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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Groves takes the reins  

SciTech Connect

A study of General Leslie R. Groves and his management style, largely concentrating on the time period beginning with his appointment on September 17, 1942 as head of the Army Corps of Engineers, Manhattan Engineer District and ending when the first bomb was dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945. This is one of a series of articles in this magazine commemorating the 50th anniversary of the first controlled chain reaction.

Goldberg, S.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Markets for compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Introduction; Characteristics and Benefits of Compost and Competing/Complementary Products; Compost Uses and Markets; Factors Pertinent to Developing Compost Markets; Compost Specifications; Compost Testing Requirements; Compost Distribution; Compost Policies; Economic and Noneconomic Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; Strategies to Mitigate/Overcome Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; and Examples of Existing Programs and Markets (as of 1989).

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Pioneer Grove | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove Grove Jump to: navigation, search Name Pioneer Grove Facility Pioneer Grove Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Acciona Windpower Developer Acciona Energy Energy Purchaser Central Iowa Power Cooperative Location Mechanicsville IA Coordinates 41.85086289°, -91.23407364° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.85086289,"lon":-91.23407364,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Manhattan Project: Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Leslie Groves and J. Robert Oppenheimer Home Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 > Groves and the MED, 1942 Events > Bringing it All Together, 1942-1945 Events > Bringing it All...

5

Spring Grove Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove Biomass Facility Grove Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Spring Grove Biomass Facility Facility Spring Grove Sector Biomass Owner P.H. Glatfelder Location Spring Grove, Pennsylvania Coordinates 39.8745436°, -76.8658078° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8745436,"lon":-76.8658078,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Composting Manure and Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composted manure and sludge can be a valuable fertilizer, but special equipment is required. Composting can be done with windrow operations, aerated windrow operations or aerated bins. Factors that affect composting rates are included.

Sweeten, John M.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

7

Adsorption of Water Vapor by Bare Soil in an Olive Grove in Southern Spain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data for water vapor adsorption and evaporation are presented for a bare soil (sandy loam, clay content 15%) in a southern Spanish olive grove. Water losses and gains were measured using eight high-precision minilysimeters, placed around an olive ...

A. Verhoef; A. Diaz-Espejo; J. R. Knight; L. Villagarca; J. E. Fernndez

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Characterization of explosives processing waste decomposition due to composting. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to provide data and methodology assisting the transfer and acceptance of composting technology for the remediation of explosives-contaminated soils and sediments. Issues and activities addressed included: (a) chemical and toxicological characterization of compost samples from new field composting experiments, and the environmental availability of composting efficiency by isolation of bacterial consortia and natural surfactants from highly efficient composts, and (c) improved assessment of compost product suitability for land application.

Griest, W.H.; Stewart, A.J.; Ho, C.H.; Tyndall, R.L.; Vass, A.A.; Caton, J.E.; Caldwell, W.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Composting Large Animal Carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disposing of large animal carcasses can be a problem for agricultural producers. Composting is a simple, low-cost method that yields a useful product that can be used as fertilizer. In this publication you'll learn the basics of composting, how to build and maintain a compost pile, tools you will need, and how to use the finished compost.

Auvermann, Brent W.; Mukhtar, Saqib; Heflin, Kevin

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Comparison of NOx Removal Efficiencies in Compost Based Biofilters Using Four Different Compost Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, 3.6 trillion kilowatt-hours of electricity were generated in the United States. Over half of this was from coal-fired power plants, resulting in more than 8.3 million tons of nitrogen oxide (NOx) compounds being released into the environment. Over 95% of the NOx compounds produced during coal combustion are in the form of nitric oxide (NO). NOx emission regulations are becoming increasingly stringent, leading to the need for new, cost effective NOx treatment technologies. Biofiltration is such a technology. NO removal efficiencies were compared in compost based biofilters using four different composts. In previous experiments, removal efficiencies were typically highest at the beginning of the experiment, and decreased as the experiments proceeded. This work tested different types of compost in an effort to find a compost that could maintain NO removal efficiencies comparable to those seen early in the previous experiments. One of the composts was wood based with manure, two were wood based with high nitrogen content sludge, and one was dairy compost. The wood based with manure and one of the wood based with sludge composts were taken directly from an active compost pile while the other two composts were received in retail packaging which had been out of active piles for an indeterminate amount of time. A high temperature (55-60C) off-gas stream was treated in biofilters operated under denitrifying conditions. Biofilters were operated at an empty bed residence time of 13 seconds with target inlet NO concentrations of 500 ppmv. Lactate was the carbon and energy source. Compost was sampled at 10-day intervals to determine aerobic and anaerobic microbial densities. Compost was mixed at a 1:1 ratio with lava rock and calcite was added at 100g/kg of compost. In each compost tested, the highest removal efficiencies occurred within the first 10 days of the experiment. The wood based with manure peaked at day 3 (77.14%), the dairy compost at day 1 (80.74%), the active wood based with sludge at day 5 (68.15%) and the inactive wood based with sludge at day 9 (63.64%, this compost was frozen when received). These levels gradually decreased throughout the remainder of the experiment until they fell between 40% and 60%. Decreasing removal efficiency was characteristic of all the composts tested, regardless of their makeup or activity state prior to testing. Although microbial densities and composition between composts may have differed, there was little change in densities within each experiment.

Lacey, Jeffrey Alan; Lee, Brady Douglas; Apel, William Arnold

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Manhattan Project: Generals Leslie Groves and Thomas Farrell  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Generals Leslie Groves and Thomas Farrell Events > Dawn of the Atomic Era, 1945 > Debate Over How to Use the Bomb, Washington, D.C., Late Spring 1945 Generals Leslie Groves and...

12

Farmers enter compost business  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One sixth of Massachusett's six million tons of solid waste can be composted economically. The Department of Food and Agriculture intends to survey and identify the existing and potential markets for compost and their demand characteristics and to promote the use of compost as an environmentally sound alternative to existing uses of synthetic fertilizers and conditioners. Various pilot projects have been set up composting poultry manures, horse manures, fish wastes, shredded newspaper, cheese whey, wood ash, etc.

Goldstein, N.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Composting Horse Manure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncontrolled stockpiles of horse manure can be an unsightly, smelly and fly-infested mess. However, composting manure can eliminate the messy problems and provide a modest additional income for horse enthusiasts, operators of equine facilities and large-animal veterinary clinics. This publication explains what composting is and how to make compost from horse manure. It also provides a case study of a successful composting operation.

Auvermann, Brent W.; McDonald, Lanny; Devin, Robert; Sweeten, John M.

1999-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

14

Camp Grove Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove Wind Farm Grove Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp Grove Wind Farm Facility Camp Grove Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner OEG (Orion Energy Group) Developer OEG (Orion Energy Group) Energy Purchaser AEP-Appalachian Power Location Marshall & Stark Counties IL Coordinates 41.088871°, -89.656684° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.088871,"lon":-89.656684,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

Biogas, compost and fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot project now under development in Folsom, California, incorporates an anaerobic digestion/aerobic composting process that could eventually supply enough biogas to a fuel cell. The Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) has two fuel cells in operation and is participating in the research project. Recently, the California Prison Industry Authority (PIA) began operating a processing facility at the Folsom prison, designed for 100 tons/day of mixed waste from the City of Folsom. The 35,000 square foot Correctional Resource Recovery Facility (CRRF) uses minimum security inmates from Folsom`s Return to Custody Facility to manually separate recyclables and compostable materials from the waste stream. The PIA will be using a new technology, high solids anaerobic digestion, to compost the organic fraction (representing approximately 60 to 70 percent of the waste stream). Construction began in June on a 40-foot wide by 120-foot long and 22-foot deep anaerobic digester. Once the vessel is operational in 1995, the composting process and the gradual breakdown of organic material will produce biogas, which SMUD hopes to use to power an adjacent two megawatt fuel cell. The electricity generated will serve SMUD customers, including the waste facility and nearby correctional institutions. 1 fig.

Wichert, B.; Wittrup, L.; Robel, R. [Sacramento Municipal Utility District, CA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Manhattan Project: Groves and the MED, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED Colonel James Marshall, 1946 GROVES AND THE MED (1942) Events > Difficult Choices, 1942 More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 The summer of 1942 proved to be a troublesome one for the fledgling bomb project. Colonel James C. Marshall (right) received the assignment of directing the Laboratory for the Development of Substitute Metals, or DSM, the military's initial cover name for the project. Marshall immediately moved from Syracuse, where he served in the Corps's Syracuse Engineer District, to New York City. Concerned that the name DSM would attract too much attention, the military set up the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), established by general order on August 13. Marshall, like most other Army officers, knew nothing of nuclear physics. Furthermore, Marshall and his Army superiors were disposed to move cautiously. In one case, for instance, Marshall delayed purchase of an excellent production site in Tennessee pending further study, while the scientists who had been involved in the project from the start were pressing for immediate purchase. Although Vannevar Bush had carefully managed the transition to Army control, there was not yet a mechanism to arbitrate disagreements between the S-1 Committee and the military. The resulting lack of coordination complicated attempts to gain a higher priority for scarce materials and boded ill for the future of the entire bomb project.

17

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost; Planning for small-scale compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a (more)

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Cedar Grove, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cedar Grove, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates...

19

Changes in cadmium mobility during composting and after soil application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of twelve weeks of composting on the mobility and bioavailability of cadmium in six composts containing sewage sludge, wood chips and grass was studied, along with the cadmium immobilization capacity of compost. Two different soils were used and Cd accumulation measured in above-ground oat biomass (Avena sativa L.). Increasing pH appears to be an important cause of the observed decreases in available cadmium through the composting process. A pot experiment was performed with two different amounts of compost (9.6 and 28.8 g per kg of soil) added into Fluvisol with total Cd 0.255 mg kg{sup -1}, and contaminated Cambisol with total Cd 6.16 mg kg{sup -1}. Decrease of extractable Cd (0.01 mol l{sup -1} CaCl{sub 2}) was found in both soils after compost application. The higher amount of compost immobilized an exchangeable portion of Cd (0.11 mol l{sup -1} CH{sub 3}COOH extractable) in contaminated Cambisol unlike in light Fluvisol. The addition of a low amount of compost decreased the content of Cd in associated above-ground oat biomass grown in both soils, while a high amount of compost decreased the Cd content in oats only in the Cambisol.

Hanc, Ales [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)], E-mail: hanc@af.czu.cz; Tlustos, Pavel; Szakova, Jirina; Habart, Jan [Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Czech University of Life Sciences, 165 21 Prague (Czech Republic)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Cleaning up compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Municipal composting is now being investigated as a way of coping with solid-waste organic materials. Municipal solid wastes (MSW) have no national standards for compost quality. One study reports that MSWs contain polychlorinated biphenyls and have levels of toxic heavy metals that match or exceed sewage sludge. However, another study reports that sorted compostable wastes have much lower content of lead and other toxic metals. A 30 day experiment involving 300 households in Connecticut with waste recycling, composting, and analysis is described. Twenty-three measured elements in the waste were well below EPA standards and the compose was effective as a fertilizer. Ongoing studies in New York City and Guelph, Ontario are reported. Ethanol production from organic wastes is discussed as another possibility for recyling.

Raloff, J.

1993-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Microsoft Word - Forest Grove Expansion I CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

, 2011 , 2011 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Amit Sinha - TEP-CSB-2 Proposed Action: Forest Grove Substation Expansion Budget Information: Work Order # 255319 Task 03 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021: B4.6 "Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities..." Location: Washington County, OR - Section 32, Township 1 North, Range 3 West of the Forest Grove Quadrangle Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to expand Forest Grove Substation located in Washington County, OR. The purpose of this project is to improve load service and reliability within the Portland vicinity as per the NERC reliability standards. Within the existing Forest Grove Substation, the

22

EcoGrove Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoGrove Wind Farm EcoGrove Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoGrove Wind Farm Facility EcoGrove Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Acciona Developer Acciona Location Stephenson County IL Coordinates 42.452903°, -89.840816° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.452903,"lon":-89.840816,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

23

Getting the most from compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composting, throughout history, has been one of the oldest, cheapest, and most environmentally friendly waste management tools. Yet, in the modern era, composting on a large scale has run into many economic and operational snags--especially in municipal programs--despite the rosy predictions of the compost industry's waste diversion potential. What has kept this natural, seemingly foolproof municipal waste management method from wholesale success According to many, it is a combination of poor planning, anemic budgets, and a general lack of understanding of the science of composting--understanding that can usually be found in the private sector. ''In my experience, there's a hell of a lot of municipalities doing small operations, but most of the large operations are private,'' says Steve Jones, vice president of DK Recycling Systems, Inc. (Lake Bluff, Ill.), which operates 12 composting facilities in northern Illinois. According to Robert Gillespie, DK's president, the composting success hinges not only on the source of funds, but on the people involved as well. For a composting system to be successful, the designer--either privately or publicly funded--must be sensitive to the biology of composting and how field applications differ from laboratory settings. Some companies compost only leaves, brush and wood, while others also take grass clipping and food wastes.

