [Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan); Fujii, Hirofumi [Division of Clinical Oncology, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan)] [Division of Clinical Oncology, Jichi Medical University, Shimotsuke, Tochigi (Japan); Kotake, Kenjiro [Department of Surgery, Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan)] [Department of Surgery, Tochigi Cancer Center, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan); Sugano, Kokichi, E-mail: ksugano@tcc.pref.tochigi.lg.jp [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan)] [Oncogene Research Unit/Cancer Prevention Unit, Tochigi Cancer Center Research Institute, Utsunomiya, Tochigi (Japan)

    2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Chemo-sensitivity to SN-38 was assayed by the automated cell counter. Colon cancer cell line, HCT116 cells were more sensitive to SN-38 than HT29 cells. Increase of cell size reflects G2/M arrest. Appearance of small particles indicates cell apoptosis. -- Abstract: In vitro assessment of chemosensitivity are important for experiments evaluating cancer therapies. The Scepter 2.0 cell counter, an automated handheld device based on the Coulter principle of impedance-based particle detection, enables the accurate discrimination of cell populations according to cell size and volume. In this study, the effects of SN-38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, on the colon cancer cell lines HCT116 and HT29 were evaluated using this device. The cell count data obtained with the Scepter counter were compared with those obtained with the {sup 3}H-thymidine uptake assay, which has been used to measure cell proliferation in many previous studies. In addition, we examined whether the changes in the size distributions of these cells reflected alterations in the frequency of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis induced by SN-38 treatment. In our experiments using the Scepter 2.0 cell counter, the cell counts were demonstrated to be accurate and reproducible measure and alterations of cell diameter reflected G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Our data show that easy-to-use cell counting tools can be utilized to evaluate the cell-killing effects of novel treatments on cancer cells in vitro.

  11. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  12. Proceedings of "Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sension, R; Tokmakoff, A

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the proceedings from the symposium on Optical Probes of Dynamics in Complex Environments, which organized as part of the 235th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in New Orleans, LA from April 6 to 10, 2008. The study of molecular dynamics in chemical reaction and biological processes using time ???????????????resolved spectroscopy plays an important role in our understanding of energy conversion, storage, and utilization problems. Fundamental studies of chemical reactivity, molecular rearrangements, and charge transport are broadly supported by the DOE Office of Science because of their role in the development of alternative energy sources, the understanding of biological energy conversion processes, the efficient utilization of existing energy resources, and the mitigation of reactive intermediates in radiation chemistry. In addition, time resolved spectroscopy is central to all of DOEs grand challenges for fundamental energy science. This symposium brought together leaders in the field of ultrafast spectroscopy, including experimentalists, theoretical chemists, and simulators, to discuss the most recent scientific and technological advances. DOE support for this conference was used to help young US and international scientists travel to the meeting. The latest technology in ultrafast infrared, optical, and xray spectroscopy and the scientific advances that these methods enable were covered. Particular emphasis was placed on new experimental methods used to probe molecular dynamics in liquids, solids, interfaces, nanostructured materials, and biomolecules.

  13. Hard probes of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Arrington; D. W. Higinbotham; G. Rosner; M. Sargsian

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the primary goals of nuclear physics is providing a complete description of the structure of atomic nuclei. While mean-field calculations provide detailed information on the nuclear shell structure for a wide range of nuclei, they do not capture the complete structure of nuclei, in particular the impact of small, dense structures in nuclei. The strong, short-range component of the nucleon-nucleon potential yields hard interactions between nucleons which are close together, generating a high-momentum tail to the nucleon momentum distribution, with momenta well in excess of the Fermi momentum. This high-momentum component of the nuclear wave-function is one of the most poorly understood parts of nuclear structure. Utilizing high-energy probes, we can isolate scattering from high-momentum nucleons, and use these measurements to examine the structure and impact of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations. Over the last decade we have moved from looking for evidence of such short-range structures to mapping out their strength in nuclei and examining their isospin structure. This has been made possible by high-luminosity and high-energy accelerators, coupled with an improved understanding of the reaction mechanism issues involved in studying these structures. We review the general issues related to short-range correlations, survey recent experiments aimed at probing these short-range structures, and lay out future possibilities to further these studies.

  14. Solids Fraction Measurement with a Reflective Fiber Optic Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seachman, S.M.; Yue, P.C.; Ludlow, J.C.; Shadle, L.J.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method has been developed to extract solids fraction information from a reflective fiber optic probe. The commercially available reflective fiber optic probe was designed to measure axial particle velocity (both up and down directions). However, the reflected light intensity measured is related to particle size and particle concentration. A light reflection model is used to relate the reflected light intensity to solids fraction. In this model we assume that the reflected light intensity is a fixed fraction, K1, of the total light intensity lost in penetration of a solid layer. Also, the solids fraction is related to particle concentration, N, in the light path, by N = K2 (1- ?), where (1-?) is the solids fraction. The parameters K1 and K2 are determined through a calibration and curve fitting procedure. This paper describes this procedure and the steps taken to derive the values of K1 and K2. It is proposed that the reflective fiber optic can be used for real time measurement of solids fraction in a circulating fluid bed.

