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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

V-144: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer 4: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer V-144: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer April 29, 2013 - 12:27am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Printers Let Remote Users Access Files on the Printer PLATFORM: HP Color LaserJet 3000 Q7534A HP Color LaserJet 3800 Q5981A HP Color LaserJet 4700 Q7492A HP Color LaserJet 4730 Multifunction Printer CB480A HP Color LaserJet 4730 Multifunction Printer CB480A HP Color LaserJet 5550 Q3714A HP Color LaserJet 9500 Multifunction Printer C8549A HP Color LaserJet CM6030 Multifunction Printer CE664A HP Color LaserJet CM6040 Multifunction Printer Q3939A HP Color LaserJet CP3505 CB442A HP Color LaserJet CP3525 CC469A HP Color LaserJet CP4005 CB503A HP Color LaserJet CP6015 Q3932A HP Color LaserJet Enterprise CP4025 CC490A

2

Casting out the printers' devils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... insight, applied to the burgeoning scientific culture of seventeenth-century England, that underlies Adrian Johns's provocative and stimulating, if ultimately not wholly satisfactory, book. He argues that ... by the same printer; this took in at least one early reader, the diarist John Evelyn, who dutifully had the offending item bound into his set of the journal. ...

Michael Hunter

1998-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

This is page 1 Printer: Opaque this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is page 1 Printer: Opaque this 1 Wavelet thresholding on non-equispaced data Maarten Jansen \\squeezing" techniques, starting from (pieces of) standard wavelets [8]. We #12; 2 Jansen Keep odd Keep even

Jansen, Maarten

4

V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

39: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized 39: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability December 4, 2012 - 2:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability PLATFORM: The Samsung printer firmware before 20121031 ABSTRACT: Samsung (as well as some Dell printers manufactured by Samsung) issued a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) security. REFERENCE LINKS: Samsung Security Advisory Vulnerability Note VU#281284 Bugtraq ID: 56692 CVE-2012-4964 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: Samsung and Dell printers are prone to an unauthorized-access vulnerability

5

V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized 9: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability December 4, 2012 - 2:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized Access Vulnerability PLATFORM: The Samsung printer firmware before 20121031 ABSTRACT: Samsung (as well as some Dell printers manufactured by Samsung) issued a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) security. REFERENCE LINKS: Samsung Security Advisory Vulnerability Note VU#281284 Bugtraq ID: 56692 CVE-2012-4964 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: Samsung and Dell printers are prone to an unauthorized-access vulnerability

6

Photo 3D-Printer, Image Credit, Ames Lab | OSTI, US Dept of Energy...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Photo 3D-Printer, Image Credit, Ames Lab Critical Materials Institute speed metals research with 3D printer. Default Caption and Credits Read More: Critical Materials Institute...

7

V-039: Samsung and Dell printers Firmware Backdoor Unauthorized...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a security advisory and an optional firmware update for all current Samsung networked laser printers and multifunction devices to enhance Simple Network Management Protocol...

8

Property:Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Printers Pages using the property "Building/SPElectrtyUsePercPrinters" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 1.29926142668 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.28348328161 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.566240926214 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 1.48505629844 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 3.2214095811 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 1.96025561063 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1.71129445978 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 1.35426488397 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 0.676132908085 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 2.81489347006 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 2.93588510144 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.798111658869 +

9

Reasoning About an ACME Printer Case Investigation with Forensic Lucid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we model the ACME printer case incident and make its specification in Forensic Lucid, a Lucid- and intensional-logic-based programming language for cyberforensic analysis and event reconstruction specification. The printer case involves a dispute about two parties that was previously solved using the finite-state automata (FSA) approach, and now re-done in a more usable way in Forensic Lucid.

Mokhov, Serguei A; Debbabi, Mourad

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

8: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users 8: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code U-048: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code November 30, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: HP LaserJet Printers Unspecified Flaw Lets Remote Users Update Firmware with Arbitrary Code . PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Printers manufactured prior to 2009 ABSTRACT A remote user can upgrade the printer's firmware with arbitrary code. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID:1026357 HP Security for Imaging and Printing HP Clarifies on Printer Security IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Low Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in some HP LaserJet Printers. A remote user can update the firmware with arbitrary code. A remote user can send a specially crafted print job or specially crafted data to the

11

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025 - Forecast Comparisons  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Forecast Comparisons Forecast Comparisons Annual Energy Outlook 2005 Forecast Comparisons Table 32. Forecasts of annual average economic growth, 2003-2025 Printer Friendly Version Average annual percentage growth Forecast 2003-2009 2003-2014 2003-2025 AEO2004 3.5 3.2 3.0 AEO2005 Reference 3.4 3.3 3.1 Low growth 2.9 2.8 2.5 High growth 4.1 3.9 3.6 GII 3.4 3.2 3.1 OMB 3.6 NA NA CBO 3.5 3.1 NA OEF 3.5 3.5 NA Only one other organization—Global Insight, Incorporated (GII)—produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2005. Other organizations address one or more aspects of the energy markets. The most recent projection from GII, as well as other forecasts that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy

12

NASA to send 3D printer into space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... time that a 3D printer flies in space. The agency has already embraced ground-based 3D printing as a fast, cheap way to make spacecraft parts, including rocket engine components that ... to make spacecraft parts literally on the fly. Space experts say that the promise of 3Dprinting is real, but a long way from the hype that surrounds it. There ...

Alexandra Witze

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- Summary Printer-Friendly Version - Summary Printer-Friendly Version Released: January 15, 2014 Next Release: January 23, 2014 Midwest propane markets tighten further on cold weather The Upper Midwest is facing a tight market for propane this winter, as evidenced by a 1.5-million-barrel inventory draw in the region for the week ending last Friday, January 10. At the beginning of November, the corn harvest in the Upper Midwest (Minnesota, Iowa, Wisconsin, Nebraska) pulled large quantities of propane from distribution terminals for corn drying. Between late-November and December, supply disruptions prevented these terminals from replenishing their supplies of propane. With the onset of severely cold weather this past week, propane supplies are extremely tight, forcing emergency measures to ensure supply and increasing the Midwest spot price of propane at Conway, Kansas compared with the spot price on the Gulf Coast at Mont Belvieu, Texas. Propane prices in the Midwest will likely need to rise to keep propane in the region rather than flowing south to the Gulf Coast.

14

Property:Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Printers Printers Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Printers Pages using the property "Building/SPBreakdownOfElctrcityUseKwhM2Printers" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 0.928422444931 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 1.42372881356 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 0.412844036697 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 0.980506822612 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 1.76744186047 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 1.27988963826 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1.12158808933 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 0.0 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 0.765719334413 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 1.01601830664 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 0.774147727273 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1.11545428544 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 0.549891248721 +

15

Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion December 11, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis As the nation's premier research laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries, with tools like 3D printers. Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity The Department of Energy and its partners are adding a new dimension to science, technology, engineering and math education (STEM). This December, high school teams competing in the FIRST Robotics Competition should be racing over to this FIRST Robotics website to put in their bid for a free

16

[send to printer] [close this window] What's Happening from Environmental Building News  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[send to printer] [close this window] What's Happening from Environmental Building News July 1-by-step move toward the goals of Architecture 2030's "2030 Challenge" to eliminate fossil-fuel use in all new

17

Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion Why 3D Printers Might Create the Next Robotic Champion December 11, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis As the nation's premier research laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory is one of the world's most capable resources for transforming the next generation of scientific discovery into solutions for rebuilding and revitalizing America's manufacturing industries, with tools like 3D printers. Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity The Department of Energy and its partners are adding a new dimension to science, technology, engineering and math education (STEM). This December, high school teams competing in the FIRST Robotics Competition should be racing over to this FIRST Robotics website to put in their bid for a free

18

Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? January 4, 2011 - 6:30am Addthis Amy Foster Parish This year for Christmas, Santa was kind enough to bring me a new wireless printer to replace my old one. When I opened the box, you can't imagine my glee. I'm a fan of using my laptop as its name implies, so you'll typically find me typing away with it on my lap while snugly ensconced in the living room in front of the fire. Without a wireless printer, though, my cozy work was constantly interrupted so I could schlep into the office to print things-all of which resulted in a lot of grumbling on my part. The new printer will no doubt make my life easier. But there is one

19

Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? Thanks for the New Printer, Santa! Now What Do I Do with the Old One? January 4, 2011 - 6:30am Addthis Amy Foster Parish This year for Christmas, Santa was kind enough to bring me a new wireless printer to replace my old one. When I opened the box, you can't imagine my glee. I'm a fan of using my laptop as its name implies, so you'll typically find me typing away with it on my lap while snugly ensconced in the living room in front of the fire. Without a wireless printer, though, my cozy work was constantly interrupted so I could schlep into the office to print things-all of which resulted in a lot of grumbling on my part. The new printer will no doubt make my life easier. But there is one

20

6/11/13 Print Article: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php?db=ocregister&id=512074 1/3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

6/11/13 Print Article: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php: Diploma done, mom's next dream: Doctor www.ocregister.com/common/printer/view.php?db=ocregister&id=512074

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data V-210: HP LaserJet Pro Printer Bug Lets Remote Users Access Data August 3, 2013 - 2:37am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability was reported in HP Printers. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. PLATFORM: HP LaserJet Pro products ABSTRACT: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP LaserJet Pro printers. The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to gain unauthorized access to data. REFERENCE LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID 1028869 CVE-2013-4807 Vendor URL IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The following models are affected: HP LaserJet Pro P1102w CE657A/CE658A HP LaserJet Pro P1606dn CE749A HP LaserJet Pro M1212nf MFP CE841A HP LaserJet Pro M1213nf MFP CE845A

22

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

posted growth relative to the year-earlier monthly level. Notwithstanding a soft patch in the first quarter of 2010, gasoline consumption averaged growth of about 35...

23

08/15/2006 04:46 PMGeorgia Tech develops a `SWAN` suit Page 1 of 1http://science.monstersandcritics.com/news/printer_1190655.php  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://science.monstersandcritics.com/news/printer_1190655.php From Monsters and Critics.com SCIENCE NEWS Georgia Tech develops a `SWAN` suit By UPI Aug 15

24

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

to resources, additional upstream and downstream capacity, a stronger, if delayed, demand response to recent price increases, or a prolonged weakening of global economic growth....

25

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

growth depends on large oil projects, generally in new areas including deepwater offshore, or in previously inaccessible areas. Few oil producing regions are more mature than...

26

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

comes. For example, the chart shows that the growth in imports has been concentrated in gasoline blending components (BC), rather than finished gasoline (FIN). Finished gasoline...

27

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

year, while imports of gasoline remain around year-ago levels. Additionally, gasoline demand growth has softened in response to a struggling economy and gasoline prices...

28

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

discusses our non-OPEC oil production forecast and identifies specific projects that help support our current view. Non-OPEC Oil Production Growth Is Expected To Increase...

29

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

As previously discussed in TWIP, the combination of robust U.S. production growth, a return of disrupted Libyan production despite recent setbacks, weakening expectations for...

30

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

firmer market. EIA's STEO includes a downward revision to forecast supply growth in U.S. tight oil plays. Because many producers have already made investment and drilling plans...

31

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

refinery trends continue to evolve Recent rapid growth in U.S. production of light tight oil has raised interest in understanding how U.S. refineries, many of which are...

32

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

economic growth through 2015 after data showed second quarter 2014 GDP contracted in Germany and Italy and stagnated in France. In addition to the weaker economy, which has been...

33

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

liquid fuels consumers, annual GDP growth since 2005 averaged only 1.5 percent for Germany, 1.3 percent for the United States, and 0.6 percent for Japan. In the June 2013 STEO,...

34

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

last couple of decades (Figure 1). In fact, the period of solid, robust growth in automobile travel ended 10 years ago, when a structural change in the motor gasoline markets...

35

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the limelight as an important component of world oil supply growth. This development has led EIA to re-evaluate our forecast for non-crude liquids production in the March 2009...

36

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

will total 10.2 million bbld in 2012 and 10.3 million bbld in 2013. In contrast, Russia, which had accounted for the bulk of non-OPEC growth between 2000 and 2007, looks set...

37

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

scheduled. We apologize for the delay and will be publishing as soon as possible. U.S. Propane Production Growth Pushes Inventories and Exports Higher As a fuel that is a product...

38

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

very limited volumes (5,644 barrels per day (bbld) in 2008) with only about 1,900 E85 pumps nationwide in 2009, and it is not expected to show significant growth over the short...

39

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

oil demand growth, physical disruption in Libyan crude production, and unrest in North Africa and the Middle East all have caused crude oil and petroleum product prices to rise in...

40

This Week In Petroleum Summary Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

continuing oil production growth in the key oil-producing regions. Altogether, in the Bakken, Niobrara, Permian, and Eagle Ford, oil production is expected to increase by 70,000...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

6, 2007 (Next Release on September 12, 2007) Measuring Oil Demand Growth Last Friday, EIA released monthly data for June, and for the 10th month in a row, total oil demand was...

42

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 1, 2010) Following the Thanksgiving Day holiday weekend, prices moved up significantly this week as wintry weather moved into much of the country. The most severe weather to date this season is increasing space-heating demand from nearly coast to coast and as far south as Florida. During the report week (November 24-December 1), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 to $4.21 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased during the report week in response to indications of warmer weather in the outlook and amid reports of growth in supply. The futures

43

Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser Safety Laser-emitting tools and equipment are common to many work situations. Lasers in printers, grocery store scanners, construction tools, and laser pointers are generally lower powered lasers emit high-intensity, directional light beams that vary in strength, they are a particular hazard

Burke, Peter

44

A forecasting decision on the sales volume of printers in Taiwan: An exploitation of the Analytic Network Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study applies the Analytic Network Process (ANP) to forecast the sales volume of printers in Taiwan for adjusting the recycling and treatment fee as an incentive for recycling industries. When historical data are lacking and when a broad spectrum ... Keywords: Analytic Hierarchy Process, Analytic Network Process, Dependence and feedback, Forecasting-related applications, Judgmental forecasting, Management decision making

Hsu-Shih Shih; E. Stanley Lee; Shun-Hsiang Chuang; Chiau-Ching Chen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technology for Education Need a Computer? Take advantage of University educational discounts on a Dell or Apple computers, printers, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a Dell or Apple computers, printers, and accessories. Visit: http://uts.sc.edu/computerpurchase/ PC Windows or Apple? Check with your college or major for any specific computer and operating system Distribution Software for Home. And while there, you can also purchase Microsoft Office for your Apple or PC

Almor, Amit

46

Reuters News Article http://www.reuters.com/printerFriendlyPopup.jhtml?type=topNews... 1 of 1 1/13/04 11:45 AM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reuters News Article http://www.reuters.com/printerFriendlyPopup.jhtml?type=topNews... 1 of 1 1-February after an evaluation of the sites. Fabbi told a daily news conference that if a consensus was reached

47

Noise analysis of inkjet printers over stages and quality of the job and frequency sources from equipment in laboratory optical trap room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This experiment measured the level of sound emitted over the course of the print cycle by an HP inkjet printer and determined how the level varies with changes in the print quality settings and stages of the print cycle. ...

Moore, Jennifer H. (Jennifer Haydon)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

PRINTING ... on the Xerox copiers in AND, BLD, and WFS You can use the new copiers in AND, BLD, and WFS as printers. There are three machines in each  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and WFS as printers. There are three machines in each building, essentially one per floor. All machines at the machine. This provides more security for your print jobs and eliminates the constant sorting usually associated with shared printers. Here's how: At your computer-- Add any or all machines to your print

Borenstein, Elhanan

49

Department of Physics and Astronomy Poster Printer Use and Costs all posters will be printed on semi-gloss photo paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Physics and Astronomy Poster Printer Use and Costs all posters will be printed on semi-gloss photo paper Poster Prints on Semi-Gloss Photo Paper (SF = square foot = 929 cm2 ; BG' poster cost = $18 Color images and wording on white BG $3.25/SF 3' X 4' poster cost = $39 Images &/or

Metchev, Stanimir

50

Economist.com | Articles by Subject | Online advertising http://www.economist.com/research/articlesBySubject/PrinterFriendly.c... 1 of 2 30/11/2006 9:16 PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economist.com | Articles by Subject | Online advertising http://www.economist.com/research/articlesBySubject/PrinterFriendly.c... 1 of 2 30/11/2006 9:16 PM Articles by subject: Topics: Advertising BUSINESS Online advertising in online advertising Get article background INTERNET advertising is booming. The industry has gone from $9

Matwin, Stan

51

8/12/08 9:47 AMLife in a bubble WebWire (Printer-friendly version) Page 1 of 2http://www.webwire.com/ViewPressRel_print.asp?aId=71284  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between the stability of the bubble and the respiratory needs of the insect. The air bubble's stability stability and the more pressure the bubble can withstand before collapsing. However, mechanical stability8/12/08 9:47 AMLife in a bubble ­ WebWire (Printer-friendly version) Page 1 of 2http://www

Flynn, Morris R.

52

Molar Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Molar Growth Molar Growth Name: Daniel Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What animals have molars that grow continuously ? Replies: No mammals that I or my colleagues are aware of, only some few whose incisors grow continuously. J. Elliott Most vertebrates are "polyphyodonts" meaning that they replace teeth continuously through out their lives. All the teeth aren't replaced at once, but in waves so that the animals always have functional teeth around those that are lost. Most mammals are "diphyodonts", which means that they have only 2 sets of teeth: baby teeth and adult teeth. The teeth of herbivore mammals, those which eat grasses, seem to grow throughout their lives. But really, the teeth are very long and extend far down into the jaws. They gradually move up in the jaw toward the surface over time, with the area beneath them filling in with bone.

53

Economic Growth Policies & Economic Growth Theory Influences.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this thesis is to describe the presence of theories for economic growth in municipalities economic growth strategies, and to compare the (more)

Hallden, Sophie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Eyeball Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Eyeball Growth Eyeball Growth Name: Jade Hawk Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Okay, I know I'm supposed to be able to answer questions here, but a friend who teaches grades 7 & 8 general science wants to know if the human eyeball is fully grown at birth. I checked my references, which are rather limited when it comes to human physiology, and found nothing. Can anyone help? Replies: The eye will still develop in size, pigmentation, and neurologically but I don't have the details here at hand. A kitten is born with eyes even more immature than human babies. Besides having sealed eyes that take about a week to open, they have retinas that a avascularized and need to undergo neovascularization to properly nourish and oxygenate the tissue. We have used the kitten to study retinopathy of prematurity, a condition caused in part by increased inspired oxygen. The kitten is also used in the study of diabetic retinopathy which a I think is the leading cause of blindness in the US. Look up publications by Dale Phelps, MD.

55

Florida Growth Fund (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

56

Article Tools Printer-friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nanotechnology electronics in medicine Posted: Aug 16th, 2012 Electronic sensing with your fingertips Posted: Aug: Aug 7th, 2012 A sub-10 nm nanopore template for nanotechnology applications Posted: Aug 6th, 2012 in the August 10, 2012, online edition of Nanotechnology ("Silicon nanomembranes for fingertip electronics

Rogers, John A.

57

Article Tools Printer-friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a novel platform for developing soft electronics Posted: Aug 20th, 2012 The future of nanotechnology electronics in medicine Posted: Aug 16th, 2012 Electronic sensing with your fingertips Posted: Aug 15th, 2012 A sub-10 nm nanopore template for nanotechnology applications Posted: Aug 6th, 2012 Nanoparticle

Suslick, Kenneth S.

58

Email a Friend Printer Friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-catalyzed carbon cloth," says Bruce E. Logan, Kappe professor of environmental engineering. The brushes used were cathode needed to be placed very close to the graphite fiber brush anode for optimum effect. At an applied brushes show great promise in that they have high current densities and high energy recovery," says Logan

59

Article Tools Printer-friendly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

catalysts holds promise for air quality Posted: Dec 15th, 2010 Atomic weights of 10 elements on periodic, 2010 Online Workshop: Nanotechnology for Solar Energy Posted: Dec 14th, 2010 Iridium is attractive table about to make an historic change Posted: Dec 15th, 2010 Study improves understanding of method

Espinosa, Horacio D.

60

The Desktop 3D Printer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Chapter 1 we saw that 3D printing has a 30-year history spanning a ... technical, legal, and societal shifts in the 3D-printing market since the major patents in the...

Joan Horvath

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ARM - Measurement - Hygroscopic growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth govMeasurementsHygroscopic growth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Hygroscopic growth The rate that aerosol particles grow at relative humidity values less than 100 percent. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System SMPS : Scanning mobility particle sizer TDMA : Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

62

Pollution adn Plant Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pollution adn Plant Growth Pollution adn Plant Growth Name: Virdina Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: What are the effcts off water polltuion on plant growth? Are there any good websites where I can find current or on going research being done by other scientist? Replies: Dear Virdina, Possibly helpful: http://www.ec.gc.ca/water/en/manage/poll/e_poll.htm http://www.epa.vic.gov.au/wq/info/wq987.htm Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach This is a very complicated question, there are so many different types of water pollution and different species of plants react very differently. Good places to start are the U.S. environmental protection agency, the office of water is at: http://www.epa.gov/ow/ and there is a link to a kid's page from there: http://www.epa.gov/OST/KidsStuff/ You might also try state EPA's, Illinois is at:

63

Plant Tumor Growth Rates  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Tumor Growth Rates Plant Tumor Growth Rates Name: Gina and Maria Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We are doing a science fair project on if B. Carotene, Green tea, and Grape Seed Extract helps plants against the crown gall disease. We injected sunflowers with agrobacterium tum. one week ago (Sun. Feb. 27, 2000). Our questions is how long will it take for the tumors to grow? We scratched the surface of the stems and injected the agrobacterium in the wound. Also which do you think, in your opinion, will do the best, if any? Our science fair is April 13, do you think we'll have growth before then, atleast enough time to do our conclusion and results? Thank you, any information you forward will be very helpful. Replies: Sunflowers form galls relatively quickly. I usually get them in two weeks at least. Good luck.

64

Research District Seeing Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monthly economic diversity column for the Tri-City Herald (May 2012) - excerpt follows: Its been a while since Ive updated you on the Tri-Cities Research District, most certainly not for lack of new activity over the past several months. In fact, much has happened, and theres more to come. I think many of us see new land development and construction as indicative of current or impending economic growth. So those of you who have ventured into North Richland either via Stevens Drive or George Washington Way lately have probably begun sensing and anticipating that such growth is afoot.

Madison, Alison L.

2012-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

Growth & Development / Parental Care  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

participate; if one parents is lost, fledging rates usually drop #12;Winkler reduced clutch size from 5 to 3Growth & Development / Parental Care #12;Embryonic Development Although the sequence of 42 stages the egg The hatching muscle helps the chick break out of the egg Parents typically dispose of the egg

Butler, Christopher J.

66

TRANSFORMED DSM TARGETS GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TRANSFORMED DSM TARGETS GROWTH ... DSM CHIEF Executive Officer Feike Sijbesma refers to Charles Darwin when talking about his companys transformation. ... In the past 10 years, DSM has transformed itself, shifting its portfolio from petrochemicals and specialties to life sciences and materials. ...

PAIGE MARIE MORSE

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 2:26pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Editor's Note: Yesterday Secretary Chu announced that solar panels and a solar hot water heater will be added to the White House by the end of next spring. This entry is cross-posted from the Energy Empowers blog and deals with how the continued growth of solar power is not only a boon for industry, but for local economies as well. The solar industry saw growth in 2010. Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW

68

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 2:26pm Addthis Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Editor's Note: Yesterday Secretary Chu announced that solar panels and a solar hot water heater will be added to the White House by the end of next spring. This entry is cross-posted from the Energy Empowers blog and deals with how the continued growth of solar power is not only a boon for industry, but for local economies as well. The solar industry saw growth in 2010. Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW

69

Pine Tree Growth Locations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pine Tree Growth Locations Pine Tree Growth Locations Name: Amielee Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Why do pine trees not grow south of the equator? Replies: Dear Amielee, The natural distribution of the pines is the northern hemisphere: http://phylogeny.arizona.edu/tree/eukaryotes/green_plants/embryophytes/conif ers/pinaceae/pinus/pinus.html However, pines have become introduced into the southern hemisphere through cultivation: http://www.woodweb.com/~treetalk/Radiata_Pine/wowhome.html Sincerely, Anthony R. Brach, Ph.D. Hi Amielee Some pine trees do live south of the equator but we (I live in Australia) do not have the huge forests of native conifers that you have in the northern hemisphere. Even in the northern hemisphere conifers are only found in two forest types: 1. Tiaga

70

Web Growth of Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel process for growth of diamond?lattice semiconductors is described and a model is proposed for the growth mechanism. For germanium the process yields extended thin flat sheets typically 1 cm wide and 0.1 mm thick of good crystalline quality and relatively flat {111} surfaces. The sheet or web freezes from a liquid film drawn up by surface tension between two coplanar dendrites which originate from a single seed and are grown from the melt simultaneously with the sheet. Resistivity throughout the sheet is quite uniform. Etching of germanium webs shows them to be essentially dislocation?free and does not reveal any microsegregation of impurities. Silicon and indium antimonide have also been grown in this manner.