Dabaie, M.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

City of Spring Grove, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Spring Grove, Minnesota (Utility Company) City of Spring Grove, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Spring Grove Place Minnesota Utility Id 17823 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO NERC MRO Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Demand Commercial Commercial- Single-Phase Commercial Commercial- Three-Phase Commercial Large Commercial Commercial Peak Alert Commercial Peak Alert- Northern Engraving Commercial Peak Alert- Tweeten Lutheran Commercial Residential- Duel Fuel Energy Residential Residential- Single-Phase Residential

25

Twin Groves I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groves I Wind Farm Groves I Wind Farm Facility Twin Groves I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Horizon Wind Energy Location McLean County IL Coordinates 40.463317°, -88.64753° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.463317,"lon":-88.64753,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

26

Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Forest Grove Light and Power - Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heat Pumps Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Air Sealing: $400 Duct Sealing: $500 Program Info State Oregon Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Heat Pump with Central Ducts (Replacement): $300 - $1,000 Heat Pump with Central Ducts (Furnace Conversion): $1,400 - $1,900 Heat Pump with Ductless System: $1,500 Clothes Washer: $20 - $70 Refrigerator: $25 Freezer: $25 Electric Water Heater: $25

27

Twin Groves II (07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twin Groves II (07) Wind Farm Twin Groves II (07) Wind Farm Facility Twin Groves II (07) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Constellation Energy Location McLean County IL Coordinates 40.463317°, -88.64753° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.463317,"lon":-88.64753,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

28

Successful bioremediation with compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Air Force Base has begun using a composting process developed by a private company to degrade petroleum hydrocarbons on site. In the process, a layer of compost is placed on top of the sealer to prevent accidental damage by the equipment. Then a layer of contaminated soil is applied, followed by another layer of compost and a final layer of turkey manure supplied by a local farmer on top. Two passes are made with the Scat to provide thorough mixing. Different techniques were examined to turn volumes of the material and it was found that this equipment works very well for smaller batches. After mixing, materials are covered with a gray, vinyl-coated nylon cover to protect the pile from the elements and encourage bacterial growth. The tarp is tied to eyelets inserted every five feet along the curb of the treatment area. Although not specifically developed for hazardous materials, PXS has piloted the process to handle PCBs, trichlorethylene, benzopyrene and other chemicals found around wood preservative plants, manufactured gas plants and military installations. It is seen that they are all degraded: first the white rot degrades them and then the bacteria metabolizes them.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Composition of Toxic Leachate and Unstable Compost to Produce Biodegradable Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper reports a study of mixing two materials that were toxic leachate and unstable compost, aiming to produce biodegradable material. Various low levels of BOD/COD of leachate were mixed with various high levels of C/N of unstable compost. CO2 evolution test was performed to measure the degree of biodegradable materials. The leachate contained BOD and COD that were more than 100 and 500 mg LG 1 respectively and represented by BOD/COD ratio of less than 0.1. The compost characterized by C/N ratio in the range of 15-20. Results showed that leachate and compost mixture produced biodegradable material. A mixture containing 20 % leachate and 80 % compost produced high level of biodegradable material. Key words: Toxic leachate % Unstable compost % Biodegradable material

Sarwoko Mangkoedihardjo; Yulia Maghriba; Rachmat Boedisantoso

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Twin Groves II (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groves II (08) Wind Farm Groves II (08) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Twin Groves II (08) Wind Farm Facility Twin Groves II (08) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Constellation Energy Location McLean County IL Coordinates 40.463317°, -88.64753° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.463317,"lon":-88.64753,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Vine Grove, Kentucky: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vine Grove, Kentucky: Energy Resources Vine Grove, Kentucky: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.8100674°, -85.9813524° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.8100674,"lon":-85.9813524,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

32

Loxahatchee Groves, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loxahatchee Groves, Florida: Energy Resources Loxahatchee Groves, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.6836768°, -80.27977° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.6836768,"lon":-80.27977,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

33

Garden Grove, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, California: Energy Resources Grove, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.7739053°, -117.9414477° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.7739053,"lon":-117.9414477,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

34

Downers Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downers Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Downers Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8089191°, -88.0111746° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8089191,"lon":-88.0111746,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Beech Grove, Indiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, Indiana: Energy Resources Grove, Indiana: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.7219884°, -86.0899847° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7219884,"lon":-86.0899847,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

36

City of Grove City, Minnesota (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, Minnesota (Utility Company) City, Minnesota (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Grove City Place Minnesota Utility Id 7732 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location MRO Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Demand-Large Three Phase. Commercial Three Phase Commercial Yard Light Lighting small single phase Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1130/kWh Commercial: $0.1030/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Grove_City,_Minnesota_(Utility_Company)&oldid=409689"

37

Pleasant Grove, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, Utah: Energy Resources Grove, Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3641184°, -111.73854° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3641184,"lon":-111.73854,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Morton Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morton Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Morton Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0405852°, -87.7825621° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0405852,"lon":-87.7825621,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

39

Willow Grove, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Grove, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.1439985°, -75.1157286° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.1439985,"lon":-75.1157286,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Sugar Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sugar Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Sugar Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.7614181°, -88.443686° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.7614181,"lon":-88.443686,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Franklin Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.8416982°, -89.3003765° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.8416982,"lon":-89.3003765,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

42

Leland Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Leland Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Leland Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.7769953°, -89.6792671° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7769953,"lon":-89.6792671,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

43

Walnut Grove, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, California: Energy Resources Grove, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.2421371°, -121.5116197° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.2421371,"lon":-121.5116197,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

44

Pingree Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pingree Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Pingree Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0686367°, -88.4134159° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0686367,"lon":-88.4134159,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

45

Final work plan : environmental site investigation at Sylvan Grove, Kansas.  

SciTech Connect

In 1998, carbon tetrachloride was found above the maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 5 {micro}g/L in groundwater from one private livestock well at Sylvan Grove, Kansas, by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The 1998 KDHE sampling was conducted under the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) private well sampling program. The Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC), a USDA agency, operated a grain storage facility in Sylvan Grove from 1954 to1966. Carbon tetrachloride is the contaminant of primary concern at sites associated with former CCC/USDA grain storage operations. Sylvan Grove is located in western Lincoln County, approximately 60 mi west of Salina (Figure 1.1). To determine whether the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove is a potential contaminant source and its possible relationship to the contamination in groundwater, the CCC/USDA has agreed to conduct an investigation, in accordance with the Intergovernmental Agreement between the KDHE and the Farm Service Agency (FSA) of the USDA. This Work Plan presents historical data related to previous investigations, grain storage operations, local private wells and public water supply (PWS) wells, and local geologic and hydrogeologic conditions at Sylvan Grove. The findings from a review of all available documents are discussed in Section 2. On the basis of the analyses of historical data, the following specific technical objectives are proposed for the site investigation at Sylvan Grove: (1) Evaluate the potential source of carbon tetrachloride at the former CCC/USDA facility; (2) Determine the relationship of potential contamination (if present) at the former CCC/USDA facility to contamination identified in 1998 in groundwater samples from one private well to the west; and (3) Delineate the extent of potential contamination associated with the former CCC/USDA facility. The detailed scope of work is outlined in Section 3. The results of the proposed work will provide the basis for determining what future CCC/USDA actions may be necessary, with the ultimate goal of achieving classification of the Sylvan Grove site at no further action status. The proposed activities are to be performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, a nonprofit, multidisciplinary research center operated by the UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy. Argonne provides technical assistance to the CCC/USDA concerning environmental site characterization and remediation at former grain storage facilities. Argonne issued a Master Work Plan (Argonne 2002) that has been approved by the KDHE. The Master Work Plan describes the general scope of all investigations at former CCC/USDA facilities in Kansas and provides guidance for these investigations. That document should be consulted for the complete details of plans for work associated with the former CCC/USDA facility at Sylvan Grove.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Elk Grove, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, California: Energy Resources Grove, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 38.4087993°, -121.3716178° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.4087993,"lon":-121.3716178,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Elm Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0430678°, -88.078978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0430678,"lon":-88.078978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

48

Lemon Grove, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lemon Grove, California: Energy Resources Lemon Grove, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 32.7425516°, -117.0314172° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.7425516,"lon":-117.0314172,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maple Grove Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3083,"lon":-111.7068,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

50

Reduction of Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Present in Food Animal Manures by Composting and Anaerobic Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Anaerobic Digestion Frederick C. Michel, Food, Agricultural, and Biological Engineering Zhongtang Yu, Animal concluded that both anaerobic digestion and composting--especially at elevated temperatures--are effective effectiveness of anaerobic digestion and composting at high temperatures is of interest to industry

Jones, Michelle

51

Using Compost for Erosion Control and Revegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composting refers to the biological decomposition and stabilization of organic materials by microorganisms under aerobic conditions. Compost from various materials (yard trimmings, manure, food processing residuals and other organic materials) has been used to improve soil quality and productivity and prevent soil erosion. This publication explains how compost can be used for those purposes.

Mukhtar, Saqib

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

52

EA-1931: Keeler-Forest Grove, Forest Grove-Tillamook Line No. 1 Line Rebuild Project, Washington and Tillamook Counties, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a BPA proposal to rebuild its 58 mile long, 115 kilovolt (kV) wood pole Keeler-Forest Grove and Forest Grove-Tillamook transmission lines. The deteriorated transmission line structures (wood pole structures, switches, cross arms, braces, guys, anchors, insulator assemblies and conductor) need to be replaced in order to maintain reliable electrical service, avoid risks to the public, and ensure worker safety.

53

Revaluing waste in New York City : planning for small-scale compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One-third of the municipal solid waste stream is organic material that, when processed in landfills, produces methane, a highly potent greenhouse gas. Composting is a proven strategy for organic waste management, which ...

Neilson, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND EROSION THROUGH COMPOST Barrie Cogburn (Phone: 512-416-saw the benefits of utilizing compost as an erosion-controltool. The compost alternative, which is comparable in cost

Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

City of Forest Grove, Oregon (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Utility Company) (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name City of Forest Grove Place Oregon Utility Id 6582 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location WECC NERC WECC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png GENERAL SERVICE SINGLE PHASE Commercial GENERAL SERVICE SINGLE PHASE TOU Commercial GENERAL SERVICE THREE PHASE Commercial GENERAL SERVICE THREE PHASE TOU Commercial INDUSTRIAL SERVICE Industrial LARGE COMMERCIAL SERVICE Commercial PURE POWER RENEWABLE ENERGY RATE Residential

56

Borough of Grove City, Pennsylvania (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Pennsylvania (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Borough of Grove City Place Pennsylvania Utility Id 7719 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Commercial Service Commercial General Service Commercial Primary Power Service Commercial Primary Power Service - 2 Industrial Residential Electric Heating Residential Residential Service Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.1090/kWh Commercial: $0.0962/kWh Industrial: $0.0770/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a"

57

Oppenheimer&Groves : The duality that led to Trinity /.  

SciTech Connect

The alliance of J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientist, and Leslie R. Groves, military leader, is often interpreted as the classic example of the clash between the academic mind and the military style. Evidence suggests, instead, that it was a collaboration that led to the dawn of the nuclear age. Instead of a clash, it was collaboration and an implosion of the diverse talents needed for the success of this project. Discussion of these flawed and fascinating individuals still ignites controversy today. This presentation will explore the backgrounds and personalities of these two men and their work together to accomplish their mission. Was the aftermath inevitable, given a relationship based on respect, but perhaps not trust? The genesis of the modern military-industrial complex rested on the genius of these two men, though they personify two distinct American sub-cultures. What lessons can be drawn from their wartime and post-war relationship? What analogies can be drawn for current American values?

Connaughton, T. G. (Theresa G.); Smith, S. E. (Sharon E.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Bioremediation of Diesel Contaminated Soil Using Spent Mushroom Compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting has been shown to be an effective bioremediation technique for the treatment of hydrocarbon-contaminated soil. In this research, spent mushroom compost (SMC), a sustainable, (more)

Eramo, Alessia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Nutrient Management Using Compost in Organic Bell Pepper Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fertility management in organic vegetable production systems relies on the use of non- synthetic sources such as compost, manure, and approved fertilizers. Compost is a (more)

Cook, Emily

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fermilabs Leaf Composting Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab's Leaf Composting Program November 15, 2012 DOE SAN Call The Program 2000 tillable acres of corn and soybean fields leased to a local farmer Agreement provision to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Volatile organic compound emissions from composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is a review of the aerobic composting process and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from this process. To understand why and (more)

Harris, Stephanie Rose Rene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance (more)

Brndli, Rahel Christine

63

Compost Application Practices for Revegetating Disturbed Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Urban development alters the physical and chemical properties of soil which presents challenges for vegetation establishment. Compost, when applied as a soil amendment, can help (more)

Dunifon, Shea Nicole

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Organic pollutants in Swiss compost and digestate.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting (aerobic treatment of organic wastes) and digestion (anaerobic treatment of organic wastes combined with biogas production) are important waste management strategies with increasing significance (more)

Brndli, Rahel Christine

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of applied sewage sludge compost and fluidized bed material on apple seedling growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two waste products, composted sewage sludge and fluidized bed material (FBM, a coal/limestone combustion byproduct) were used as soil amendments for apple seedlings (Malus domestica) grown in the greenhouse. Compost was applied at rates equivalent to 0, 25 and 50 dry metric tons/ha and FBM was applied at levels of 1 and 2 times the soil lime requirement on a weight basis (12.5 and 25.0 metric tons/ha). Plant growth was significantly increased by compost or FBM additions. Tissue Ca was increased by both waste, reflecting the high Ca inputs to the low fertility Arendtsville soil. Potentially high soil Mn levels were reduced by both wastes due to their neutralizing effect on soil pH. Root Cd levels were increased by compost additions even though soil pH was maintained above 6.3. Tissue Zn, Cu and Ni were not consistently affected by waste additions.

Korcak, R.F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to cattle manure compost and biogas residue compost. Higherafter crop harvest in biogas residue compost treatment.2) cattle compost, 3) biogas residue, 4) control, no

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Copyright ? 1996, American Society for Microbiology Isolation of Thermus Strains from Hot Composts (60 to 80?C)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aerobic, thermophilic bacteria related to the genus Thermus were isolated from thermogenic composts at temperatures between 65 and 82?C. These bacteria were present in different types of wastes (garden and kitchen wastes and sewage sludge) and in all the industrial composting systems studied (open-air windrows, boxes with automated turning and aeration, and closed bioreactors with aeration). Isolates grew fast on a rich complex medium at temperatures between 40 and 80?C, with optimum growth between 65 and 75?C. Nutritional characteristics, total protein profiles, DNA-DNA hybridization (except strain JT4), and restriction fragment length polymorphism profiles of the DNAs coding for the 16S rRNAs (16S rDNAs) showed that Thermus strains isolated from hot composts were closely related to Thermus thermophilus HB8. These newly isolated T. thermophilus strains have probably adapted to the conditions in the hot-compost ecosystem. Heterotrophic, ovalspore-forming, thermophilic bacilli were also isolated from hot composts, but none of the isolates was able to grow at temperatures above 70?C. This is the first report of hot composts as habitats for a high number of thermophilic bacteria related to the genus Thermus. Our study suggests that Thermus strains play an important role in organic-matter degradation during the thermogenic phase (65 to 80?C) of the composting process. Composting is a self-heating, aerobic, solid-phase, biodegradative process of organic-waste materials (7, 8). During the

Trello Beffa; Michel Blanc; Pierre-franois Lyon; Gudrun Vogt; Marcello Marchiani; Johanna Lott Fischer

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Have You Ever Tried Composting? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ever Tried Composting? Ever Tried Composting? Have You Ever Tried Composting? January 20, 2012 - 10:07am Addthis This week, Erin talked about how she's helping her parents (and learning from them) as they maintain an outdoor compost pile. By composting, you can nourish your garden for very little cost while keeping organic garbage out of sewer systems and city dumps. Compost materials range from food scraps to worms, and you can keep your compost in an open pile outdoors or in a specialized container. Of course, composting isn't just for homes - you can also participate in composting at the office. Whether at work or at home, indoors or outdoors, worms or food scraps: Have you ever tried composting? Why or why not? E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov.