  15. Time-resolved pump-probe experiments at the LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glownia, James; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Cryan, J.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Andreasson, J.; /Uppsala U.; Belkacem, A.; /LBNL, Berkeley; Berrah, N.; /Western Michigan U.; Blaga, C.L.; /Ohio State U.; Bostedt, C.; Bozek, J.; /SLAC; DiMauro, L.F.; /Ohio State U.; Fang, L.; /Western Michigan U.; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Gessner, O.; /LBNL; Guhr, M.; /SLAC; Hajdu, J.; /Uppsala U.; Hertlein, M.P.; /LBNL; Hoener, M.; /Western Michigan U. /LBNL; Huang, G.; Kornilov, O.; /LBNL; Marangos, J.P.; /Imperial Coll., London; March, A.M.; /Argonne; McFarland, B.K.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /IRAMIS, Saclay /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Georgia Tech /Argonne /Kansas State U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC /LBNL /Argonne /SLAC /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; ,

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The first time-resolved x-ray/optical pump-probe experiments at the SLAC Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) used a combination of feedback methods and post-analysis binning techniques to synchronize an ultrafast optical laser to the linac-based x-ray laser. Transient molecular nitrogen alignment revival features were resolved in time-dependent x-ray-induced fragmentation spectra. These alignment features were used to find the temporal overlap of the pump and probe pulses. The strong-field dissociation of x-ray generated quasi-bound molecular dications was used to establish the residual timing jitter. This analysis shows that the relative arrival time of the Ti:Sapphire laser and the x-ray pulses had a distribution with a standard deviation of approximately 120 fs. The largest contribution to the jitter noise spectrum was the locking of the laser oscillator to the reference RF of the accelerator, which suggests that simple technical improvements could reduce the jitter to better than 50 fs.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts as Probes of the First Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The redshift where the first stars formed is an important and unknown milestone in cosmological structure formation. The evidence linking gamma ray bursts (GRBs) with star formation activity implies that the first GRBs occurred shortly after the first stars formed. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows may thus offer a unique probe of this epoch, because they are bright from gamma ray to radio wavelengths and should be observable to very high redshift. Indeed, our ongoing near-IR followup programs already have the potential to detect bursts at redshift z ~ 10. In these proceedings, we discuss two distinct ways of using GRBs to probe the earliest star formation. First, direct GRB counts may be used as a proxy for star formation rate measurements. Second, high energy cutoffs in the GeV spectra of gamma ray bursts due to pair production with high redshift optical and ultraviolet background photons contain information on early star formation history. The second method is observationally more demanding, but also more rewarding, because each observed pair creation cutoff in a high redshift GRB spectrum will tell us about the integrated star formation history prior to the GRB redshift.

  17. Design, Assembly, and Testing of a Photon Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, Robert M; Cox, Brian C; Daykin, Edward P; DeVore, Douglas O; Esquibel, David L; Frayer, Daniel K; Frogget, Brent C; Gallegos, Cenobio H; Kaufman, Morris I; McGillivray, Kevin D; Romero, Vincent T; Briggs, Matthew E; Furlanetto, Michael R; Holtkamp, David B; Pazuchanics, Peter; Primas, Lori E; Shinas, Michael A

    2011-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber-optic probe measures the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Reflected light from each spot on the moving surface is Doppler shifted with a small portion of this light propagating backwards through the launching fiber. The reflected light is mixed with a reference laser in a technique called photon Doppler velocimetry, providing continuous time records. Within the probe, a matrix array of 56 single-mode fibers sends light through an optical relay consisting of three types of lenses. Seven sets of these relay lenses are grouped into a close-packed array allowing the interrogation of seven regions of interest. A six-faceted prism with a hole drilled into its center directs the light beams to the different regions. Several types of relay lens systems have been evaluated, including doublets and molded aspheric singlets. The optical design minimizes beam diameters and also provides excellent imaging capabilities. One of the fiber matrix arrays can be replaced by an imaging coherent bundle. This close-packed array of seven relay systems provides up to 476 beam trajectories. The pyramid prism has its six facets polished at two different angles that will vary the density of surface point coverage. Fibers in the matrix arrays are angle polished at 8{sup o} to minimize back reflections. This causes the minimum beam waist to vary along different trajectories. Precision metrology on the direction cosine trajectories is measured to satisfy environmental requirements for vibration and temperature.

  18. A Fisheye Lens as a Photonic Doppler Velocimetry Probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frogget, B C; Cox, B C; DeVore, D O; Esquibel, D L; Frayer, D K; Furlanetto, M R; Holtkamp, D B; Kaufman, M I; Malone, R M

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fisheye lens design is used as a miniature probe to measure the velocity distribution of an imploding surface along many lines of sight. Laser light, directed and scattered back along each beam on the surface, is Doppler shifted by the moving surface and collected into the launching fiber. The received light is mixed with reference laser light in each optical fiber in a technique called photonic Doppler velocimetry, providing a continuous time record. An array of single-mode optical fibers sends laser light through the fisheye lens. The lens consists of an index-matching positive element, two positive doublet groups, and two negative singlet elements. The optical design minimizes beam diameters, physical size, and back reflections for excellent signal collection. The fiber array projected through the fisheye lens provides many measurement points of surface coverage over a hemisphere with very little crosstalk. The probe measures surface movement with only a small encroachment into the center of the cavity. The fiber array is coupled to the index-matching element using index-matching gel. The array is bonded and sealed into a blast tube for ease of assembly and focusing. This configuration also allows the fiber array to be flat polished at a common object plane. In areas where increased measurement point density is desired, the fibers can be close packed. To further increase surface density coverage, smaller-diameter cladding optical fibers may be used.