S. O'Hara; A. I. Bennett

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% 4,100 4,400 4,700 5,000 5,300 5,600 5,900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: 2.5% Aug '12 to Aug '13: -1.3% YTD '12 to YTD '13: 1.5% 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons U.S. Residual Fuel Sales 2011 2012 2013 Adjusted Growth Rates* Jul '13 to Aug '13: -0.8%

72

Fostering Growth | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Fostering Growth Fostering Growth The solar energy industry in the United States is growing rapidly as the price of solar panels has decreased over the past decade. U.S. solar...

73

Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Adjusted Adjusted Growth Rates* Jan. '99 to Feb. '99: -1.7% Feb. '98 to Feb. '99: +19.8% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +15.0% U.S. Distillate Fuel Sales 3,000 3,500 4,000 4,500 5,000 5,500 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -7.4% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -0.1% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -0.1% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -16.8% Jan '99 to Jan '00: -3.2% YTD '99 to YTD '00: -3.2% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1998 1999 2000 Adjusted Growth Rates* Dec '99 to Jan '00: -9.3% Jan '99 to Jan '00: +3.5% YTD '99 to YTD '00: +3.5% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

74

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

June '99 to July '99: -5.4% June '99 to July '99: -5.4% July '98 to July '99: +3.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.3% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: -0.5% July '98 to July '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +0.5% July '98 to July '99: +1.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.3% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* June '99 to July '99: +1.5% July '98 to July '99: +10.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +7.2%

75

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Nov '99 to Dec '99: +5.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +8.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.0% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +6.0% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +4.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +2.4% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +3.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Nov '99 to Dec '99: +32.3% Dec '98 to Dec '99: +2.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +5.5%

76

The Growth of Fishes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growth of Fishes Growth of Fishes Nature Bulletin No. 272-A June 3, 1967 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F, Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE GROWTH OF FISHES Baby fish, by the millions, are hatching now every day in our lakes, streams and ponds. Some kinds come from eggs sown broadcast among water plants; others from eggs laid in clusters or nests; some from masses of eggs hidden in underwater holes; while the eggs of many little fish, such as minnows and darters, are attached in neat patches to the underside of rocks or sunken logs. For some time before hatching, the young fish can be seen wriggling inside the eggs. Newly hatched baby fish -- or fry, as they should be called -- look much alike, regardless of the size or appearance of their parents. Each is almost transparent except for the large dark eyes and a bulging stomach which encloses yolk from the egg. Under a magnifying glass, the pumping red heart can be seen and the mouth gulping water. The tiny fins are beginning to form, a few dots of dark pigment may show in the skin, but there is little or no sign of scales. They vary from an eighth to a half inch or more in length, depending upon the species and the size of the egg.

77

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% July '99 to Aug. '99: +4.7% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +1.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -1.9% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.9% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: -0.1% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: -1.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: -0.7% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* July '99 to Aug. '99: +22.3% Aug. '98 to Aug. '99: +21.1%

78

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Aug '99 to Sep '99: +4.9% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.7% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.4% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +0.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.3% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: -2.1% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +4.6% YTD '98 to YTD '99: 0.0% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Aug '99 to Sep '99: +7.3% Sep '98 to Sep '99: +8.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +8.3%

79

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Oct '99 to Nov '99: +0.1% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +5.5% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.5% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: -0.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +1.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.1% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +2.5% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +6.0% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.8% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Oct '99 to Nov '99: +9.7% Nov '98 to Nov '99: +2.2% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.2%

80

Adjusted Growth Rates*  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Sep '99 to Oct '99: +3.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: +2.3% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +4.4% U.S. Motor Gasoline Sales 8,000 9,000 10,000 11,000 12,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -0.2% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.9% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +1.0% U.S. Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Sales 1,500 1,600 1,700 1,800 1,900 2,000 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -1.9% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -0.7% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +0.4% U.S. Propane Sales 600 800 1,000 1,200 1,400 1,600 1,800 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Millions of Gallons 1997 1998 1999 Adjusted Growth Rates* Sep '99 to Oct '99: -2.1% Oct '98 to Oct '99: -6.4% YTD '98 to YTD '99: +6.6%

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

82

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Plant Growth and Photosynthesis Name: Jack Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Do plants have any other way of growing besides photosythesis? Plants do not use photosynthesis to grow!!! They use cellular respiration just like every other organism to process energy into work. Plants use oxygen just like we do. Photosynthesis is principally only a process to change sunlight into a chemical form for storage. Replies: Check out our archives for more information. www.newton.dep.anl.gov/archive.htm Steve Sample Jack, Several kinds of flowering plants survive without the use of chlorophyll which is what makes plants green and able to produce sugar through photosynthesis. Dodder is a parasitic nongreen (without chlorophyll) plant that is commonly found growing on jewelweed and other plants in damp areas. Dodder twines around its host, (A host is an organism that has fallen victim to a parasite.), like a morning glory and attaches itself at certain points along the stem where it absorbs sugar and nutrients from the hosts sap.

83

China urges rapid growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This time last year China's paramount leader, Deng Xiaoping, launched the country on another bout of fast-paced economic growth and restructuring. After three years of riding out political and economic clampdown, foreign chemical companies were jerked awake by major changes in China's chemical industry. As the state becomes less involved with managing the economy, unleashing 12% gross national product growth, closer involvement with domestic factories has become attractive and essential. MCI officials say government funds will now be channeled toward clearing energy and transport bottlenecks, and chemical enterprises will be given more chance to turn a profit. They will be allowed to issue shares, seek foreign investment partners themselves, and bypass trading companies like China National Import-Export Corp. (Sinochem), the former state monopoly. Foreign analysts question whether China's finances and oil resources can support expansion. Even if they can, Cai estimates that ethylene imports will remain around the present level of 1 million tons. To further guarantee chemical supplies, China has invested in urea and polypropylene plants in the US and polystyrene plant in Hong Kong.

Hendry, S.

1993-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Argentina: export-biased growth versus import-biased growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARGENTINA. : EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1972... Major Subject: Economics ARGENTINA: EXPORT-BIASED GROWTH VERSUS IMPORT-BIASED GROWTH A Thesis by MICHAEL PAGE BRADLEY Approved as to style and content by: rman o omit ee ea o Depar men em er Mem er May 1&72 ABSTRACT Argentina: Export...

Bradley, Michael Page

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Growth model for carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented, through high-resolution electron microscopy images, for the open-end growth of carbon nanotubes. Terminations of incomplete layers of carbon, seen on the tube surfaces and cone tips, suggest that the extension and thickening of the tubes occur by the island growth of graphite basal planes on existing tube surfaces. The nucleation of positive (pentagons) and negative (heptagons) disclinations on open tube ends results in changes of growth directions, producing different morphologies. A novel structure that shows complete turn around growth, involving pentagon-heptagon pairs, of the tubular assemblies is presented.

Sumio Iijima; P. M. Ajayan; T. Ichihashi

1992-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

86

Robust Growth-Optimal Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2014 ... Adopting standard terminology, we refer to the portfolio managed under the Kelly strategy as the growth-optimal portfolio. This portfolio displays...

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

87

Military Expenditure, Threats, and Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a country's external military threat; lgdp is the log ofMilitary Expenditure, Threats, and Growth * September 2003expenditure, external threats, corruption, and other

Aizenman, Joshua; Glick, Reuven

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Controlled growth of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrones Controlled growth of carbon nanotubes R. Vajtai 1 B. Q. Wei 2 P. M. Ajayan...Rouge, LA 70803-5901, USA Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical and electronic...state-of-the-art account of tailored nanotube growth. To provide these properties...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(particularly autos) comprises a large share of total energy consumption, its reduction through more compact in transportation energy consumption resulting from Smart Growth planning. Since energy consumed by transportationCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CALIFORNIA SMART GROWTH ENERGY SAVINGS MPO SURVEY FINDINGS SEPTEMBER

90

Annual World Oil Demand Growth  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Notes: Following relatively small increases of 1.3 million barrels per day in 1999 and 0.9 million barrels per day in 2000, EIA is estimating world demand may grow by 1.6 million barrels per day in 2001. Of this increase, about 3/5 comes from non-OECD countries, while U.S. oil demand growth represents more than half of the growth projected in OECD countries. Demand in Asia grew steadily during most of the 1990s, with 1991-1997 average growth per year at just above 0.8 million barrels per day. However, in 1998, demand dropped by 0.3 million barrels per day as a result of the Asian economic crisis that year. Since 1998, annual growth in oil demand has rebounded, but has not yet reached the average growth seen during 1991-1997. In the Former Soviet Union, oil demand plummeted during most of the

91

Growth Energetics of Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The growth energetics of carbon nanotubes during arc discharge conditions are investigated. Ab initio molecular dynamics calcualtions show that the electric field alone cannot stabilize the growth of open metallic tubes. The addition of atoms and small clusters to tubes were studied using realistic atomic potentials. Deposition on tubes narrower than 3 nm leads to nucleation of curved defects (adjacent pentagon pairs) and eventual tube closure, while deposition on wider tubes favors the formation of hexagons and isolated pentagons, thereby promoting open-ended growth.

A. Maiti; C. J. Brabec; C. M. Roland; J. Bernholc

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

Smith, Hal

93

Parameterized Beyond-Einstein Growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A single parameter, the gravitational growth index gamma, succeeds in characterizing the growth of density perturbations in the linear regime separately from the effects of the cosmic expansion. The parameter is restricted to a very narrow range for models of dark energy obeying the laws of general relativity but can take on distinctly different values in models of beyond-Einstein gravity. Motivated by the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism for testing gravity, we analytically derive and extend the gravitational growth index, or Minimal Modified Gravity, approach to parameterizing beyond-Einstein cosmology. The analytic formalism demonstrates how to apply the growth index parameter to early dark energy, time-varying gravity, DGP braneworld gravity, and some scalar-tensor gravity.

Linder, Eric; Linder, Eric V.; Cahn, Robert N.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Cosmic Growth History and Expansion History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the expansion history dark energy equation of state,and growth history constraints on the dark energy equationand growth history constraints on the dark energy equation

Linder, Eric V.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Camptothecine, a selective plant growth regulator ... The literature documents several hundred plant products that appear to exhibit growth-regulating activity. ...

J. George Buta; Joseph F. Worley

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11900 11900 DOE/EA-1399 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87355 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison Site July 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

97

Guneafinal-for laser printer.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

11900 11900 DOE/EA-1399 Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Site Final July 2002 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87355 DOE Grand Junction Office EA of Ground Water Compliance at the Gunnison Site July 2002 Final Page iii Contents Page Acronyms and Abbreviations ........................................................................................................... v Executive Summary .......................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction.............................................................................................................................1

98

This is page v Printer: Opaque this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theory of fluid and gases, this book can be read without any specific knowledge in these fields. I have the abstract Feynman­Kac and particle theory developed in this book, provided they overcome the fear of seeing integral operators rather than summations or integrals with respect to some density function. Besides its

Del Moral , Pierre

99

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E-Print Network [OSTI]

­direct product U(2) n R 4 . The implications of this observation for the fusion rules and electric gauge group, namely SU(2) broken to U(1), see [AH88] for a review. They provide a paradigmatic example the monopole's magnetic charge. 2. At low energy it is possible to separate the solitonic ``particle'' de

Schroers, Bernd J.

100

Color Printer Characterization Adjustment for Different  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is often implemented as a 3D look-up table that maps from a device independent color space (e.g. CIELAB by printing a number of color patches with known device control values, measuring the colors obtained-uniformity). Typically, the impact of these factors is minimized through careful design of the printing system. However

Sharma, Gaurav

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

This is page 1 Printer: Opaque this  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

people worldwide experienced a life-threatening heart attack. In the US alone, 1.4 million people suffer from a heart attack annually. Of the 140 million Americans between the ages of 35-44, 17.4% of males% of heart attack related deaths occur in people with no prior symptoms [6]. Hence, sudden heart attacks

Kakadiaris, Ioannis

102

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E-Print Network [OSTI]

) to the more geometrical operators such as projection, rotors, meet and join, and end with to the homogeneous of ats using the geometric algebra of homogeneous blades. For instance, the intersection between lines; % point P Q = e+ e1+e2/2; % point Q R = e+ e1/2-e2/4; % point R PQ = join(P,Q); % line PQ QR = join

Waterloo, University of

103

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E-Print Network [OSTI]

, or by an electrical potential across a capacitor. Polymers are molecules that consist of repeated structural units in the distribution of chemical compounds and electrical charges. The cell's state and environ­ ment interact realistic (e.g., see Hartmanis [Har95] for a discussion of mass vs. instance size for #12; ii Stuart A

Royer, James S.

104

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E-Print Network [OSTI]

data from the Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) study, which collected reported emissions of particulates the Hazardous Air Pollutants (HAPs) study, which collected reported emissions of particulates smaller than 2 Understanding the effects of pollutants on the health of individuals requires consideration of different

Haran, Murali

105

Theory of carbon nanotube growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetics of carbon nanotube growth under arc discharge conditions were investigated over different length and time scales using complementary numerical techniques. Relaxation by ab initio molecular dynamics (Car-Parrinello method) shows that large electric fields present at the tube tips are not the critical factor responsible for the open-ended growth observed experimentally. Classical molecular-dynamics simulations using realistic many-body carbon-carbon potentials show that wide tubes that are initially open can continue to grow straight and maintain an all-hexagonal structure. However, tubes narrower than a critical diameter, estimated to be about ?3 nm, readily nucleate curved, pentagonal structures that lead to tube closure with further addition of atoms. Very narrow tubes can be grown, however, if a small metal particle prevents tube closure. This effect was simulated explicitly by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. Monte Carlo simulations were also used to study nanotube growth over longer time scales. The resulting structures are in agreement with the above growth scenario, and provide an estimate for the lowest tube tip temperature necessary for the growth of nanotubes.

A. Maiti; C. J. Brabec; C. Roland; J. Bernholc

1995-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Growth and Development Economics 777 July 18, 2008 Fall Semester 2008 Professor J. H. Mc of economic growth and development. We will analyze several different growth models and look at some recent empirical research. Text The text for this course is: Economic Growth (2nd Edition) by Robert J. Barro

Almor, Amit

107

Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Poverty and income growth: measuring pro-poor growth in the case of Romania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper attempts to examine the extent to which income growth was beneficial to poverty reduction in Romania between the years 2000 and 2007. We build income growth incidence curves, both in absolute and relative terms, on the basis of mean individual ... Keywords: economic growth, growth incidence curve, income, inequality, poverty, pro-poor growth

Eva Militaru; Cristina Stroe

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Blue-Green Algae: Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IT is well known that many species of algae fail to thrive in simple inorganic media and may be cultured with greater ease in ... organic materials such as soil extract1 2. These observations have promoted the suggestion that such algae may have requirements for growth factors, especially since many species are now known to ...

J. S. BUNT

1961-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

Graphene Growth and Device Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

screens, photonic applications, energy generation, and batteries [3], [12], [13]. The first graphene filmsINVITED P A P E R Graphene Growth and Device Integration This paper describes one of the emerging methods for growing grapheneVthe chemical vapor deposition methodVwhich is based on a catalytic reaction

111

Public Capital, Growth and Welfare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and sanitation--increase in enrolment rates (especially for girls, rural areas). 2. Electricity reason: improved access benefits the poor more than proportionally; if inequality is bad for growth (e be internalized. #12;18 Policy Implications #12; 1. Investment spending is a poor proxy for the accumulation

112

Strategy and Leadership in Growth Companies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High growth medium-size companies are important because they make a disproportionate contribution to economic growth, they are responsible for the creation of new employment, and they play a major role in the ...

B. Taylor; D. Hahn

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimating phytoplankton growth rates from compositional data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I build on the deterministic phytoplankton growth model of Sosik et al. by introducing process error, which simulates real variation in population growth and inaccuracies in the structure of the matrix model. Adding a ...

Thomas, Lorraine (Lorraine Marie)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Stress corrosion crack growth in porous sandstones.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress corrosion crack growth occurs when the chemical weakening of strained crack tip bonds facilitates crack propagation. I have examined the effect of chemical processes on the growth of a creack population by carrying out triaxial compression...

Ojala, Ira O

115

Method for crystal growth control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The growth of a crystalline body of a selected material is controlled so that the body has a selected cross-sectional shape. The apparatus is of the type which includes the structure normally employed in known capillary die devices as well as means for observing at least the portion of the surfaces of the growing crystalline body and the meniscus (of melt material from which the body is being pulled) including the solid/liquid/vapor junction in a direction substantially perpendicular to the meniscus surface formed at the junction when the growth of the crystalline body is under steady state conditions. The cross-sectional size of the growing crystalline body can be controlled by determining which points exhibit a sharp change in the amount of reflected radiation of a preselected wavelength and controlling the speed at which the body is being pulled or the temperature of the growth pool of melt so as to maintain those points exhibiting a sharp change at a preselected spatial position relative to a predetermined reference position. The improvement comprises reference object means positioned near the solid/liquid/vapor junction and capable of being observed by the means for observing so as to define said reference position so that the problems associated with convection current jitter are overcome.

Yates, Douglas A. (Burlington, MA); Hatch, Arthur E. (Waltham, MA); Goldsmith, Jeff M. (Medford, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original article Growth stresses in tension wood: role of microfibrils and lignification T Okuyama the growth stress generation in the region of normal and tension woods. growth stress/ tension wood in normal and ten- sion wood. The compressive stress from the deposition of lignin controls the level

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

"Table 2. Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Real Gross Domestic Product Growth Trends, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected Real GDP Growth Trend" " cumulative average percent growth in projected real GDP from first year shown...

118

Green Growth Planning | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planning Planning Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Growth Planning Agency/Company /Organization Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Partner Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA) Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Economic Development Topics Finance, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Website http://www.gggi.org/project/ma Program Start 2011 Program End 2016 Country Cambodia, Ethiopia, Jordan, Peru, Thailand South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Africa, Western Asia, South America, South-Eastern Asia References Global Green Growth Institute[1] Cambodia Green Growth Planning[2] Overview "GGGI supports emerging and developing countries that seek to develop rigorous green growth economic development strategies. It does so by

119

Normal Growth of Range Cattle.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION A. B. CONNER, DIRECTOR College Station, Brazos County, Texas BULLETIN NO. 409 MARCH, 1930 DIVISION OF RANGE ANIMAL HUSBANDRY - Lr9RARv' *n+!nmt">3~roql f', 44+lpl,9-' . 16' , ,, ..!c?! cq!!f?~c nt... of these special problems, the Texas Station presents in this Bulletin a study of the growth in weight and in measurements which actually took place in the calves born during nine years at Substation No. 14, the Ranch Experiment Station. This study so far has...

Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence)

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Old growth and new forestry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns for ecosystems have spurred a rethinking of forest management practices. This paper reviews the current resource management practices of the timber industry and of the Menominee Indians of Wisconsin who have been practicing sustained management through selective harvest since 1854. The paper begins with a discussion of the definitions of old growth, snags, coarse woody debris, and riparian zones and the Congressional excesses of the past which are at least partly to blame for the situation in the timber industry of the Pacific Northwest.

Meadows, D.G.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Apparatus for monitoring crystal growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Method of monitoring crystal growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

Sachs, Emanual M. (Watertown, MA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan) Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan) Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Solar Wind Program Info State Michigan Program Type Grant Program Provider Michigan Farm Bureau A joint venture between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the Strategic Growth Initiative Grant Program was designed to leverage business development and growth for the state's $91.4 billion food and agriculture industry. The grant program aims to remove barriers inhibiting growth in the state's food and agriculture industry, fostering economic opportunities for Michigan-based food processors, agribusiness and

124

Jumping-Catalyst Dynamics in Nanowire Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanowire growth is generally considered a steady-state process, but oscillatory phenomena are known to often play a fundamental role. Here we identify a natural sequence of distinct growth modes, in two of which the catalyst droplet jumps periodically on and off a crystal facet. The oscillatory modes result from a mismatch between catalyst size and wire diameter; they enable growth of straight smooth-sided wires even when the droplet is too small to span the wire tip. Jumping-catalyst growth modes are seen both in computer simulations of vapor-liquid-solid growth, and in movies of Si nanowire growth obtained by insitu microscopy. Our simulations also provide new insight into nanowire kinking.

K.?W. Schwarz; J. Tersoff; S. Kodambaka; F.?M. Ross

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Phenomenological approach for describing environment dependent growths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different classes of phenomenological universalities of environment dependent growths have been proposed. The logistic as well as environment dependent West-type allometry based biological growth can be explained in this proposed framework of phenomenological description. It is shown that logistic and environment dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. It is also established that environment independent and enviornment dependent biological growth processes lead to the same West-type biological growth equation. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment dependent description. In addition, some other phenomenological descriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

Dibyendu Biswas; Swarup Poria

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

126

Cancer growth: Predictions of a realistic model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations of avascular cancer growth are performed using experimental values of the relevant parameters. This permits a realistic assessment of the influence of these parameters on cancer growth dynamics. In general, an early exponential growth phase is followed by a linear regime (as observed in recent experiments), while the thickness of the viable cell layer remains approximately constant. Contrary to some predictions, a transition to latency is not observed.

S. A. Menchn and C. A. Condat

2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

127

Human preproinsulin-like growth factor I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a synthetic DNA sequence encoding a preproinsulin-like growth factor-I protein. It comprises: the sequence of amino acids.

Rotwein, P.S.; Krivi, G.G.

1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

Growth and structure of -lactalbumin nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotubes are formed after partial hydrolysis of the milk protein -lactalbumin. This scattering study presents dimensions of the -lactalbumin nanotubes and a model of their growth.

Graveland-Bikker, J.F.

2006-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

IN THIS ISSUE Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AGRONOMY NOTES July, 2004 IN THIS ISSUE COTTON Excessive Cotton Growth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Management Influence on Hardlock Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Wet Conditions and Nitrogen Applications on Cotton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Watson, Craig A.

130

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Lappeenranta, Finland University of Montana, Missoula, MT, USA Finnish Meteorological institute

Bardsley, John

131

Optimization Online - Robust Growth-Optimal Portfolios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

May 24, 2014 ... Abstract: The growth-optimal portfolio is designed to have maximum ... the asset return distribution, which is not directly observable but must be...

Napat Rujeerapaiboon

2014-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

"Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection", Dr. Bryan Czech, resident, Center for the Advancement of the Steady State...

133

Essays on Indias Economic Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

initial euphoria about liberalisation, a revisionist viewand industrial policy liberalisation. Three, growth in thebuilt up under the pre-liberalisation policy regime), their

Singh, Nirvikar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

Hastings, Alan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Green Growth and Transport | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Transport Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Green Growth and Transport AgencyCompany Organization: ITF ComplexityEase of Use: Not Available Website:...

136

VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Growth in solar means growth in Ohio Growth in solar means growth in Ohio VP 100: Growth in solar means growth in Ohio October 6, 2010 - 10:57am Addthis DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont DuPont is betting on major growth in the market for solar energy -- and therefore for its Tedlar film, a durable backing for silicon solar panels. | Photo Courtesy of DuPont Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers Market research company Solarbuzz reports that global demand for solar power soared by 54 percent in the second quarter of 2010. The research firm reports that in the United States, the annual number of total watts installed moved from 485 MW in all of 2009 to 2.3 GW as of June -- and

137

Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

138

KINETIC ROUGHENING PHENOMENA, STOCHASTIC GROWTH, DIRECTED  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KINETIC ROUGHENING PHENOMENA, STOCHASTIC GROWTH, DIRECTED POLYMERS AND ALL THAT Aspects 254 (1995) 215-414 Kinetic roughening phenomena, stochastic growth, directed polymers and all that for the nonlinear term 3.2. Dynamic RG analysis 3.3. A worthy detour: kinetic roughening with conservation law 3

Halpin-Healy, Tim

139

BIOTIC INFLUENCES AFFECTING POPULATION GROWTH OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chlorella and Nitz8chia _ Growth curve and division rate of Chlorella _ Growth curve and division rate in conditioned media _ Inhibitory effect o~ Chlorella of Nitz8chia-conditioned medium _ Inhibitory effect on Nitz8chia of Chlorella-condit,ioned medium _ Inhibitory effects of filtrate from conditioned media

140

Social Capital and Growth Bryan R. Routledge ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, labor mobility, and social capital. The key assumption is that technological innovation, which drivesSocial Capital and Growth Bryan R. Routledge , Joachim von Amsberg § March 2002 Revised July 2002 Abstract We define and characterize social capital in a simple growth model. We capture social capital

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair _____________________________________________________________________________ Introduction Let X = fX= be a finite simplicial complex. We study the growth rate of the Betti numbers of X. It is easy to see that the sequence of Betti numbers {bq(Xi)} can grow at most linearly

Clair, Bryan

142

Annual Growth Bands in Hymenaea courbaril  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One significant source of annual temperature and precipitation data arises from the regular annual secondary growth rings of trees. Several tropical tree species are observed to form regular growth bands that may or may not form annually. Such growth was observed in one stem disk of the tropical legume Hymenaea courbaril near the area of David, Panama. In comparison to annual reference {Delta}{sup 14}C values from wood and air, the {Delta}{sup 14}C values from the secondary growth rings formed by H. courbaril were determined to be annual in nature in this one stem disk specimen. During this study, H. courbaril was also observed to translocate recently produced photosynthate into older growth rings as sapwood is converted to heartwood. This process alters the overall {Delta}{sup 14}C values of these transitional growth rings as cellulose with a higher {Delta}{sup 14}C content is translocated into growth rings with a relatively lower {Delta}{sup 14}C content. Once the annual nature of these growth rings is established, further stable isotope analyses on H. courbaril material in other studies may help to complete gaps in the understanding of short and of long term global climate patterns.