69

In-vessel composting of household wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The process of composting has been studied using five different types of reactors, each simulating a different condition for the formation of compost; one of which was designed as a dynamic complete-mix type household compost reactor. A lab-scale study was conducted first using the compost accelerators culture (Trichoderma viridae, Trichoderma harzianum, Trichorus spirallis, Aspergillus sp., Paecilomyces fusisporus, Chaetomium globosum) grown on jowar (Sorghum vulgare) grains as the inoculum mixed with cow-dung slurry, and then by using the mulch/compost formed in the respective reactors as the inoculum. The reactors were loaded with raw as well as cooked vegetable waste for a period of 4 weeks and then the mulch formed was allowed to maturate. The mulch was analysed at various stages for the compost and other environmental parameters. The compost from the designed aerobic reactor provides good humus to build up a poor physical soil and some basic plant nutrients. This proves to be an efficient, eco-friendly, cost-effective, and nuisance-free solution for the management of household solid wastes.

Iyengar, Srinath R. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: srinathrangamani@yahoo.com; Bhave, Prashant P. [Civil and Environmental Engineering Department, V.J. Technological Institute, H.R. Mahajani Road, Matunga, Mumbai 400 019 (India)]. E-mail: drppbhave@vsnl.net

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Assessing risk of solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the movement of metals in soils and their accumulation in plants. Research with sewage sludge compost indicates that these risks can be minimized with proper handling and management. The objectives of this study were: (I) to evaluate potential groundwater contamination due to plant nutrients and heavy metals in the compost; and (II) to assess the accumulation of metals in plants grown on compost-amended soil. Data are presented for analyses of nickel, lead, cadmium, copper and zinc in snap beans.

Dyer, J.M.; Razvi, A.S. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Stevens Point (USA))

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Method of making compost and spawned compost, mushroom spawn and generating methane gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Newly designed ribbon-type mixers provide an improved method for making composts, aerating composts, growing mushroom spawn, generating methane gas, and filling conveyors in the mushroom-growing industry. The mixers may be the double-ribbon type for purely mixing operations or the single-ribbon type for moving the material from one place to another. Both types can operate under pressure. In preparing compost for mushroom growing, operators can first use the airtight mixers for a preliminary anaerobic fermentation to produce methane, then by changing the atmosphere to an oxidizing one, complete the compost preparation under the necessary aerobic conditions.

Stoller, B.B.

1981-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Compost teas and compost amended container media for plant disease control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The primary goal of this dissertation research was to assess the use of compost for the control of several foliar and soil borne diseases commercially (more)

[No author

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases from a switchgrass-adapted compost community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S2 Correspondence analysis of the compost bioreactor Author2004) Microbial Ecology of Compost. In: Lens P, Hamelers B,composting in a monitored compost bin. J Appl Microbiol 94:

Allgaier, M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004) Microbial Ecology of Compost. In: Lens P, Hamelers B,composting in a monitored compost bin. J Appl Microbiol 94:a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community Martin Allgaier ,

Reddy, Amitha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Research of sludge compost maturity degree modeling method based on wavelet neural network for sewage treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the compost maturity degree judging system appear the nonlinearity and uncertainty. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost maturity degree ...

Meijuan Gao; Jingwen Tian; Wei Jiang; Kai Li

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Study of Compost Quality Evaluation Modeling Method Based on Fuzzy Neural Network for Sewage Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the quality evaluation system of sludge compost appear the fuzziness. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost quality evaluation modeling method ...

Jingwen Tian; Meijuan Gao; Yujuan Xiang

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Biofiltration of isopentane in peat and compost packed beds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercially available biofiltration systems have used natural bioactive materials in packed beds due to low media cost and easy availability. Detailed understanding and modeling of biofiltration systems are lacking in existing literature. Experimental studies on the isopentane treatment in air using peat- and compost-packed beds were conducted with inlet isopentane concentrations of 360 to 960 ppmv, and empty-bed gas-phase residence times of 2 to 10 min. High removal efficiencies (>90%) were achieved at low contaminant concentrations (8 min). For both peat and compost biofilters, there was an optimal water content that gave the highest removal efficiency. For higher water content, mass transfer of isopentane through the liquid phase controlled the biofiltration removal efficiency. At low water content, irreversible changes in the bioactivity of peat and compost occurred, resulting in an irrecoverable loss of removal efficiency. Increases in biofilter bed temperature from 25 to 40 C improved the removal efficiency. A mathematical model incorporating the effect of water content and temperature was developed to describe the packed-bed biofilter performance. Model predictions agreed closely with experimental data.

Wang, Z.; Govind, R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

What Is Your Experience with Composting? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Is Your Experience with Composting? Is Your Experience with Composting? What Is Your Experience with Composting? April 8, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Tuesday, John told you about his experience with composting and vermiculture-or composting with worms. John pointed out that communities use a lot of energy pumping and treating water and wastewater, and composting can help avoid sending so much food and water through the water treatment system, ultimately keeping our energy use and costs a bit lower. Many people also compost to produce rich soil for their gardens. What is your experience with composting? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. Please comment with your answers, and also feel free to respond to other comments. E-mail

79

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR...

80

Fly ash-amended compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Homemade organic compost prepared from lawn grass clippings was amended with fine fly ash collected from a coal-fired power plant (SRS 484.D. Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC) to investigate its usefulness as a manure in enhancing nutrient uptake and increasing dry matter yield in selected agricultural crops. Three treatments were compared: five crops (mustard, collard, string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant) were each grown on three kinds of soil: soil alone, soil amended with composted grass clippings, and soil amended with the mixed compost of grass clippings and 20% fly ash. The fly ash-amended compost was found to be effective in enhancing the dry matter yield of collard greens and mustard greens by 378% and 348%, respectively, but string beans, bell pepper, and eggplant did not show any significant increase in dry matter yield. Analysis of the above-ground biomass of these last three plants showed they assimilated high levels of boron, which is phytotoxic; and this may be the reason for their poor growth. Soils treated with fly ash-amended compost often gave higher concentrations than the control for K, Ca, Mg, S, Zn, and B in the Brassica crops. 18 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Menon, M.P.; Sajwan, K.S.; Ghuman, G.S.; James, J.; Chandra, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

DISEASE SUPPRESSION WITH COMPOST: HISTORY, PRINCIPLES AND FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composts have been used for centuries to maintain soil fertility and plant health. Even so, the mechanisms by which diseases are controlled by composts are just now being elucidated. This paper reviews the recent history on control of plant diseases with composts. Furthermore, the present state of knowledge in this field is reviewed. Finally, potential future opportunities for

Harry A. J. Hoitink; Professor Emeritus; Ligia Zuniga De Ramos; Senior Fullbright

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energetics of compost production and utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developments during the past decade have led to a fairly clear delineation of the role of composting in municipal solid waste (MSW) management. However, before that role can be accepted and implemented on a practical scale, certain important environmental and economic factors must be resolved. Of the economic factors, the energetics of composting in waste management is in urgent need of further elaboration and exploration. This need prompted an attempt on the part of the authors of this paper to resolve basic questions regarding the energetics involved in the production and utilization of compost from urban solid waste and municipal sludges, and peripherally, the applicability of these findings to the management of other wastes (e.g., agricultural). Progress made in pursuing this attempt is described in the present paper.

Diaz, L.F.; Golueke, C.G.; Savage, G.M.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The soil organic matter dynamic by using different compost organic manure in a vegetable system in North China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

following the long-term application of manure compost.Chicken manure compost showed the highest soil organicwhen compared to cattle manure compost and biogas residue

Sun, Qinping; Li, Jijin; Liu, Bensheng; Zou, Guoyuan; Liu, Baocun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effects of alkyl polyglycoside (APG) on composting of agricultural wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composting is the biological degradation and transformation of organic materials under controlled conditions to promote aerobic decomposition. To find effective ways to accelerate composting and improve compost quality, numerous methods including additive addition, inoculation of microorganisms, and the use of biosurfactants have been explored. Studies have shown that biosurfactant addition provides more favorable conditions for microorganism growth, thereby accelerating the composting process. However, biosurfactants have limited applications because they are expensive and their use in composting and microbial fertilizers is prohibited. Meanwhile, alkyl polyglycoside (APG) is considered a 'green' surfactant. This study aims to determine whether APG addition into a compost reaction vessel during 28-day composting can enhance the organic matter degradation and composting process of dairy manure. Samples were periodically taken from different reactor depths at 0, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. pH levels, electrical conductivity (EC), ammonium and nitrate nitrogen, seed germination indices, and microbial population were determined. Organic matter and total nitrogen were also measured. Compared with the untreated control, the sample with APG exhibited slightly increased microbial populations, such as bacteria, fungi, and actinomycetes. APG addition increased temperatures without substantially affecting compost pH and EC throughout the process. After 28 days, APG addition increased nitrate nitrogen concentrations, promoted matter degradation, and increased seed germination indices. The results of this study suggest that the addition of APG provides more favorable conditions for microorganism growth, slightly enhancing organic matter decomposition and accelerating the composting process, improving the compost quality to a certain extent.

Zhang Fabao [Soil and Fertilizer Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Nutrient Cycling and Farmland Conservation, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Gu Wenjie, E-mail: guwenjie1982@yahoo.cn [Soil and Fertilizer Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Nutrient Cycling and Farmland Conservation, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Xu Peizhi; Tang Shuanhu; Xie Kaizhi; Huang Xu; Huang Qiaoyi [Soil and Fertilizer Institute, Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Guangdong Key Laboratory of Nutrient Cycling and Farmland Conservation, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

The design and construction of a pilot-scale compost reactor for the study of gas emissions from compost under different physical conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting is generally accepted as an environmentally benign process for organic waste disposal. However, when not properly managed, composting can result in the emission of (more)

Phillip, Edsel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting Reducing Waste and Saving Energy with Composting January 16, 2012 - 9:29am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs "Hey, don't throw that away!" This a phrase I heard quite often when I visited my parents over the holidays. What were they referring to? All the banana and carrot peelings I would discard, nonchalantly into the garbage bin. My father, an avid gardener for as long as I can remember, has taken-up composting again, this time with renewed fervor and an ever watchful eye. The result of my compost-conscious parent's hard work? A humungous nutrient-rich compost pile, perfect for all their summer outdoor gardening projects.In addition to the usual suspects of compost (coffee grinds, apple

87

Modeling of Sludge Compost Maturity Degree Based on Radial Basic Function Network for Sewage Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the compost maturity degree judging system appear the non-linearity and uncertainty. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost maturity degree ... Keywords: Compost, Maturity degree, Radial basic function network, Modeling

Jingwen Tian; Meijuan Gao; Yanxia Liu; Shiru Zhou; Fan Zhang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Evaluation of compost specifications for stormwater management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Urban development will continue to increase in Texas because of population growth and urban sprawl. Despite the desire for urbanization and expansion of the economy, this growth increases the amount of construction, which, if not properly managed, can increase non-point source pollution and threaten surface water quality. Therefore, Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has approved and promoted the use of compost as a stormwater best management practice (BMP) during highway construction. The objectives of this study were to construct and calibrate an indoor rainfall simulator and to determine the effectiveness of using compost rather than conventional hydroseeding or topsoil to reduce erosion from disturbed soils. Runoff rates, interrill erosion, and interrill erodibility were determined and compared across five compost treatments following TxDOT specifications for compost applied as an erosion control and two control treatments of topsoil (TS) and hydroseeding (HS) applied at 5 cm depth. The simulator produced 89% uniformity using ten Veejet 80100 nozzles at a target rate of 100 mm h-1. The surface runoff was collected after 5 minutes of rainfall (first flush) and during the last 30 minutes of rainfall (steady-state). The first flush mean runoff for GUC-5 treatment was significantly higher than all other treatments. All other treatments; 50% woodchips and 50% compost blend (ECC-1.3, ECC-5), and hydroseeding (HS) had significantly lower runoff and erosion rates compared to topsoil (TS) and compost manufactured topsoil (CMT) at first flush and steady-state. Furthermore, there were no performance differences between 1.3 cm and 5 cm compost applications at first flush or steady-state. The results of this project indicate that particle size, soil moisture capabilities, and time at which rainfall is applied affect surface runoff. TxDOT specification of using ECC at 5 cm depth on a max of 3:1 slope should be reconsidered. An ECC application depth of 1.3 cm was effective in reducing first flush runoff and interrill erosion rates.

Birt, Lindsay Nicole

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

Domene, Xavier, E-mail: x.domene@creaf.uab.es [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Energy-supply options for Soldier's Grove, Wisconsin. A summary of recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents ANL's findings on energy supply options for Soldier's Grove, Wisconsin. Thirteen energy supply systems were considered. Although any of the systems could be used--at a price--Argonne recommends the new downtown be supplied by a wood-fired central heating plant with steam distribution. Although a list of the less desirable systems is provided, full details have been omitted here, but will be included in ANL's final report.