  19. Method for producing labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, John J. (Bellport, NY); Quesada, Mark A. (Middle Island, NY); Randesi, Matthew (Upton, NY)

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method for the introduction of unidirectional deletions in a cloned DNA segment. More specifically, the method comprises providing a recombinant DNA construct comprising a DNA segment of interest inserted in a cloning vector, the cloning vector having an f1 endonuclease recognition sequence adjacent to the insertion site of the DNA segment of interest. The recombinant DNA construct is then contacted with the protein pII encoded by gene II of phage f1 thereby generating a single-stranded nick. The nicked DNA is then contacted with E. coli Exonuclease III thereby expanding the single-stranded nick into a single-stranded gap. The single-stranded gapped DNA is then contacted with a single-strand-specific endonuclease thereby producing a linearized DNA molecule containing a double-stranded deletion corresponding in size to the single-stranded gap. The DNA treated in this manner is then incubated with DNA ligase under conditions appropriate for ligation. Also disclosed is a method for producing single-stranded DNA probes. In this embodiment, single-stranded gapped DNA, produced as described above, is contacted with a DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides to fill in the gap. This DNA is then linearized by digestion with a restriction enzyme which cuts outside the DNA segment of interest. The product of this digestion is then denatured to produce a labeled single-stranded nucleic acid probe.

  20. Positron emission tomography probes for imaging immune activation and selected cancers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radu, Caius G. (Los Angeles, CA); Witte, Owen N. (Los Angeles, CA); Nair-Gill, Evan David (Los Angeles, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Shu, Chengyi J. (Los Angeles, CA); Czernin, Johannes (Los Angeles, CA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Compounds for use as PET probes and methods for synthesizing and using these, comprising [.sup.18F]D-FAC and other cytosine and adenosine analogs.

  1. Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamic broadenings, and changes in the branching ratio. The authors demonstrate that ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy is a suitable probe to deliver detailed new insights or...

  2. anisotropy probe five-year: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These...

  3. Efficient FISH mapping with small cDNA probe and its application in comparative mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heng, H.H.Q.; Shi, X.M.; Tsui, L.C. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gene mapping for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is generally difficult for small probes, especially cDNA probes. Yet, different cDNA projects have generated large number of clones that can be useful in generating physical and transcription maps and as candidate genes in studying human genetic diseases. To develop an efficient FISH method for mapping small cDNA probes (generally around a few hundred bp in size), we have investigated different hybridization conditions, methods of probe preparation as well as slide preparation. Our results suggest that the efficiency of FISH mapping with cDNA probes is critically dependent on the probe labeling and concentration, the temperature of hybridization and washing, and the concentration of formamide present in the solution. These conditions may be optimized systematically. The use of probe self-ligation to increase {open_quotes}network{close_quotes} formation was another useful signal amplification method. So far, we have been able to determine precise chromosome location for 90% of the cDNA probes (45/50). The sizes of the successfully mapped clones were between 200 bp and 2.5 kb. One important extension of our study has been our ability to map cDNA probes from heterologous species. Nine cDNA clones (390 bp to 3 kb) from mouse, rat, rabbit, chicken, frog and fish were successfully mapped to specific regions of banded human chromosomes. The latter application should greatly facilitate comparative gene mapping and study of genome evolution through identification of syntenic groups.

  4. Magnetism at spinel thin film interfaces probed through soft x-ray spectroscopy techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chopdekar, R.V.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetism at spinel thin ?lm interfaces probed through softachievable in bulk form. Magnetism at the interface regionand the origin of the magnetism from multiple magnetic

  5. Probing substituent effects in aryl-aryl interactions using stereoselective diels-alder cycloadditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wheeler, Steven E.

    Stereoselective Diels?Alder cycloadditions that probe substituent effects in aryl?aryl sandwich complexes were studied experimentally and theoretically. Computations on model systems demonstrate that the stereoselectivity ...

  6. NOPR CH2M | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagement of theTechno-economicOctoberNETLForeignDepartmentFactCAMECO

  7. Function: GTP:-`&t` -graded tensor product Calling Sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ablamowicz, Rafal

    the oak property of first order theories, which is a syntactical condition that we2 show to be sufficient

  8. Flow Test At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  10. Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information

  11. Geothermometry At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell TestingGeothermal/Power PlantUse)Alum

  12. Ground Magnetics At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to:InformationGrotonOpen EnergyEnergyOpenArea

  13. GTP Adds Meeting on the National Geothermal Data System Project...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the full range of geoscience and engineering data pertinent to geothermal resources, as well as incorporate data from the full suite of geothermal resource types. It will be an...

  14. Aeromagnetic Survey At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) | Open EnergyInformationInformation 411

  15. Aeromagnetic Survey At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta2004) | OpenInformation Zablocki, 1978) Jump

  16. GTP to Present at Upcoming Geothermal Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003 Intellectual Propertyto Present at

  17. GTP energy production from low-temperature resources, coproduced fluids,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil EnergyFullGO 2009 Annual NEPAPolicyGTO 2013and

  18. Field Mapping At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania:57427°,Ferry County, Washington:EnergyInformation

  19. Hydroprobe At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia, California:ProjectPrograms

  20. Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergy

  1. Hydroprobe At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9 CorporationHydraA)Hydropower

  2. Pressure Temperature Log At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for Energy EfficiencyConsultation| Open

  3. Magnetotellurics At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison Gas & JumpStructuralMuse,

  4. Magnetotellurics At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy| Open Energy2005)

  5. Magnetotellurics At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadison GasEnergy| Open

  6. Magnetotellurics At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAGMadisonOpen Energy Information

  7. Radiometrics At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGS Development BVRadiantRadioFort

  8. Reflection Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:bJumpRedSeismic Imaging, Majer,Area|

  9. Rock Density At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to: navigation, searchRobbinsDensity At Alum

  10. Slim Holes At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcioEthanolSkyline HighSleepingDoDAlum

  11. Slim Holes At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformation Slim Holes ActivityNotes 2OpenMaui

  12. Geothermometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co KGEnergyFish Lake

  13. Geothermometry At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH und Co2010) |Information|

  14. Geothermometry At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)EnergyAmatitlanGmbH undOpen

  15. Multispectral Imaging At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) | Open EnergyEnergy Information

  16. Multispectral Imaging At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasoleTremor(Question) | Open EnergyEnergyEnergyInformation