Westbrook, J A; Guilderson, T P; Colinvaux, P A

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

143

Bifurcation Analysis of Endogenous Growth Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that the model could produce chaotic dynamics, but our analysis cannot confirm that conjecture. Further this thesis analyses the dynamics of a variant of Jones semi-endogenous growth model "Sources of US Economic growth in a World of Ideas" The American Economic...

Ghosh, Taniya

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Green Growth Strategy Support | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Support Support Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Growth Strategy Support Agency/Company /Organization Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Partner Brazilian Finance Ministry, EMBRAPA, FGV, Danish Energy Agency Sector Energy, Land Topics Low emission development planning Resource Type Publications Website http://www.gggi.org/ Program Start 2010 Country Brazil, Indonesia, South Korea South America, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Asia References Global Green Growth Institute[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Brazil 3 Indonesia 4 References Overview The Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) was founded on the belief that economic growth and environmental sustainability are not merely compatible objectives; their integration is essential for the future of humankind. GGGI is dedicated to pioneering and diffusing a new model of economic

145

Career Growth | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Growth | National Nuclear Security Administration Growth | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Career Growth Home > Federal Employment > Working at NNSA > Career Growth Career Growth Learning doesn't stop with a college or post-graduate degree. It is a key part of individual career development and is central to NNSA's efforts to

146

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

147

Digital electronic bone growth stimulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

Kronberg, J.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

3.0 GROWTH FACILITY SPACE REQUESTS Prospective users of the greenhouses or growth chambers are encouraged to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for greenhouse and growth chamber specifications, including space, lighting and fees. Greenhouse and Growth Chamber Space Inventory Greenhouse and Growth Chamber Lighting Inventory #12;Hourly Rate Service Charges3.0 GROWTH FACILITY SPACE REQUESTS Prospective users of the greenhouses or growth chambers

Pawlowski, Wojtek

149

Hypersonic Measurements of Roughness-Induced Transient Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of surface roughness on boundary-layer disturbance growth and laminar-to-turbulent transition are not well understood, especially in hypersonic boundary layers. The transient growth mechanism that produces algebraic growth of stream wise...

Sharp, Nicole Susanne

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

150

Crack propagation driven by crystal growth  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Support Mechanism in Technopolis Toward Green Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phrase Green Economy was first mentioned in Green Economy Blue Book...by the British economist Pierre published in 1989. Green Economy promotes economic growth, instead of blocking ... at harmonious devel...

Herbert Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Integrated Regulation of Growth and of Function  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In vivo studies have shown that thyrotropin regulates thyroid growth and function. How TSH is able to exert these dramatic effects is not clear. The last decade has seen such refinements in cell culture system...

Margaret C. Eggo; Gerard N. Burrow

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral...gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in...geological timescale. age anhydrite Chihuahua Mexico cooling crystal growth crystallization...

A. E. S. Van Driessche; J. M. Garca-Ruz; K. Tsukamoto; L. D. Patio-Lopez; H. Satoh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

New Jersey Business Growth Fund (New Jersey)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Creditworthy small or mid-sized companies that are creating or retaining jobs in New Jersey can apply for financing through the New Jersey Business Growth Fund, a joint program of the EDA and PNC...

155

Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A survey released by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) shows continued growth in the number of new geothermal power projects under development in the United States, a 20% increase since January of this year.

156

Illusory spirals and loops in crystal growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...spirals and loops in crystal growth 10.1073/pnas.1311637110 Alexander G. Shtukenberg Zina Zhu Zhihua An Misha Bhandari Pengcheng Song Bart Kahr Michael D. Ward Molecular Design Institute and Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York...

Alexander G. Shtukenberg; Zina Zhu; Zhihua An; Misha Bhandari; Pengcheng Song; Bart Kahr; Michael D. Ward

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Essays on Productivity Change, Growth, and Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: To replicate an industrial revolution: from exogenous to endogenous growth In the last quarter of the second millennium many countries experienced, simultane- ously, an industrial revolution (an exponential increase

Sadeh, Norman M.

158

Ageing, Debt, and Growth Crises: Two Forerunners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High levels of public debt and frustratingly low growth in Japan and Italy have a common root: an ... chapter follows the reactions of ageing corporations, households, and governments to show that debt crises...

Martin Schulz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Subcritical crack growth in fibrous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present experiments on the slow growth of a single crack in a fax paper sheet submitted to a constant force $F$. We find that statistically averaged crack growth curves can be described by only two parameters : the mean rupture time $\\tau$ and a characteristic growth length $\\zeta$. We propose a model based on a thermally activated rupture process that takes into account the microstructure of cellulose fibers. The model is able to reproduce the shape of the growth curve, the dependence of $\\zeta$ on $F$ as well as the effect of temperature on the rupture time $\\tau$. We find that the length scale at which rupture occurs in this model is consistently close to the diameter of cellulose microfibrils.

Santucci, Stphane; Deschanel, Stphanie; Vanel, Loic; Ciliberto, Sergio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

ClimateWorks-Egypt-Low Carbon Growth Planning Support | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REDIRECT ClimateWorks Low Carbon Growth Planning Support Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleClimateWorks-Egypt-LowCarbonGrowthPlanningSupport&oldid553606"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

162

Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Energy Digital Transfer Growth of Patterned 2D Metal Chalcogenides by Confined Nanoparticle Evaporation October 28, 2014 (a) Illustration of the digital transfer growth...

163

Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GF) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) Name: Global Green Growth Forum (3GF) Address: Assiatisk Plads 2, 1448 Place: Copenhagen, Denmark References:...

164

New Partners for Smart Growth Conference | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

New Partners for Smart Growth Conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability conference. The three-day conference is themed, "Practical Tools and Innovative...

165

Apparatus for silicon web growth of higher output and improved growth stability  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure describes an apparatus to improve the web growth attainable from prior web growth configurations. This apparatus modifies the heat loss at the growth interface in a manner that minimizes thickness variations across the web, especially regions of the web adjacent to the two bounding dendrites. In the unmodified configuration, thinned regions of web, adjacent to the dendrites, were found to be the origin of crystal degradation which ultimately led to termination of the web growth. According to the present invention, thinning adjacent to the dendrites is reduced and the incidence of crystal degradation is similarly reduced.

Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Growth of geologic fractures into large-strain populations: review of nomenclature, subcritical crack growth, and some implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Growth of geologic fractures into large-strain populations: review of nomenclature, subcritical at the earliest stages of fracture nucleation). Slow, subcritical crack growth in rock is associated

167

New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector August 23, 2012 - 12:20pm Addthis New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector New Report Highlights Growth of America's Clean Energy Job Sector Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs

168

Growth factor parametrization in curved space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth rate of matter perturbation and the expansion rate of the Universe can be used to distinguish modified gravity and dark energy models in explaining cosmic acceleration. We explore here the inclusion of spatial curvature into the growth factor. We expand previous results using the approximation {omega}{sub m}{sup {gamma}} and then suggest a new form, f{sub a}={omega}{sub m}{sup {gamma}}+({gamma}-4/7){omega}{sub k}, as an approximation for the growth factor when the curvature {omega}{sub k} is not negligible, and where the growth index {gamma} is usually model dependent. The expression recovers the standard results for the curved and flat {lambda}CDM and Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati models. Using the best fit values of {omega}{sub m0} and {omega}{sub k0} to the expansion/distance measurements from Type Ia SNe, baryon acoustic oscillation, WMAP5, and H(z) data, we fit the growth index parameter to current growth factor data and obtain {gamma}{sub {lambda}}({omega}{sub k}{ne}0)=0.65{sub -0.15}{sup +0.17} and {gamma}{sub DGP}({omega}{sub k}{ne}0)=0.53{sub -0.12}{sup +0.14}. For the {lambda}CDM model, the 1-{sigma} observational bounds are found consistent with theoretical value, unlike the case for the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model. We also find that the current data we used is not enough to put significant constraints when the 3 parameters in f{sub a} are fit simultaneously. Importantly, we find that, in the presence of curvature, the analytical expression proposed for f{sub a} provides a better fit to the growth factor than other forms and should be useful for future high precision missions and studies.

Gong Yungui; Ishak, Mustapha; Wang Anzhong [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China) and Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75083 (United States); CASPER, Physics Department, Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Growth factor parametrization and modified gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth rate of matter perturbation and the expansion rate of the Universe can be used to distinguish modified gravity and dark energy models in explaining the cosmic acceleration. The growth rate is parametrized by the growth index {gamma}. We discuss the dependence of {gamma} on the matter energy density {omega} and its current value {omega}{sub 0} for a more accurate approximation of the growth factor. The observational data, including the data of the growth rate, are used to fit different models. The data strongly disfavor the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model. For the dark energy model with a constant equation of state, we find that {omega}{sub 0}=0.27{+-}0.02 and w=-0.97{+-}0.09. For the {lambda}CDM model, we find that {gamma}=0.64{sub -0.15}{sup +0.17}. For the Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati model, we find that {gamma}=0.55{sub -0.13}{sup +0.14}.

Gong Yungui [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

170

Journal of Crystal Growth 271 (2004) 128133 Growth of strontium barium niobate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Crystal Growth 271 (2004) 128­133 Growth of strontium barium niobate: the liquidus. Roth Available online 11 September 2004 Abstract The liquidus­solidus phase diagram of strontium barium, and dielectric properties, strontium barium niobate, SrxBa1?xNb2O6--hen- ceforth denoted as SBN, is one

Osnabrück, Universität

171

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

Johnson, Eric E.

172

Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: A brief Summary of Theory and Evidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Population Growth, (Per Capita) Economic Growth, and Poverty Reduction in Uganda: A brief Summary: This note examines the link between population and per capita economic growth in Uganda. After showing that Uganda has one of the highest population growth rates in the world which, due to the inherent demographic

Krivobokova, Tatyana

173

World economic growth pushing LNG use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas, especially liquefied (LNG), is in position to participate in the energy growth now being triggered by strong worldwide economic growth, increasingly open markets, and expanding international trade. Natural gas is abundant, burns cleanly, and is highly efficient in combined-cycle, gas-turbine power plants. Moreover, the comparative remoteness of much of the resource base to established and emerging markets can make LNG a compelling processing and transportation alternative. Discussed here are the resource distribution and emerging market opportunities that can make LNG attractive for monetizing natural-gas reserves.

Brown, R.L. [Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States); Clary, R. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

174

Bimodal Island Size Distribution in Heteroepitaxial Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bimodal size distribution of two-dimensional islands is inferred during interface formation in heteroepitaxial growth of bismuth ferrite on (001) oriented SrTiO3 by sputter deposition. Features observed by in situ x-ray scattering are explained by a model where coalescence of islands determines the growth kinetics with negligible surface diffusion on SrTiO3. Small clusters maintain a compact shape as they coalesce, while clusters beyond a critical size impinge to form large irregular connected islands and a population of smaller clusters forms in the spaces between the larger ones.

P.?V. Chinta and R.?L. Headrick

2014-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Monitoring hydraulic fracture growth: Laboratory experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors carry out small-scale hydraulic fracture experiments to investigate the physics of hydraulic fracturing. The laboratory experiments are combined with time-lapse ultrasonic measurements with active sources using both compressional and shear-wave transducers. For the time-lapse measurements they focus on ultrasonic measurement changes during fracture growth. As a consequence they can detect the hydraulic fracture and characterize its shape and geometry during growth. Hence, this paper deals with fracture characterization using time-lapse acoustic data. Hydraulic fracturing is used in the oil and gas industry to stimulate reservoir production.

Groenenboom, J.; Dam, D.B. van

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Direct growth of graphene on Si(111)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the need of integrated circuit in the current silicon technology, the formation of graphene on Si wafer is highly desirable, but is still a challenge for the scientific community. In this context, we report the direct growth of graphene on Si(111) wafer under appropriate conditions using an electron beam evaporator. The structural quality of the material is investigated in detail by reflection high energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Our experimental results confirm that the quality of graphene is strongly dependent on the growth time during carbon atoms deposition.

Thanh Trung, Pham, E-mail: phamtha@fundp.ac.be; Joucken, Frdric; Colomer, Jean-Franois; Robert, Sporken [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), 61 Rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Electrical Engineering (ELEN), Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Universit catholique de Louvain UCL, 3 place du Levant, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hackens, Benot; Santos, Cristiane N. [Nanoscopic physics (NAPS), Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Universit catholique de Louvain UCL, 2 chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Bioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the deficiency was removed. Total water used efficiency (TWUE), as dry matter: water use (DM:WU) and water use efficiency (WUE); as seed yield: water use (SY:WU), were significantly higher for the second year. A timeBioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth of soybeans. II. Water use and water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

178

The Henley Accelerator supports ambitious high growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a business in the 5-6% of SMEs that are on a high growth trajectory. Typically these businesses will have and Technology Centre, University of Reading, Earley Gate, Reading, Berkshire RG6 6BZ Tel: 0118 935 7115 Email

Reading, University of

179

Oil, economic growth and strategic petroleum stocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An examination of over 40 years of data reveals that oil price shocks are invariably followed by 23 years of weak economic growth and weak economic growth is almost always preceded by an oil price shock. This paper reviews why the price-inelastic demand and supply of oil cause oil price shocks and why oil price shocks reduce economic growth through dislocations of labor and capital. This paper also reviews the current state of oil-supply security noting that previous episodes of supply instability appear to have become chronic conditions. While new unconventional oil production technologies have revitalized North American oil production, there are significant barriers to a world-wide uptake of these technologies. Strategic petroleum stocks could provide a large measure of protection to the world economy during an oil supply disruption if they are used promptly and in sufficient volume to prevent large oil-price spikes. Despite the large volume of world-wide emergency reserves, their effectiveness in protecting world economies is not assured. Strategic oil stocks have not been used in sufficient quantity or soon enough to avoid the economic downturns that followed past oil supply outages. In addition, the growth of U.S. oil production has reduced the ability of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve to protect the economy following a future oil supply disruption. The policy implications of these findings are discussed.

Carmine Difiglio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

SOME SOIL FACTORS AFFECTING TREE GROWTH  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of gravity. Hence permeability to water ranks high...quality for tree growth. Permeability to water depends both...considered the chief reservoir for water held against...good criterion of its permeability. Moreover, the relation...to non-capillary porosity appears to be exponential...

ROBT. M. SALTER

1940-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

Charych, Deborah H. (Albany, CA), Berman, Amir (Ben-Shiva, IL)

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Growth Versus Government Management Improvement During  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we find that the growth rate of GDP per capita, g, decreases with p, and increases with DGCI. Further 33% of govern- ment employees has increased its GDP per capita by approximately 4% (corrected and Thermal Energy Science, School of Physical Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 200092, Shanghai

Podobnik, Boris

183

Influence of Light on Plant Growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A JOINT symposium on the influence of light on plant growth arranged by the Association of Applied Biologists and the Horticultural Education Association ... the chrysanthemum. In short-day plants, providing that they have first been exposed to light of high intensity, flowering is determined by exposure to dark periods of more than ...

D. VINCE

1957-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

Nanoscale Growth Twins in Sputtered Copper Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.............................................................. 7 I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) .................................... 8 I.2. Fabrication of copper thin films .................................................... 12... to the exposure of the film growth surface to the solution, impurities may be introduced. I.1.3. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) CVD is a chemical process used to produce high-purity, high-performance thin films and often used in the semiconductor industry...

Anderoglu, Osman

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

LIMITS TO GROWTH AND STOCHASTICS Nicolas Bouleau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to acknowledge that the impact of the economy on the environment is not a result of temperance or mitigation of natural variations but rather that the economy itself ­ in addition to the underlying trends due to growth the context for our main discussion. I. On the Rome report: simple models and their refinements The issue

Boyer, Edmond

186

EIA - Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables 1990-2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 13 complete) Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region, Low Economic Growth Case Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Low Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table C2 World Total Energy Consumption by Region and Fuel, Low Economic Growth Case

187

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Growth of Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Support for Growth of Alternative Fuel Sources

188

Energy scarcity and economic growth reconsidered  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The analysis in this paper is concerned with the effect of energy scarcity on economic growth in the United States. After defining the notion of scarcity and introducing two measures of scarcity - unit costs and relative energy price - changes in the trend in resource scarcity for natural gas, bituminous coals, anthracite coal, and crude oil over the most recent three decades are investigated. Each of the energy resources became significantly more scarce resources during the decade of the 1970s in the Malthusian Stock Scarcity and Malthusian Flow Scarcity sense. Unit costs exhibit a similar change for natural gas and crude oil but not for bituminous coal and anthracite coal. The situation reversed itself during the 1980s. Natural gas, bituminous coal, anthracite coal, and crude oil all became significantly less scarce resources during the decade of the 1980s than they had been during the 1970s. That is, the increase in scarcity as measured by relative energy prices observed during the decade of the) 1970s was not reversed completely during the 1980s for natural gas and crude oil. Unit costs for natural gas and crude oil demonstrate analogous patterns and test results. Given that change has taken place, it has implications for future economic growth to the extent resource scarcity and economic growth are interrelated. To see whether this is a relevant concern, subsequent to the examination of changing resource scarcity trends, an objective effort is made to identify a long run equilibrium relationship between energy scarcity and economic growth. Relying on cointegration techniques, only for crude oil is there a suggestion that resource scarcity has affected economic growth in the United States over the period 1889-1992.

Noel D. Uri

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Human capital composition, growth and development: an R&D growth model versus data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of human capital composition on growth and development has been somewhat neglected in economic literature. However, evidence has suggested the importance of engineering and technical (high-tech) ski...

Tiago Neves Sequeira

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Inflation uncertainty, growth uncertainty, oil prices, and output growth in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the transmission and response of inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the UK using a bi-variate EGARCH model. Results suggest that inflation uncertain...

Ramprasad Bhar; Girijasankar Mallik

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dominance testing for pro-poor growth with an application to European growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article introduces statistical testing procedures to evaluate pro-poor growth. Our measure of pro-poorness follows Kakwani (J Quant Econ 16(1):67...2000), Kakwani and Pernia (Asian Dev Rev 18(1...2000),...

Daniel Sotelsek-Salem; Ismael Ahamdanech-Zarco; John A. Bishop

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1989-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

193

Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

194

EIA - High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables 1990-2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) International Energy Outlook 2006 High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables (1990-2030) Formats Data Table Titles (1 to 13 complete) High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Table B1 World Total Primary Energy Consumption by Region, High Economic Growth Case High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. High Economic Growth Case Projection Tables. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

195

GGGI-Ethiopia-Green Growth Strategy Support | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GGGI-Ethiopia-Green Growth Strategy Support GGGI-Ethiopia-Green Growth Strategy Support Jump to: navigation, search Name GGGI-Ethiopia-Green Growth Strategy Support Agency/Company /Organization Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI) Partner Ethiopian Development Research Institute (EDRI) Sector Energy Focus Area Economic Development Resource Type Publications Website http://www.gggi.org/ Program Start 2010 Program End 2012 Country Ethiopia UN Region Eastern Africa References Global Green Growth Institute[1] Abstract In 2010, GGGI carried out a first phase baseline analysis of Ethiopia's green growth opportunities, focusing on three key sectors: agriculture, forestry, and power. The objective of this phase1project was to identify, prioritize and evaluate the opportunities for green growth in Ethiopia in the context of its very ambitious Economic Transformation Plan (ETP) and economic growth targets which state the objective of transforming Ethiopia in a mid-income country by 2025.

196

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25-28, 2007. Topic: Soot GRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY:on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer isomerizes to reversea possibly important step in graphene layer growth, thus

Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Japan's Hunger for Growth: Environment as Political Symbolism.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In the afterglow of Japans dramatic economic growth during the post-war period, the growth mentality is still apparent in contemporary Japan. The powerful business communities (more)

Kokubun, Naoko

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films grown using HfO2 ceramic Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of...

199

Transatlantic Growth Differentials, ICT Dynamics, Fiscal Policy and Innovation Policy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The United States (US) recorded in the period 19912000 a formidable growth rate of about 3% p.a. where a considerable impulse for high and sustained growth stems from high investment in information and commun...

Professor Dr. Paul J. J. Welfens

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Domain growth in the clock model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of order in the clock (ZN) model is studied following a quench from the disordered phase to a low-temperature unstable state below the ferromagnetic critical point. Growth laws for the average size of domains are obtained by computer simulation for N=3, 4, 8, 16, and 26 degenerate states. In disagreement with recent Monte Carlo work, no pinning by vortices is observed.

Kimmo Kaski; Martin Grant; J. D. Gunton

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

GROWTH OF SOUTH AFRICAN AFRICA' ~-' ,, I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROWTH OF SOUTH AFRICAN FISHERIES -SQUTH-: WEST .-' AFRICA' ~-' ,, I I , I :--. .,' UN I .............................................. Regrouping of Interests ······························ Fisheries Development Corporation of South Africa, Ltd and the trawling interests, respectively. The quasi-official Fisheries Develop- ment Corporation of South Africa

202

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 23) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 23) Natural gas spot and futures price movements were mixed for the week, as Hurricane Ivan pushed prices upward in Gulf of Mexico production areas and in consuming markets east of the Mississippi, but had little effect on prices elsewhere. Likewise, on the NYMEX, the price for the near-month contract (for October delivery) got a significant, brief boost from Ivan, while the November contract price was nearly flat for the week and out-month contracts fell in price. At yesterday's price of $5.16 per MMBtu, the Henry Hub spot price reflected a gain of 47 cents or 10 percent on the week. The October futures contract price increased $0.193 per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, on the week to settle yesterday at $4.824. EIA

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8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 6, 2007) Since Wednesday, June 20, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountains and Northeast regions. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 65 cents per MMBtu, or 9 percent, since Wednesday, June 20, to $6.74 per MMBtu, posting its lowest level since March 19. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (June 27) at $6.929 per MMBtu, falling 46 cents per MMBtu, or 6 percent since last Wednesday, June 20. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub posted a decline of $1.012 per MMBtu or nearly 13 percent. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 Bcf as of June 22, which is 18

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5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 22, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 14, 2011) A touch of autumn in the air combined with hopes for the eventual return of winter was likely the catalyst enabling natural gas prices to recapture the $4 mark this week despite an environment of negative consumption fundamentals and continued strong production. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011 natural gas contract advanced 9.9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) to close at $4.039 per MMBtu over the week. The Henry Hub price oscillated in a similar but narrow range before closing up 5 cents for the week at $4.01 per MMBtu on September 14. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,112 billion cubic

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2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: February 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 11, 2009) Natural gas prices decreased this week as space-heating demand slackened with a break from the bitter cold of prior weeks. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.33 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week as the economic downturn is expected to be accompanied with a large-scale reduction in demand for all energy products, thus affecting prices for energy in forward markets. The futures contract for February 2009 delivery decreased by 6.5 cents per MMBtu on the week to

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4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: September 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 27, to Wednesday, September 3) Since Wednesday, August 27, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) at most locations. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.29 per MMBtu or about 15 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (September 3) at $7.264 per MMBtu, declining $1.344 or about 16 percent in its first week as the near-month contract. Natural gas in storage was 2,847 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of August 29, which is about 4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007),

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22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) 22 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 29) Since Wednesday, July 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub remained at $5.91 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.931 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday (July 14). Natural gas in storage was at 2,227 Bcf as of July 16, which is 2.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 35 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $40.63 per barrel or $7.005 per MMBtu. Prices: Strengthening weather fundamentals and increasing power generation loads

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, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) , 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 10, 2007) Since Wednesday, April 25, natural gas spot price movements were mixed in the Lower 48 States, with decreases principally occurring west of the Rocky Mountains and increases predominant to the east of the Rockies. Prices at the Henry Hub increased a nickel since Wednesday, April 25, to $7.64 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined about 5 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, April 25, to settle at $7.730 per MMBtu yesterday (Wednesday, May 2). Natural gas in storage was 1,651 Bcf as of April 27, which is 19 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.55 per barrel on the week

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1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas

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6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 23) Natural gas spot prices have climbed 10 to 30 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations since Wednesday, January 8. Strong space-heating demand in Northeast and Midwest population centers boosted prices throughout much of the country, but particularly where several interstate pipelines notified shippers of restrictions on their systems. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price climbed 15 cents to an average of $5.22 per MMBtu, while the New York citygate price registered a much steeper increase of $1.20 to an average of $7.46. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery gained just under 27 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.43 on Wednesday, January 15. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 10, decreased to 2,195 Bcf, which is 0.8 percent below the

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8 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 8 (No issue Thanksgiving week; next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell for a third consecutive week (Wednesday to Wednesday, November 10-17), as temperatures for most of the nation continued to be moderate to seasonal. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, for the smallest week-on-week decrease in the nation. Spot gas traded there yesterday (Wednesday, November 17) at $6.06 per MMBtu. Price declines at the majority of market locations ranged from around a dime to nearly 60 cents per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the price for the near-month natural gas futures contract (for December delivery) fell by almost 40 cents on the week, settling yesterday at $7.283 per MMBtu. EIA reported that working gas inventories in underground

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4, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 4, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 21) Warmer weather in many regions of the country last weekend contributed to a continuation of the November reprieve from October's steep rise in natural gas prices. Spot prices eased 7 to 14 cents per MMBtu at most Gulf Coast and Southwest production-area trading locations since Wednesday, November 6. Spot gas at the Henry Hub traded at a steady $3.83 per MMBtu on each of the past 3 days. At $3.83 per MMBtu, this price declined 10 cents for the week (Wednesday-Wednesday). Despite considerable price swings within daily sessions this week, the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub increased a moderate $0.023 per MMBtu for the week to $3.877. Natural gas in storage decreased to 3,097

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6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 23, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 15, 2011) The past week was characterized by passing of the earlier week’s heat wave. The Henry Hub price decreased 31 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.4 percent) to close at $4.52 per MMBtu on June 15. During the midst of the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,256 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 10, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 69 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 275 Bcf below year-ago levels.