Kron, R; Davis, A; Davis, H; Kennedy, A S; Bauer, P; Hrabak, R; Tschanz, J F; Voelker, J

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Scientists, growers assess trade-offs in use of tillage, cover crops and compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depth depth depth depth compost was added two times perConv. crops were present. Compost was ap- Main effect Fof tillage, cover crops and compost Louise E. Jackson Irenee

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Phosphorus depletion from rhizosphere solution by maize grown in compost-amended soil.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Buhler, D.D. 2004. Tillage and compost affect yield of corn,response to tillage and compost. Agron. J. 100:1039-1046.such as manure and compost, are an economical alternative to

Bortolon, Leandro; Kovar, John L.; Gianello, Clesio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Determining Compost Carryover for Optimal Use in an Organic Corn Squash Rotation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Organically certified farms using compost to improve or maintain fertility rarely consider compost carryover and its impact on the determination of economically optimal application (more)

Olsen, Davey J.R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Improving compost process efficiency by controlling aeration, temperature and pH.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Biowaste composting is rapidly increasing, and many composting plants in Scandinavia have had problems with low pH during the process. The aim of this thesis (more)

Sundberg, Cecilia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Production and Use of Compost and Vermicompost in Sustainable Farming Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Compost use in agriculture has gained popularity in recent decades as public concern over the environmental impact of synthetic inputs in agriculture has increased. Compost (more)

McClintock, Nathan C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Efficacy of compost amendments and extracts in the control of foliar disease in organic tomato production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Effects of compost amendments and extracts on tomato foliar disease severity and yield were assessed in greenhouse and field experiments. Aerated and nonaerated compost tea (more)

Murray, William Kraft.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Compost as a Growth Substrate for Woody Ornamental Nursery Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Peat is an expensive, environmentally nonrenewable component of media used to grow woody ornamental trees. Leaf compost from the city of Bowling Green is an (more)

Crocker, Jaime

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mathematical Modelling of Self-Heating in Compost Piles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to environmental concerns about waste management and global warming, composting has become an increasingly popular method for handling organic waste, manure and other organic (more)

Luangwilai, Thiansiri

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Biowaste and vegetable waste compost application to agriculture.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The landfilling of biodegradable waste is proven to contribute to environmental degradation. Compost use in agriculture is increasing as both an alternative to landfilling for (more)

Kokkora, Maria I.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The influence of compost physical parameters on microbial oxygen uptake.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The wide range of optimal values reported for the physical parameters of compost mixtures suggest that their interactive relationships should be investigated. The objective of (more)

Mohajer, Ardavan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Compost Bedded Pack Barns: Management Practices and Economic Implications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Compost bedded pack (CBP) barn design and pack maintenance procedures vary considerably, making advising and problem-solving challenging. One objective of this research was to characterize (more)

Black, Randi Alyson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

UTILIZATION OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPOST IN HORTICULTURE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Composting of municipal solid waste (MSW) has long been considered an attractive waste management tool for effective reduction of waste volume and beneficial utilization of (more)

Lu, Wenliang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

104

Leachability of heavy metals from growth media containing source-separated municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of heavy metals in source-separated municipal solid waste (MSW) compost was determined by irrigation leaching of growth medium, admixed with varying amounts of compost, used for container grown plants. Perennial flowers (black-eyed Susan, Rudbeckia hirta L.) were grown in 2-L containers filled with the growth medium for a 10-wk period. Rainfall was supplemented with overhead irrigation to supply 2 cm of water per day. Leachates collected over each 2-wk period were analyzed for Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn using atomic spectrometry. Concentrations of the heavy metals in the leachates increased with increasing proportions of MSW compost in the growth medium, but decreased with time of leaching. Leaching of the metals occurred at relatively high concentrations initially, followed by continued leaching at low concentrations. The initial leaching of heavy metals is attributed to their soluble or exchangeable forms and the subsequent slow leaching to the solid compounds. The concentrations of the heavy metals remained below the current drinking water standards in all treatments throughout the leaching period. The results thus suggest that contamination of groundwater with heavy metals from source-separated MSW compost applied as a soil amendment should be negligible, as the low concentrations in the leachates leaving the surface soil would be further attenuated by the subsoil. 29 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Sawhney, B.L.; Bugbee, G.J.; Stilwell, D.E. [Connecticut Agricultural Experimental Station, New Haven, CT (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Assessment of Foodborne Pathogen Survival During Production and Pre-harvest Application of Compost and Compost Tea.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of compost in crop production systems as a soil amendment is recognized by both conventional and organic plant production practitioners as a means (more)

Ingram, David Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effective pine bark composting with the Dome Aeration Technology  

SciTech Connect

In South Africa garden refuse is primarily disposed of in domestic landfills. Due to the large quantities generated, any form of treatment would be beneficial for volume reduction, waste stabilization and resource recovery. Dome Aeration Technology (DAT) is an advanced process for aerobic biological degradation of garden refuse and general waste [Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999a. Advantages of dome aeration in mechanical-biological waste treatment. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Waste Management and Landfill Symposium, Cagliari, 4-8 October 1999; Paar, S., Brummack, J., Gemende, B., 1999b. Mechanical-biological waste stabilization by the dome aeration method. Environment Protection Engineering 25 (3/99). Mollekopf, N., Brummack, J., Paar, S., Vorster, K., 2002. Use of the Dome Aeration Technology for biochemical stabilization of waste prior to landfilling. In: Proceedings of the Wastecon 2002, Waste Congress and Exhibition, Durban, South Africa.]. It is a non-reactor open windrow composting process, with the main advantage being that the input material needs no periodic turning. A rotting time of only 3-4 months indicates the high efficiency. Additionally, the low capital/operational costs, low energy inputs and limited plant requirements provide potential for use in aerobic refuse stabilization. The innovation in the DAT process is the passive aeration achieved by thermally driven advection through open windrows caused by temperature differences between the degrading material and the outside environment. This paper investigates the application of Dome Aeration Technology to pine bark composting as part of an integrated waste management strategy. A full-scale field experiment was performed at the Bisasar Road Landfill Site in Durban to assess the influence of climate, waste composition and operational conditions on the process. A test windrow was constructed and measurements of temperature and airflow through the material were taken. The process monitoring revealed that prevailing climatic conditions in a subtropical location do not affect the high efficiency of this technology. However, the composition of the input material can be detrimental for production of high quality compost because of a lack of nitrate.

Trois, Cristina [CRECHE Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)]. E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za; Polster, Andreas [Dresden University of Technology, Institute for Process Engineering and Environmental Technology, Helmholtzstrasse 14, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

CX-008211: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Cedar Grove Composting High Solids Anaerobic Digestion Permitting CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.1 Date: 03/23/2012 Location(s): Washington Offices(s): Golden Field Office

108

Renovation of a pear orchard site with sludge compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lime-stabilized sewage sludge compost was used as a surface amendment to improve the soil and nutritional status of a number of established pear cultivars grown on an acidic, low fertility soil site. Leaf Ca status was significantly increased while trace metals were not elevated and in most cases decreased by sludge compost over the course of the study. Soil chemical properties were modified in a manner similar to liming. Addition of sludge composts, particularly low metal containing materials, appears to represent an acceptable aid in renovating established pear orchards located on poor soil sites. Leaf, fruit flesh or peel Cd were not significantly effected by the compost addition. The compost added twice the recommended level of available N the first year and sub-optimum N the following two years. Leaf N, although significantly increased in the composted versus non-composted controls, was below sufficiency levels by the third year after addition. This indicates that compost cannot fully supply required N from a one time application even over the short term.

Korcak, R.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Composting in small laboratory pilots: Performance and reproducibility  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We design an innovative small-scale composting device including six 4-l reactors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate the performance and reproducibility of composting on a small scale. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermophilic conditions are established by self-heating in all replicates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical transformations, organic matter losses and stabilisation are realistic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The organic matter evolution exhibits good reproducibility for all six replicates. - Abstract: Small-scale reactors (<10 l) have been employed in composting research, but few attempts have assessed the performance of composting considering the transformations of organic matter. Moreover, composting at small scales is often performed by imposing a fixed temperature, thus creating artificial conditions, and the reproducibility of composting has rarely been reported. The objectives of this study are to design an innovative small-scale composting device safeguarding self-heating to drive the composting process and to assess the performance and reproducibility of composting in small-scale pilots. The experimental setup included six 4-l reactors used for composting a mixture of sewage sludge and green wastes. The performance of the process was assessed by monitoring the temperature, O{sub 2} consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions, and characterising the biochemical evolution of organic matter. A good reproducibility was found for the six replicates with coefficients of variation for all parameters generally lower than 19%. An intense self-heating ensured the existence of a spontaneous thermophilic phase in all reactors. The average loss of total organic matter (TOM) was 46% of the initial content. Compared to the initial mixture, the hot water soluble fraction decreased by 62%, the hemicellulose-like fraction by 68%, the cellulose-like fraction by 50% and the lignin-like fractions by 12% in the final compost. The TOM losses, compost stabilisation and evolution of the biochemical fractions were similar to observed in large reactors or on-site experiments, excluding the lignin degradation, which was less important than in full-scale systems. The reproducibility of the process and the quality of the final compost make it possible to propose the use of this experimental device for research requiring a mass reduction of the initial composted waste mixtures.

Lashermes, G.; Barriuso, E. [INRA, UMR1091 Environment and Arable Crops (INRA, AgroParisTech), F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France); Le Villio-Poitrenaud, M. [VEOLIA Environment - Research and Innovation, F-78520 Limay (France); Houot, S., E-mail: sabine.houot@grignon.inra.fr [INRA, UMR1091 Environment and Arable Crops (INRA, AgroParisTech), F-78850 Thiverval-Grignon (France)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) Solid Waste Regulation No. 8 - Solid Waste Composting Facilities (Rhode Island) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Rhode Island Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Management Facilities which compost putrescible waste and/or leaf and yard waste are subject to these regulations. The regulations establish permitting, registration, and operational requirements for composting facilities. Operational requirements for putrescible waste facilities include siting, distance, and buffer requirements, as well as standards for avoiding harm to endangered species and contamination of air and water sources. Specific

111

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jrgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL D EGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL D EGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL D EGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL D EGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL D EGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INTH WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CREEK COAL D EGAS OAK GROVE COAL D EGAS BIG SANDY CREEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL D

113

Pontotoc Co. Greene Co. Hale Co. OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS CEDAR COVE COAL DEGAS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

COAL DEGAS COAL DEGAS BLU E CREEK COAL DEGAS BR OOKWOOD C OAL D EGAS ST AR ROBIN SONS BEND COAL DEGAS BLU FF COR INNE MOU NDVILLE COAL DEGAS BLU EGU T CR EEK WH ITE OAK CREEK COAL DEGAS BEAVERT ON BLU FF FAYETTE W SN EAD S CREEK SPLU NGE PAR HAM N MUSGR OVE CR EEK MCCRAC KEN MOU NTAIN DAVIS C HAPEL BAC ON BLOOMING GROVE MT Z ION FAIRVIEW JASPER BLOWHORN CREEK MAPLE BRAN CH KEN NEDY COAL F IRE CR EEK MCGEE LAKE SILOAM MILLPOR T FERNBANK DAVIS C HAPEL NE DETROIT E BEANS F ERRY LEXIN GT ON PET ERSON COAL DEGAS CALEDONIA ABERD EEN HOL T COAL DEGAS MULDON ELD RIDGE MCKINLEY CREEK TREBLOC HEARTLIN E SH ANNON TROY_MS_D BOXES CREEK WISE GAP NOR THSID E TREMONT VAN VLEET HOL LY BET HEL CHU RCH ABERD EEN S ST RONG BAN KST ON MOLLOY WR EN COR INT H WELLS THORN REID REID HOU STON ST AR DEERLICK CR EEK C OAL DEGAS OAK GROVE C OAL D EGAS BIG SANDY C REEK COAL D EGAS MABEN LITT LE SAND Y CREEK COAL DEGAS

114

Effects of composted dairy manure on soil chemical properties and forage yield and nutritive value of coastal Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research was conducted to compare the effects of composted dairy manure and raw dairy manure alone, or in combination with supplemental inorganic fertilizer, on soil chemical properties and Coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] yield and nutritive value. Composted dairy manure was surface applied at rates of 14 (125 kg N ha-1), 29 (250 kg N ha-1) and 57 (500 kg N ha-1) Mg dry matter (DM) ha-1, and raw dairy manure was surface applied at a rate of 54 (420 kg N ha-1) Mg DM ha-1 to established bermudagrass. Selected compost and manure plots received supplemental inorganic N at rates of 56, 84 and 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 or 112 kg ha-1 cutting-1 of supplemental N with supplemental inorganic phosphorus or potassium at rates of 112 kg P2O5 ha-1 yr-1 and 112 kg K2O ha-1 cutting-1, respectively. Composted dairy manure (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or raw manure alone increased cumulative forage yields compared to the untreated check in both years of the study, but were less than those obtained using only inorganic fertilizer. Application of 56 kg N ha-1 cutting-1 or more of supplemental N to compost (29 and 57 Mg DM ha-1) or iv manure produced forage yields that were equal to or greater than those obtained using inorganic fertilizer alone. However, increasing compost rate did not increase tissue N concentrations regardless of supplemental inorganic N rate. Yield and tissue K concentrations were increased in the second growing season when supplemental inorganic K was applied to 29 Mg ha-1 of compost or 54 Mg ha-1 of raw dairy manure. No yield response was observed when supplemental inorganic P was applied to compost or manure. Soil pH and concentrations of NH4, NO3, K, Ca, Mg and Mn were increased by application of compost or manure. Soil P concentrations in the 0 to 5-cm zone exceeded 200 mg kg-1 when compost was applied at the high rate. Dairy manure compost was an effective nutrient source for bermudagrass hay production, but will require the use of supplemental N and, in some cases, K to achieve yields comparable to inorganic fertilizer.

Helton, Thomas J.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 1722, 2008 Asilomar Conference Center Pacific Grove, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings August 17­22, 2008 · Asilomar Conference Center · Pacific Grove, California 1 Targeting Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings Using Advanced a four-step method to analyze the utility bills and weather data from multiple buildings to target

Kissock, Kelly

116

Evaluation of nitrogen availability in irradiated sewage sludge, sludge compost and manure compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted during 2 yr to determine plant availability of organic N from organic wastes, and effects of gamma irradiation on organic N availability in sewage sludge. The wastes investigated were: digested, dewatered sewage sludge (DSS), irradiated sewage sludge (DISS), irradiated, composted sewage sludge (DICSS), and composted livestock manure (CLM). The annual application rates were: 10, 20, 30, and 40 Mg solids ha{sup {minus}1}. Fertilizer N was added to the control, to which no waste was applied, as well as to the waste applications to ensure approximately equal amounts of available N (110 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}) for all treatments. Lettuce, petunias, and beans were grown in 1990 and two cuts of lettuce were harvested in 1991. Crop yields and plant N concentrations were measured. Assuming that crop N harvested/available N applied would be approximately equal for the control and the waste treatments, the N from organic fraction of the wastes, which is as available as that in fertilizer, was estimated. With petunia in 1990 and the combination of first and second cut of lettuce in 1991, the percentage ranged from 11.2 to 29.7 in nonirradiated sludge, 10.1 to 14.0 in irradiated sludge, 10.5 to 32.1 in sludge compost and 10.0 to 19.7 in manure compost. Most often, the highest values were obtained with the lowest application rates. Yields of petunia and N concentrations in second cut lettuce in 1991 were lower with irradiated sludge than with nonirradiated sludge suggest that the availability of organic N in digested sludge may have been reduced after irradiation. Irradiation of sludge appears to have released NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N. The availability of organic N, however, appears to have been reduced by irradiation by greater amount than the increase in NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N. 41 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Wen, Guang; Bates, T.E.; Voroney, R.P. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Microsoft Word - CX-ForestGrove-McMinnvilleWoodPolesFY12_WEB.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2012 5, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP-Alvey SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum James Semrau Project Manager - TEP-TPP-1 Proposed Action: Forest Grove-McMinnville #1 Wood Pole Replacement Projects PP&A Project No.: 2326 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.3 Routine maintenance Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Location: The project is located in Washington and Yamhill counties, Oregon, in BPA's Salem District. Structure locations are as follows: Structure Legal Description County, State 2\5 1S, 3W, Sec. 6 Washington, OR 3\3 1S, 3W, Sec. 7 Washington, OR 3\6, 4\3 1S. 4W, Sec. 12 Washington, OR 4\8, 4\9, 5\3 1S, 4W, Sec. 14 Washington, OR 6\2, 6\5 1S, 4W, Sec. 23 Washington, OR

118

DOE Challenge Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development, LLC., Custom Home, Downer Grove, IL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LLC LLC Custom Home Downers Grove, IL BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE DOE Challenge Home builders are in the top 1% of builders in the country meeting the extraordinary levels of excellence and quality specifi ed by the U.S. Department of Energy. Every DOE Challenge Home starts with ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 for an energy-effi cient home built on a solid foundation of building science research. Then, even more advanced technologies are designed in for a home that goes above and beyond current code to give you the superior quality construction, HVAC, appliances, indoor air quality, safety, durability, comfort, and solar-ready components along with ultra-low or no utility bills. This provides homeowners with a quality home that will last for generations to come.