  17. Static Temperature Survey At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt. Francis(RedirectedStarr|| Open EnergyOpenOpen

  18. Thermochronometry At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformationThe yearThermalSoul Jump to:ThermoDate

  19. Core Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| ExplorationCooperstown,Terrace,Lakes, Arizona:Alum Area

  20. Core Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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  1. Cuttings Analysis At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew|CoreCpWingCushing, Maine:1983) | OpenEnergy|Cuttings

  2. Development Wells At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy

  3. Development Wells At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump to:

  4. Development Wells At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: EnergyKansas:DetroitOpen Energy1987) |Jump4Wister

  5. Thermochronometry At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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  6. Cuttings Analysis At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpen EnergyRoadmap Meeting

  7. Cuttings Analysis At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpen EnergyRoadmap

  8. Cuttings Analysis At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpen EnergyRoadmap1977CuttingsInformation

  9. Cuttings Analysis At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpenInformation 2)| Open

  10. Cuttings Analysis At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:PowerCER.pngRoofs and HeatOpenInformation 2)| Open

  11. Multispectral Imaging At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,SpurrMulberry, Ohio:GeothermalInformationAlum

  12. Multispectral Imaging At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,SpurrMulberry,Energy Information

  13. Multispectral Imaging At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville,Missoula,MontereyHill,SpurrMulberry,Energy InformationAl., 2001) |

  14. Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmore County,andJumpInformationBlack WarriorColrado

  15. Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAtGas NaturalColrado Area

  16. Gas Sampling At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAtGas NaturalColrado

  17. Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAtGasMaui Area

  18. Gas Sampling At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAtGasMaui AreaExploration

  19. FMI Log At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to:FAS TechnologiesInformationCross-Well

  20. Nonlinear ultrafast dynamics of high temperature YBa[subscript 2]Cu[subscript 3]O[subscript 7-?] superconductors probed with THz pump / THz probe spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grady, N. K.

    High power THz pulses induce near transparency in superconductive YBCO thin films below the critical temperature. THz pump/THz probe measurements reveal a decay of the induced transparency on the time scale of a few picoseconds.

  1. Lithium Ethylene Dicarbonate Identified as the Primary Product ofChemical and Electrochemical Reduction of EC in EC:EMC/1.2M LiPF6Electrolyte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Xu, Kang; Yang, Hui; Jow, T. Richard; RossJr., Philip N.

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium ethylene dicarbonate (CH2OCO2Li)2 was chemically synthesized and its Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrum was obtained and compared with that of surface films formed on Ni after cyclic voltammetry (CV) in 1.2M lithium hexafluorophosphate(LiPF6)/ethylene carbonate (EC): ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) (3:7, w/w) electrolyte and on metallic lithium cleaved in-situ in the same electrolyte. By comparison of IR experimental spectra with that of the synthesized compound, we established that the title compound is the predominant surface species in both instances. Detailed analysis of the IR spectrum utilizing quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations indicates that intermolecular association through O...Li...O interactions is very important in this compound. It is likely that the title compound in passivation layer has a highly associated structure, but the exact intermolecular conformation could not be established based on analysis of the IR spectrum.

  2. Nondestructive millimeter wave imaging and spectroscopy using dielectric focusing probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hejase, Jose A.; Shane, Steven S.; Park, Kyoung Y.; Chahal, Premjeet [Terahertz Systems Laboratory (TeSLa) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A tool for interrogating objects over a wide band of frequencies with subwavelength resolution at small standoff distances (near field region) in the transmission mode using a single source and detector measurement setup in the millimeter wave band is presented. The design utilizes optics like principles for guiding electromagnetic millimeter waves from large cross-sectional areas to considerably smaller sub-wavelength areas. While plano-convex lenses can be used to focus waves to a fine resolution, they usually require a large stand-off distance thus resulting in alignment and spacing issues. The design procedure and simulation analysis of the focusing probes are presented in this study along with experimental verification of performance and imaging and spectroscopy examples. Nondestructive evaluation will find benefit from such an apparatus including biological tissue imaging, electronic package integrity testing, composite dielectric structure evaluation for defects and microfluidic sensing.

  3. Scanning probe microscopy: Sulfate minerals in scales and cements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are illustrated with examples from oilfield mineralogy, particularly emphasizing sulfate minerals involved in scale formation and cement hydration chemistry. The topography of the (010) cleavage surface of gypsum observed by atomic force microscopy shows atomically flat terraces separated by shallow steps often only one unit cell high. SPM allows direct observation of processes on mineral surfaces while they are in contact with solutions. The dissolution etching and crystal growth of gypsum and barite are discussed and rates of step migration estimated. The orientation of steps is related to the crystallographic axes. The action of phosphonate crystal growth inhibitor on gypsum and of a chelating scale solvent on barite are also shown. The multiphase microstructure of an oilwell cement clinker is described in relation to its hydration chemistry in contact with water and its reaction with sulfate ions.