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2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 29) Natural gas prices continued their upward trend for a second consecutive week with most market locations in the Lower 48 States registering gains of up to 25 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, August 14. Continued hot temperatures across the country and an increase in oil prices resulted in prices generally ranging between $3.15 and $3.25 per MMBtu along the Gulf Coast, representing new 8-week highs. At the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for September delivery closed on Wednesday, August 21, at $3.274 per MMBtu, an increase of just over 36 cents, or about 12.5 percent, on the week. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 16 was 2,657 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by 13.1

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8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 25, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased since Wednesday, October 10, at nearly all market locations. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.32 per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to $7.11 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub rose 45 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $7.458 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 12, was 3,375 Bcf, which is 6.7 percent above the 5-year average. Despite the seemingly favorable supply conditions and little weather-related natural gas demand, natural gas prices continued their upward movement of the past 6 weeks. The Henry Hub spot price exceeded the $7-per MMBtu mark in this week's

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6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 30, 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 30, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were modest at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 8-15), as current demand for space-heating remained relatively low amid continuing concerns over long-term supplies. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.08 per MMBtu, or about 1 percent, to $7.45. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 30 cents per MMBtu, or 3.4 percent, higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, November 15) at $8.12. Natural gas in storage was 3,450 Bcf as of Friday, November 10, which is 7.4 percent higher than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas

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3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

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1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: June 18, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 10, 2009) Since Wednesday, June 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the Henry Hub spot price falling to $3.56 per million Btu (MMBtu), about a 7 percent decline from the previous Wednesday’s level of $3.81 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the July contract fell from $3.766 to $3.708 over the week, about a 2 percent decline. Prices for contracts beyond the near month and August 2009, however, increased. Natural gas in storage was 2,443 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 5, which is 21.8 percent above the 5-year (2004-2008) average, after an

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8, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 15) 8, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 15) Natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, March 31, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 13 cents or about 2 percent to $5.76 per MMBtu. Yesterday (Wednesday, April 7), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.872 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 6 cents or 1 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage increased to 1,034 Bcf as of April 2, which is less than 6 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed 53 cents per barrel or about 1.5 percent since last Wednesday, to $36.28 per barrel or $6.255 per MMBtu.

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8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

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5, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) 5, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 22) Spot and futures prices reversed their downward trends from the previous week, as sweltering temperatures returned to many parts of the nation early this week. At the Henry Hub, average spot prices increased 4 days in a row from last Wednesday (August 7), gaining 30 cents per MMBtu to reach $3.03 per MMBtu on Tuesday (August 13), which was repeated yesterday. This pattern was mirrored by the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub, which rose a cumulative 25 cents per MMBtu for the week to settle at $2.910 per MMBtu on Wednesday, August 14. Working gas in storage for the week ended Friday, August 9 was 2,620 Bcf, which exceeds the average for the previous 5 years by just under 15

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, 2001 , 2001 Seasonal temperatures in the Northeast and an early-week cooling trend in Texas and parts of the Southeast translated into little temperature-driven demand in many markets for much of last week. This resulted in a steady decline for spot prices in most regions. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) On Monday, September 26, the Henry Hub spot price fell below $2.00 per MMBtu for the first time since November 1999, and stayed below $2.00 for the entire week. It ended trading Friday at $1.84 per MMBtu, 20 cents below the previous Friday's level. Likewise, the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub fell sharply on Monday, losing over 19 cents to $1.910 per MMBtu. The October contract closed out trading on Wednesday down further to $1.830 per MMBtu. Crude oil

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7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 14, 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 14, 2007) Warm temperatures in most areas of the Lower 48 States and the associated space cooling demand during the report week (Wednesday, May 30 - Wednesday, June 6) led to increases in spot prices in most market locations, with the exception of the Rocky Mountain and Northeast trading regions, as well as a few scattered points in California, Arizona, and West Texas. The formation of the second tropical storm on the first day of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season (June 1) appeared to have an immediate impact on the futures and spot prices. Since May 30, the Henry Hub spot price increased 12 cents per MMBtu, or 1.6 percent, to $7.83 per MMBtu. Similarly, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange

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2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) 2, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 19) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 25 to 50 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, June 4. On the week (Wednesday, June 4-Wednesday, June 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 35 cents per MMBtu to $6.06. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 16 cents per MMBtu to $6.213. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 6, increased to 1,324 Bcf, which is 25.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.36 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (June 11) closing price of $32.17 per barrel, or $5.55 per MMBtu. Prices: Natural gas spot prices at many market locations in the Lower 48 States

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7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 16, 2011) With imports (particularly from outside North America) becoming less significant to U.S. natural gas markets, spot natural gas prices this report week appeared largely unaffected by international events that have had large impacts on other energy commodities. As weather turned spring-like in many parts of the country and storage withdrawals continued to slow dramatically, the Henry Hub spot price increased just $0.04 to $3.85 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased slightly for delivery in the near-term. The futures contract for

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9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations across the country this past week initially declined and then began to creep upwards as natural gas use for power generation increased. The upward trend was halted yesterday, as prices at nearly all points retreated, possibly due to forecasts for considerably colder weather. After declining from $3.78 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.72 per MMbtu on Thursday, the Henry Hub spot price increased to $3.92 per MMBtu on Tuesday and closed at $3.88 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011

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3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 20) 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 20) Since Wednesday, March 5, natural gas spot prices have decreased at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States, falling more than $1.45 per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased $2.03 or roughly 26 percent to $5.78 per MMBtu. However, prices at the Henry Hub and elsewhere have returned to levels that prevailed in late January and early February and remain comparable to their elevated levels of the middle of February 2001. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub decreased roughly $1.156 per MMBtu or 17 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $5.865 per MMBtu yesterday (March 12). Natural gas in storage decreased to 721 Bcf as of Friday, March 7, which is

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9, to Wednesday, April 16) 9, to Wednesday, April 16) Released: April 17, 2008 Next release: April 24, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 9, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. Currently, spot prices exceed the average spot prices of the 2007-2008 heating season by about 25 percent. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 16) at $10.433 per million Btu (MMBtu), posting a 38-cent increase and reaching the highest price for a near-month contract since January 2006. · Natural gas in storage was 1,261 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 11, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

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3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 2, 2006) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 2, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 15 - 22) with the exception of some western locations where prices declined modestly. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 23 cents, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday to trade at $7.54 per MMBtu yesterday (February 22). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub also increased about 3 percent this week closing at $7.283 per MMBtu yesterday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 17, decreased to 2,143 Bcf, which is 48 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.42 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $59.03 per barrel or

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12 to Wednesday, December 19) 12 to Wednesday, December 19) Released: December 20 Next release: January 4, 2008 · Since Wednesday, December 12, natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 4 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or less than 1 percent to $7.18 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 19) at $7.179 per MMBtu, falling 23 cents or 3 percent since Wednesday, December 12. · Natural gas in storage was 3,173 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of December 14, which is 9 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.30 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $91.11

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13, 2001 13, 2001 Spot prices for natural gas appeared to stabilize just above the $3.00 mark during the week ended August 10, 2001, as the price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana varied between $3.14 and $2.98 per million Btu. Net injections of natural gas into storage for the previous week again fell within the range of market expectations reported in the trade press and contributed to the stability of the price level. However, due to warmer-than-normal temperatures in the Northeast, Midwest, and parts of the Southwest and Southeast, prices at the Henry Hub increased early in the week before decreasing and finishing over 2 percent lower than the previous week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil finished the week at

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3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 30, 2006) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 30, 2006) Natural gas spot prices showed relatively modest changes at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, March 15, 2006. For the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, March 15 to 22), the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by 3 cents, or less than one-half percent, to $7.07 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery settled at $6.953 per MMBtu yesterday (March 22), which is 19 cents, or about 3 percent, less than last Wednesday. As of Friday, March 17, 2006, natural gas in storage was 1,809 Bcf or 67 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $60.03 per barrel or $10.35 per MMBtu yesterday. This price is $2.08 per barrel less

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7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 24, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices increased slightly this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 9-16), despite the usual lull in demand during this shoulder period between the winter heating and summer cooling seasons. The upward price trend likely resulted from a variety of factors, including rising prices for competing petroleum products (as evidenced by an increase in the underlying crude oil price). Additionally, concerns over current and future supplies do not appear to have eased. The official start of the hurricane season is imminent, and the first named tropical storm appeared this week. However, imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly in the past few months. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price

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2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 19) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 19) Natural gas spot and futures prices moved lower on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 4-11), as unseasonably cool temperatures prevailed in most high gas-consuming regions of the nation. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 6 cents on the week, or just over 1 percent, to yesterday's (Wednesday, August 11) level of $5.64 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for September delivery edged down nearly 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent, to settle yesterday at $5.614. EIA reported that inventories were 2,452 Bcf as of Friday, August 6, which is 5.0 percent greater than the average for the previous 5 years (1999-2003). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose sharply in last Thursday's (August 5) trading to top $44 per barrel

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October 9, 2001 October 9, 2001 After beginning last week down on Monday (10/1), spot prices at the Henry Hub moved up and peaked on Thursday before declining slightly to end trading last week at $2.12 per MMBtu-almost $0.30 higher than the previous Friday. At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery of natural gas moved up most days before dropping by almost $0.19 per MMBtu on Friday to end the week down from the previous Friday. Both the spot and futures markets were open on Columbus Day (10/8) and the downward trend at the Henry Hub continued as spot prices were reported to be $2.04 per MMBtu, while on the NYMEX the November contract gained over 4 cents. A key influence on prices last week seems to have been the weather. Cool weather moved into the Midwest on Wednesday affecting most markets in the

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15, 2009 15, 2009 Next Release: January 23, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 14, 2009) In the eastern half of the Lower 48 States, temperatures were significantly lower this report week, resulting in sharp price increases in the Northeast as space-heating demand rose. In the West and in the producing regions along the Gulf coast, however, a respite from cold weather provided some softening in natural gas spot prices. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.42 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $5.47. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in four out of the five trading sessions this report week. The futures contract for February delivery fell during the

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: November 20, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, November 5, to Thursday, November 13) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday (November 5), failing to respond to the increase in heating load that occurred across much of the country, particularly in the Midwest and the Rocky Mountains. Since last Wednesday, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.31 after the intraweek run-up to more than $7 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for the near-month contract decreased in five of the six trading sessions covered by this report, resulting in a weekly net decrease of $0.931 per MMBtu. The

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9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 8, 2010) Price changes during the week were mixed, but in most areas, these changes were moderate. The Henry Hub price rose slightly from $3.73 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, September 1, to $3.81 per MMBtu yesterday. The report week was shortened due to the Labor Day holiday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the October 2010 futures contract rose about 5 cents, from $3.762 per MMBtu on September 1 to $3.814 per MMBtu on September 8. Working natural gas in storage as of Friday, September 3, was 3,164 Bcf, following an implied net injection of 58 Bcf, according to EIA’s

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 22) 5, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 22) Compared with Wednesday, May 7, natural gas spot prices were higher at all locations in the Lower 48 States in trading on May 14. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 69 cents or roughly 12 percent to $6.16 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 65 cents per MMBtu or 11 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $6.314 per MMBtu yesterday (May 14). Natural gas in storage increased to 900 Bcf as of Friday, May 9, which is about 38 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.97 per barrel or roughly 11 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2009 2, 2009 Next Release: March 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 11, 2009) Since Wednesday, March 4, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 59 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, to $3.92 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 11, at $3.80 per MMBtu, declining 54 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,681 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 6, which is about 13 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 13, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 5, 2011) Like autumn leaves floating down to earth, natural gas prices dropped decidedly from their $4 support branch this past week. In a whirlwind of generally unsupportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed down 25 cents for the week to $3.63 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 5. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract dropped nearly 23 cents per MMBtu to close at $3.570 per MMBtu over the week. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,409 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 30, according to the U.S. Energy

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 12) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 12) Since Wednesday, July 28, natural gas spot prices have decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 7 cents or about 1 percent to $5.70 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 4), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.661 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 48 cents or nearly 8 percent since last Wednesday (July 28). Natural gas in storage was 2,380 Bcf as of July 30, which is 4.3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 8 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent on the week to $42.73 per barrel or $7.367 per MMBtu, despite reaching a record high of $44.13 per barrel during the week.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 29, 2007) As the bitter cold has evolved to more moderate temperatures, natural gas spot prices have eased through most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined 4 cents per MMBtu to $6.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts were slightly higher, as increases Tuesday and yesterday (March 20 and 21) more than offset decreases that occurred in the 3 previous trading days. The futures contract for April delivery, which is the first contract following the current heating season, increased 7.7 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.160. Relatively high levels of natural gas in working storage and decreasing prices for competing fuels likely

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 22, 2007) Spring-like temperatures in most regions of the country this week led to lower natural gas spot and futures prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, March 7. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 7-14), the Henry Hub spot price decreased 66 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $6.86. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery fell 28 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $7.083 yesterday (March 14). Working gas in underground storage was 1,516 Bcf as of Friday, March 9, which is 12 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $3.70 per barrel on the week to

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 30) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 30) Since Wednesday, June 15, changes to natural gas spot prices were mixed, declining at most markets in the Gulf of Mexico and Northeast regions while increasing at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub edged up 1 cent, to $7.40 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 22), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.442 per MMBtu, roughly equal to last Wednesday's settlement price of $7.441 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 2,031 Bcf as of June 17, which is about 15 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.74 per barrel, or about 5 percent, on the week to

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: February 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices decreased in half of the trading regions in the Lower 48 States this report week. Generally, areas east of the Rockies and particularly those that experienced frigid temperatures posted weekly price increases. However, there were some exceptions, including the Midcontinent and East Texas. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures trading for the near-month contract was fairly volatile, with daily price changes ranging between a 16-cent loss and a 16-cent increase. The March 2009 contract ended trading yesterday 18 cents higher than on the previous Wednesday.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

24, 2001 24, 2001 Mild temperatures and moderate demand helped prices to decline gradually last week as markets returned to relatively normal operation. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price for natural gas ended the week at $2.04 per million Btu, down 37 cents per million Btu from the previous Friday. On the futures market, the near-month (October) NYMEX contract settled on Friday at $2.103 per million Btu - off close to 60 cents from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell steadily from $28.85 per barrel ($4.974 per million Btu) on Monday to $ 25.50 or $4.40 per million Btu on Friday. Prices: Spot prices at many major market locations took a downward turn last

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 16) Since Wednesday, October 1, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 37 cents or 8 percent to $4.84 per MMBtu. Prices climbed despite moderating temperatures in the Lower 48 States as the market expected a return to cold temperatures. Yesterday (Wednesday, October 8), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub was over 47 cents more than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,863 Bcf as of October 3, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down $0.17 per barrel or about 1 percent since last Wednesday to $29.60 per

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 29, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week, with the changes at most market locations somewhat more modest than the price changes observed over the past couple weeks. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, November 7-14), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 15 cents per MMBtu or about 2 percent. Relatively abundant supplies in the West and high stock levels in storage helped to drive spot prices lower this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for December delivery moved up about 21 cents to $7.835 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 3,536 Bcf as of Friday, November 9, which is 8.4 percent higher than the 5-year average of 3,263 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Spot market prices at the Henry Hub trended upward most days last week reaching a high of $2.40 per MMBtu on Thursday before ending the week at $2.35-20 cents higher than the previous Friday. This increase occurred as market fundamentals were generally unchanged last week with continued weakness in weather-related demand along with persistent strong natural gas supplies and above average stock levels. On the weather front moderate temperatures prevailed in most parts of the country again last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the NYMEX futures market, the near-month October contract also moved up last week to the end the week at $2.50 per MMBtu. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude gained $0.80 per barrel last week and finished at $28.05 or

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: July 31, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, July 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at all markets in the Lower 48 States, with prices falling more than $1 per MMBtu at most locations during the period. Prices at the Henry Hub fell $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 11 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $9.788 per MMBtu, declining $1.61 or about 14 percent since Wednesday, July 16. Natural gas in storage was 2,396 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 18, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 84 Bcf.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) 1, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 18) Spot price changes were mixed while futures prices edged up by a penny or two over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 3-10). Warmer-than-normal temperatures over nearly the entire nation early in the week gave way to considerably cooler temperatures in parts of the South and to colder-than-normal temperatures in the Midwest, the Middle Atlantic, and New England beginning over the weekend. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a penny on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 10) at $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for April delivery settled yesterday at $5.397 per MMBtu, just 2.2 cents higher than its settlement price one week ago. EIA reported that inventories were

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) , 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 8) Natural gas spot prices surged upward in the past three days, bringing price levels significantly above those of a week ago (Wednesday, March 24) in all regional markets. At the Henry Hub, the price for spot gas increased $0.28 per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 24-31), or about 5 percent, trading yesterday at $5.63. Taking over as the near-month futures contract on Tuesday, March 30, the NYMEX contract for May delivery moved up sharply, ending trading yesterday at its highest-ever settlement price of $5.933 per MMBtu. EIA reported that natural gas inventories were 1,014 Bcf as of Friday, March 26, which is 7.7 percent less than the preceding 5-year average for the week. Despite anticipation

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) August 26 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 2) Natural gas prices in both the spot and futures markets continued their downward slide, as unusually cool August temperatures persisted for another week in most areas of the country. At the Henry Hub, the spot price edged down 3 cents on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 18-25) as spot gas traded yesterday (August 25) for $5.32 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery declined over 8 cents, or just under 2 percent, settling yesterday at $5.298 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 2,614 Bcf as of Friday, August 20, which is 6.7 percent greater than the prior 5-year average. After climbing to consecutive record highs on Wednesday and

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 0, 2009 Next Release: August 6, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 29, 2009) Since Wednesday, July 22, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations, with decreases of as much as 19 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.41 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday, July 29, at $3.379 per MMBtu, decreasing by 41 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 3,023 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of July 24, which is about 19 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2001 6, 2001 After opening the week up at $3.353 per MMBtu, prices on the NYMEX futures market moved down 3 of the remaining 4 days of the week to settle at the end of the week at $2.971-more than 22 cents lower than the previous Friday. Despite unseasonably high temperatures in much of the Midwest and parts of the Southwest last week and the threat of a tropical storm in the Gulf of Mexico, (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) prices at the Henry Hub spot market moved down late in the week, falling to $3.06 per MMBtu on Friday. Net injections to storage declined for the second consecutive week but still averaged 11 Bcf per day, bringing the estimated stock level to 2,262 Bcf as of July 27 with more than 3 months remaining in the refill season. The price of West Texas

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) 6, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 4) In contrast to last year's late February price spikes, spot and futures prices this week continued drifting lower as temperatures were seasonably cool across most of the country. Since Wednesday, February 18, natural gas spot prices have decreased between 10 and 30 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per MMBtu or 4 percent to $5.10. Yesterday (Wednesday, February 25), the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $5.15 per MMBtu, which was 21 cents less than last Wednesday's price and 59 cents less than its debut as the near-month contract at $5.74. Natural gas in storage

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 13) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States except in the Gulf of Mexico producing region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 5 cents or about 1 percent to $4.45 per MMBtu. Prices climbed in most areas despite moderate temperatures in the Lower 48 States in apparent anticipation of a return to cold temperatures. Yesterday (Wednesday, November 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub was nearly 4 cents more than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage increased to 3,155 Bcf as of October 31, which is about 3 percent above the 5-year average. The spot

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 8, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 15, 2007) Since Wednesday, January 31, natural gas spot price movements were mixed with prices generally increasing east of the Mississippi River and decreasing to the west of it. On Wednesday, February 7, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.89 per MMBtu, a gain of 14 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, from the level the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.709 per MMBtu on Wednesday, February 7, rising about 4 cents per MMBtu, or nearly 1 percent, from the settlement price of $7.667 recorded last Wednesday, January 31. Natural gas in storage was 2,347 Bcf as of February 2, which is 19 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 1, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 5) Both spot and futures prices recorded significant gains over the past week (Wednesday, November 13 to Wednesday, November 20), as temperatures in many regions of the country headed below normal and the National Weather Service (NWS) predicted more of the same through the end of the month for at least the eastern two-thirds of the nation. Most of the gains came in large one-day price increases on Monday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price increased 5 days in a row, and ended trading yesterday (November 20) at $4.27 per MMBtu, 44 cents higher than last Wednesday, 27 cents of which was gained on Monday. The NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.254 per MMBtu, up $0.377 for

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 6, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 13, 2007) Since Wednesday, August 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with a few exceptions in Florida and the Rocky Mountain region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub rose 17 cents, or about 3 percent, to $5.81 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 5), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.805 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 22 cents or about 4 percent since last Wednesday (August 29). Natural gas in storage was 3,005 Bcf as of August 30, leaving natural gas inventories at 10.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased in all but one trading

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) 13, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 20) Moderate price increases on Monday and Wednesday of this week could not offset declines during the other three trading days of the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 5-12), leaving spot prices lower at most locations for the sixth consecutive week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price decreased by 13 cents to $3.15 per MMBtu. Six weeks ago, on Wednesday, May 1, the Henry Hub spot price stood at $3.79 per MMBtu. Futures prices also trended lower for the sixth consecutive week. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub declined by $0.203 per MMBtu for the week, settling Wednesday, June 12 at $3.057 per MMBtu-a decrease of a little over 6 percent from the previous Wednesday. EIA's estimate

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 11) 4, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 11) Despite moderating temperatures across the northern tier of the Lower 48 States, natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, February 25, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 24 cents or about 5 percent to $5.34 per MMBtu. Yesterday (Wednesday, March 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.375 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 15 cents or 3 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,171 Bcf as of February 27, which is about 11 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $1.48 per barrel or about

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 14, 2010) Natural gas prices moved significantly lower at market locations across the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub spot price averaged $4.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) in trading yesterday, July 14, decreasing $0.37 compared with the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub decreased in 4 out the 5 trading sessions during the report week. The near-month contract settled yesterday at $4.31 per MMBtu, about $0.26 lower than the previous Wednesday. As of Friday, July 9, working gas in underground storage was 2,840

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

January 02, 2002 January 02, 2002 Spot prices in the Midwest and the East moved up most days during the holiday period as cold weather blanketed much of the area. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) (Temperature map) (Temperature Deviation Map). Prices in Chicago moved close to $3.00 per MMBtu last week, while prices in the New York City area approached $5.00 on the last day of the year. Daytime temperatures early this week in the Northeast remained in the 20s and 30s from Washington, DC to Boston. The National Weather Service is calling for the wintry temperatures to continue through the end of the week in most areas in the eastern two thirds of the country. On the NYMEX, the daily settlement price for the futures contract for February delivery has declined in recent trading as the higher-than-average

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 23, 2010) Natural gas spot and futures prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 16, completely reversing the previous week’s gains. However, spot prices remain significantly higher than they were 3 weeks ago. Prices at most market locations fell between 10 and 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week, with most locations ending the week below $5 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.804 per MMBtu, decreasing by 17 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. In

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, to Wednesday, May 7) 30, to Wednesday, May 7) Released: May 8, 2008 Next release: May 15 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 30, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 2.5 percent, to $11.08 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (May 7) at $11.327 per MMBtu, rising 48 cents or about 4 percent since Wednesday, April 30. · Natural gas in storage was 1,436 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 2, which is 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net injection of 65 Bcf. · The spot price for West Texas

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 1, 2007) As the weather has made the transition from extreme cold to much more moderate conditions this week, natural gas spot prices have declined in much of the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 14-21), the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.40 per MMBtu to $7.51 as prices for next-day delivery responded to reduced demand for space-heating. However, the bitter and widespread cold of the first 2 weeks of February likely contributed to revised expectations of future storage levels, leading to increased futures prices this week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price for the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased 41 cents per MMBtu or about 5.6 percent. Generally,

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 2, 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 2, 2006) Since Wednesday, October 18, natural gas spot prices increased significantly at all market locations, as colder weather moved across the country. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.13 per MMBtu, or about 19 percent, to $7.20 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub gained about 89 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (October 25) at $7.693 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 20, was 3,461 Bcf, which is 10 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.43 per barrel, or about 2.5 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $59.09 per

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 13, 2010) Natural gas spot prices posted gains at most markets across the lower 48 States since Wednesday, October 6, accompanied by double-digit increases in trading since the holiday weekend. Price increases on the week ranged up to 25 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), with the Henry Hub natural gas spot price increasing $0.02 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.58 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, October 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.696 per MMBtu, falling by $0.169, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday.