119

Evaluation of Cu and Pb Bioavailability from Compost Amended Soils.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Land application of biosolid or industrial compost raises concerns regarding heavy metal accumulation in soils, plants and free-ranging livestock. A strip-split plot design evaluated two (more)

Cooper, Alicia M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A proposal for the analysis of nitrocellulose in soil or compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Currently, there is no ``standard`` analytical method for the measurement of nitrocellulose (NC) in soil or compost. At the present, an indirect method is used. This method extracts the NC from soil or compost, separates out nitrate or nitrite ions, hydrolyzes the NC nitrogroups, and measures the liberated nitrite colorimetrically. Major weaknesses are that the %N content or degree of nitrate substitution (DS) of the NC must be known to convert the nitrate measurements to NC concentrations, incomplete separation of nitrate/nitrite ions coextracted from the soil leads to over-estimation of NC, and incomplete extraction and/or hydrolysis of the NC cause a low bias to the NC estimations. Additionally, the method provides no information about the condition of the NC. Characterization of the molecular weight distribution and detection of functional groups in addition to nitrate ester would be highly useful in developing and applying remediation technologies. This paper proposes a size exclusion chromatography (SEC)-based method for analysis of NC in soil, compost, or other sample matrices. The method has the potential to provide both quantitative and qualitative information. The proposed method is described and some of the factors which must be addressed in method development and validation are discussed. SEC has much potential as a tool for guiding the development and application of remediation technologies for NC contaminated soils and other matrices. The extraction of NC from soil without deterioration is probably the main technical difficulty to overcome. Development of an analytical method is encouraged.

Griest, W.H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

Yamada, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan); Kawase, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

The art of cross-writing in Grove Hall : two centuries of form and place-making in a Boston neighborhood  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Boston neighborhood of Grove Hall is presently engaged in a period of urban revival. New civic, commercial and residential projects are starting to fill in empty lots and rejuvenate historic yet dilapidated structures. ...

Rosenzweig, Gilad J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effectiveness of three bulking agents for food waste composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rather than landfilling, composting the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes recycles the waste as a safe and nutrient enriched soil amendment, reduces emissions of greenhouse gases and generates less leachate. The objective of this project was to investigate the composting effectiveness of three bulking agents, namely chopped wheat (Triticum) straw, chopped mature hay consisting of 80% timothy (milium) and 20% clover (triphullum) and pine (pinus) wood shavings. These bulking agents were each mixed in duplicates at three different ratios with food waste (FW) and composted for 10 days using prototype in-vessel composters to observe their temperature and pH trends. Then, each mixture was matured in vertical barrels for 56 days to measure their mass loss and final nutrient content and to visually evaluate their level of decomposition. Chopped wheat straw (CWS) and chopped hay (CH) were the only two formulas that reached thermophilic temperatures during the 10 days of active composting when mixed with FW at a wet mass ratio of 8.9 and 8.6:1 (FW:CWS and FW:CH), respectively. After 56 days of maturation, these two formulas were well decomposed with no or very few recognizable substrate particles, and offered a final TN exceeding the original. Wood shavings (WS) produced the least decomposed compost at maturation, with wood particles still visible in the final product, and with a TN lower than the initial. Nevertheless, all bulking agents produced compost with an organic matter, TN, TP and TK content suitable for use as soil amendment.

Adhikari, Bijaya K. [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada); Barrington, Suzelle [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)], E-mail: suzelle.barrington@mcgill.ca; Martinez, Jose [Cemagref, Rennes Regional Centre, 7 avenue du Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); King, Susan [Department of Bioresource Engineering, Macdonald Campus of McGill University, 21 111 Lakeshore, Ste Anne de Bellevue (Quebec), H9X 3V9 (Canada)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Greenhouse gas emissions from home composting of organic household waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is a potential environmental disadvantage of home composting. Because of a lack of reliable GHG emission data, a comprehensive experimental home composting system was set up. The system consisted of six composting units, and a static flux chamber method was used to measure and quantify the GHG emissions for one year composting of organic household waste (OHW). The average OHW input in the six composting units was 2.6-3.5 kg week{sup -1} and the temperature inside the composting units was in all cases only a few degrees (2-10 {sup o}C) higher than the ambient temperature. The emissions of methane (CH{sub 4}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) were quantified as 0.4-4.2 kg CH{sub 4} Mg{sup -1} input wet waste (ww) and 0.30-0.55 kg N{sub 2}O Mg{sup -1} ww, depending on the mixing frequency. This corresponds to emission factors (EFs) (including only CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O emissions) of 100-239 kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww. Composting units exposed to weekly mixing had the highest EFs, whereas the units with no mixing during the entire year had the lowest emissions. In addition to the higher emission from the frequently mixed units, there was also an instant release of CH{sub 4} during mixing which was estimated to 8-12% of the total CH{sub 4} emissions. Experiments with higher loads of OHW (up to 20 kg every fortnight) entailed a higher emission and significantly increased overall EFs (in kg substance per Mg{sup -1} ww). However, the temperature development did not change significantly. The GHG emissions (in kg CO{sub 2}-eq. Mg{sup -1} ww) from home composting of OHW were found to be in the same order of magnitude as for centralised composting plants.

Andersen, J.K., E-mail: jka@env.dtu.d [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H.; Scheutz, C. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Karnataka Compost Development Corporation KCDC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compost Development Corporation KCDC Compost Development Corporation KCDC Jump to: navigation, search Name Karnataka Compost Development Corporation (KCDC) Place Bangalore, Karnataka, India Sector Biomass Product Bangalore-based, biomass project developers. Coordinates 12.97092°, 77.60482° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":12.97092,"lon":77.60482,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

126

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of fly ash as amendment to compost is presented. Plant growth/yields of corn collard greens, mustard greens, and sorgum is described. The treatment parameters such as fly ash to compost ratio, fly ash-amended compost to soil ratio, type of compost used for treatment etc. are discussed. 2 refs., 5 figs., 8 tabs. (CBS)

Menon, M.P.

1990-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Cost effective waste management through composting in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The financial/social/institutional sustainability of waste management in Africa is analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This note is a compendium of a study on the potential for GHG control via improved zero waste in Africa. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study provides the framework for Local Authorities for realizing sustained GHG reductions. - Abstract: Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per person from urban waste management activities are greater in sub-Saharan African countries than in other developing countries, and are increasing as the population becomes more urbanised. Waste from urban areas across Africa is essentially dumped on the ground and there is little control over the resulting gas emissions. The clean development mechanism (CDM), from the 1997 Kyoto Protocol has been the vehicle to initiate projects to control GHG emissions in Africa. However, very few of these projects have been implemented and properly registered. A much more efficient and cost effective way to control GHG emissions from waste is to stabilise the waste via composting and to use the composted material as a soil improver/organic fertiliser or as a component of growing media. Compost can be produced by open windrow or in-vessel composting plants. This paper shows that passively aerated open windrows constitute an appropriate low-cost option for African countries. However, to provide an usable compost material it is recommended that waste is processed through a materials recovery facility (MRF) before being composted. The paper demonstrates that material and biological treatment (MBT) are viable in Africa where they are funded, e.g. CDM. However, they are unlikely to be instigated unless there is a replacement to the Kyoto Protocol, which ceases for Registration in December 2012.

Couth, R. [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [CRECHE, Centre for Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, Civil Engineering Programme, School of Engineering, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Compost-powered food drying project. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of a study performed to demonstrate the use of heat generated from compost piles to dry food are presented. Results indicate that compost pile heat, the main source of heat for the dryer, performed rather erratically in past trials, but its positive effects on the environment merit more study. The increase in nitrogen fertilizer value of finished compost over the original materials ranged between 25% and 90%. This replaces nitrogen usually made with fossil fuels, without generating any known toxic effects on the surrounding environment. Bacteria are very efficient workers that can be harnessed to do certain tasks. Heating and producing nitrogen would be using the same bacteria to do two jobs efficiently. When too much heat is extracted from a pile, the bacteria cannot function efficiently and the pile cools down. Therefore there is only a limited amount of heat available for outside uses. This amount of heat is felt to be proportionate to pile size, so a larger pile could meet the heating demands of the dryer used in the project. Operator expertise is very critical in composting for heat and is effectively gained only through experience. Since the cost effectiveness of the operation depends on using waste materials available at the site, the operator must find the correct combination of these materials and combine them correctly. The length of time involved in fully composting materials and the seasonal limitations of the method combine to bring expertise to the operator only after years of composting. A positive side effect of the project has been the realization of the usefulness of the pre-made insulated box (used refrigerator truck body) in temperature controlled situations. It has proved to be a very cost effective and portable dryer.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Extractability, plant yield and toxicity thresholds for boron in compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boron (B) is a trace element essential to crop growth in small soil concentrations (0.2-1.5ppm), yet may produce plant toxicity symptoms readily as the amount in the soil solution increases over 2ppm. Our study examined commercial compost made with coal fly-ash used to prepare growing media for cultivars of varying sensitivity (corn, beans, cucumber, peas). We examined total vs. extractable boron content and relate final visual symptoms of B-toxicity to yields and tissue concentrations. Visual toxicity effects included tip burn (corn), leaf mottling and necrosis (beans and peas) and leaf mottling and cupping (cucumbers). Fly ash added to compost increased hot-water soluble (HWS) B in proportion to rate and in dependence on pH, with 30% and 10% of total-B expressed as HWS-B at a media pH of 6 and 7.5, respectively. Biomass for bean and cucumber was significantly reduced by 45 to 55%, respectively, by addition of 33% fly-ash compost to growing media (28ppm total-B) while plant tissue-B increased by 6- to 4-fold, respectively. Economic yield depressions in compost media are evident for all crops and appeared at levels of HWS-B in compost media exceeding 5 ppm. The study underscores the need for careful management of exogenous factors that may be present in composts and suggests detailed understanding of media-pH and cultivar preferences may be required in preparation of growing media in order to reduce potential negative growth effects.

Brinton, W.F.; Evans, E.; Blewett, C. [Woods End Labs Inc., Mt. Vernon, ME (United States)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Amending constructed roadside and urban soils with large volume-based compost applications: effects on water quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral nutrients imported in composted dairy manure (CDM) and municipal biosolid (CMB) amendments for highway-rights-of-way and urban landscapes can pose a threat to surface water quality. Treatments were developed to evaluate recommendations for amending roadside and urban soils with compost at large volumebased rates. Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) recommendations were evaluated in 2002 and 2003. Municipal recommendations were evaluated in 2004. Treatments were imposed on 4 by 1.5-m field plots on a constructed soil with an 8.5% slope. Three TxDOT compost application methods were tested; incorporation at 25% by volume (CMT), topdressing over vegetation (GUC), and topdressing a 5-cm compost woodchip mix over bare soil (ECC). In 2003, a 12.5% CMT treatment was substituted for the GUC, and two contrasting composts were compared. In 2002, soil test phosphorus (STP) concentrations (mg kg-1) were 291, 360, 410, and 1921 mg kg-1 in the 0 to 5-cm layer of a course textured CMT, fine textured CMT, GUC, and ECC treatments, respectively using CDM. In 2003, STP concentrations were 264, 439, 496,623, 1115, and 2203 mg kg-1, in the 0 to 5-cm layer after incorporation of CDM and CMB at the 12.5 and 25% volume-based rates, and topdressing the 5-cm CDM- or CMB-woodchip mix over bare soil, respectively. In 2004, contrasting CMB products, relatively low or high in total phosphorus (TP) were incorporated into the soil at 12.5 and 25% by volume, or imported in transplanted sod at the 25% by volume rate. The STP concentrations were 87, 147, 180, 301, 322, and 544 mg kg-1, respective to the previously defined treatments. Runoff water from 14, 10, and 8 natural rain events was used to characterize nutrient and sediment transport in 2002, 2003, and 2004, respectively. Concentration of TDP in runoff water was highly variable for roadside treatments across rain events. Mass losses of TDP were similar after CDM or CMB were incorporated into the soil at 12.5 and 25% by volume. Compost incorporation was the most effective method for limiting TP loss in runoff. Roadway and urban soils are expected to contribute greater TP losses as P concentration increases in soils.

Hansen, Nels Edward

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Process and installation for simultaneously producing compost and biogas from organic waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid organic waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas, wherein the liquid organic waste is subjected to a liquid-solid separation. The liquid phase from this separation is subjected to anaerobic fermentation in at least one closed digester, the solid phase from the liquid-solid separation is mixed with the solid or semi-solid organic waste, and the resulting mixture is subjected to aerobic fermentation at the periphery of the digester and in contact therewith. Mud, clarified liquid and gas are respectively discharged from the digester whereas compost from the aerobic fermentation of the solid or semi-solid waste is recovered at the periphery of the digester wherein the digester is characterized by two superimposed compartments, an upper compartment at low pressure and a lower compartment at high pressure, the compartments communicating together through at least one lateral pipe and through a central siphon. A means is provided for lowering the pressure of the lower compartment when the liquid reaches a predetermined level therein. An installation is described for the simultaneous treatment of solid or semi-solid organic waste and liquid waste with a view to the simultaneous production of compost and biogas. This comprises: means for separating the liquid organic waste into a solid phase and a liquid phase; at least one closed digester; means for introducing the liquid phase into the digester; means for mixing the solid phase with the solid or semi-solid waste; means for bringing the resulting mixture to the periphery of the digester in contact therewith; and means for discharging respectively from the digester the gas which is formed therein by anaerobic fermentation and the sludges which are deposited therein.

Lebesgue, Y.; Zeana, A.