  4. Exceptional collections and D-branes probing toric singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. Herzog; Robert L. Karp

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that a strongly exceptional collection on a singular toric surface can be used to derive the gauge theory on a stack of D3-branes probing the Calabi-Yau singularity caused by the surface shrinking to zero size. A strongly exceptional collection, i.e., an ordered set of sheaves satisfying special mapping properties, gives a convenient basis of D-branes. We find such collections and analyze the gauge theories for weighted projective spaces, and many of the Y^{p,q} and L^{p,q,r} spaces. In particular, we prove the strong exceptionality for all p in the Y^{p,p-1} case, and similarly for the Y^{p,p-2r} case.

  5. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huterer, Dragan; Kirkby, David; Bean, Rachel; Connolly, Andrew; Dawson, Kyle; Dodelson, Scott; Evrard, August; Jain, Bhuvnesh; Jarvis, Michael; Linder, Eric; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansionmoresuch as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.less

  6. Identifying performance bottlenecks on modern microarchitectures using an adaptable probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griem, Gorden; Oliker, Leonid; Shalf, John; Yelick, Katherine

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The gap between peak and delivered performance for scientific applications running on microprocessor-based systems has grown considerably in recent years. The inability to achieve the desired performance even on a single processor is often attributed to an inadequate memory system, but without identification or quantification of a specific bottleneck. In this work, we use an adaptable synthetic benchmark to isolate application characteristics that cause a significant drop in performance, giving application programmers and architects information about possible optimizations. Our adaptable probe, called sqmat, uses only four parameters to capture key characteristics of scientific workloads: working-set size, computational intensity, indirection, and irregularity. This paper describes the implementation of sqmat and uses its tunable parameters to evaluate four leading 64-bit microprocessors that are popular building blocks for current high performance systems: Intel Itanium2, AMD Opteron, IBM Power3, and IBM Power4.

  7. Strong laser fields as a probe for fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holger Gies

    2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Upcoming high-intensity laser systems will be able to probe the quantum-induced nonlinear regime of electrodynamics. So far unobserved QED phenomena such as the discovery of a nonlinear response of the quantum vacuum to macroscopic electromagnetic fields can become accessible. In addition, such laser systems provide for a flexible tool for investigating fundamental physics. Primary goals consist in verifying so far unobserved QED phenomena. Moreover, strong-field experiments can search for new light but weakly interacting degrees of freedom and are thus complementary to accelerator-driven experiments. I review recent developments in this field, focusing on photon experiments in strong electromagnetic fields. The interaction of particle-physics candidates with photons and external fields can be parameterized by low-energy effective actions and typically predict characteristic optical signatures. I perform first estimates of the accessible new-physics parameter space of high-intensity laser facilities such as POLARIS and ELI.

  8. Probing Bino-Wino Coannihilation at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagata, Natsumi; Shirai, Satoshi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study bino-wino coannihilation scenario in the so-called spread or mini-split supersymmetry. We show that, in this model, a neutral wino has a macroscopic decay length in a wide range of parameter space. This characteristic feature could be observed as a displaced vertex plus missing transverse energy event at the LHC. In this paper, we study the current constraints and future prospects on the scenario based on the displaced vertex search performed by the ATLAS collaboration. It is found that a sizable parameter region has already been probed at the 8~TeV LHC run. This search strategy will considerably extend its reach at the next stage of the LHC running, and thus play a crucial role to examine a possibility of bino dark matter in the mini-split type supersymmetric models.

  9. FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE OBSERVATIONS: SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, E. L.; Chen, X. [UCLA Physics and Astronomy, P.O. Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S.; Weiland, J. L. [Adnet Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Larson, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, 2511 Speedway, RLM 15.306, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George St., Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)], E-mail: wright@astro.ucla.edu (and others)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the list of point sources found in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analyses now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the Galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR >4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:1 range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.

  10. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jandrasits, W.G.; Kikta, T.J.

    1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction. 9 figs.

  11. Method and apparatus for probing relative volume fractions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jandrasits, Walter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); Kikta, Thomas J. (Upper St. Clair, PA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relative volume fraction probe particularly for use in a multiphase fluid system includes two parallel conductive paths defining therebetween a sample zone within the system. A generating unit generates time varying electrical signals which are inserted into one of the two parallel conductive paths. A time domain reflectometer receives the time varying electrical signals returned by the second of the two parallel conductive paths and, responsive thereto, outputs a curve of impedance versus distance. An analysis unit then calculates the area under the curve, subtracts the calculated area from an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a first fluid phase, and divides this calculated difference by the difference between an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of the first fluid phase and an area produced when the sample zone consists entirely of material of a second fluid phase. The result is the volume fraction.

  12. Probing the nucleon structure with SIDIS at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, Sergio Anafalos [INFN-Frascati

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, measurements of azimuthal moments of polarized hadronic cross sections in hard processes have emerged as a powerful tool to probe nucleon structure. Many experiments worldwide are currently trying to pin down various effects related to nucleon structure through Semi-Inclusive Deep-Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS). Azimuthal distributions of final-state particles in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, in particular, are sensitive to the orbital motion of quarks and play an important role in the study of Transverse Momentum Dependent parton distribution functions (TMDs) of quarks in the nucleon. The CLAS spectrometer, installed in Hall-B at Jefferson Lab, has collected semi-inclusive data using the CEBAF 6 GeV polarized electron beam on polarized solid NH{sub 3} and ND{sub 3} targets. An overview of these measurements is presented.