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1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 18, 2006) Springtime temperatures in most regions of the country this week and slightly lower prices for crude oil led to an easing of natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 3. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, May 3-10), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1.0 percent, to $6.50. In contrast to spot market activity, trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) this week resulted in gains. The NYMEX contract for June delivery increased 29.4 cents per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $6.900 yesterday (May 10). Net injections reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report brought natural gas storage supplies to

274

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 30, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6) Since Wednesday, January 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States, falling up to $3.18 per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 6 cents or roughly 1 percent to $5.62 per MMBtu. However, prices hit $6.56 on Thursday, January 23, which is its highest level since late January 2001. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 1 cent per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.660 per MMBtu yesterday (January 29) in its final day of trading. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1, 729 Bcf for the week ended Friday, January 24, which is roughly 10 percent below the 5-year

275

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 30, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 7, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 29, 2010) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the lower 48 States decreased between 5 and 10 percent this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 22–29). The week coincided with the first week of fall, a season in which demand is typically lower given the lack of extreme weather conditions across the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.21 per million Btu (MMBtu), or 5 percent, to $3.81 per MMBtu. The price of the October futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) at final expiration on September 28 was $3.84 per MMBtu,

276

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 2, 2011) Extremely cold weather conditions moving across the country strained production capability and elevated consumption levels related to heating needs this report week (January 26-February 2). Spot prices increased sharply in many parts of the country, including the West and Midcontinent regions, where prices had shown little upward pressure this winter. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.15 to $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery expired on January 27 at $4.316 per MMBtu, which was

277

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 10) Since Wednesday, October 27, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 86 cents, or about 11 percent, to $7.26 per MMBtu. Yesterday (November 3), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $8.752 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 2 cents since last Wednesday (October 27). Natural gas in storage was 3,293 Bcf as of October 29, which is 7.8 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $0.62 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $50.90 per barrel or $8.776 per MMBtu. Prices: Moderate temperatures, falling crude oil prices, and a favorable supply

278

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 11) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 27 - August 3), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.25 per MMBtu, or about 17 percent, to $8.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 76 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 3) at $8.351. Natural gas in storage was 2,420 Bcf as of Friday, July 29, which is 7.6 percent higher than the 5-year average. However, the hot temperatures throughout the Lower 48 States have slowed

279

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. , 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 8, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 31, 2011) Coming only a few days after last week’s earthquake, Hurricane Irene (later downgraded to Tropical Storm Irene) brought with it cooler weather and reduced electric power demand. Irene put downward pressure on prices, but most prices rallied on the last day of the report week. The Henry Hub spot price registered a net decline of 13 cents, falling from $4.10 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.97 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2011 contract moved into the near-month position, and rose from $3.889 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.054 yesterday.

280

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2001 0, 2001 Prices in both spot and futures markets rose last week. For the week, spot prices at the Henry Hub increased by 25 cents from the previous Friday to $3.23 per MMBtu-an increase of 8 percent. The settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery gained 37-plus cents on Wednesday in response to the AGA storage report, then declined to settle at $3.303 on Friday-still up $0.263 from the previous Friday's ending price. Pressure for sustained high prices was limited as temperatures across most of the nation moderated significantly from the heat wave conditions experienced for much of the preceding week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil oscillated in a fairly narrow range

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 18) Spot natural gas prices increased 5 to 15 cents in most regional markets for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 3-10). The Henry Hub spot price gained 10 cents on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, September 10) at $4.78 per MMBtu. Futures prices were up as well, with the gains owing almost entirely to yesterday's large price increases. The NYMEX futures contract for October delivery moved up nearly 24 cents in yesterday's trading, and for the week gained $0.278 per MMBtu with its settlement yesterday at $4.968. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that inventories were 2,486 Bcf as of Friday, September 5, which is 5.5 percent less than the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The spot

282

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 26, 2011) The weatherman’s promise for chillier temperatures later this week and mention of the word "snow" in some forecasts was the likely catalyst propelling prices upwards this week. In an environment of generally supportive market fundamentals, the Henry Hub price closed up 7 cents for the week to $3.65 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on October 26. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the November 2011 natural gas contract rose just under half a cent per MMBtu for the week to close at $3.590 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3,716 billion cubic

283

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 4, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 27, 2009) Natural gas spot prices declined this report week (May 20-27), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.49. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand. The futures contract for June delivery expired yesterday, May 27, at a price of $3.538 per MMBtu, which is the second-lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract in more than 6 years. Meanwhile, the price

284

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Next Release: May 14, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 6, 2009) Natural gas spot prices rose this week at almost every market location, with increases generally ranging between 10 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot location rose to $3.67 per MMBtu, increasing by 7 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased this week in tandem with the crude oil prices. The natural gas futures contract for delivery in June gained 48 cents and ended the report week at $3.887 per MMBtu. Meanwhile, the price for the July 2009 contract rose by 47 cents, settling at $4.012 per MMBtu in yesterday’s session.

285

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

286

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: June 11, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 3, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 27, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging up to 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 32 cents per MMBtu, or about 9 percent, to $3.81 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, June 3, at $3.766 per MMBtu, increasing by 13 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,337 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 29, which is about 22 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

287

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 21) Natural gas spot prices climbed 25 to 55 cents across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, August 6-Wednesday, August 13). Increases were highest in sun-drenched California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest as this summer's hottest weather to date occurred in parts of the two regions. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 43 cents or roughly 9 percent to $5.17 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining just over 43 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $5.179 per MMBtu yesterday (August 13). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,188 Bcf as of Friday, August 8, which is about 8.5 percent below the

288

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, to Wednesday, February 27) 20, to Wednesday, February 27) Released: February 28, 2008 Next release: March 6, 2008 Since Wednesday, February 20, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountain and Midcontinent regions. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 13 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $9.21 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (February 27) at $8.930 per MMBtu, falling 4 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, February 20. Natural gas in storage was 1,619 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 22, which is 6 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net withdrawal of 151 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

289

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) 23, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 30) Natural gas spot and futures prices trended down for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 15-22). The cold front that moved into major gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast for the weekend and lingered into the first part of this week had minimal impact on prices. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price fell 24 cents for the week to $3.38 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the near-month contract (June delivery) declined for 5 straight trading sessions before recording a small increase of $0.064 per MMBtu in May 22 trading, to settle at $3.459. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil, which had held at or above $28 per barrel since last Thursday, fell nearly $1 on Tuesday, May

290

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 2, 2011) The previous report week's increasing prices gave way to relatively consistent declines across a large part of the country over this report week. The Henry Hub spot price showed a slight increase over the weekend, but closed down 26 cents for the week to $3.39 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) on November 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the higher valued December 2011 natural gas contract moved into position as the near-month contract and declined by 2.6 cents per MMBtu to close the week at $3.749 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 3794 billion cubic

291

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 29) Natural gas spot prices increased 10 to 60 cents per MMBtu at nearly all major trading locations in the Lower 48 States as space-heating demand remained strong amid very cold temperatures in critical gas-consuming markets. However, elevated prices of $40 per MMBtu and more in the Northeast eased closer to historical norms over the course of the week following at least a temporary reprieve from the extreme cold in the region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $0.53 per MMBtu, or 9 percent, to $6.27. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub fell approximately 24 cents per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, January 21) at $6.150. Natural gas in storage was 2,258 Bcf as of Friday, January 16, which is 9.3

292

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(next release 2:00 p.m. on June 9) (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 9) Natural gas spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 25-June 1), while futures prices increased. The spot price at the Henry Hub, however, rose by 3 cents per MMBtu on the week, or nearly 0.5 percent, to $6.36 per MMBtu. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the June contract expired at $6.123 per MMBtu on May 26 after declining 19 cents in its final day of trading. The settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub increased by 42 cents on the week, settling yesterday (June 1) at $6.789 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories of working gas in underground storage were 1,778

293

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 17) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 17) Natural gas spot prices decreased at almost all market locations since Wednesday, November 2, as above normal temperatures persisted throughout the country and working gas storage injections continued. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the price at the Henry Hub decreased $1.53 per MMBtu, or about 14 percent, to $9.31 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub gained about 7 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (November 9) at $11.669 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 4, was 3,229 Bcf, which is 4 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 10 cents per barrel, or less than 1 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $59.65 per barrel or

294

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

295

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 27) Natural gas spot prices declined at nearly all trading locations for a third consecutive week (March 12-19) as temperatures became more spring-like and space-heating demand slackened. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased $0.58 per MMBtu, or 10 percent, to $5.20. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub fell to its lowest point since becoming the near-month contract, decreasing for the week about $0.59 per MMBtu to settle yesterday (Wednesday, March 19) at $5.278. Natural gas in storage decreased to a record low of 636 Bcf as of Friday, March 14, which is more than 50 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $7.86 per barrel or about 21 percent

296

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 5, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot price movements were mixed this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 21-28), with price decreases generally occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and price increases dominant in trading locations in the eastern parts of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.20 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.60. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased for the report week, continuing a trend of rising prices that has occurred in futures markets for many commodities this spring, including futures prices for crude oil. The futures contract for June delivery, for

297

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: July 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 8, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Price decreases at the spot market ranged between 1 and 44 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a few points in the lower 48 States posted small increases. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $3.22 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for August delivery lost 44.2 cents and ended the report week at $3.353 per MMBtu. The price for the August 2009 contract has posted a

298

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 24, 2006) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 24, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 9, natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. On Wednesday, August 16, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $7.02 per MMBtu, decreasing 57 cents per MMBtu, or about 7.5 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.766 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, August 16, falling about 89 cents per MMBtu, or 11.6 percent, from the settlement price of $7.651 last Wednesday, August 9. Natural gas in storage was 2,800 Bcf as of August 11, which is about 14 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.46 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week

299

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 4, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 27, 2011) As last week’s Eastern heat wave subsided, natural gas prices declined at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 18 cents from $4.64 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 20, to $4.46 per MMBtu yesterday, July 27. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) decreased from $4.500 per MMBtu to $4.370 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,714 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 22, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

300

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: April 16, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 8, 2009) Since Wednesday, April 1, natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging up to 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub fell by 6 cents per MMBtu, or about 2 percent, to $3.50. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 8, at $3.63 per MMBtu, declining by 7 cents or about 2 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 3, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2009 30, 2009 Next Release: May 7, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 29, 2009) The direction of spot price movements was mixed this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 22-29). However, changes were relatively small regardless of direction. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.05 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.43. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased as moderate temperatures in most of the country limited demand and a perception of strong supply continues. The futures contract for May delivery expired on Tuesday, April 28, at a price of $3.321 per MMBtu, which is the lowest monthly closing price for a NYMEX near-month contract

302

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, to Wednesday, April 9) 2, to Wednesday, April 9) Released: April 10, 2008 Next release: April 17, 2008 · Since Wednesday, April 2, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 3 percent, to $9.89 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (April 9) at $10.056 per MMBtu, rising nearly 22 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday, April 2. · Natural gas in storage was 1,234 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of April 4, which is nearly 2 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an implied net withdrawal of 14 Bcf. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude

303

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 18, 2009) Since Wednesday, February 11, natural gas spot prices declined at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 3 and 78 cents per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 7 percent, to $4.35 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 18) at $4.214 per MMBtu, declining 32 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 1,996 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 13, which is about 8.4 percent above the 5-year average

304

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 30, 2010) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices decreased across the lower 48 States, with declines of as much as $0.68 per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.37, or about 7 percent, averaging $4.53 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 30. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.616 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.24 or about 5 percent since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub expired in trading on Monday, June 28, at $4.717 per MMBtu, climbing $0.39 per MMBtu during its

305

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 29) 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 29) Since Wednesday, April 14, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 21 cents or about 4 percent to $5.52 per MMBtu. Yesterday (April 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.582 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 16 cents or 3 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,077 Bcf as of April 16, which is 6 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was relatively unchanged, falling $0.01 per barrel on the week to $36.61 per barrel or $6.312 per MMBtu. Prices: Moderating temperatures led to price declines of at least 10 cents per

306

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 15, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 7, 2009) Since last Wednesday, September 30, natural gas prices rose across the board, with increases ranging between 37 cents and $1.32 per million Btu (MMBtu). Natural gas prices oscillated by large amounts at most market locations across the United States. The Henry Hub began the report week at $3.24 per MMBtu, fell to $2.32 on October 2, and ended trading yesterday at $3.70 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the near-month contract for November ended the week at $4.904 per MMBtu, a slight increase from the previous week’s value of $4.841 per MMBtu.

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3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 21) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 21) Moderate temperatures throughout most of the country kept natural gas spot prices close to those of last week at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 5-12), the price for next-day delivery at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent to $5.89. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub yesterday (January 12) settled at $5.943 per MMBtu, which was 11 cents less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,610 Bcf as of January 7, which is about 14.0 percent above the 5-year average. The crude oil price continues to provide upward pressure on energy prices. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved up

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upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas upcoming holidays, we will not produce another Natural Gas Weekly Update until January 2, 2002. Overview: Monday, December 17, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the trading week on December 14 at $2.41 per MMBtu, roughly 30 cents or 14 percent over the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.846 per MMBtu, up nearly 28 cents over the previous Friday. Market prices were affected early in the week by colder weather, and then by milder temperatures that prevailed after Tuesday. (Temperature Map)(Temperature Deviation Map) At 22 Bcf, withdrawals from storage were again much smaller than historical averages. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased by

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9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) 9, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 26) Spot and futures prices fell for the second straight week, as generally mild temperatures continued to prevail in most major market areas and storage injections exceeded 100 Bcf for a third straight week. At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 52 cents per MMBtu on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, June 11-19), or almost 9 percent, to $5.54 per MMBtu. The settlement price for the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery declined by $0.632 on the week, closing yesterday (June 18) at $5.581 per MMBtu-a decline of 10 percent. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 1,438 Bcf as of Friday, June 13, which is about 22 percent below the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for

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, 2009 , 2009 Next Release: July 9, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 2, 2009) Since Wednesday, June 24, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations east of the Rocky Mountains, with decreases of as much as 89 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub declined by 17 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to $3.63 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, July 1, at $3.795 per MMBtu, decreasing by 11 cents or about 3 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,721 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 26, which is about 20.7 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

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11, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 18, 11, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 18, 2007) Since Wednesday, January 3, natural gas spot prices increased by more than 43 cents per MMBtu at market locations across the Lower 48 States, with increases exceeding 75 cents per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, January 10, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $6.41 per MMBtu, a climb of 94 cents per MMBtu, or about 17 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.755 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 10, rising about 59 cents per MMBtu, or nearly 10 percent, from the settlement price of $6.163 recorded last Wednesday, January 3. Natural gas in storage was 3,025 Bcf as of January 5, which is 18 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West

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3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 10) 3, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 10) Since Wednesday, March 26, natural gas spot prices were lower at most locations in the Lower 48 States, while other locations had narrow gains. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 2 cents or less than 1 percent to $4.89 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub decreased roughly 8 cents per MMBtu or nearly 2 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $5.065 per MMBtu yesterday (April 2). Natural gas in storage increased to 680 Bcf as of Friday, March 28, which is about 43 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 16 cents per barrel or less than 1 percent since last Wednesday

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7, 2008 7, 2008 Next Release: July 24, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview The report week ended July 16 registered significant price declines at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with the largest decreases occurring in the Arizona/Nevada, California, and Louisiana trading regions. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 94 cents per million British thermal units (MMBtu) to $11.15 as of yesterday. Similarly, at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for all futures contracts in the 12-month strip declined between 44.6 and 69.7 cents per MMBtu. The near-month contract on Monday settled below $12-per MMBtu for the first time in 6 weeks, dropping to $11.398 per MMBtu as of

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9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 16, 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 16, 2006) Natural gas spot price movements were mixed since Wednesday, November 1, including significant price decreases at locations in the Rockies, relatively small increases along the Gulf Coast, and varied movements in other regions. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, to $7.37 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub gained about 11 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday (November 8) at $7.823 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 3, was 3,445 Bcf, which is 7.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.29 per barrel, or 2.2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $59.93 per barrel or $10.33 per

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0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7) Natural gas spot prices dropped in almost all locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 22-29) partly because of a decline in cooling demand across much of the Lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents, or about 4.5 percent, to $7.07 per MMBtu, while locations in the West generally saw the largest decreases ranging between 27 cents and 71 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery expired Tuesday (June 28) at $6.976, decreasing about 47 cents per MMBtu, or 6.2 percent, since last Wednesday (June 22). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 24 was 2,123 Bcf, which is 14.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.04 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last

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7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 3, 2006) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 3, 2006) Since Wednesday, July 19, natural gas spot prices have increased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased by about 14 percent to $6.71 per MMBtu. Yesterday (July 26), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.887 per MMBtu in its next to last day of trading, increasing $1.025 or about 18 percent since last Wednesday (July 19). Natural gas in storage was 2,756 Bcf as of July 21, which is 21.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.03 per barrel or 1.4 percent on the week to $73.82 per barrel or $12.73 per MMBtu. Prices: As a result of the record-setting heat and correspondingly higher power

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1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 7) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 7) With the traditional heating season coming to a close, temperatures moderated this week and spot price changes were relatively small at most trading locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 23-30), the spot price at the Henry Hub increased 6 cents per MMBtu, or less than 1 percent to $7.17. In contrast to the mixed price patterns on the spot markets, the prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for delivery through next heating season all rose on the week. After rising 32.4 cents per MMBtu on Tuesday, March 29, the day of expiration, the April NYMEX contract's monthly settlement price was $7.323. The futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, March 30) settled at $7.460 per MMBtu, which is 20.5 cents more

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5, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 5, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 22) A drop in temperatures across most of the Lower 48 States helped push natural gas spot and futures prices up on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 7-14). The spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $0.85 per MMBtu, or about 6 percent, for the week, to $14.80 in yesterday's (Wednesday, December 14) trading. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery added 97.9 cents to its settlement price of 1 week ago, settling yesterday at $14.679 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were 2,964 Bcf as of Friday, December 9, which is 3.7 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot

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1, 2008 1, 2008 Next Release: September 18, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 3, to Wednesday, September 10) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 3-10), as the fifth hurricane of the season moving through the Gulf of Mexico has prompted mandatory evacuation orders in some areas as well as evacuation of personnel from offshore platforms. Mandatory evacuation orders in Louisiana have led to the shutdown of at least two processing plants, with a total of 700 million cubic feet (MMcf) per day of processing capacity. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.39 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.65.

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9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 6, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 28, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, April 21 – Wednesday, April, 28), as a late-season chill temporarily increased demand. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.19 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month futures contract bounced above $4 per MMBtu in the final days of trading before its monthly expiration. The May contract expired yesterday at $4.271 per MMBtu, which is $0.429 more than the April contract’s expiration price of $3.842 per MMBtu. As a result, the May contract is the

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9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 26) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 26) Higher crude oil prices this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, August 11-18) failed to offset the downward pressure on natural gas prices from unseasonably cool weather and associated lower electric power demand. Natural gas spot prices decreased 17 to 44 cents per MMBtu at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, August 11. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 29 cents to $5.35 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery dropped just over 23 cents per MMBtu to a close of $5.382 on Wednesday, August 18. Working gas in storage as of Friday, August 13, increased to 2,530 Bcf, which is 5.7 percent above the 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate

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9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 16) Downward pressure on prices during August carried over to the first week of September as mostly moderate temperatures during the holiday-shortened trading week resulted in net price declines. Since Wednesday, September 1, natural gas spot prices have declined between 11 and 43 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, September 1-8), the spot price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana fell 34 cents or roughly 7 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 33.4 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $4.631 yesterday (September 8). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,775 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 7.1 percent. The spot price for West

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9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 16) Both natural gas spot and futures prices fell significantly over the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 1-8), as temperatures in most major gas-consuming areas of the nation were above normal most days, with differences reaching double digits in the past several days in many locations east of the Mississippi River. The Henry Hub spot price fell 79 cents per MMBtu, or nearly 12 percent, since last Wednesday (December 1) trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 8) at $5.98. The NYMEX futures contract for January 2005 delivery declined by a similar amount for the week (73 cents per MMBtu), settling yesterday) at $6.683 per MMBtu, or about 10 percent less than last Wednesday's settlement price ($7.413). EIA reported that inventories were 3,211 Bcf as of Friday, December 3,

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6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 2) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 2) Since Wednesday, May 18, natural gas spot prices have declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while climbing in the Southwestern region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 17 cents, or nearly 3 percent, to $6.33 per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 25), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.315 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 8 cents, or about 1 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,692 Bcf as of May 20, which is about 22 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.38 per barrel, or about 7 percent, on the week to $50.37 per barrel or $8.684 per

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8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 7, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday, June 30–Wednesday, July 7), as much of the East Coast experienced the hottest regional temperatures of the year. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.23 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed yesterday, July 7, at $4.565 per MMBtu, which is $0.05 lower than the previous Wednesday. Although the near-month contract increased $0.24 per MMBtu at the beginning of the report week, on Thursday, July 1, likely in response

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4, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 4, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 21, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices decreased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 6-13) as weather-related demand was limited amid close-to-normal temperatures for this time of year. Easing prices also likely resulted in part from reduced supply uncertainty in response to the amount of natural gas in underground storage (mostly for use during the winter heating season but also available for periods of hot weather in the summer). Supplies from international sources have grown considerably this spring, as imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) have increased markedly even as natural gas supplies from Canada (transported by pipeline) likely have decreased. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased 23 cents

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Tuesday February, 19, 2002 Tuesday February, 19, 2002 Spot prices at many market locations finished the week on Friday, February 15 with sharp decreases that reversed most of the gains from earlier in the week. The price at the Henry Hub was $2.18, a decline of 2 cents per MMBtu compared with the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.206 per MMBtu, roughly 2 cents greater than the previous Friday. A trend towards cooling temperatures across most of the country may have contributed to the rally in prices early in the week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) However, expectations of warmer temperatures early this week and lighter demand over the holiday weekend along with unusually high storage levels likely reversed the price rally. The spot price for

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(next release 2:00 p.m. on March 9, 2006) (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 9, 2006) Since Wednesday, February 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with decreases exceeding $1 per MMBtu at most locations. On Wednesday, March 1, the spot price at the Henry Hub averaged $6.62 per MMBtu, declining about 92 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday). The futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.733 per MMBtu yesterday (March 1), falling about 70 cents per MMBtu or about 9 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,972 Bcf as of February 24, which is about 48 percent above the 5-year average. Since February 22, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

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7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 24, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 16, 2010) Natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 9. Increases ranged between $0.01 and $1.03 per million Btu (MMBtu), continuing an upward trend that began in early May. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, June 16, at $5.13 per MMBtu, 8 percent higher than the previous Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.978 per MMBtu, increasing by 30 cents or about 6 percent during the report week.

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September 4, 2001 September 4, 2001 Prices in most major markets continued generally downward last week, spurred by relatively mild temperatures throughout much of the country and more than adequate supplies as indicated by reports of another strong storage refill rate for the prior week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) The spot market price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana ended the week down 62 cents at $2.15 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX futures market, the contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub expired on Wednesday at $2.295 per MMBtu, compared with almost $4.62 a year ago. The contract for delivery in October ended the week at $2.38. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week down at $27.25 per barrel ($4.70 per MMBtu), a decline of $1.05 per barrel from

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6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 23) Summer-like heat across much of the country and shut-ins in the Gulf of Mexico owing to the first tropical storm of this year's hurricane season continued to put upward pressure on natural gas prices this week (June 8 - June 15). The Henry Hub spot price increased 17 cents per MMBtu or 2.4 percent on the week to $7.39 in trading yesterday (June 15). The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub gained 44 cents since last Wednesday, closing yesterday at $7.441 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 10, totaled an estimated 1,963 Bcf, which is 17.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.02 per barrel, or about 6 percent, on the week to $55.53 per barrel, or $9.57 per MMBtu.

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7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 3) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 19-26), as a large volume of production continued to be shut in from the recent major hurricanes and cool temperatures added space-heating demand in many regions of the country. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.15 per MMBtu, or about 8.5 percent, to $14.67. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 49 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, October 26) at $14.04. A steady pace of injections into underground storage has continued despite offshore production shut-ins of almost 5.6 billion cubic feet (Bcf) a day,

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2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 9) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 9) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub declined 29 cents, or about 5 percent, to $5.03 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 1), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $4.965 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 47 cents or about 9 percent since last Wednesday (August 25). Natural gas in storage was 2,695 Bcf as of August 27, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 6 cents per barrel, or less than 1 percent, on the week to $43.89 per barrel or $7.567 per MMBtu,

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0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 17, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 9, 2010) Since Wednesday, June 2, natural gas prices rose at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases generally ranging between 30 and 40 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). At the Henry Hub in Erath, Louisiana, the spot price rose 43 cents during the week from $4.32 to $4.75 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the July 2010 contract also rose over the week, increasing about 6 percent from $4.242 per MMBtu on June 2 to $4.677 on June 9. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,456 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 4, following an implied net injection of 99 Bcf,

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4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 3, 2010) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, limiting demand related to space heating for much of the country. Prices declined, with the biggest decreases occurring at markets in the Rocky Mountains and the Midcontinent. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.15 to $4.76 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by $0.10 on the week to $4.76 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 26, working gas in underground storage was

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9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: November 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 28, 2009) Natural gas prices posted decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at virtually all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 6 and 46 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, a couple trading locations did post gains this week. The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell 21 cents or about 4 percent, ending trading yesterday at $4.59 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for November delivery expired yesterday at $4.289 per MMBtu, falling 81 cents or about 16 percent since last Wednesday. The December

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3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 30) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the effects of Hurricane Ivan. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 43 cents, or about 8 percent, to $5.59 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 22), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.629 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 81 cents or about 17 percent since last Wednesday (September 15). Natural gas in storage was 2,942 Bcf as of September 17, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $4.58 per barrel, or about 10 percent, on the

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9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: March 26, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 18, 2009) Warmer temperatures moved into major population centers this report week, signaling the imminent end of winter and the corresponding reduction in demand related to space heating. Spot prices continued to decline, with the biggest decreases west of the Mississippi River. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.75. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased as temperatures climbed higher this week. The futures contract for April delivery decreased by 11 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.68, the lowest close for a near-month contract in about 6½ years.