1986-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

132

Evaluation of water production in tight gas sands in the Cotton Valley formation in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Normally in tight gas sands, water production is not a problem but in such low permeability reservoirs it is difficult to produce gas at commercial flow rates. Since water is more viscous than gas, very little water is normally produced in low permeability reservoirs. The production of large volumes of water from tight gas sands, say 50-100 bbls of water per MMcf of gas constitutes a cause for concern. High water production (>200 bbls of water per MMcf of gas) has been observed in the low permeability Cotton Valley sands in the Caspiana, Elm Grove and Frierson fields of North Louisiana. This research evaluates water production in the above tight gas sands using field data provided by Matador Resource, a member of the Crisman Institute in Texas A&M university. The research is aimed at providing realistic reservoir scenarios of excess water production in tight gas sands. Log analysis, property trends and well production profiles have been used in establishing the different scenarios. The reservoir simulation results and the production trends show a possible water source from faults and fractures connecting the Travis Peak/Smackover sands to the Cotton Valley sands. An improved understanding of the reservoir would help in further field development.

Ozobeme, Charles Chinedu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nitrogen availability and leaching from soil amended with municipal solid waste compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beneficial use of municipal solid waste compost depends on identifying a management strategy that supports crop production and protects water quality. Effects of compost and N fertilizer management strategies on corn (Zea mays L.) yield and NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching were evaluated in a 3-yr study on a Hubbard loamy sand soil. Two composts were each applied at either 90 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} from 1993 to 1995, or at 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} in one application in 1993. The compost and non-amended plots were side dressed annually with N fertilizer as urea at 0, 125, and 250 kg ha{sup {minus}1}. Biochemical properties of the compost as well as compost management strongly affected crop response and fate of N. Compost increased grain yield with no significant yield response to N fertilizer with the single compost application in Year 1 and the annual compost application in Year 3. Plant N uptake increased with N fertilizer rate, except in the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost treatments in Year 1. Over the 3-yr period, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching with the 270 Mg ha{sup {minus}1} compost application was 1.8 times greater compared to that with the annual application. The estimated N mineralization ranged from 0 to 12% and 3 to 6% in the annual and single compost addition, respectively. Under the conditions of this study, annual compost application with reduced supplemental N fertilizer was the best management strategy to reach optimum crop yield while minimizing NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N leaching losses.

Mamo, M.; Rosen, C.J.; Halbach, T.R.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comparison of mass balance, energy consumption and cost of composting facilities for different types of organic waste  

SciTech Connect

Mass balance, energy consumption and cost are basic pieces of information necessary for selecting a waste management technology. In this study, composting facilities that treat different types of organic waste were studied by questionnaire survey and via a chemical analysis of material collected at the facilities. The mass balance was calculated on a dry weight basis because the moisture content of organic waste was very high. Even though the ratio of bulking material to total input varied in the range 0-65% on a dry basis, the carbon and ash content, carbon/nitrogen ratio, heavy metal content and inorganic nutrients in the compost were clearly influenced by the different characteristics of the input waste. The use of bulking material was not correlated with ash or elemental content in the compost. The operating costs were categorised into two groups. There was some economy of scale for wages and maintenance cost, but the costs for electricity and fuel were proportional to the amount of waste. Differences in operating costs can be explained by differences in the process characteristics.

Zhang Huijun [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan); Matsuto, Toshihiko, E-mail: matsuto@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Lab of Solid Waste Disposal Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

www.epa.gov Innovative Uses of Compost Erosion Control, Turf Remediation, and Landscaping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ompost has been viewed as a valuable soil amendment for centuries. Most people are aware that the use of compost is an effective way to improve plant growth. Compost-enriched soil can also reduce erosion, alleviate soil compaction, and help control disease and pest infestation in plants. These beneficial uses of compost can increase healthy plant production, help save money, reduce the use of chemical fertilizers, and conserve natural resources. Compost used for a specific purpose or with a particular soil type works best when it is tailor-made or specially designed. For example, compost that is intended to prevent erosion might not provide the best results when used to alleviate soil compaction, and vice versa. Technical parameters to consider when customizing a compost mixture include maturity, stability, pH level, density, particle size, moisture, salinity, and organic content, all of which can be adjusted to fit a specific application and soil type.

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Comparison of methods for leaching heavy metals from composts  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the determination of total iron, copper, zinc, chromium, nickel, lead, cadmium and mercury contents in the compost obtained from sorted municipal organic solid waste applying the following methods of sample mineralization: 40% hydrofluoric acid with preliminary incineration of a sample, a mixture of concentrated nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids with preliminary incineration of organic matter and a mixture of nitric(V) and chloric(VII) acids without sample incineration. The speciation analysis of Tessier was used to estimate the bioavailability of the metals. Elution degrees of the mobile forms of the metals from the compost with 10% nitric(V) acid and 1 mol/dm{sup 3} hydrochloric acid were compared. The contents of the elements in the eluates were determined applying atomic absorption spectrometry.

Ciba, Jerzy; Zolotajkin, Maria; Kluczka, Joanna; Loska, Krzysztof; Cebula, Jan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Treatment program of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) (Quebec, Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Program for processing of organic matter by anaerobic digestion and composting (PTMOBC) provides financial assistance to municipalities and the private sector for the installation of...

138

Food and Yard Waste Compost as a Nutrient Source for Corn Production.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Utilizing food and yard waste (FYW) compost for plant production requires determination of application rates that support crop production, improve soil properties and avoid excessive (more)

Garnett, Angela

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Simulation of substrate degradation in composting of sewage sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To simulate the substrate degradation kinetics of the composting process, this paper develops a mathematical model with a first-order reaction assumption and heat/mass balance equations. A pilot-scale composting test with a mixture of sewage sludge and wheat straw was conducted in an insulated reactor. The BVS (biodegradable volatile solids) degradation process, matrix mass, MC (moisture content), DM (dry matter) and VS (volatile solid) were simulated numerically by the model and experimental data. The numerical simulation offered a method for simulating k (the first-order rate constant) and estimating k{sub 20} (the first-order rate constant at 20 {sup o}C). After comparison with experimental values, the relative error of the simulation value of the mass of the compost at maturity was 0.22%, MC 2.9%, DM 4.9% and VS 5.2%, which mean that the simulation is a good fit. The k of sewage sludge was simulated, and k{sub 20}, k{sub 20s} (first-order rate coefficient of slow fraction of BVS at 20 {sup o}C) of the sewage sludge were estimated as 0.082 and 0.015 d{sup -1}, respectively.

Zhang Jun [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao Ding, E-mail: gaod@igsnrr.ac.c [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Chen Tongbin; Zheng Guodi; Chen Jun; Ma Chuang; Guo Songlin [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Du Wei [Beijing GreenTech Environmental Engineering Company, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Microbial Degradation and Humification of the Lawn Care Pesticide 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid during the Composting of Yard Trimmings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microbial degradation and humification of the lawn care pesticide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid during the composting of yard trimmings.

F C Michel; C A Reddy; L J Forney; Frederick C. Michel; C. Adinarayana Reddy; Larry J. Forney

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal for a mid-size city  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review of composting and anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste and a methodological proposal and processes on composting and anaerobic digestion are compiled, showing the versatility and multivariable of the compost. In addition, anaerobic decomposition followed by vermicomposting is pointed as one of the best

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

142

Comparison of five organic wastes regarding their behaviour during composting: Part 2, nitrogen dynamic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aimed to compare household waste, separated pig solids, food waste, pig slaughterhouse sludge and green algae regarding processes ruling nitrogen dynamic during composting. For each waste, three composting simulations were performed in parallel in three similar reactors (300 L), each one under a constant aeration rate. The aeration flows applied were comprised between 100 and 1100 L/h. The initial waste and the compost were characterized through the measurements of their contents in dry matter, total carbon, Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen, nitrite and nitrate. Kjeldahl and total ammoniacal nitrogen and nitrite and nitrate were measured in leachates and in condensates too. Ammonia and nitrous oxide emissions were monitored in continue. The cumulated emissions in ammonia and in nitrous oxide were given for each waste and at each aeration rate. The paper focused on process of ammonification and on transformations and transfer of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The parameters of nitrous oxide emissions were not investigated. The removal rate of total Kjeldahl nitrogen was shown being closely tied to the ammonification rate. Ammonification was modelled thanks to the calculation of the ratio of biodegradable carbon to organic nitrogen content of the biodegradable fraction. The wastes were shown to differ significantly regarding their ammonification ability. Nitrogen balances were calculated by subtracting nitrogen losses from nitrogen removed from material. Defaults in nitrogen balances were assumed to correspond to conversion of nitrate even nitrite into molecular nitrogen and then to the previous conversion by nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. The pool of total ammoniacal nitrogen, i.e. total ammoniacal nitrogen initially contained in waste plus total ammoniacal nitrogen released by ammonification, was calculated for each experiment. Then, this pool was used as the referring amount in the calculation of the rates of accumulation, stripping and nitrification of total ammoniacal nitrogen. Separated pig solids were characterised by a high ability to accumulate total ammoniacal nitrogen. Whatever the waste, the striping rate depended mostly on the aeration rate and on the pool concentration in biofilm. The nitrification rate was observed as all the higher as the concentration in total ammoniacal nitrogen in the initial waste was low. Thus, household waste and green algae exhibited the highest nitrification rates. This result could mean that in case of low concentrations in total ammoniacal nitrogen, a nitrifying biomass was already developed and that this biomass consumed it. In contrast, in case of high concentrations, this could traduce some difficulties for nitrifying microorganisms to develop.

Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@cemagref.f [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Mallard, P.; Teglia, C.; Marin, A.; Le Pape, C.; Launay, M.; Benoist, J.C.; Petiot, C. [Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

Oxygen respirometry to assess stability and maturity of composted municipal solid waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability and maturity of compost prepared from municipal solid waste (MSW) at a full-scale composting plant was assessed through chemical, physical, and biological assays. Respiration bioassays used to determine stability (O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} respirometry) were sensitive to process control problems at the composting plant and indicated increasing stability with time. Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) growth bioassays revealed that immature compost samples inhibited growth. Growth of ryegrass in potting mix prepared with cured compost not amended with fertilizer was enhanced as compared to a pest control. Garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.) seed germination, used as an indicator of phytotoxicity, revealed inhibition of germination at all compost maturity levels. The phytotoxicity was though to be salt-related. Spearman rank-order correlations demonstrated that O{sub 2} respirometry, water-soluble organic C, and the water extract organic C to organic N ratio, significantly correlated with compost age and best indicated an acceptable level of stability. Oxygen respirometry also best predicted the potential for ryegrass growth, and an acceptable level of compost maturity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Iannotti, D.A.; Grebus, M.E.; Toth, B.L.; Madden, L.V.; Hoitink, A.J. [Ohio State Univ./Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, OH (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Investigation and optimization of composting processes--test systems and practical examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To determine the optimal course of composting it is useful to carry out experiments. The selection of the right experimental set-up depends on the question of concern. Each set-up is useful for a particular application and has its limits. Two test systems of different scales (up to 1500 ml; up to 100 l) are introduced. The purpose and importance of each system design shall be highlighted by application examples: (1) Suitability of a liquid industrial residue as composting accelerator; (2) Determination of the compost maturity; (3) Behaviour of odor-reducing additives during waste collection and composting; (4) Production of tailor-made compost with respect to Nitrogen (5) Suitability of O{sub 2}-enriched air for acceleration of composting. Small-scale respiration experiments are useful to optimize parameters which have to be adjusted during substrate pre-treatment and composting, with the exception of particle size and temperature, and to reduce the number of variants which have to be investigated in greater detail in larger scale experiments. As all regulation possibilities such as aeration, moistening, turning can be simulated with the technical scale set-up, their complex cooperation can be taken into consideration. Encouraging composting variants can be tested, compared and optimized.

Koerner, I.; Braukmeier, J.; Herrenklage, J.; Leikam, K.; Ritzkowski, M.; Schlegelmilch, M.; Stegmann, R

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Characteristics of Dewatered Sewage Sludge and Green Waste Co-composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study the characteristics of the co-composting of sewage sludge and green waste (weight ratio 8:1). The indexes such as temperature, total nitrogen and total organic carbon contents, germination index, were analyzed to ... Keywords: sewage sludge, Composting, Maturity index

Hua Zhang; Delong Lv; Leilei Wei

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The Influence of the Mushroom Compost Application on the Microorganism Quantity of Reclamated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mushroom compost which was produced from farm can be used to improving the quality of the reclamated soil. On the one hand, the question about environmental pollution made by the mushroom compost is solved, and on the other hand, it can improve the ... Keywords: mushroom material, micro-organisms, soil quality

Liu Xueran; Li Xinju; Li Bing

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost complicate the isolation of PCR- amplifiable DNA from compost and other organic-rich samples. In this study contamination, PCR amplifiability, and microbial community structure assessed by terminal restriction fragment

Michel Jr., Frederick C.

148

Production of compost with bagasse and vinasses for cane crop in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent laboratory experiments have shown that a mixture of bagasse, animal manure and vinasse can be transformed into compost suitable for agriculture. The factors necessary for good composting are discussed, these include the carbon-nitrogen ratio, moisture, aeration and temperature. A mixture of 300 kg cane bagasse and 38 kg poultry manure moistened with vinasse gave the best results.

Park, Y.K.; Castro Gomez, R.J.H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Neural Image Analysis of Maturity Stage during Composting of Sewage Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the experiments of compost images analysis carried out with two types of digital cameras working in daylight and ultraviolet light. The data collected with two cameras were analysed with the usage of neural network model (using part ... Keywords: neural image analysis, artificial neural networks, sewage sludge, composting

Piotr Boniecki; Jacek Dach; Krzysztof Nowakowski; Artur Jakubek

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Sewage waste enriches city parks: forced aeration allows sludge cake to be used as compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of managing sewage wastes in the City of Windsor shows that composting of sludges is practical in most urbanized areas in Canada. Composting is a method to treat waste (or recycling of waste) and at this point is not a signficant moneymaker. By composting sewage sludge cake, the odors are alleviated and a stable humus-like organic material is produced. The exothermic proces generates temperatures within the pile that effectively destroy many of the human pathogens. While composting is more labor intensive than some of the other systems of sludge cake disposal, it is not capital intensive. The composting of sewage sludge is a conserver of energy when compared to other methods of disposal. The end product can be utilized as a soil conditioner safety.

Romano, L.S.; Faust, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Heavy metals and toxic organic pollutants in MSW-composts: Research results on phytoavailability, bioavailability, fate, etc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is a review and interpretation of research which has been conducted to determine the fate, transport, and potential effects of heavy metals and toxic organic compounds in Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)-composts and sewage sludges. Evaluation of research findings identified a number of pathways by which these contaminants can be transferred from MSW-compost or compost-amended soils to humans, livestock, or wildlife. The pathways consider direct ingestion of compost or compost-amended soil by livestock and children, plant uptake by food or feed crops, and exposure to dust, vapor, and water to which metals and organics have migrated.