  13. Charged Higgs Probes of Dark Bosons at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, Kyoungchul [University of Kansas; Lee, Hye-Sung [William and Mary College, JLAB; Park, Myeonghun [University of Tokyo

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A very light (GeV scale) dark gauge boson (Z?) is a recently highlighted hypothetical particle that can address some astrophysical anomalies as well as the 3.6? deviation in the muon g-2 measurement. We suggest top quark decays as a venue to search for light dark force carriers at the LHC. Such Z?s can be easily boosted, and they can decay into highly collimated leptons (lepton-jet) with large branching ratio. We investigate a scenario where a top quark decays to bW accompanied by one or multiple dark force carriers and find that such a scenario could be easily probed at the early stage of LHC Run 2.

  14. Growth of Cosmic Structure: Probing Dark Energy Beyond Expansion

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huterer, Dragan [University of Michigan, Department of Physics Ann Harbor, MI (United States); Kirkby, David [UC Irvine, Department of Physics and Astronomy, CA (United States); Bean, Rachel [Cornell University, Department of Astronomy, Ithaca, NY (United States); Connolly, Andrew [University of Washington, Department of Astronomy, Seattle, WA (United States); Dawson, Kyle [University of Utah, Department of Physics & Astronomy, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Dodelson, Scott [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, Batavia, IL (United States); University of Chicago, Department of Physics & Astrophysics, Chicago, IL (United States); Evrard, August [University of Michigan, Department of Physics Ann Harbor, MI (United States); Jain, Bhuvnesh [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Jarvis, Michael [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Linder, Eric [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Mandelbaum, Rachel [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Physics, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); May, Morgan [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raccanelli, Alvise [California Institute of Technology, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA (United States); Reid, Beth [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Physics Division, Berkeley, CA (United States); Rozo, Eduardo [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), Menlo Park, CA (United States); Schmidt, Fabian [Princeton University, Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton, NJ (United States); Max-Planck-Insitute for Astrophysics, Garching (Germany); Sehgal, Neelima [Stony Brook University, NY (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Van Engelen, Alex [Stony Brook University, NY (United States); Wu, Hao-Yi [University of Michigan, Department of Physics, Ann Harbor, MI (United States); Zhao, Gongbo [Chinese Academy of Science, National Astronomy Observatories, Beijing (China)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantity and quality of cosmic structure observations have greatly accelerated in recent years, and further leaps forward will be facilitated by imminent projects. These will enable us to map the evolution of dark and baryonic matter density fluctuations over cosmic history. The way that these fluctuations vary over space and time is sensitive to several pieces of fundamental physics: the primordial perturbations generated by GUT-scale physics; neutrino masses and interactions; the nature of dark matter and dark energy. We focus on the last of these here: the ways that combining probes of growth with those of the cosmic expansion such as distance-redshift relations will pin down the mechanism driving the acceleration of the Universe.

  15. Nuclear structure studies with medium energy probes. [Northwestern Univ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth, Kamal K.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the continuing program of experimental research in nuclear structure with medium-energy probes during the year 1979-1980 is reviewed, and the research activities planned for the year 1980-1981 are discussed. In the study of pion-induced reactions emphasis is placed on investigation of isovector characteristics of nuclear excitations and on double charge exchange reactions. Pion production studies form the major part of the program of experiments with proton beams of 400 to 800 MeV at LAMPF. Current emphasis is on the bearing of these investigations on di-baryon existence. The study of high-spin states and magnetic scattering constitute the main goals of the electron scattering program at Bates. Representative results are presented; completed work is reported in the usual publications. (RWR)

  16. Method for identifying and probing phase transitions in materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Asay, Blaine W. (Los Alamos, NM); Henson, Bryan F. (Los Alamos, NM); Sander, Robert K. (Los Alamos, NM); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Son, Steven F. (Los Alamos, NM); Dickson, Peter M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a method for identifying and probing phase transitions in materials. A polymorphic material capable of existing in at least one non-centrosymmetric phase is interrogated with a beam of laser light at a chosen wavelength and frequency. A phase transition is induced in the material while it is interrogated. The intensity of light scattered by the material and having a wavelength equal to one half the wavelength of the interrogating laser light is detected. If the phase transition results in the production of a non-centrosymmetric phase, the intensity of this scattered light increases; if the phase transition results in the disappearance of a non-centrosymmetric phase, the intensity of this scattered light decreases.

  17. Protein structure and hydration probed by SANS and osmotic stress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rau, Dr. Donald [National Institutes of Health

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions governing protein folding, stability, recognition, and activity are mediated by hydration. Here, we use small-angle neutron scattering coupled with osmotic stress to investigate the hydration of two proteins, lysozyme and guanylate kinase (GK), in the presence of solutes. By taking advantage of the neutron contrast variation that occurs upon addition of these solutes, the number of protein-associated (solute-excluded) water molecules can be estimated from changes in both the zero-angle scattering intensity and the radius of gyration. Poly(ethylene glycol) exclusion varies with molecular weight. This sensitivity can be exploited to probe structural features such as the large internal GK cavity. For GK, small-angle neutron scattering is complemented by isothermal titration calorimetry with osmoticstress to also measure hydration changes accompanying ligand binding. These results provide a framework for studying other biomolecular systems and assemblies using neutron scattering together with osmotic stress.

  18. Using Chandra/LETG spectra to probe stellar coronae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaitee A. J. Hussain; Nancy Brickhouse; Andrea K. Dupree; Adriaan A. van Ballegooijen; Andrew Collier Cameron; Moira Jardine; Jean-Francois Donati

    2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We probe the relationship between surface magnetic fields and the X-ray emitting corona in the rapidly rotating star AB Dor. Circularly polarised spectra have been inverted to produce a surface (photospheric) magnetic field map. This surface map has been extrapolated to model AB Dor's coronal field topology and X-ray light curve. Chandra/LETG light curves of AB Dor from the same epoch show intrinsic variability at the 30% level. Period analysis indicates a fraction of this is due to rotational modulation. We measure velocity shifts in emission line centroids as a function of rotation period and find evidence of rotational modulation (max. vel. ~40+/- 13km/s). This modulation may indicate the presence of a localised X-ray emitting region at mid-to-high latitudes.