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1, 2002 1, 2002 Natural gas prices have declined substantially in the past 7 days. Spot prices at most market locations across the country finished the day on Wednesday, April 10 down slightly. However the cumulative difference from the previous Wednesday ranged between $0.21 and $0.89 per MMBtu. Prices at the Henry Hub declined 43 cents per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday to trade at $3.25 yesterday. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $3.184 per MMBtu, down roughly 32 cents since last Wednesday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil declined $1.40 per barrel since the previous Wednesday, trading at $26.15 per barrel or $4.51 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices declined since Wednesday, April 3 at most major trading

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5, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 12) 5, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 12) Compared with Wednesday, May 28, natural gas spot prices were higher at all locations in the Lower 48 States in trading on June 4. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 70 cents or about 12 percent to $6.41 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 36 cents per MMBtu or 5 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $6.375 per MMBtu yesterday (June 4). Natural gas in storage increased to 1,199 Bcf as of Friday, May 30, which is about 29 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.325 per barrel or roughly 5 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $29.81 per

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 2 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 19) Spot prices generally moved higher for the week (Wednesday, December 4 to Wednesday, December 11) with exceptions at several Northeast locations, while futures prices experienced robust gains, particularly for contracts for delivery through the end of the heating season. Unusually cold temperatures accompanied the heating season's first significant and widespread snow storm late last week, and temperatures plunged again ahead of the ice storm of Tuesday and Wednesday. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price gained 41 cents for the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, December 11) at $4.64 per MMBtu. Since last Wednesday, the NYMEX futures contract for delivery in January 2003 gained $0.411 per MMBtu, settling yesterday at $4.709. Natural gas in storage as of Friday,

342

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December , 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent,

343

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 8) Since Wednesday, June 23, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 24 cents or about 4 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 30), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.155 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 33 cents or about 5 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,938 Bcf as of June 25 which is 0.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell 64 cents per barrel or nearly 2 percent on the week to $36.92 per barrel or $6.37 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperature conditions and falling crude oil prices

344

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 6 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 23) Moderate temperatures for much of the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 8-15) failed to offset upward pressure on spot prices from higher crude oil prices and the prospect of higher demand with the approaching heating season. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of 9 cents per MMBtu to $4.93. Despite losing value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub was higher on the week by about 28 cents per MMBtu to $5.431. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, October 10, increased to 2,944 Bcf, which is 0.3 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $2.14 per barrel on the week to yesterday's (October 15) closing price of $31.74 per barrel, or $5.47 per

345

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 25, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 10, to Wednesday, September 17) Natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, September 10-17), even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricane Ike. However, price movements were not uniform, and prices increased at some trading locations directly supplied by offshore Gulf of Mexico production, which was almost entirely shut-in for most of the week. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.17 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.82. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the

346

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

347

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 1, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 23, 2009) Natural gas prices posted across-the-board increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices rose at almost all market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 2 and 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.43 per MMBtu, increasing by 15 cents or about 5 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for October delivery increased by 10 cents to $3.860 per MMBtu. The November contract also posted gains this week, albeit much smaller at 4

348

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. , 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 8, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 31, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell almost across the board, as mild weather moved into most areas in the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub price fell by 9 cents, from $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, March 24, to $3.93 per MMBtu yesterday (March 31). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2010 contract expired on Monday, March 29, at $3.842 per MMBtu. The May 2010 contract ended trading yesterday at $3.869 per MMBtu, a decline of about 29 cents from its closing price of $4.154 per MMBtu on March 24. Inventories of working natural gas in storage rose to 1,638 billion

349

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2008 30, 2008 Next Release: November 6, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, October 29) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States decreased from Wednesday to Wednesday, October 22-29, with relatively large declines of more than 10 percent occurring in markets west of the Mississippi River and more modest price movements in the eastern half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.36 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased for the report week. The futures contract for November delivery, for which the final day of trading was yesterday (October 29), decreased by

350

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2009 1, 2009 Next Release: May 28, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 20, 2009) Natural gas prices at most trading locations fell on the week because of mild weather as well as continued weakness in the economy. Declines ranged between 37 cents at the Dracut trading area in the Northeast to 90 cents at the El Paso non-Bondad area in the Rocky Mountains. The Henry Hub spot price fell by 67 cents during the week to $3.75 per million Btu (MMBtu). Moving in the opposite direction of natural gas prices, the price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil contract rose on the week to $61.45 per barrel, or $10.59 per MMBtu. Oil prices are now at their highest level since November 10, 2008, having more than doubled since falling to a

351

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: June 12, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Spot gas at most market locations (outside the Rocky Mountain Region) traded above $10 per million Btu (MMBtu) this report week (Wednesday-Wednesday), with many points registering prices in excess of $12 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub moved higher by 38 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday (June 4) at $12.379 MMBtu. Natural gas in storage was 1,806 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 30, which is 0.1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

352

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 19, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased during this holiday-shortened report week (Thursday-Wednesday, July 5-11) as weather-related demand emerged in response to the hottest temperatures to date this year in the Northeast and Midwest. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 36 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the story was slightly different with the contract price for August delivery decreasing to $6.600 per MMBtu, which was 1.8 cents lower than last Thursday's (July 5) closing price. EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report today reported natural gas storage supplies of 2,627 Bcf as of Friday, July 7. This level of working gas in underground storage is 16.6

353

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

15, 2001 15, 2001 Natural gas prices generally rose last week despite mild temperatures throughout much of the country (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map). After beginning the week down on Monday, October 8, spot prices at the Henry Hub climbed through Thursday before dropping 10 cents on Friday, October 12, to end the week at $2.31 per million Btu, $0.19 or almost 9 percent above the previous Friday. At the NYMEX futures market, the settlement price for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $2.43 per million Btu, 32 cents above the previous Friday. Net additions to storage in the week ended October 5 were 1 billion cubic feet (Bcf) below the prior week, but, at 65 Bcf, remained above historical levels. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil closed at $22.55 per

354

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 1) 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 1) Since Wednesday, April 16, natural gas spot prices were lower at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 4 cents or less than 1 percent to $5.58 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub decreased roughly 11 cents per MMBtu or nearly 2 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $5.569 per MMBtu yesterday (April 23). Natural gas in storage increased to 684 Bcf as of Friday, April 18, which is about 46 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.12 per barrel or roughly 4 percent since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $28.04 per barrel or

355

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 at 2:00 P.M. 0 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Tuesday, November 9, 2010) Since Wednesday, November 3, natural gas spot prices rose across the lower 48 States, increasing between $0.25 and $1.12 per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub rose $0.41 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $3.76 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.21 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.37, or about 10 percent, since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage totaled 3,840 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of November 5, about 10 percent above the 5-year (2005-2009) average, and

356

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 4) Natural gas spot prices in most market areas rose slightly in the past week (Wednesday, August 20-Wednesday, August 27), supported by seasonal hot weather throughout much of the country and the risk of lost production due to tropical storm activity. Increases were generally less than a dime in most areas. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 9 cents per MMBtu on the week to trade yesterday (Wednesday, August 27) at $5.12. At the NYMEX, the September contract expired yesterday at $4.927 per MMBtu, down just over 11 cents on the day and a little more than 19 cents since last Wednesday. The EIA reported that working gas in storage was 2,319 Bcf as of Friday, August 22, which is 7.5 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002)

357

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, Overview - May 21, 2001 Somewhat warmer temperatures early in the week, especially in the South, provided a lift to natural gas spot and futures prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) However, a report of another large stock build and a revised forecast for normal to below-normal temperatures over a larger area of the country turned the week's gains into losses. On a week-to-week basis, the spot price of natural gas at the Henry Hub dropped $0.10 to end Friday, May 18 at $4.15 per MMBtu, while the NYMEX price of natural gas for June delivery at the Henry Hub declined $0.013 to $4.291 per MMBtu. At 119 Bcf, net injections to storage for the week ended May 11, 2001, were the highest value for the 8-year period of weekly AGA data.

358

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 to Wednesday, December 12) 5 to Wednesday, December 12) Released: December 13 Next release: December 20, 2007 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 5-12), as cooler temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.22. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for January delivery rose about 22 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.408. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a healthy supply picture as the winter heating season progress. As of Friday, December 7, working gas in storage

359

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 31, 2006) Since Wednesday, August 16, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations with the exception of a few locations in the Northeast. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 17 cents to $7.19 per MMBtu. Yesterday (August 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery settled at $6.875 per MMBtu, increasing about 11 cents or about 2 percent since Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,857 Bcf as of August 18, which is 13.5 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased 19 cents per barrel, or about 0.3 percent, on the week to $71.45 per barrel, or $12.32 per MMBtu. Prices: Despite the lower cooling load across much of the Lower 48 States and a

360

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 20, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 12, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States, with price hikes ranging between 6 and 30 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, May 12, at $4.18 per MMBtu, 18 cents higher than the preceding week. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.284 per MMBtu, increasing by 29 cents or about 7 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,089 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 0 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 6) Natural gas spot and futures prices tumbled this week as storage levels rose above the 5-year average and forecasts called for continued moderate temperatures into the official start of the winter heating season (November 1). For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 22-29), the price at the Henry Hub decreased 38 cents or about 8 percent to $4.50 per MMBtu. Prices in market areas along the Gulf Coast and Texas similarly fell between 30-45 cents per MMBtu, while Northeast prices slid more than 50 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery expired at $4.459 on October 29, after declining roughly 47 cents per MMBtu or slightly more than 9 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage

362

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: March 12, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 4, 2009) A late winter cold spell in major population centers in the Lower 48 States this report week temporarily boosted space-heating demand in most of the country. Prices at trading locations throughout the country were slightly higher for the report week. The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.03 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.23. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), trading of the March contract ended during the report week with a final or expiration price of $4.056 per MMBtu, the lowest expiration price for a near-month NYMEX contract since the October 2002 contract. Nonetheless, futures prices were

363

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 9, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 1, 2011) The past week was marked by two distinct trading markets — “before” and “after” the Memorial Day holiday. Cash markets were listless going into the holiday weekend but escalated Tuesday following an early heat wave that drifted into the East. The Henry Hub price advanced 27 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) for the week (6.2 percent) to close at $4.63 per MMBtu on June 1. Just prior to the heat wave, working natural gas in storage last week rose to 2,107 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, May 27, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas

364

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(next release 2:00 p.m. on June 10) (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 10) Natural gas futures prices moved down during the holiday-shortened trading week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 26-June 2) joined by falling spot prices in markets east of the Rocky Mountains, while cash prices in western market locations rose appreciably. The spot price at the Henry Hub declined 19 cents per MMBtu on the week, or nearly 3 percent, to $6.51. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the settlement price for the futures contract for July delivery fell by $0.213 to $6.519 per MMBtu. EIA reported that inventories were 1,564 Bcf as of Friday, May 28, which is 0.5 percent less than the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was 64 cents per barrel (11 cents per MMBtu)

365

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 1, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 24, 2011) Even an earthquake on Tuesday could not shake up most gas prices significantly for the week. However, the prospects of some near-term returning cooling load was likely the catalyst boosting overall cash market prices this week. The Henry Hub price increased 13 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (up 3.2 percent) to close at $4.10 per MMBtu on August 24. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), there was a 10.4 cent per MMBtu price spike on Tuesday following the East Coast earthquake but the September 2011 natural gas contract eventually gave most of the gain back and closed at $3.922 per MMBtu on Wednesday.

366

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 7) 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 7) Since Wednesday, September 22, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the effects of Hurricane Ivan, climbing crude oil prices, and market expectations of an early arrival of winter. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 64 cents, or about 11 percent, to $6.23 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 29), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.911 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 67 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday (September 22). Natural gas in storage was 3,011 Bcf as of September 24, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.12 per barrel, or about 2

367

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 27, 2010) Natural gas prices at the Henry Hub fell from $5.54 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 20 to $5.42 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 27, a decline of 12 cents or 2 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, (NYMEX), the price of the February 2010 natural gas contract fell 22 cents, or 4 percent, over the week, closing at $5.274 per MMBtu. The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended the week at $73.64 per barrel, or $12.70 per MMBtu, a decline of $3.78 per barrel from the previous week. Working gas in storage decreased to 2,521 billion cubic feet (Bcf)

368

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2008 0, 2008 Next Release: July 17, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices declined sharply this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, July 2-9), with the largest decreases generally occurring in consuming regions in the Northeast and Midwest. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.22 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $12.09. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of rising prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. After the August 2008 contract reached a daily settlement price of $13.578 per MMBtu (a record high for this contract) on July 3, the price decreased by $1.57 per MMBtu over the next three trading sessions and ended the week

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 14, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 6, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down overall for the week, some by more than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub price decreased 6 cents per MMBtu over the week (1.4 percent) to close at $4.34 per MMBtu on July 6. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,527 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 1, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 95 Bcf, leaving storage volumes positioned 224 Bcf under year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August 2011 natural

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2009 4, 2009 Next Release: May 21, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 13, 2009) Since Wednesday, May 6, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 49 and 95 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Prices at the Henry Hub climbed by 75 cents per MMBtu, or about 20 percent, to $4.42 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, May 13, at $4.333 per MMBtu, increasing by 45 cents or about 11 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,013 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 8, which is about 23 percent above the 5-year average (2004-2008),

371

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) May 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 8) Spot natural gas prices at most trading locations in the Lower 48 States dropped $0.25-$0.50 per MMBtu this week (Wednesday, April 23-Wednesday, April 30) as springtime temperatures prevailed in most areas. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 33 cents per MMBtu to $5.25, while spot price declines in the Northeast were generally greater at between $0.36 and $0.50. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery, which became the near-month contract on Tuesday, April 29, has declined 29 cents since last Wednesday. The June contract settled at $5.385 yesterday (April 30). Natural gas in storage increased to 741 Bcf as of Friday, April 25, which is about 43.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West

372

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 14) With little in the way of fundamental changes, spot and futures prices showed modest gains for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, July 30-August 6). The Henry Hub spot price gained a nickel on the week, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 6) at $4.71 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the near-month futures contract (for September delivery) settlement price increased by $0.077 to $4.745 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas inventories were 2,106 Bcf as of Friday, August 1, which is 10 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. Crude oil prices showed more upward movement, as a terrorist bombing in Indonesia and continuing unsettled conditions in Iraq

373

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 17) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 2-9) as a late season cold front moved into major gas-consuming regions of the country, bringing a reminder that the end of winter is still two weeks away. Spot prices climbed 17 to 76 cents per MMBtu at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday. Price changes in the Northeast were at the higher end of the range, while trading in the West resulted in gains at the lower end. The Henry Hub spot price increased 38 cents per MMBtu, or 5.7 percent, to $6.99. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery gained 16.3 cents per MMBtu, settling at $6.880 on Wednesday, March 9. Natural gas in storage as

374

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 0, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 27) Since Wednesday, February 12, natural gas spot prices have decreased at nearly all locations in the Lower 48 States, falling up to $6.03 per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 10 cents or roughly 2 percent to $6.07 per MMBtu. However, prices remain close to their highest levels since late January 2001. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased roughly 35 cents per MMBtu or 6 percent since last Wednesday to settle at $6.134 per MMBtu yesterday (February 19). Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,168 Bcf for the week ended Friday, February 14, which is about 27 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas

375

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 17) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 17) Natural gas spot and futures prices have generally decreased for the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, February 2-9). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 18 cents, or about 3 percent, while prices at most other regional markets ended the week with decreases of between 2 and 42 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased $0.211 per MMBtu, or slightly over 3 percent, settling yesterday (February 9) at $6.165 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported working gas in underground storage of 1,906 Bcf, which reflects an implied net decrease of 176 Bcf. West Texas Intermediate crude oil on the spot market fell $1.20 per barrel, or about $0.21 per MMBtu,

376

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 1, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 24, 2010) The natural gas market is transitioning to spring, a “shoulder” season of lower demand between the relatively high-demand periods of winter and summer. As space-heating demand ebbed during the report week, prices declined across the lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price ended trading yesterday, March 24, at $4.02 per million Btu (MMBtu), a decrease of $0.25 compared with the previous Wednesday, March 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices continued to decline as storage inventories appeared more than adequate and domestic production remained strong. The futures contract for April

377

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 13) Spot prices at many major markets declined significantly from last Wednesday's (February 26) levels as temperatures moderated somewhat over the weekend and again on Tuesday and Wednesday (March 5-6). The spot price at the Henry Hub declined $2.55 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, despite peaking for the week at $10.65 on Friday, to end trading yesterday (Wednesday, March 6) at $7.81. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery began trading as the near-month contract on Thursday, February 27, and promptly surged to its all-time high to date of $8.101 per MMBtu on Friday, before settling yesterday at $7.021. Natural gas stocks fell to 838 Bcf as of February 28, which is nearly 42 percent below the 5-year average. As of yesterday, the WTI spot price had dropped $1.10 per

378

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2008 5, 2008 Next Release: May 22, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Natural gas spot prices increased in a majority of regions of the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, May 7-14).The Henry Hub spot price increased $0.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $11.51, the highest average price recorded at the Henry Hub in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also continued on an upward trend that has resulted in weekly price increases in 6 of the last 7 report weeks. The futures contract for June delivery increased 27.1 cents per MMBtu on the week to approximately $11.60. During the week ending Friday, May 9, estimated net injections of natural gas into underground storage totaled the largest volume to date

379

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 15) Natural gas spot prices climbed 15 to 62 cents per MMBtu across the Lower 48 States this week (Wednesday, June 30-Wednesday, July 7). Increases were highest in the sun-drenched Southwest and California, but also significant in the Northeast and Midwest. At the Henry Hub, the spot price increased 23 cents or roughly 4 percent to $6.28 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub similarly increased, gaining 21.5 cents per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $6.370 per MMBtu yesterday (July 7). Natural gas in storage increased to 2,047 Bcf as of Friday, July 2, which is about 1.2 percent above the 5-year average inventory level for the report week. The spot price for West Texas

380

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 9, 2011) The Henry Hub spot price fell during the week from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 2, to $4.22 per MMBtu on Wednesday, February 9. The price decline occurred in spite of very cold weather across the United States. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell from $89.78 per barrel, or $15.48 per MMBtu, on Thursday to $85.59 per barrel, or $14.76 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near month futures contract (March 2011) fell by 39 cents from $4.429 per MMBtu to $4.044 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell below the 5-year average for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 7, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 4, 2007) Since Wednesday, September 19, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Rocky Mountain region. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 24 cents per MMBtu, or 4 percent, since Wednesday, September 19, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the NYMEX, the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (September 26) at $6.423 per MMBtu, rising 24 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday, September 19. Natural gas in storage was 3,206 Bcf as of September 21, which is 8 percent above the 5-year average (2002-2006). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $1.68 per barrel on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $80.31 per barrel or $13.85 per MMBtu.

382

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2009 8, 2009 Next Release: June 25, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 17, 2009) Natural gas prices increased across the board at both the spot and futures markets. Price jumps at spot market locations in the Lower 48 States ranged up to $1 per million Btu (MMBtu) with an overall average of 53 cents per MMBtu. During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.99 per MMBtu, increasing by 12 percent since last Wednesday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices of futures contracts rose this week. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery gained 54.5 cents and ended the report week at $4.253 per MMBtu. Meanwhile, the price for the August 2009 contract rose by 53 cents,

383

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Next Release: June 19, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 4, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, as a heat wave gripped much of the Lower 48 States. However, prices eased in trading yesterday (June 11) in response to moderating temperatures. Prices at the Henry Hub increased 32 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 3 percent, to $12.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $12.66 per MMBtu, rising 28 cents or less than 3 percent since Wednesday, June 4. Natural gas in storage was 1,886 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of June 6, which is about 1 percent below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following

384

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 2, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19) Although seasonally cold weather continued to dominate the country this week, the absence of January's extreme temperatures resulted in prices easing 20 to 75 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, February 4. On the week (Wednesday, February 4-Wednesday, February 11), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 39 cents per MMBtu to $5.35. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery also fell 39 cents on the week to close at $5.26 yesterday (February 11). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, February 6, decreased to 1,603 Bcf, which is 2.3 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $0.87 per barrel on the week to yesterday's closing price of $33.93

385

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 14) Despite the close of the traditional heating season with relatively high volumes of natural gas remaining in storage and milder temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, spot prices increased at most market locations. For the week, (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 30-April 6), the Henry Hub spot price increased by 29 cents per MMBtu, or 4 percent, to $7.46. Similarly, the NYMEX futures contract price for May delivery at the Henry Hub increased by nearly 10 cents from last Wednesday's level, settling yesterday (April 6) at $7.558 per MMBtu. As of Friday, April 1, natural gas in storage was 1,249 Bcf, or 22.2 percent higher than the 5-year average of 1,022 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

386

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2009 6, 2009 Next Release: August 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 5, 2009) Natural gas prices posted increases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday, with price increases at the spot market ranging between 12 and 43 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). During the report week, the price at the Henry Hub spot market rose to $3.61 per MMBtu, increasing by 20 cents or 5.9 percent. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures contract for September delivery increased by 49 cents to $4.042 per MMBtu. The September futures contract closed above $4.00 per MMBtu for the first time since June 19 on Monday, reaching $4.031 per MMBtu. The near-month

387

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 11) 5, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 11) Natural gas spot prices declined by 30 cents or more at most market locations in the Lower 48 last week as temperatures across the country began to moderate from recent extreme highs. The average spot price at the Henry Hub during the week (Wednesday, June 26 to Wednesday July 3) fell by more than 9 percent to $3.10 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery fell 6 percent on the week for a closing price of $3.142 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,260 Bcf for the week, which is 19.5 percent above the 5-year average inventory at this time of the year, according to EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $.15 per

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 18, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 10, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 3, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with decreases of as much as 11 percent. Prices at the Henry Hub declined $0.32, or about 7 percent, to $4.44 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, March 10, at $4.56 per MMBtu, falling by $0.20 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,626 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of March 5, about 1 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009). The implied

389

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 23, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 15, 2010) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 8–15), likely supported by demand in the electric power sector from late-season heat and associated air-conditioning demand in much of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.25 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $4.06 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the October futures contract increased in 4 out of 5 trading days for a total gain during the report week of about $0.18 per MMBtu. The price of the

390

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, to Wednesday, February 6) 30, to Wednesday, February 6) Released: February 7, 2008 Next release: February 14, 2008 Since Wednesday, January 30, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 23 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 3 percent, to $7.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 6) at $7.994 per MMBtu, falling 5 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, January 30. Natural gas in storage was 2,062 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 1, which is 3 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). The implied net withdrawal of 200 Bcf was the second largest this heating season. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased

391

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) 8 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 15) A massive cold front that began flowing into the Plains States over this past weekend and spread south and eastward sent spot prices sharply upward for the first two days of this week. Coupled with the generally smaller net increases seen during the holiday-shortened New Year's week (Monday, December 29-Friday, January 2), spot prices have gained more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 24, at nearly every market location. At the Henry Hub, the spot price rose 27 cents per MMBtu during New Year's week, and jumped 86 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, December 31, for a net increase of $1.13 per MMBtu since Christmas, ending trading yesterday (Wednesday, January 7) at $6.63. On the NYMEX, the contract for January

392

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 17, 2006) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 17, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased at all locations except for one this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, August 2 - 9) as moderating temperatures contributed to lower demand. The Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.06 per MMBtu this week, or more than 12 percent, to $7.59. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery also decreased, albeit only by 15 cents since last Wednesday (August 2) to settle yesterday at $7.651 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, August 4, was 2,763 Bcf, which is 15.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended yesterday's trading session at $76.28 per barrel ($13.15 per MMBtu) after increasing $0.12 per barrel (2

393

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2008 4, 2008 Next Release: December 11, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, December 3, 2008) Since Wednesday, November 26, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, although selected markets posted relatively modest gains on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 5 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or less than 0.5 percent, to $6.48 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (December 3) at $6.347 per MMBtu, falling 53 cents per MMBtu or about 8 percent since last Wednesday, November 26. Natural gas in storage was 3,358 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

394

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 4, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 11) Colder-than-expected weather over the Thanksgiving weekend that continued into this week resulted in higher natural gas spot prices at most trading locations since Wednesday, November 26. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $0.70 per MMBtu, prices along the Gulf Coast increased a more modest $0.50-$0.60. On the week (Wednesday, November 26-Wednesday, December 3), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.59 per MMBtu to $5.45, closing above $5 for the first time since late August. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery increased $0.83 per MMBtu, or 12 percent, to $5.756 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 28, decreased by 59 Bcf to 3,095 Bcf, which exceeds the