Ryan, J.A.; Chaney, R.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simple technologies for on-farm composting of cattle slurry solid fraction  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simple management techniques were examined for composting slurry solid fraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composting slurry solids was effective without bulking agents, turning or rewetting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Maximum rates of organic matter destruction were observed in short piles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermophilic temperatures in tall piles maximised sanitation and moisture reduction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The simple compost management approach maximised N retention and agronomic value. - Abstract: Composting technologies and control systems have reached an advanced stage of development, but these are too complex and expensive for most agricultural practitioners for treating livestock slurries. The development of simple, but robust and cost-effective techniques for composting animal slurries is therefore required to realise the potential benefits of waste sanitation and soil improvement associated with composted livestock manures. Cattle slurry solid fraction (SF) was collected at the rates of 4 m{sup 3} h{sup -1} and 1 m{sup 3} h{sup -1} and composted in tall (1.7 m) and short (1.2 m) static piles, to evaluate the physicochemical characteristics and nutrient dynamics of SF during composting without addition of bulking agent materials, and without turning or water addition. Highest maximum temperatures (62-64 Degree-Sign C) were measured in tall piles compared to short piles (52 Degree-Sign C). However, maximum rates of organic matter (OM) destruction were observed at mesophilic temperature ranges in short piles, compared to tall piles, whereas thermophilic temperatures in tall piles maximised sanitation and enhanced moisture reduction. Final OM losses were within the range of 520-660 g kg{sup -1} dry solids and the net loss of OM significantly (P < 0.001) increased nutrient concentrations during the composting period. An advanced degree of stabilization of the SF was indicated by low final pile temperatures and C/N ratio, low concentrations of NH{sub 4}{sup +} and increased concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -} in SF composts. The results indicated that minimum intervention composting of SF in static piles over 168 days can produce agronomically effective organic soil amendments containing significant amounts of OM (772-856 g kg{sup -1}) and plant nutrients. The implications of a minimal intervention management approach to composting SF on compost pathogen reduction are discussed and possible measures to improve sanitation are suggested.

Brito, L.M., E-mail: miguelbrito@esa.ipvc.pt [Escola Superior Agraria, Instituto Politecnico de Viana do Castelo, Refoios, 4990-706 Ponte de Lima (Portugal) and Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), IPB, Campus de St Apolonia, Apartado 1172, 5301-855 Braganca (Portugal); Mourao, I. [Escola Superior Agraria, Instituto Politecnico de Viana do Castelo, Refoios, 4990-706 Ponte de Lima (Portugal) and Mountain Research Centre (CIMO), IPB, Campus de St Apolonia, Apartado 1172, 5301-855 Braganca (Portugal); Coutinho, J., E-mail: j_coutin@utad.pt [C. Quimica, DeBA, EC Vida e Ambiente, Universidade de Tras-os-Montes e Alto Douro, ap 1013, 5001-911 Vila Real (Portugal); Smith, S.R., E-mail: s.r.smith@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effect of granular porous media on the composting of swine manure  

SciTech Connect

This study investigated the feasibility of a bulking agent of granular porous media (GPM) for the composting of swine manure. Two lab-scale composting reactors were operated to evaluate the general performances and maturity parameters using GPM made of wastes from the Portland cement manufacturing processes as an alternative bulking agent. The overall volatile solid (VS) removal was 38.5% (dry basis). During the experiments, moisture content ranged between 41% and 53%, ensuring feasibility of microbial activity in composting. Cured compost showed proper maturity and low phytotoxicity, despite the slight decreases of CO{sub 2} production and VS removal at the second batch operation. Various physico-chemical parameters of the cured compost met the regulatory standards reported elsewhere. The pH, carbon-to-nitrogen ratio, ammonia nitrogen and soluble organic carbon (SOC) of the cured compost were significantly correlated to the germination index (GI) using the seeds of Chinese cabbage and lettuce, indicating the progressive biodegradation of phytotoxins as well as organic matter. Consequently, the results obtained in this study demonstrate that GPM could contribute to the environmentally friendly and economical composting of problematic swine manure as a recyclable bulking agent.

Kim, Ku-Yong; Kim, Hyun-Woo [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Han, Sun-Kee [Department of Environmental Health, Korea National Open University, 169 Dongsung-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-791 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Eung-Ju [Department of Environmental Engineering, Daegu University, Jinryang, Gyeongsan, Gyeongbuk 712-714 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chae-Young [Department of Civil Engineering, The University of Suwon, San 2-2, Wau-ri, Bongdam-eup, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-743 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hang-Sik [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hangshin@kaist.ac.kr

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Methane production during the anaerobic decomposition of composted and raw organic refuse in simulated landfill cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methane contributes 20% annually to increases in global warming, and is explosive at concentrations of 5-15% in air. Landfills contribute 15% to total methane emissions. This study was conducted to determine the potential decrease in methane production from landfills if organic waste is composted prior to. The quantities and rates of methane production were measured from simulated landfill cells containing composted and raw simulated refuse. The refuse was composted in an open pile and characterized by temperature, pH, ash content and C02 evolved during aerobic respiration. Assuming a 1 0% lignin content, the labile carbon fraction was reduced by an estimated 71 % during composting. Over a of six month period, simulated landfill cells filled with raw waste generated 66 M3 methane per Mg of dry refuse, while cells containing compost produced 31 M3 methane per Mg of dry compost. Per unit weight of dry raw material, composted waste placed in a landfill produced only 23% of the methane that was generated from raw refuse.

West, Margrit Evelyn

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Happened Composting with My Wiggly Friends - or, The Great Escape That Never Happened April 6, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis John Lippert It's hard for many of us of the "me" generation to think about being careful and conserving energy, even when it directly affects our pocketbooks. We leave the lights and television on when there's no one in the room, despite the fact that this specific action-or lack of action-increases our electricity consumption, raising our next electric bill. How much harder is it for us to take steps that may benefit our community, or society, but that are harder to discern how they affect us economically? My wife, Jane, and I have been composting for more than a dozen years.

156

Co-composting of green waste and food waste at low C/N ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, co-composting of food waste and green waste at low initial carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios was investigated using an in-vessel lab-scale composting reactor. The central composite design (CCD) and response surface method (RSM) were applied to obtain the optimal operating conditions over a range of preselected moisture contents (45-75%) and C/N ratios (13.9-19.6). The results indicate that the optimal moisture content for co-composting of food waste and green waste is 60%, and the substrate at a C/N ratio of 19.6 can be decomposed effectively to reduce 33% of total volatile solids (TVS) in 12 days. The TVS reduction can be modeled by using a second-order equation with a good fit. In addition, the compost passes the standard germination index of white radish seed indicating that it can be used as soil amendment.

Kumar, Mathava; Ou, Y.-L. [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001, University Road, Hsinchu City 30010, Taiwan (China); Lin, J.-G., E-mail: jglin@mail.nctu.edu.t [Institute of Environmental Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001, University Road, Hsinchu City 30010, Taiwan (China)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Yard-waste compost evaluation for soil amendment utilization| Elemental, thermal, and infrared analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This research generates analytical criteria for the utilization of Northern California yard-waste composts, regardless of the samples feedstock, treatment facility, or final form. Several (more)

Flock, Rebecca J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Ex Situ Bioremediation of Mineral Oil in Soils: Land Treatment and Composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mineral oil dielectric fluid (MODF) has replaced PCB oil as the insulating medium in electrical transformers. Although eliminating PCBs has reduced the environmental impact resulting from transformer leaks, soil contaminated with mineral oil still often requires remediation. This study evaluated the feasibility of ex situ biotreatment by land farming and composting for Southern Company Services/Georgia Power. Research results indicate that composting does not enhance the biodegradation of mineral oil com...

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Application of composted pulp and paper mill sludge to a young pine plantation  

SciTech Connect

Disposing of sludge recovered from the effluent stream of pulp and paper mills has traditionally involved landfilling. Shortages in landfill space and increasingly stringent environmental regulations in many countries have forced the industry to seek alternative disposal options. The authors assessed the feasibility of compost-recycling a primary pulp and paper mill sludge (PMS) for use as a nutrient-releasing mulch in plantation forestry. The effects of the composted PMS on the growth, nutrition, water relations, and week suppression in a 3-yr-old plantation of radiata pine (Pinus radiata D.Don) on an infertile sandy soil in southern Tasmania were assessed. Compost was applied to the surface without incorporation in 0.5-m wide bands in tree rows at rates of 0, 20, 40, and 60 metric t ha{sup {minus}1} (dry matter). One year after application of compost, the percentage increase in stem diameter was 40 to 66% greater than that achieved in untreated plots, with better growth at the highest compost application rate. Improved growth of radiata pine after application of compost was primarily attributable to a 17 to 37% increase in the concentration of foliar N and to decreased water stress in amended plots. Nitrogen released from the compost was mostly absorbed by plant roots within the first 20 cm of the soil profile, with no significant movement beyond this depth range. Application of compost prepared from PMS to young stands of radiata pine was found to be acceptable recycling alternative for this material, capable of improving plantation productivity.

Jackson, M.J.; Line, M.A.; Wilson, S.; Hetherington, S.J.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Tracking Dynamics of Plant Biomass Composting by Changes in Substrate Structure, Microbial Community, and Enzyme Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

Wei, H.; Tucker, M. P.; Baker, J. O.; Harris, M.; Luo, Y. H.; Xu, Q.; Himmel, M. E.; Ding, S. Y.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Multispecies toxicity assessment of compost produced in bioremediation of an explosives-contaminated sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multispecies terrestrial test system was used to assess the environmental effectiveness of composting for bioremediation of explosives-contaminated soils. The assessment involved comparing biological responses, from the individual to the community level, in remediated and reference composts. A 6-month greenhouse study incorporated two soil invertebrate species, three plant species and an associated symbiont, and the naturally occurring complement of soil microorganisms. Measured parameters included growth and reproduction of earthworms and isopods; soil mote diversity; soil lipid class composition as an indicator of soil microbial community structure; plant growth, photosynthesis, and reproduction; and root nodulation and symbiotic N{sub 2} fixation. Additional short-term toxicity tests of seed germination and earthworm survival were performed to supplement the mesocosm data. Compost prepared from the explosives-contaminated soil inhibited several aspects of plant growth and physiology, but few adverse effects on soil invertebrates were detected. An initial lag in earthworm and isopod reproduction occurred in the reference compost, reflecting some inherent compost differences not associated with contamination, and highlighting the importance and the difficulty of finding appropriate reference soils for assessing hazardous waste sites or remediation technologies. Nonetheless, the results from this study suggested some nonlethal effects from the contaminated-soil compost, primarily to plants. The mesocosm methodology used in this study can bridge the gap between traditional short-term toxicity testing and longer term field assessments, and provide information on ecological effects by explicitly including measurements of multiple species across several levels of ecological organization.

Gunderson, C.A.; Napolitano, G.E.; Wicker, L.F.; Richmond, J.E.; Stewart, A.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Kostuk, J.M. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences; Gibbs, M.H. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Center for Environmental Biotechnology

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Evaluation of oxygen utilization as an indicator of municipal solid-waste compost stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research evaluated oxygen utilization parameters as indicators of MSW compost stability. Parameters evaluated were the oxygen utilization rate (OUR), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), five-day biochemical oxygen demand, and chemical oxygen demand. In addition, other suggested indicators of stability were investigated including percent volatile solids, volatile solids reduction, nitrogen content, carbon: nitrogen ratio, and reheating potential (RP). OUR is a measure of the rate of oxygen utilization by the microorganisms in the decomposition of organic matter in compost. OUR was observed to be sensitive to the degree of stabilization and decreased with increasing compost age and stability. OUR values near zero indicate that the compost microorganisms are in a state of endogenous respiration, which is characteristic of a stable compost. Therefore, OUR is an excellent indicator of stability. A number of disadvantages are associated with OUR for practical application. Therefore, other parameters were evaluated as indicators of stability based on their statistical correlation to OUR. RP exhibited the strongest correlation to OUR. In combination, RP and SOUR were the two parameters which exhibited the strongest correlation to OUR. OUR, RP, and SOUR are all measures of microbial activity which reflect the degree of organic decomposition, and therefore, stability. Based on the results of this research; OUR, RP, and SOUR are useful parameters in assessing compost stability.

Zimmerman, R.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

2. Government 3. Recipients Catalog No. Accession No. 4. Title and Subtitle A REVIEW AND EVALUATION OF LITERATURE PERTAINING TO COMPOST CHARACTERISTICS AND TO THE APPLICATION OF COMPOST ALONE AND MIXED WITH DIFFERENT SOILS 7. Author(s)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TxDOT reports that composted manures have been used in 22 of the 25 TxDOT districts, usually with excellent results. The application of composted manures to rights-of-way successfully improved growth of vegetation and controlled erosion of slopes on highway embankments. However, consistent availability of compost of the quality and quantity required for use in roadside projects is problematic in some states. Many states have adopted specifications for compost characteristics to ensure consistent quality of compost. The objectives of this literature evaluation are identification of the constituents and composition of various types of composted materials including animal manures, municipal wastes (solid waste and wastewater sludges), and other waste materials, as well as documentation of application of the composted materials alone as well as mixed with different soils (composted manufactured topsoil). Most compost has a pH in the neutral range, organic matter content ranges from 30 % to 60%, moisture content ranges from 30 % to 50 % range, and the concentrations of N, P, K, and salts are higher than those

Christine Kirchhoff; Joseph F. Malina, Ph.D.; Michael E. Barrett, Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Correlation of Process Data and Electrocheical Noise to Assess Kraft Digester Corrosion: Second Year at Spring Grove  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical noise (EN) probes were deployed in the carbon steel continuous kraft digester at Spring Grove at four locations and at one location in the bottom cone of the associated flash tank for a second consecutive year of a corrosion study. The probes contained dual electrodes of 309LSi stainless steel overlay--representing a field repair material applied to a portion of the vessel--and dual electrodes of 312 stainless steel overlay. Current and potential noise, the temperature at each probe location, and the value of 23 process parameters (flow rates, liquor chemistry, etc.) were again monitored continuously for a period of almost one year. Historical vessel inspection data and post-test evaluation of the probe components were used to assess/compare EN corrosion activity with physical changes in wall thickness and corrosion patterns on the digester shell. In addition, attempts were made to correlate EN activity from each electrode type with process parameters. The results indicate the corrosion conditions aggressive to mild steel persist within the digester, as post-test inspection of the vessel revealed localized corrosion of mild steel in locations previously free of attack. Further, there was evidence that the depth of localized attack of exposed steel had increased in some locations. Nevertheless, the stainless steel overlay in the digester was essentially immune to corrosion, as evidenced by retained surface relief and heat tint associated with the original deposition process. The 309LSi electrodes also appeared visually pristine, and post-exposure metallographic examination of the 309LSi electrode materials revealed no attack. The 312 electrode materials were similar in appearance, but exhibited very minor interdendritic attack over the exposed surface. The silver electrodes in the probes were consumed (to Ag{sub 2}S) to variable degree over the course of the exposure indicating a useful life of not more than a year in digester service in this vessel. Since the stainless steel overlay electrodes were immune to corrosion during the exposure, the current and potential noise activity on these probes is likely related to redox processes on the electrode surfaces. Analysis of this activity as a function of position (and year) in the vessel suggests that redox chemistry/conditions vary by a significant amount on a consistent basis--even on opposite sides of the vessel at the same elevation--and that these differences are not identified by process parameters tracked at the mill. These variable environmental conditions (flow, temperature, liquor chemistry) appear to have little effect on stainless steel overlays under evaluation, but apparently can be quite corrosive to steel as determined in the initial study in the digester at Spring Grove. With the exception of start-up and shutdown activity, including brief upsets for ''hanging columns'' or brief maintenance periods, no regular correlation was observed between tracked process variables and EN activity on any of the probes. In combination with the variable redox activity, this result suggests that the liquor sampling and flow data compiled at the mill do not represent the corrosion conditions in the vessel particularly well.