  19. Evaluation of the NDP (neutron diagnostic probe) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pentaleri, E.A.; Eisen, Y.Y.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron diagnostic probe (NDP), an explosive detection system developed by Consolidated Controls Corporation and based on the associated-alpha-particle technique, was evaluated. Although many problems were found with the prototype system that make it useless for most practical applications, the NDP system may be considered a successful proof-of-principle for the basic explosive detection system design. In addition to evaluating the design and performance of the present system, models were developed to estimate the performance that might reasonably be expected from full scale systems of different conceptual design. Specific examples involved various types of bulk and sheet explosives contained in a suitcase and a large crate. Also considered were the effects of innocuous materials surrounding explosives in different scenarios, including the deliberate use of shielding materials as a countermeasure to detection. 11 refs., 46 figs., 24 tabs.

  20. Can Gravity Probe B usefully constrain torsion gravity theories?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, Eanna E.; Rosenthal, Eran [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 14853 (United States)

    2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In most theories of gravity involving torsion, the source for torsion is the intrinsic spin of matter. Since the spins of fermions are normally randomly oriented in macroscopic bodies, the amount of torsion generated by macroscopic bodies is normally negligible. However, in a recent paper, Mao et al. (arXiv:gr-qc/0608121) point out that there is a class of theories, including the Hayashi-Shirafuji (1979) theory, in which the angular momentum of macroscopic spinning bodies generates a significant amount of torsion. They further argue that, by the principle of action equals reaction, one would expect the angular momentum of test bodies to couple to a background torsion field, and therefore the precession of the Gravity Probe B gyroscopes should be affected in these theories by the torsion generated by the Earth. We show that in fact the principle of action equals reaction does not apply to these theories, essentially because the torsion is not an independent dynamical degree of freedom. We examine in detail a generalization of the Hayashi-Shirafuji theory suggested by Mao et al. called Einstein-Hayashi-Shirafuji theory. There are a variety of different versions of this theory, depending on the precise form of the coupling to matter chosen for the torsion. We show that, for any coupling to matter that is compatible with the spin transport equation postulated by Mao et al., the theory has either ghosts or an ill-posed initial-value formulation. These theoretical problems can be avoided by specializing the parameters of the theory and in addition choosing the standard minimal coupling to matter of the torsion tensor. This yields a consistent theory, but one in which the action equals reaction principle is violated, and in which the angular momentum of the gyroscopes does not couple to the Earth's torsion field. Thus, the Einstein-Hayashi-Shirafuji theory does not predict a detectable torsion signal for Gravity Probe B. There may be other torsion theories which do.

  1. 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta -Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 31 Hadron pair azimuthal angle 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 32 Center of mass angle hadron decay plane Center of mass direction in lab frame Center of mass frame R #12;2 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta

  2. 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta -Fragmentation to probe transversity 21 Azymuthal asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 21 Azymuthal asymmetry factors in the evolution of the asymmetry. D. Boer, NPB 603 (2000) 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta quark with mass mq q #12;2 29 Nov 2001 A. Bacchetta - Fragmentation to probe transversity 23 Model

  3. Accuracy of Link Capacity Estimates using Passive and Active Approaches with CapProbe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ling-Jyh

    appropriate streaming rates, while ISPs would be able to determine the capacity of their installed linksAccuracy of Link Capacity Estimates using Passive and Active Approaches with CapProbe Rohit Kapoor to estimate capacity. CapProbe combines both dispersion and end-to-end delay to estimate the capacity

  4. Three envelope approach for ultrafast pulse characterization in a pump-probe experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three envelope approach for ultrafast pulse characterization in a pump-probe experiment Balakishore of temporally identical ultrashort pulses at the focal point in a pump-probe experiment for potential use, fundamental, and second harmonic spectra, combined with an error minimization pulse retrieval scheme

  5. Using Downhole Probes to Locate and Characterize Buried Transuranic and Mixed Low Level Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, Donald K; Bramblett, Richard L; Hertzog, Russel C

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Borehole logging probes were developed and tested to locate and quantify transuranic elements in subsurface disposal areas and in contaminated sites at USDOE Weapons Complex sites. A new method of measuring very high levels of chlroine in the subsurface was developed using pulsed neutron technology from oilfield applications. The probes were demonstrated at the Hanford site in wells containing plutonium and other contaminants.

  6. Structural evaluation of thermocouple probes for 241-AZ-101 waste tank

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.

    1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the structural analysis of the thermocouple probe to be installed in 241-AZ-101 waste tank. The thermocouple probe is analyzed for normal pump mixing operation and potential earthquake induced loads required by the Hanford Site Design Criteria SDC-4.1.