395

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 9, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) Spot and futures prices surged upward as two tropical storms in close succession made their presence felt in gas markets over the past week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents week-to-week (Wednesday, September 11 to Wednesday, September 18) to $3.79 per MMBtu, which is at its highest level since May 1. In addition to some production shut-ins from Tropical Storm Hanna's arrival in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday (September 13), spot prices were also bolstered somewhat by warmer-than-normal temperatures in most regions since last Wednesday, as well as by outages of a number of nuclear-fired electric plants for routine maintenance. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract

396

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIA’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

397

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2002 1, 2002 Lingering low temperatures last week prompted spot prices at the Henry Hub to start the week up sharply gaining 19 cents to trade on Monday at $2.68 per MMBtu. Prices then declined sharply before rebounding on Thursday and Friday to end the week at $2.81 per MMBtu-32 cents higher than the previous Friday. Prices on the NYMEX futures market moved up most days to end the week up almost $0.45 per MMBtu at $2.800. Temperatures moderated in many parts of the country last week and rose to the 60s and 70s on Friday and Saturday in much of the Northeast. The latest National Weather Service (NWS) 6- to 10-day forecast calls for cool temperatures in the Midwest but for above normal temperatures to return to the Northeast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Net withdrawals from stocks increased to132 Bcf

398

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, , 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 9, 2007) Natural gas spot prices increased this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 25-August 1) as tropical storm activity increased and weather-related demand returned along with normal summertime heat in large market areas in the East. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 62 cents per MMBtu, or 11.1 percent, to $6.19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for August delivery expired last Friday (July 27) at $6.11 per MMBtu. Although the price of the expiring contract in the last couple days of trading rose slightly, the expiration price was still the second lowest of the year (the January 2007 contract expired at $5.838). Taking over as the near-month contract, the September 2007

399

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Holiday Notice: Holiday Notice: Due to the federal holiday in observance of Martin Luther King Day on Monday, January 21, 2002, the next issue of the Natural Gas Weekly Update will be published on Tuesday, January 22, 2002. Overview: Monday, January 14, 2002 Natural gas prices were generally lower last week as the fundamentals of ample working gas in storage and very little temperature-driven swing demand dominated the market. With little in the way of market-changing developments, trading in both the spot and futures markets tended to occur in relatively small price ranges throughout the week. The warming trend begun late in the previous week continued nearly unabated through last week, with the heavy gas-consuming areas of the Midwest and Northeast recording many of the greatest deviations above daily normal

400

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 23, 2006) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 23, 2006) Since Wednesday, March 8, natural gas spot prices have risen at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, despite some decreases during yesterday's trading. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 62 cents, or about 10 percent, to $7.10 per MMBtu. Yesterday (March 15), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.143 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 50 cents, or more than 7 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,832 Bcf as of March 10, which is about 60 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.05 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $62.11

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 29, 2006) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 29, 2006) Since Wednesday, June 14, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. On Wednesday, June 21, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $6.51 per MMBtu, increasing 41 cents per MMBtu, or about 7 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.588 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, June 21, posting a slight decline from the settlement price of $6.590 last Wednesday, June 14. Natural gas in storage was 2,476 Bcf as of June 16, which is almost 35 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 95 cents per barrel, or about 1 percent, on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $70.07 per barrel or

402

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

22, 2001 22, 2001 The spot price at the Henry Hub finished the week at $2.34 per MMBtu, or just 3 cents above its level the previous Friday. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for November delivery ended the week over a quarter of a dollar higher than the previous Friday, at $2.681 per MMBtu. Despite a brief 2-day cold snap, temperatures across the Lower 48 States were relatively mild. Although some unseasonably cooler temperatures were seen from the Gulf Coast into the Mid-continent, even there average temperatures for the week generally were 50 degrees or more. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) On October 12 the Coast Guard lifted the ban on liquefied natural gas (LNG) tankers' use of Boston harbor to reach Distrigas of Massachusetts' import facility, helping to alleviate concerns about

403

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 27, 2006) 20 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 27, 2006) Since Wednesday, July 12, natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. On Wednesday, July 19, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $5.89 per MMBtu, increasing 24 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.862 per MMBtu, on Wednesday, July 19, climbing 8 cents per MMBtu, or about 1 percent, from the settlement price of $5.782 last Wednesday, July 12. Natural gas in storage was 2,763 Bcf as of July14, which is almost 26 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.20 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) to $72.79 per barrel or $12.55 per MMBtu.

404

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 21, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 13, 2010) Significant price increases occurred through Friday, January 8, apparently as a result of extreme temperatures and continued wellhead freeze-offs in some parts of the country during the first half of the report week. However, with temperatures across much of the lower 48 States returning to normal, spot prices receded significantly between Monday, January 11, and Wednesday, January 13. On the week, natural gas spot prices registered significant net decreases at all locations in the lower 48 States since January 6. The largest weekly price drops occurred in Florida and the

405

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 4, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 24, 2010) Natural gas prices declined across the board, continuing a downward trend from the previous week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price closed at $4.91 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, February 24, a decline of about 10 percent from $5.47 per MMBtu on February 17. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March 2010 delivery, which expired yesterday, fell 11 percent on the week, from $5.386 per MMBtu to $4.816 per MMBtu. With an implied net withdrawal of 172 billion cubic feet (Bcf), working gas in storage decreased to 1,853 Bcf as of Friday, February 19,

406

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) 26, 2007 to Thursday, January 3, 2008) Released: January 4, 2008 Next release: January 10, 2008 · Natural gas spot and futures prices increased this report week (Wednesday to Thursday, December 26, 2007, to January 3, 2008), as frigid temperatures in much of the country increased demand for space heating. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.90 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $7.84. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant increases. The futures contract for February delivery rose about 51 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.674. · Working gas in storage is well above the 5-year average for this time year, indicating a ready supply source to meet peak demand as

407

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) 30 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 6) Since Wednesday, December 22, natural gas spot prices have decreased sharply at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 87 cents per MMBtu or about 12 percent to $6.18. Prices declined in each of the last three days of trading (December 27-29) as temperatures moderated following the coldest weather to date of the 2004-2005 heating season, which occurred during the holiday weekend. On Tuesday, December 28, the January futures contract at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) ended its tenure as the near-month contract, settling at $6.213 per MMBtu. On its first day of trading as the near-month contract, the NYMEX futures contract for February

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) 13 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 20, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this week despite significant drops in prices at many locations early in the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub was one of the few to decrease for the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, July 5 to 12), declining 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $5.65 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery settled at $5.782 per MMBtu yesterday (July 12), which is 2 cents, or less than 1 percent, above last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, July 7, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,704 Bcf or 27.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $74.99 per barrel or $12.93

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 30) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 30) A drop in temperatures in the eastern half of the nation beginning this past Monday (December 13) helped push natural gas spot prices up sharply on the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, December 8-15). Futures prices rose by smaller, but still significant, amounts. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased by $1.06 per MMBtu, or nearly 18 percent, for the week, to $7.04 in yesterday's (Wednesday, December 15) trading. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for January delivery added 55.3 cents to its settlement price of one week ago, settling yesterday at $7.236 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that inventories were 3,150 Bcf as of Friday, December 10, which is 14.3 percent greater than the previous 5-year average. The spot

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 5 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 12) Cold weather over the Thanksgiving weekend and early this week lifted natural gas spot prices in many regions of the country. While prices at several Northeast trading locations climbed more than $1 per MMBtu since Wednesday, November 27, prices along the Gulf Coast and other producing areas increased by a more modest 4 to 25 cents per MMBtu. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price rose $0.04 per MMBtu to $4.24. At the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for January delivery climbed just under a dime to $4.298 per MMBtu. Cold weather throughout the final full week in November also resulted in the season's largest withdrawal from storage. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 29,

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) 31, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 7) Compared with Wednesday, July 23, natural gas spot prices were lower at all locations in the Lower 48 States in trading on July 30. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 19 cents or about 4 percent to $4.69 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub closed on Tuesday, July 29 at $4.693 per MMBtu, down roughly 18 cents or 4 percent since last Wednesday. The NYMEX futures contract for September delivery became the near month contract on Wednesday, July 30, settling at $4.668 per MMBtu (or 18 cents less than last Wednesday's price.) Natural gas in storage increased to 2,032 Bcf as of Friday, July 25, which is about 12 percent below the 5-year

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 12, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 4, 2011) Wholesale natural gas prices at market locations in the lower 48 States moved higher this week as cold weather persisted in some consuming regions. Prices also increased at the beginning of the report week as the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) released data (on April 28) showing the refill of storage inventories following last winter has proceeded slower than in recent years. During the report week (April 27-May 4), the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.24 to $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 25, 2002 February 25, 2002 Natural gas prices generally increased last week. At the Henry Hub, spot prices moved up $0.22 compared with the previous Friday and ended the week at $2.40 per MMBtu. Contributing to this increase was the latest National Weather Service ( NWS) 6- to 10- day forecast, which calls for lower temperatures to arrive this week in most of the eastern two-thirds of the country. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) There is an upward price trend on the NYMEX futures market also as the March contract gained over $0.24 during last week's holiday-shortened trading to settle on Friday at $2.449 per MMBtu. Net storage withdrawals exceeded 100 Bcf during the second week of February, but stocks remain over 90 percent higher than last year at this time. The spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) declined

414

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, February 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 16, 2006) Despite the slightly colder weather that dominated the country this week, natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased for the week (February 1-8). The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 83 cents, or about 10 percent, while prices at most other regional markets ended the week with decreases averaging 58 cents per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 99 cents per MMBtu, or slightly over 11 percent, settling yesterday (February 8) at $7.735 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported working gas in underground storage of 2,368 Bcf as of February 3, which reflects an implied net decrease of 38 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

May 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) May 16, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 23) Natural gas spot prices at many trading locations this week surged close to their highest levels for the month, but then eased yesterday (May 15) as cooler weather relieved a heat wave in the South and a recent run-up in the price of crude oil abated. On Tuesday, the NYMEX closing price of $3.855 per MMBtu for the futures contract with June delivery was the highest price for a near-month contract since June 2001. But by the end of trading the next day, prices had subsided along with a drop in crude oil prices. After reaching a high of $29.17 per barrel on Tuesday, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped Wednesday to an average of $28.17 per barrel, or $4.86 per MMBtu. This was an increase of 3 percent

416

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 21, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell during the week at locations across the country, with declines ranging from 12 to 62 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 19 cents, or about 5 percent, averaging $3.96 per MMBtu yesterday, April 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the value of the futures contract for May 2010 delivery at the Henry Hub fell about 6 percent, from $4.199 per MMBtu on April 14 to $3.955 per MMBtu on April 21. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price fell 3 percent since last Wednesday to $82.98 per barrel, or $14.31 per MMBtu.

417

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 10) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 10) Since Wednesday, January 26, natural gas spot price movements have been mixed, increasing at most market locations in the Lower 48 States while decreasing in the Northeast and Louisiana regions. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 6 cents, or about 1 percent, to $6.38 per MMBtu Yesterday (February 2), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.376 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 5 cents, or about 1 percent, since last Wednesday (January 26). Natural gas in storage was 2,082 Bcf as of January 28, which is about 15 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $2.15 per barrel, or about 4 percent, on the week to $46.65

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next observance of Veterans Day on Monday, November 12, the next Natural Gas Weekly Update, will be published on Tuesday, November 13, 2001. Overview: Monday, November 5, 2001 Spot prices at the Henry Hub began the week up then trended down to end the week 10 cents below the previous Friday at $2.96 per MMBtu. This represents a reversal from the pattern of a week earlier when the Henry Hub price gained more than $0.70 per MMBtu on a Friday-to-Friday basis. Warmer-than-normal temperatures in most parts of the country last week along with forecasts calling for the moderate weather to continue into the weekend contributed to the decline in prices. .(See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) Estimates of weekly net additions to storage again were below normal levels for this time of year but the total working gas in

419

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) 8, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 15) Spot and futures prices seesawed throughout the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, April 30-May 7) with no clear underlying trend, however prices ended trading yesterday at uniformly higher levels than one week ago. The weather's influence on gas demand was muted, as temperatures in most areas of the country were generally comfortably spring-like, except for some parts of the Southeast and Southwest, where summer-like temperatures prompted some early air conditioning load. The Henry Hub average spot price increased 23 cents from the previous Wednesday (April 30) to $5.48 per MMBtu. The daily settlement price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery rose $0.275 on the week, ending at $5.660 per MMBtu in yesterday's trading. The EIA reported that 821 Bcf of gas was held in

420

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2008 8, 2008 Next Release: September 4, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, August 20, to Wednesday, August 27) Natural gas spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week (Wednesday–Wednesday, August 20-27), as tropical storm Gustav appeared to be heading into the Gulf of Mexico and industry initiated precautionary safety measures likely to result in the evacuation of offshore Gulf of Mexico platforms. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.53 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $8.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), a trend of declining prices for futures contracts was at least temporarily interrupted. Early in the report week, the price of the near-term contract (September 2008) had

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) 9 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 5) Moderate temperatures across the country except in the Southwest and Gulf Coast contributed to natural gas spot prices easing 9 to 35 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, July 21. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 21-28), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 14 cents per MMBtu to $5.77. In contrast to the decrease in spot prices, natural gas futures prices increased this week owing at least in part to higher crude oil and petroleum product prices. The NYMEX futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub expired at $6.048 per MMBtu on Wednesday, July 28, after increasing 11.7 cents in its last week of trading. The September contract takes over as the near-month contract at nearly a dime premium to the August contract,

422

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 9, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 26, 2007) With winter-like conditions finally moving toward the moderate temperatures (and less heating demand) of spring, natural gas spot prices have eased across most of the country. During the report week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 11-18), the Henry Hub spot price declined 42 cents per MMBtu to $7.54. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also were lower. The futures contract for May delivery decreased 35.8 cents per MMBtu on the week to $7.497. Working gas in storage as of Friday, April 13, was 1,546 Bcf, which is 22.1 percent above the 5-year (2002-2006) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.16 per barrel on the week to $63.14, or $10.89 per MMBtu.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 29, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down slightly for the week on light weather load despite an end-week rally anticipating warmer weather for the approaching July 4th holiday weekend. The Henry Hub price decreased 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (0.5 percent) to close at $4.40 per MMBtu on June 29. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,432 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 24, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 78 Bcf, leaving storage volumes

424

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 3) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 3) Since Wednesday, February 16, natural gas spot prices have declined at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while increasing in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $6.02 per MMBtu. Yesterday (February 23), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.311 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 20 cents, or about 3 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,720 Bcf as of February 18, which is about 26 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $3.38 per barrel, or about 4 percent, on the week to $51.73 per barrel or $8.919 per MMBtu.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 05, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 12) Since Wednesday, August 28, natural gas spot prices have declined at most locations in the Lower 48 States, generally falling between 1 and 22 cents with steeper declines at some market locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 21 cents or roughly 6 percent to $3.12 per MMBtu. Price drops at most locations were driven principally by moderating temperatures since late last week. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub decreased 21 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $3.193 per MMBtu yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,781 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 13 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 19, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 26) Spot and futures prices moved in different directions over the past week (Wednesday to Wednesday, February 11-18), with spot prices at most market locations falling from a nickel to around 30 cents per MMBtu, while futures prices increased by a dime or less. At the Henry Hub, the spot price eased down 2 cents on the week, to $5.33 per MMBtu. On the NYMEX, the futures contract for March delivery increased $0.096 per MMBtu for the week, ending trading yesterday (February 18) at $5.356. EIA reported that natural gas inventories declined to 1,431 Bcf as of Friday, February 13, which is 6.2 percent lower than the previous 5-year (1999-2003) average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate crude oil rose each day of the

427

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

26, 2009 26, 2009 Next Release: March 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 25, 2009) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week. The return of frigid temperatures for much of the report week in the Northeast, Southeast, and part of the Midwest did little to support any upward price movements in these regions. In fact, spot prices at all trading locations covered by this report either decreased or remained unchanged. Spot prices in the Northeast dipped below $5 per million Btu (MMBtu) for the first time in more than 2 years. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) the near-month futures contract barely remained above $4 per MMBtu this week. The futures contract

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 9, 2006) Since Wednesday, January 25, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases ranging between 20 and 67 cents per MMBtu or about 2 to 8 percent at most markets. On Wednesday, February 1, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $8.71 per MMBtu, reflecting an increase of $0.21 per MMBtu or about 2 percent since Wednesday, January 25. The futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub closed at $8.40 per MMBtu on Friday, January 27, falling about 6 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, January 25. By February 1, the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub increased about 9 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent since Wednesday, January 25. Natural gas in

429

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 3 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 30) Spot price changes were mixed for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 15-22), with markets with declines outnumbering those with increases by about 2 to 1, while futures prices fell significantly. At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined a nickel for the week, ending trading yesterday at $4.88 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for November delivery dropped $0.507 per MMBtu for the week, settling yesterday at $4.924. EIA reported that inventories were 3,028 Bcf as of Friday, October 17. This is 0.8 percent greater than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil ended a string of four consecutive weeks of price increases with a decline of $1.74

430

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 2, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 17, 2010) Natural gas spot prices fell modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points, likely because expectations for colder weather were slow in materializing and storage levels rose again. The Henry Hub price fell 23 cents (about 6 percent) for the week ending November 17, to $3.77 per million Btu (MMBtu). The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $80.43 per barrel ($13.87 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, November 17. This represents a decrease of $7.34 per barrel, or $1.27 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage set another new all-time record

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: June 26, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, June 11, natural gas spot prices increased at all markets in the Lower 48 States except one, despite the lack of weather-related demand in much of the country. The restoration of production at the Independence Hub to the level prevailing prior to the April 8 shut-in had limited effect on prices. For the week, the Henry Hub spot price increased 44 cents to $12.93 per million British thermal units (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices also increased on the week, with the weekly increase of the near-month contract exceeding those observed at spot market locations in the eastern half of the country.

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 6) 30, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 6) Since Wednesday, May 22, natural gas spot prices were down at most locations, despite gains ranging between 2 and 14 cents per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 29. For the week, prices at the Henry Hub declined 9 cents to $3.29 per MMBtu, which is a decrease of almost 3 percent. Moderate temperatures and falling crude oil prices contributed to declines in demand for natural gas as neither cooling demand nor heating demand for gas seemed sufficient to avoid the price declines. The NYMEX futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (May 29) at $3.42 per MMBtu. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.37 per barrel or over 5 percent since last Wednesday, trading

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 12, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 4, 2010) Natural gas spot prices rose at nearly all market locations in the lower 48 States since last Wednesday, July 28. A few exceptions to these increases occurred in trading locations that serve markets in California as well as a few other locations scattered around the lower 48. Prices at most market locations rose between 5 and 15 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) this week; however, some locations registered significantly higher increases. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.737

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

18, 2002 18, 2002 Spot prices at most market locations across the country finished the week on Friday, March 15 with sharp gains that contributed to significant increases ranging between 11 and 36 cents per MMBtu over the previous Friday. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed 18 cents per MMBtu from the previous Friday to trade at $2.99. On the NYMEX, the price of the futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $3.076 per MMBtu, up roughly 28 cents over the previous Friday. A trend towards cooler temperatures across some parts of the country, larger-than-expected net withdrawals from storage for the week ended Friday, March 8, and a recovering economy that increased demand likely contributed to the rally in prices. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation Map) The spot price for West

436

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) 16, 2007 to Thursday, January 23, 2008) Released: January 24, 2008 Next release: January 31, 2008 · Since Wednesday, January 16, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States, with the exception of the Northeast and Florida, and a few scattered points in Louisiana, Alabama/Mississippi, and the Rocky Mountains. · Prices at the Henry Hub declined 39 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $7.84 per MMBtu. · The New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 23) at $7.621 per MMBtu, falling 51 cents or 6.3 percent since Wednesday, January 16. · Natural gas in storage was 2,536 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 18, which is 7.4 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007).

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 31, 2007) 4, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 31, 2007) Natural gas spot prices decreased or remained unchanged at almost all trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, May 16, 2007. For the week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 16 to May 23), the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.53 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery settled at $7.757 per MMBtu yesterday, which is 13 cents or about 2 percent less than last Wednesday. As of Friday, May 18, 2007, natural gas in storage was 1,946 Bcf, or 20.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $65.10 per barrel or $11.22 per MMBtu as of yesterday. This is $2.53 per barrel more than the price last

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7, 2006) 29 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased at virtually all market locations this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, June 21-28) partly because of moderate cooling demand across much of the Lower 48 States. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 46 cents, or about 7 percent, to $6.04 per MMBtu, while locations in the Midwest and Midcontinent recorded the largest decreases averaging 59 and 66 cents per MMBtu, respectively. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery expired yesterday (June 28) at $5.887, decreasing 70 cents per MMBtu, or 10.6 percent, since last Wednesday (June 21). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, June 23 was 2,542 Bcf, which is 31.6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas

439

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 24, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 16, 2011) A reprieve from extreme cold in much of the country this week limited space-heating demand, contributing to price declines. The biggest price decreases occurred in the Northeast. During the report week (February 9-16), the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.29 to $3.93 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also decreased. The futures contract for March delivery decreased by $0.12 on the week to $3.92 per MMBtu. As of Friday, February 11, working gas in underground storage was 1,911 billion cubic feet (Bcf), which is 6.3 percent below the 5-year

440

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) 20, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 27) Natural gas spot prices registered gains of a dime or less at most major trading locations this week (Wednesday-Wednesday) as weather-driven demand combined with increasing oil prices to reverse a declining trend in prices. The upward price movement followed 6 weeks of declining prices until a low last Thursday, June 12, when prices at some trading locations along the Gulf Coast dipped just below $3.00 per MMBtu. Futures prices rose late last week after reaching similar lows. The NYMEX futures contract for July delivery settled Wednesday, June 19, at $3.314 per MMBtu, an increase of 26 cents for the week. EIA's estimate of total working gas inventories for the week ended June 14 was 2,096 Bcf with implied net injections of 81 Bcf.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "growth 2003-2025 printer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2009 , 2009 Next Release: April 9, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 1, 2009) Despite a persistent heating load in some areas of the country, most notably in the Midwest and the Midcontinent, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations this report week, undoubtedly reacting to the drops in futures prices since last Wednesday (March 25). The first day of the refill season (April 1 to October 31) was characterized by natural gas prices that reached their lowest levels in years on both the spot and futures markets. Much like other trading locations in the Lower 48 States, the spot price at the Henry Hub in Louisiana continued its downward trend this week,

442

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 13, 2006) 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 13, 2006) Despite the close of the traditional heating season on March 31 with relatively high volumes of natural gas remaining in storage, spot prices increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 29-April 5), however, the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 28 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent to $6.88. In contrast to the mixed price patterns on the spot markets, the prices of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) for delivery through next heating season all declined on the week. The futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub yesterday (Wednesday, April 5) settled at $7.069 per MMBtu, which is 39 cents less than last Wednesday's price.

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 30, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 22, 2010) Since Wednesday, September 15, natural gas spot prices fell at most markets across the lower 48 States, with declines of less than 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). However, selected markets in the Rocky Mountains and at the Florida citygate posted considerably larger declines, falling by as much as $0.51 per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell $0.04 per MMBtu since last Wednesday, averaging $4.02 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, September 22. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $3.966 per

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

27, 2001 27, 2001 With the return of above-average storage refill estimates for the third week of August and relatively widespread normal temperatures, prices moved down at most major markets last week. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) At the Henry Hub, the spot market price ended the week down 46 cents per MMBtu at $2.77. On the futures market, the near-month (September) NYMEX contract ended trading on Friday at $2.706 per MMBtu-off close to $0.60 from the previous Friday. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil remained at or above $27.20 per barrel each day last week and ended the week at $28.30 or $4.88 per MMBtu. Prices: Spot prices at most major market locations began the week down from the previous Friday, then trended up slightly at mid-week. However, following

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) 3 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 10, 2006) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, July 26 - August 2), as demand for power generation remained high in order to meet air-conditioning load and crude oil continued to trade near record-high prices. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $1.94 per MMBtu, or about 29 percent, to $8.65. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the August contract expired last Thursday, July 27, at $7.042 per MMBtu, about $1.16 more than the previous month's settlement. The price of the futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub moved about 83 cents per MMBtu higher on the week to settle yesterday (Wednesday, August 2) at $7.799. Natural gas in storage was 2,775 Bcf as of

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2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 3) Cold temperatures in parts of the Midwest and the Northeast lifted aggregate demand this week, resulting in higher natural gas spot prices at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 19-26), spot prices at the Henry Hub increased 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3.7 percent, to $6.44. Prices in the Northeast surged as extreme wintry conditions moved into the region, and constraints on interstate pipelines limited supply options for incremental deliveries. Yesterday (January 26), the price of the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.388 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 10 cents, or 1.5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,270 Bcf as of January 21, which is 14.0 percent above the

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 6, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 2, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 25, 2011) Warmer weather moved into major population centers this report week, increasing demand at electric power plants in order to meet air-conditioning needs. Prices moved higher at most trading locations in the lower 48 States, with the biggest increases occurring in the Southeast. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price increased $0.21 to $4.36 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also increased as the weather outlook suggested higher weather-related consumption for the remaining days of May. The futures contract for June

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 11, 2006) 4 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 11, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 26, 2006. For the week (Wednesday, April 26 to Wednesday, May 3), the spot price at the Henry Hub decreased 62 cents, or about 9 percent, to $6.56 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for June delivery settled at $6.606 per MMBtu yesterday (May 3), which is 67 cents or about 9 percent less than last Wednesday's level. As of Friday, April 28, 2006, natural gas in storage was 1,904 Bcf or 58 percent above the 5-year average of 1,205 Bcf. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil was $72.26 per barrel or $12.46 per MMBtu as of yesterday. This is 55 cents per barrel more than the price

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9, 2007 to Thursday, January 16, 2008) 9, 2007 to Thursday, January 16, 2008) Released: January 17, 2008 Next release: January 24, 2008 Since Wednesday, January 9, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 35 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 4 percent, to $8.23 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (January 16) at $8.133 per MMBtu, climbing 3 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, January 9. Natural gas in storage was 2,691 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 11, which is 7 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $4.84 per barrel on the week to $90.80 per barrel or $15.66 per MMBtu.