  7. Fast scanning probe for tokamak plasmas J. Boedo, D. Gray, L. Chousal, and R. Conn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    Fast scanning probe for tokamak plasmas J. Boedo, D. Gray, L. Chousal, and R. Conn Department of tokamaks. The probe described here has five tips which obtain a full spectrum of plasma parameters such as turbulence and anomalous radial particle transport.3 Understanding the tokamak boundary has pro- found

  8. Fast, long-scan-range pump-probe measurement based on asynchronous sampling using a dual-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Fast, long-scan-range pump-probe measurement based on asynchronous sampling using a dual-scan-range pump-probe scheme is experimentally demonstrated using a dual-wavelength passively mode- locked fiber. 134(25), 10569­10583 (2012). 4. A. Schmidt, M. Chiesa, X. Chen, and G. Chen, "An optical pump

  9. Multiple Exciton Coherence Sizes in Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes viewed by Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukamel, Shaul

    Multiple Exciton Coherence Sizes in Photosynthetic Antenna Complexes viewed by Pump, 1996X The pump-probe signal from the light-harvesting antenna LH2 of purple bacteria is analyzed using absorption,4,5 pump-probe,11-16 and three pulse echoes.8,17 These measurements show ultrafast energy transfer

  10. Manual-scanning optical coherence tomography probe based on position tracking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Changhuei

    Manual-scanning optical coherence tomography probe based on position tracking Jian Ren,1, * Jigang to reconstruct images for a manual-scanning optical coherence tomog- raphy (OCT) probe is proposed's pose. The continuous device poses tracking, and the collected OCT depth scans can then be combined

  11. Data Mining Empowers the Generation of a Novel Class of Chromosome-specific DNA Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeng, Hui; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.; Kwan, Johnson; Wang, Mei; O'Brien, Benjamin

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Probes that allow accurate delineation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences in interphase or metaphase cell nuclei have become important clinical tools that deliver life-saving information about the gender or chromosomal make-up of a product of conception or the probability of an embryo to implant, as well as the definition of tumor-specific genetic signatures. Often such highly specific DNA probes are proprietary in nature and have been the result of extensive probe selection and optimization procedures. We describe a novel approach that eliminates costly and time consuming probe selection and testing by applying data mining and common bioinformatics tools. Similar to a rational drug design process in which drug-protein interactions are modeled in the computer, the rational probe design described here uses a set of criteria and publicly available bioinformatics software to select the desired probe molecules from libraries comprised of hundreds of thousands of probe molecules. Examples describe the selection of DNA probes for the human X and Y chromosomes, both with unprecedented performance, but in a similar fashion, this approach can be applied to other chromosomes or species.

  12. The path inference filter: model-based low-latency map matching of probe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbeel, Pieter

    of automation onboard vehicles have created a very fertile ground for GPS data sources from probe vehicles for example [4], and the paradigm of connected (and automated) vehicles does not automatically translateThe path inference filter: model-based low-latency map matching of probe vehicle data Timothy

  13. Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast Vibrational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast@stanford.edu Abstract: The dynamics of water at the surface of artificial membranes composed of aligned multibilayers pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiments are performed at various hydration levels, x ) 2 - 16 water

  14. LOCAL PROBE IN A RAYLEIGH-BENARD EXPERIMENT IN LIQUID HELIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-369 LOCAL PROBE IN A RAYLEIGH-BENARD EXPERIMENT IN LIQUID HELIUM A. LIBCHABER and J. MAURER. Abstract. 2014 We have measured, in a Rayleigh-Benard experiment in liquid helium, the time dependent-Benard experiment in liquid helium, using for the first time a local probe. Time dependent effects above

  15. Probing the electronic structure and optical response of a graphene quantum disk supported on monolayer graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Probing the electronic structure and optical response of a graphene quantum disk supported on monolayer graphene This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text.1088/0953-8984/24/31/314213 Probing the electronic structure and optical response of a graphene quantum disk supported on monolayer

  16. MULTIPROBE EXPLORATION OF THE GIANT PLANETS SHALLOW PROBES Sushil K. Atreya(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atreya, Sushil

    , University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2143, USA, Email: atreya@umich.edu (2) Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA (3) Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio, Texas, TX 78228 about 10 bars. At the ice-giants, Uranus and Neptune, neither probes even deep probes nor radiometry

  17. [Frontiers in Bioscience 4795-4808, May 1, 2008] Probing protein aggregation using discrete molecular dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    tool to study protein misfolding 5.1. Probing conformational changes in beta2-microglobulin leading predictor probing protein domain-swapping 5.6. iFold webserver as a tool to study protein aggregation 6 of fibrillar proteinaceous deposits termed "senile amyloid plaques" is characteristic of the Alzheimer

  18. Oxygen Isotope Effects as Probes of Electron Transfer Mechanisms and Structures of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Justine P.

    Oxygen Isotope Effects as Probes of Electron Transfer Mechanisms and Structures of Activated O2, Maryland 21218 RECEIVED ON JULY 26, 2008 C O N S P E C T U S Competitively determined oxygen (18 O) isotope effects can be power- ful probes of chemical and biological transformations involving molec- ular oxygen

  19. Dynamics of Nanoscopic Water: Vibrational Echo and Infrared Pump-Probe Studies of Reverse Micelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    Dynamics of Nanoscopic Water: Vibrational Echo and Infrared Pump-Probe Studies of Reverse MicellesVersity, Stanford, California 94305 ReceiVed: April 8, 2005; In Final Form: May 12, 2005 The dynamics of water of the hydrogen-bond network dynamics. Pump-probe experiments show that the vibrational lifetime of the OD stretch

  20. Belgirate, Italy, 28-30 September 2005 MICROMACHINED HEAT EXCHANGER FOR A CRYOSURGICAL PROBE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    with large refrigeration capacity [2-4] and techniques for real-time monitoring using ultrasound or magnetic that surrounds the cold end of the probe is controlled by the refrigeration power and surface temperature probe. The isobars Refrigeration Load isenthalps Entropy, S Temperature,T (1) (5) (2) (4) (3) (1) (5) (2