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5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 2, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 19) Natural gas spot prices have moved up by 10 to 25 cents at most trading locations since Wednesday, September 4. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the average Henry Hub price climbed $0.20 per MMBtu to $3.32 as Tropical Storm Fay temporarily threatened Gulf area production activity and late-season high temperatures triggered cooling demand in key market areas. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub increased a more moderate $0.057 per MMBtu since last Wednesday to settle at $3.250 yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,855 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by nearly 12.3 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rose $1.49 per barrel to $29.77, or

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3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 30, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices eased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 15-22), as Hurricane Dean failed to have a significant impact on U.S. production in the Gulf of Mexico and moderate temperatures limited demand. On the week, the Henry Hub spot price declined $1.46 per MMBtu, or 20 percent, to $5.84. Trading of futures contracts at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) also resulted in large price decreases. The NYMEX contract for September delivery decreased $1.286 per MMBtu on the week to a daily settlement of $5.578 yesterday (August 22). Working gas inventories reported in today's release of EIA's Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report were 2,926 Bcf as of Friday, August 17, which is 12.8

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0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 27, 2006) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 27, 2006) High crude oil prices and increasing cooling demand in some regions contributed to natural gas spot prices climbing more than 10 percent at trading locations in the Lower 48 States since Wednesday, April 12. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 12-19), the Henry Hub spot price rose 93 cents per MMBtu to $7.72. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery rose in each trading session this week, gaining $1.384 per MMBtu to close at $8.192 per MMBtu yesterday (April 19). Net storage injections continued for the second week this refill season. Working gas in storage as of Friday, April 14, increased to 1,761 Bcf, which is 62.6 percent above the 5-year (2001-2005) average. The spot price

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7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on July 14) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, June 29-July 6), as two tropical storms have disrupted production in the Gulf of Mexico and power generation demand to meet air-conditioning load has remained strong. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased $0.61 per MMBtu to $7.68. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for August delivery at the Henry Hub moved approximately 60 cents per MMBtu higher to settle yesterday (Wednesday, July 6) at $7.688. Natural gas in storage was 2,186 Bcf as of Friday, July 1, which is 12.4 percent above the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased

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5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 5, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 1, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally decreased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, October 17-24), as moderate weather prevailed across much of the Lower 48 States. Although tropical storms entering the Gulf of Mexico production region-evidenced by a system currently moving through the Caribbean-could still disrupt supplies, the passing of at least the most active part of the hurricane season may help explain the price declines. On the week the Henry Hub spot price decreased $1.01 per MMBtu to $6.10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), prices for futures contracts also registered significant decreases. The futures contract for November delivery declined about 49 cents per MMBtu on the

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4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 11, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 3, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were down modestly for the week following passage of the heat wave that had earlier gripped most of the country. The Henry Hub price decreased 20 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (down 4.5 percent) to close at $4.26 per MMBtu on August 3. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the downward price response was somewhat more pronounced (down 5.3 percent) with the September 2011 natural gas contract losing ground over the week, closing at $4.090 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,758 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 29, according to the U.S. Energy Information

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04, 2001 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 25) 8, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 25) Natural gas spot prices have increased since Wednesday, March 10, at most market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 28 cents or about 5 percent to $5.61 per MMBtu. Yesterday (Wednesday, March 17), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $5.722 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 33 cents or 6 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage decreased to 1,097 Bcf as of March 12, which is less than 6 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $2.00 per barrel or about 6 percent since last Wednesday, to $38.21 per barrel or $6.588 per MMBtu.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) 5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 22) An early spring chill in the Northeast kept natural gas spot prices firm this week until yesterday (April 14), when warmer temperatures resulted in sharp price declines at most trading locations for the day and moderately lower prices on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, April 7-14). The Henry Hub spot price declined 3 cents per MMBtu on the week to $5.73. After climbing above $6.00 per MMBtu earlier in the week, the NYMEX futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub dropped in the last two trading sessions to yesterday's closing price of $5.744, which represents a net decline of 13 cents per MMBtu on the week. There was a second consecutive week of injections into storage with stocks as of Friday, April 9, at 1,049 Bcf,

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, 2001 , 2001 The overall decline in spot prices accelerated last week, as continued below-normal temperatures in significant portions of the country suppressed electricity demand for air-conditioning use and storage injections once again hit record-setting levels. Temperatures averaged in the 80s for most of the eastern half of the nation, with slightly cooler temperatures prevailing along much of the populous West coast. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map). Futures market prices reinforced the general price weakness, with contracts for future deliveries falling 5 days in a row. NYMEX Natural Gas Futures Near Month Contract Settlement Price, Henry Hub Spot Price, and West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Price Prices: The key factors of increased supply and very little weather-generated swing

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on 3, 2007 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 20, 2007) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally increased this report week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 6-13), as tropical storms threatened to disrupt supplies and pipeline explosions in Mexico stirred concerns of supply security. Hurricane Humberto is still active near the Texas-Louisiana border at the time of this writing, and Tropical Depression 8 in the South Atlantic is apparently moving toward Puerto Rico and the general direction of the Gulf of Mexico (where these storms might cause energy-producing platforms to be evacuated and supplies to be shut in). However, companies have not yet announced significant shut-in production or damage from the weather. On the week the Henry Hub spot price increased 32

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7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 24, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 16, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased sharply this report week (September 9-17) amid some indications of improvement in the economy. The largest price increases generally occurred in the western half of the country. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.56 to $3.28 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices increased significantly and are now more than $1 per MMBtu above the recent lows in early September. The futures contract for October delivery increased by $0.93 per MMBtu on the week to $3.76 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (September 11)

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19 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 19 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 26, 2006) Changes in natural gas spot prices were mixed this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, January 11-18), as colder weather boosted demand for space-heating in the eastern half of the country and moderate temperatures in part led to continued price declines in the West. For the week, the price at the Henry Hub increased 30 cents, or about 3.5 percent, to $8.85 per MMBtu, as colder weather returned to the East. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for February delivery dropped 47 cents per MMBtu yesterday (January 18) to $8.694, a 6-month low for the February 2006 contract, on expectations of moderate temperatures for the rest of the heating season. The near-month contract decreased roughly 54 cents since last Wednesday (January 11), and is now

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June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) June 6, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 13) Natural gas spot prices weakened in the opening days of June as concerns lingered over high storage inventories levels and mild weather limited gas demand in the key market areas of the Midwest and Northeast. Net storage injections for the week ending May 31 were 105 Bcf, bringing the total inventory level in the country to 1,893 Bcf, according to EIA estimates. Since Wednesday, May 29, prices at most trading locations have dropped by 16 cents or less. At the NYMEX, prices for futures contracts have declined more sharply. In the first week of trading as the near-month contract, the price for a futures contract for July delivery fell to $3.260 per MMBtu by yesterday's close, a drop of $0.245 per MMBtu since the

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 15) Since Wednesday, November 30, natural gas spot prices have increased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases exceeding $2.50 per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, December 7, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $13.95 per MMBtu, increasing $2.22 per MMBtu, or about 19 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub has increased about $1.11 per MMBtu, or about 9 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $13.70 per MMBtu yesterday (December 7). Natural gas in storage was 3,166 Bcf as of December 2, which is about 7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.88 per barrel, or

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9, 2008 9, 2008 Next Release: October 16, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, October 1 to Wednesday, October 8) Natural gas spot prices in the Lower 48 States this report week declined to their lowest levels this year even as disruptions in offshore Gulf of Mexico production continue in the aftermath of Hurricanes Ike and Gustav. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased $0.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $6.58. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-term contract (November 2008) decreased to its lowest price since September 2007, closing at $6.742 per MMBtu yesterday (October 8). The net change during a week in which the price decreased each trading day was

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 1) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 1) Since Wednesday, November 9, natural gas spot prices have increased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States, with increases exceeding $2 per MMBtu at most markets. On Wednesday, November 16, prices at the Henry Hub averaged $11.04 per MMBtu, increasing $1.73 per MMBtu, or more than 18 percent, since the previous Wednesday. The futures contract for December delivery has increased 66 cents per MMBtu, or about 6 percent on the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), settling at $12.329 per MMBtu yesterday (November 16). Natural gas in storage was 3,282 Bcf as of November 11, which is about 6 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil decreased $1.80 per barrel, or

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1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) 1, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 28) Despite rising temperatures in many regions of the country that helped push prices upward over the past 3 days, spot prices nonetheless ended trading yesterday (Wednesday, August 20) down for the most part from levels of the previous Wednesday (August 13). At the Henry Hub, the spot price fell by 14 cents per MMBtu on the week, ending trading yesterday at $5.03. Likewise on the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for September delivery ended the week down 6 cents per MMBtu from the previous week, when it finished trading yesterday at $5.119. The EIA reported that working gas in storage increased to 2,266 Bcf as of Friday, August 15, which is 7.4 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average for the week.

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7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on March 24) Since Wednesday, March 9, natural gas spot prices have risen at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, while declining in the Northeast region. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 9 cents, or about 1 percent, to $7.08 per MMBtu. Yesterday (March 16), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.192 per MMBtu, increasing roughly 31 cents, or about 5 percent, since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,379 Bcf as of March 11, which is about 24 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per barrel, or about 3 percent, on the week to $56.50 per barrel or $8.741

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2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) 2 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 29) Since Wednesday, September 14, natural gas spot prices have increased at all market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing to the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina and the approaching Hurricane Rita. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased $3.45, or about 32 percent, to $14.25 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 21), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $12.594 per MMBtu, increasing roughly $1.43 or about 13 percent since last Wednesday (September 14). Natural gas in storage was 2,832 Bcf as of September 16, which is 3.4 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $1.76 per

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 3, 2009 Next Release: August 20, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 12, 2009) Reversing gains from the previous week, natural gas prices posted declines in both the spot and futures markets, with decreases in the spot markets of up to 48 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The Henry Hub spot price fell 25 cents, or 7 percent, closing at $3.36 per MMBtu on Wednesday, August 12. The natural gas futures contract for September 2009 at the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) fell 56 cents, or 14 percent, on the week, closing at $3.479 on Wednesday. During its tenure as the near-month contract, the price of the September 2009 contract peaked at $4.042 on August 5.

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Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 15) 8, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on August 15) Since Wednesday, July 31, natural gas spot prices have declined at most locations in the Lower 48 States, generally falling between 17 and 41 cents. However, steeper declines were recorded at some market locations. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 31 cents or nearly 14 percent to $2.73 per MMBtu. Principally moderating temperatures since Monday, August 5 drove price drops at most locations. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for September delivery at the Henry Hub decreased over 29 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $2.660 per MMBtu yesterday. Natural gas in storage increased to 2,567 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by more than 15 percent. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil moved down 44 cents per

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1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 7, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 30, 2011) Cooler-than-normal temperatures helped to briefly lift natural gas cash market prices at nearly all domestic pricing points during the middle of the week, after which general price declines continued. For the week ending March 30, the Henry Hub price rose a token 7 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (1.7 percent) to $4.25 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,624 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 25, according to the Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 12 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

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6, 2008 6, 2008 Next Release: November 14, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the week ending Wednesday, November 5) Since Wednesday, October 29, natural gas spot prices increased at most markets in the Lower 48 States outside the Midwest, Northeast, and Alabama/Mississippi regions, with gains of up to $1.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) in a week of highly variable prices. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 36 cents per MMBtu or about 5 percent, to $6.94 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for December delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (November 5) at $7.249 per MMBtu, climbing 47 cents per MMBtu or about 7 percent since last Wednesday, October 29. Natural gas in storage was 3,405 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

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3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 19, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 11, 2009) With little impact on production in the Gulf of Mexico from Hurricane Ida and moderate temperatures in many parts of the country, natural gas spot prices decreased sharply this report week (November 4-11). The Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.90 to $3.59 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices also moved lower as the threat of an interruption in supplies from the hurricane passed. The futures contract for December delivery decreased by $0.22 on the report week to $4.503 per MMBtu. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (November 6) is

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9 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 9 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 3) Natural gas spot prices on Wednesday, December 18, were higher than the previous Wednesday at most locations in the Lower 48 States, climbing between 20 and 60 cents per MMBtu. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub increased 36 cents or roughly 8 percent to $4.86 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub has increased nearly 57 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $5.278 per MMBtu yesterday (December 18). Natural gas in storage decreased to 2,635 Bcf, which is below the 5-year average by over 5 percent, but well within the 5-year historical range. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.95 per barrel or about

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31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 31, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on November 7) Spot and futures prices fluctuated over the past week (Wednesday, October 23 to Wednesday, October 30), with cash prices moving up from 6 to 35 cents per MMBtu at most market locations in response to rising demand from colder-than-normal temperatures, while futures prices for contracts for delivery through the impending heating season drifted lower. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 9 cents from the previous Wednesday (October 23) to $4.33 per MMBtu in yesterday's (October 30) trading. The expired near-month contract for November delivery ended trading on Tuesday, October 29 at $4.126 per MMBtu, recording a net gain of $0.085 since beginning as the prompt month contract on September 27. The new

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22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 22, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on January 5, 2006) Spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States this week as moderating temperatures relative to the prior week reduced space-heating demand and prices for competing petroleum products eased. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, December 14-21), the Henry Hub price decreased $1.25 per MMBtu to $13.55. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for January delivery settled yesterday (December 21) at $14.271 per MMBtu, which was about 41 cents per MMBtu, or 2.8 percent, lower on the week. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that working gas in storage was 2,804 Bcf as of Friday, December 16, which reflects an implied net decrease of 162 Bcf.

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Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on May 25, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased this week (Wednesday - Wednesday, May 10-17) at virtually all market locations, partly because of weak weather-related demand and a decrease in the price of crude oil. The Henry Hub spot price decreased 34 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, while some other market locations in Louisiana noted decreases of up to 65 cents on the week. East and South Texas trading locations, as well as locations in the Northeast, experienced slightly less dramatic decreases, averaging 31 cents per MMBtu. Yesterday (May 17), the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.129 per MMBtu, decreasing 77 cents or about 11 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, May

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481

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) 1 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 28) Increased natural gas demand owing to falling temperatures this week (Wednesday-Wednesday, October 13-20) combined with higher petroleum prices to lift spot and futures gas prices dramatically. The result at the Henry Hub was a net gain on the week of $1.86 per MMBtu, or 35 percent, to $7.25. After gaining value in the past three trading days, the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub ended the week at $7.623 per MMBtu, a net increase of 77.2 cents. Natural gas in storage continues to build at a rate that could result in the highest inventories in years by the start of the traditional heating season (November 1). As of Friday, October 15, inventories were 3,223 Bcf, which is 7.4 percent above the

482

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 11, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 3, 2010) Since Wednesday, January 27, natural gas spot prices rose at most market locations in the lower 48 States, with increases of less than 10 percent on the week. Prices at the Henry Hub climbed $0.09, or about 2 percent, to $5.51 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, February 3, at $5.42 per MMBtu, increasing by 19.5 cents or about 4 percent during the report week. Natural gas in storage was 2,406 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 29, which is about 7 percent above the 5-year average (2005-2009).

483

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, to Wednesday, March 26) 19, to Wednesday, March 26) Released: March 27, 2008 Next release: April 3, 2008 · Since Wednesday, March 19, natural gas prices increased on both the spot and futures markets. · The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 14 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) or 1.5 percent on the week, averaging $9.25 per MMBtu yesterday. · One day ahead of its expiration as the near-month contract, the price of the April 2008 futures contract settled at $9.572 per MMBtu, increasing about 55 cents or 6 percent since last Wednesday. · Natural gas in storage was 1,277 Bcf as of March 21, which is 2.7 percent above the 5-year average. · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $2.58 per barrel on the week to $105.83 per barrel or $18.25 per

484

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

485

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 0, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 17) Since Wednesday, October 2, natural gas spot prices at most Gulf Coast markets have dropped $0.20 to $0.80 per MMBtu with the passing of Hurricane Lili. Although offshore producers and pipeline companies are still working to return supply operations to normal, infrastructure damage appears minimal. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub fell 33 cents or slightly less than 8 percent to $3.91 per MMBtu. The price of the NYMEX futures contract for November delivery at the Henry Hub decreased slightly more than 24 cents since last Wednesday to settle at $3.918 per MMBtu yesterday (October 9). Natural gas in storage as of October 4 increased to 3,080 Bcf, which exceeds the 5-year average by 9 percent. The

486

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 21, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 13, 2011) Nearly all pricing points were up somewhat for the week on a heat wave that affected nearly half the country’s population according to national news reports. Despite the record heat, the Henry Hub price increased a modest 9 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) over the week (2.0 percent) to close at $4.43 per MMBtu on July 13. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price response was more robust (up 4.4 percent) with the August 2011 natural gas contract price gaining ground over the week, closing at $4.403 per MMBtu on Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage rose last week to 2,611 billion cubic

487

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

488

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 6, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 13) Natural gas spot prices climbed between $0.55 and $0.95 per MMBtu at most production-area trading locations since Wednesday, January 29. Strong space-heating demand in the Midcontinent and parts of New England supported prices well over $6 throughout much of the country, but price gains were particularly large at Rockies trading locations. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), the Henry Hub spot price jumped $0.62 to an average of $6.24 per MMBtu. The NYMEX futures contract for March delivery gained just under 2 cents per MMBtu on the week to settle at $5.644 on Wednesday, February 5. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 31, decreased to 1,521 Bcf, which is 15.9 percent below the 5-year (1998-2002) average. The

489

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) 7 (next release 2:00 p.m. on October 14) Natural gas spot and futures prices generally moved in opposite directions for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, September 29-October 6), as spot prices fell at most market locations, while futures prices continued to climb higher. In yesterday's (Wednesday, October 6) trading at the Henry Hub, the spot price for natural gas averaged $6.00 per MMBtu, down 23 cents per MMBtu, or close to 4 percent, from the previous Wednesday. On the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for November delivery gained $0.134 per MMBtu on the week, or about 2 percent, as it settled yesterday at $7.045. Settlement prices for contracts for gas delivery in December 2004 through March 2005 rose much more sharply, with

490

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 3) 7, 2003 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 3) At the Henry Hub, the spot price declined 29 cents per MMBtu from the previous Wednesday (March 19), as spot gas traded yesterday (Wednesday, March 26) for $4.91. Both spot and futures prices trended lower for the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, March 19-26), as mild temperatures in most of the nation accompanied the first week of spring. On the NYMEX, the settlement price for the futures contract for April delivery fell a cumulative $0.181 per MMBtu from last Wednesday's level, to $5.097 per MMBtu at yesterday's close of trading. Natural gas stocks as of Friday, March 21 stood at 643 Bcf, which is 47.4 percent less than the previous 5-year (1998-2002) average. The war in Iraq has caused significant volatility in oil prices over the past week. In yesterday's trading,

491

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2009 9, 2009 Next Release: February 5, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 28, 2009) Since Wednesday, January 21, natural gas spot price movements were mixed, with decreases at most markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 3 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $4.84 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub expired yesterday (January 28) at $4. 476 per MMBtu, declining 30 cents per MMBtu or about 6 percent since last Wednesday, January 21. Natural gas in storage was 2,374 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of January 23, which is about 1.2 percent above the 5-year average

492

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 6, 2006) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 6, 2006) Since Wednesday, March 22, natural gas spot prices decreased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, with declines of up to 38 cents per MMBtu. On Wednesday, March 29, the spot price at the Henry Hub averaged $7.16 per MMBtu, climbing about 9 cents per MMBtu or about 1 percent during the week (Wednesday-Wednesday). The futures contract for April delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $7.233 per MMBtu yesterday (March 29), gaining about 28 cents per MMBtu or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,705 Bcf as of March 24, which is about 62 percent above the 5-year average. Since March 22, the spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased $5.97 per barrel, or about 10

493

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

February 6, to Wednesday, February 13) February 6, to Wednesday, February 13) Released: February 14, 2008 Next release: February 21, 2008 · Since Wednesday, February 6, natural gas spot prices increased at virtually all markets in the Lower 48 States. Prices at the Henry Hub rose 41 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 5 percent, to $8.35 per MMBtu. · At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for March delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday (February 13) at $8.388 per MMBtu, climbing 39 cents or about 5 percent since Wednesday, February 6. · Natural gas in storage was 1,942 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of February 8, which is 5.9 percent above the 5-year average (2003-2007). · The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil climbed $6.12 per barrel on the week to $93.28 per barrel or $16.08 per

494

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) 8 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 15, 2006) Continuing moderate temperatures across much of the Lower 48 States, particularly in the eastern half of the country, helped lower natural gas spot and futures prices during the week (Wednesday to Wednesday, May 31 - June 7). The spot price at the Henry Hub decreased by $0.15 per MMBtu, or about 2.5 percent, for the week, to $5.82 in yesterday's (Wednesday, June 7) trading. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the futures contract for July delivery moved lower by 41 cents per MMBtu compared with its settlement price a week ago, ending yesterday at $5.974 per MMBtu. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported that natural gas inventories in underground storage were an estimated 2,320 Bcf

495

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 31 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 7, 2006) Natural gas spot prices decreased significantly in the Lower 48 States this week as Tropical Storm Ernesto moved north along the east coast, easing the threat to Gulf of Mexico natural gas supplies. The spot price at the Henry Hub dropped 79 cents, or about 11 percent this week (Wednesday to Wednesday, August 23 to 30) to $6.40 per MMBtu. In its first day of trading as the near month contract, the price of the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX) futures contract for October delivery settled at $6.29 per MMBtu yesterday (August 30), which is 72 cents, or about 10 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. As of Friday, August 25, 2006, natural gas in storage was 2,905 Bcf or 12.4 percent above the 5-year average. The

496

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 1) 5, 2004 (next release 2:00 p.m. on April 1) Weather cooperated with the calendar this week, as the official start of spring on March 20 brought a warming trend and a possible end to seasonally chilly weather. The absence of wintertime temperatures and slightly lower oil prices resulted in prices easing 20 to 45 cents per MMBtu since Wednesday, March 17. On the week (Wednesday-Wednesday, March 17-24), the Henry Hub spot price dropped 26 cents per MMBtu to $5.35. The NYMEX futures contract for April delivery fell 29 cents on the week to close at $5.429 yesterday (March 24). Natural gas in storage as of Friday, March 19, decreased to 1,032 Bcf, which is 8.2 percent below the 5-year average inventory for the report week. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate

497

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2008 2, 2008 Next Release: May 29, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview Since Wednesday, May 14, natural gas spot prices decreased at most markets in the Lower 48 States. However, a price rally yesterday (May 21) contributed to price increases at some market locations since last Wednesday, May 14. Prices at the Henry Hub fell 11 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), or about 1 percent, to $11.40 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $11.64 per MMBtu, rising 4 cents or less than 1 percent since Wednesday, May 14. Natural gas in storage was 1,614 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May 16, which is slightly below the 5-year average (2003-2007), following an

498

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 17) 0 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 17) Since Wednesday, June 2, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 46 cents or about 7 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 9), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.082 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 44 cents or nearly 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,666 Bcf as of June 4, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $2.36 per barrel or nearly 6 percent on the week to $37.60 per barrel or $6.48 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperatures and falling crude oil prices contributed

499

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 2, 6 (next release 2:00 p.m. on February 2, 2006) Natural gas spot prices continued to decrease this week at all market locations as unseasonably mild temperatures persist in most regions of the United States. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub declined 35 cents per MMBtu, or about 4 percent, to trade at $8.50 per MMBtu yesterday (January 25). The price of the NYMEX futures contract for February delivery at the Henry Hub also decreased this week. The contract closed yesterday at $8.460 per MMBtu which is 23 cents per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, less than last Wednesday's price. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, January 20, decreased to 2,494 Bcf, which is 21.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas

500

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) 5 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 22) Since Wednesday, September 7, natural gas spot prices have increased at most market locations in the Lower 48 States, owing at least partially to the aftermath of storm activity in the Gulf of Mexico. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday) however, prices at the Henry Hub decreased 25 cents, or about 2 percent, to $10.80 per MMBtu. Yesterday (September 14), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for October delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $11.166 per MMBtu, decreasing by only 3.5 cents or about 0.3 percent since last Wednesday (September 7). Natural gas in storage was 2,758 Bcf as of September 9, which is 3.7 percent above the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil increased 82 cents per barrel, or 1.3 percent, since last Wednesday,