Pawel, SJ

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

165

Use of compost filter bermsfor sediment trapping: primary focus on water quality and structural stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Runoff from road construction and maintenance sites is responsible for erosion and deposition of sediments in the receiving water bodies. In addition to soil particles from erosion, runoff also transports other pollutants such as rubber, toxic metals, automobile fluids, car exhausts (which settle with the rain), pesticides, fertilizers, and other debris. Compost has been used effectively as a valuable soil amendment to aid plant growth. Berms (mounds) of compost placed at the top or bottom of steep slopes can be used to slow the velocity of water and provide additional protection for receiving waters. However, a downside of the application of composted organic material is the potential degradation of runoff water quality. Overloading with nitrogen and phosphorus causes eutrophication, which reduces the suitability of waterways for beneficial uses. A field testing of the berms coupled with a laboratory analysis of the testing water will provide a basis for the impact of the compost berms on the runoff water quality. The study of the impact of compost on the runoff water quality was investigated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of berms made from various materials such as dairy manure compost, yard waste compost and composted bio-solids mixed with wood chips in a ratio of 50:50 on the runoff water quality, as well as, the sediment removal efficiencies. Field tests were performed on the berms to simulate conventional rainfall runoff and the tested water was collected as time-weighted samples and analyzed in the laboratory. Several variables were investigated during this study. Results of this investigation demonstrated that the effectiveness of this application was hampered by the structural instability of the berm. A 100% failure rate was observed in the berms tested. Optimum performance was observed in yard waste compost berms, which introduced the least amount of contaminants into the water. However, some masking effect could be present due to berm failures. In fact, the actual sediment removal by the berms could not be determined. The study of compost filter berms showed some evidence of the existence of first flush effect.

Raut Desai, Aditya Babu

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Bioavailability of TNT residues in composts of TNT-contaminated soil  

SciTech Connect

Composting is being explored as a means to remediate 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) contaminated soils. This process appears to modify TNT and to bind it to organic matter. The health hazards associated with dusts generated from such materials cannot be predicted without knowing if the association between TNT residues and compost particulate is stable in biological systems. To address this question, single doses of [{sup 14}C]-TNT, soil spiked with [{sup 14C]-TNT, or compost generated with [{sup 14}C]-TNT-spiked soils were administered to rats by intratracheal instillation. The appearance of {sup 14}C in urine and tissues was taken as an indication of the bioavailability of TNT residues from compost particles. In rats instilled with neat [{sup 14}C]-TNT, about 35% of the {sup 14}C dose appeared in urine within 3 d. The {sup 14}C excreted in urine by these rats decreased rapidly thereafter, and was undetectable by 4 wk after treatment. Similar results were obtained with soil-treated rats. In contrast, after treatment with [{sup 14}C]-TNT-labeled compost, only 2.3% of the total {sup 14}C dose appeared in urine during the first 3 d. Low levels of {sup 14}C continued to be excreted in urine from compost-treated rats for more than 6 mo, and the total amount of {sup 14}C in urine was comparable to that in TNT-treated animals. Determination of the radiolabel in tissues showed that {sup 14}C accumulated in the kidneys of rats treated with labeled compost but not in rats treated with [{sup 14}C]-TNT or [{sup 14}C]-TNT-spiked soil. These results indicate that the association between TNT and particulate matter in compost is not stable when introduced into the lungs. Accumulation of {sup 14}C in kidneys suggests the presence of a unique TNT residue in compost-treated rats. The rate of excretion and tissue disposition of {sup 14}}C in rats treated with TNT-spiked soil indicate that TNT in soil is freely available in the lungs. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Palmer, W.G. [Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Beaman, J.R. [Geo-centers, Fort Detrick, Frederick, MD (United States); Walters, D.M.; Creasia, D.A. [Army Research Institute for Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Contour Ripping and Composted Dairy Manure for Erosion Control on Fort Hood Military Installation, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Training activities on the Fort Hood Military Installation have imposed serious impacts to its grass-dominated landscape. Six decades of tracked vehicle impacts have caused soil compaction and vegetation reduction which has lead to severe surface erosion. This investigation examined two conservation practices directed at improving and creating sustainable training conditions on Fort Hood training lands, contour ripping and the application of composted dairy manure. The application of composted dairy manure may increase vegetation, while contour ripping may decrease discharge, both of which will lead to a decrease in erosion. Three small 0.30 ha watersheds were established on Fort Hood in January 2005. Each watershed had 0.46 m berms installed on all four sides with a 0.305 m H-flume and was equipped with automated storm sampling equipment. Soil samples were collected prior to any treatments, and twice after compost applications. Discharge and precipitation was collected continuously on each watershed. Stormwater samples were collected during storm events and analyzed for water quality parameters. Water quality samples, discharge and precipitation records were collected between January 2005 and July 2007. Three composted dairy manure application rates at 0, 28 and 57 m3 ha-1 were applied on watersheds C0, C1 and C2, respectively; watersheds were evaluated for effects on NO3 and soluble reactive phosphates (SRP) concentrations and loadings in storm events and on stormwater discharge. Twenty two months after the initial compost application, the two previously composted watersheds (C1 and C2) were treated with contour ripping and C2 received a second compost application. The compost application caused the spikes in NO3 and SRP concentrations and loads immediately after application. Both NO3 and SRP concentrations decreased as the number of days from application increased. Compost application did not appear to have an effect on the discharge from watersheds. Contour ripping had a significant effect on stormwater discharge. Contour ripping decreased discharge by 74 and 80% on C1 and C2, respectively when compared to the untreated control (C0).

Prcin, Lisa J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of cellulosic biofuels from non-food crops is currently an area of intense research interest. Tailoring depolymerizing enzymes to particular feedstocks and pretreatment conditions is one promising avenue of research in this area. Here we added a green-waste compost inoculum to switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and simulated thermophilic composting in a bioreactor to select for a switchgrass-adapted community and to facilitate targeted discovery of glycoside hydrolases. Smallsubunit (SSU) rRNA-based community profiles revealed that the microbial community changed dramatically between the initial and switchgrass-adapted compost (SAC) with some bacterial populations being enriched over 20-fold. We obtained 225 Mbp of 454-titanium pyrosequence data from the SAC community and conservatively identified 800 genes encoding glycoside hydrolase domains that were biased toward depolymerizing grass cell wall components. Of these, ,10percent were putative cellulasesmostly belonging to families GH5 and GH9. We synthesized two SAC GH9 genes with codon optimization for heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and observed activity for one on carboxymethyl cellulose. The active GH9 enzyme has a temperature optimum of 50uC and pH range of 5.5 to 8 consistent with the composting conditions applied. We demonstrate that microbial communities adapt to switchgrass decomposition using simulated composting condition and that full-length genes can be identified from complex metagenomic sequence data, synthesized and expressed resulting in active enzyme.

Reddy, Amitha; Allgaier, Martin; Park, Joshua I.; Ivanoval, Natalia; Dhaeseleer, Patrik; Lowry, Steve; Sapra, Rajat; Hazen, Terry C.; Simmons, Blake A.; VanderGheynst, Jean S.; Hugenholtz, Philip

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

Prediction of temperature and thermal inertia effect in the maturation stage and stockpiling of a large composting mass  

SciTech Connect

A macroscopic non-steady state energy balance was developed and solved for a composting pile of source-selected organic fraction of municipal solid waste during the maturation stage (13,500 kg of compost). Simulated temperature profiles correlated well with temperature experimental data (ranging from 50 to 70 deg. C) obtained during the maturation process for more than 50 days at full scale. Thermal inertia effect usually found in composting plants and associated to the stockpiling of large composting masses could be predicted by means of this simplified energy balance, which takes into account terms of convective, conductive and radiation heat dissipation. Heat losses in a large composting mass are not significant due to the similar temperatures found at the surroundings and at the surface of the pile (ranging from 15 to 40 deg. C). In contrast, thermophilic temperature in the core of the pile was maintained during the whole maturation process. Heat generation was estimated with the static respiration index, a parameter that is typically used to monitor the biological activity and stability of composting processes. In this study, the static respiration index is presented as a parameter to estimate the metabolic heat that can be generated according to the biodegradable organic matter content of a compost sample, which can be useful in predicting the temperature of the composting process.

Barrena, R. [Escola Universitaria Politecnica del Medi Ambient, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Rbla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100-Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Canovas, C. [Escola Universitaria Politecnica del Medi Ambient, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Rbla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100-Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain); Sanchez, A. [Escola Universitaria Politecnica del Medi Ambient, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Rbla Pompeu Fabra 1, 08100-Mollet del Valles, Barcelona (Spain)]. E-mail: asanchez@eupma.uab.es

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Biofiltration of benzene contaminated air streams using compost-activated carbon filter media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three laboratory-scale biofilter columns were operated for 81 days to investigate the removal of benzene from a waste gas stream. The columns contain a mixture of yard waste and sludge compost as biomedia. Different amounts of granular activated carbon (GAC) are mixed with the compost in two of the three columns to evaluate the extent to which biofilter performance can be enhanced. The effects of different operating conditions on the performance of the removal of benzene from air were evaluated. More than 90% removal efficiency was observed for an influent benzene concentration of about 75 ppm and an air flow rate of 0.3 L/min. in all 3 columns under steady-state conditions. Under most cases of shock loading conditions, such as a sudden increase in the air flow rate, or the benzene concentration in the influent, the biofilters containing GAC provided higher removal efficiencies and more stable operation than the biofilter containing compost only.

Zhu, L.; Kocher, W.M. [Cleveland State Univ., OH (United States). Civil Engineering Dept.; Abumaizar, R.J. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

171

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil. Technical terminal report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of fly ash-amended composts as manure enhances the crop yield of certain plants like corn, sorghum, collard and mustard greens. Organic compost made out of grass and leaves (home-made) is better than the commercial composts for amendment with fly ash. A 20--40% fly ash in the amended compost and a soil to ash-amended compost ratio of 3:1 are recommended for making bed for plantation. Organic compost mixed with fly ash, due to reduced porosity, will help the bed to retain water and conserve water supply to plants. Organic compost will release to the manure additional quantities of N, P, and S that are not substantially available in fly ash. It appears that chemical reaction and/or mineralization occurs during composting of fly ash with organic manure to release more N, P, K and S to the system. Potassium is more elevated in all plants grown in potted soil treated with fly ash-amended compost than in those grown in soil or soil treated with organic manure. Contrary to expectation Ca in fly ash is not effectively used by plants as the latter treated with ash- amended compost is not rich in Ca. This suggests that Ca may be tied up as insoluble CaSO{sub 4} in the manure so that it may not be bioavailable to the plant. Uptake of boron by bean, bell pepper and egg plant is considerably higher than that absorbed by corn, sorghum and greens resulting in poor yield for the former.

Menon, M.P.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Impact of struvite crystallization on nitrogen losses during composting of pig manure and cornstalk  

SciTech Connect

An absorbent mixture of magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) and phosphoric acid (H{sub 3}PO{sub 4}) was added to compost mixtures of pig manure with cornstalk in different molar ratios (T1, 1:1; T2, 1:2; T3, 1:3) in order to examine its effect on controlling ammonia losses during composting. Based on the principle of struvite precipitation, and with an unamended trial as control (CK), an in-vessel composting experiment was conducted in fermenters (60 L with forced aeration) in which the absorbent mixture was added with proportions of 3.8%, 7.3% and 8.9% of dry weight for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. The results showed that the total nitrogen loss was reduced from 35% to 12%, 5% and 1% of initial N mass, respectively. In the final compost, the total nitrogen content in T1, T2 and T3 was improved by 10, 14, 12 g kg{sup -1}, and NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N in T1, T2 and T3 was improved by 8, 9, and 10 g kg{sup -1}, respectively, compared with the unamended trial. The results of the germination index test showed that the maturity of treatment T2 was best among the four treatments in the final compost, followed by T1, CK and T3. The results of X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirmed the formation of magnesium ammonium phosphate hexahydrate (MgNH{sub 4}PO{sub 4}.6H{sub 2}O:MAP) in the T1, T2 and T3 compost. Based on these results, the adsorbent mixture of Mg(OH){sub 2} + H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} could control nitrogen loss effectively during composting via struvite crystallization. However, an excess of phosphoric acid (1:3) had a negative influence on composting properties. The pH value decreased which led to reduced microorganism activity, and which finally resulted in reduced biodegradation of the organic matter.

Ren Limei [College of Resource and Environmental Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Schuchardt, Frank [Heinrich von Thunen-Institute, Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Institute of Agricultural Technology and Biosystems Engineering, Braunschweig 38116 (Germany); Shen Yujun [College of Resource and Environmental Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Li Guoxue, E-mail: ligx@cau.edu.c [College of Resource and Environmental Science, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Li Chunping [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Analytical and spectroscopic characterization of humic acids extracted from sewage sludge, manure, and worm compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Humic acids extracted from sewage sludges, manure, and worm compost have been characterized by chemical and spectroscopic methods. Meaningful differences in the composition were revealed by FTIR, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR, and visible spectroscopies. These differences allow a differentiation among the products depending on the source from which they were obtained. Humic acid extracted from sewage sludges contains the highest percentage of aliphatic carbon, associated with polysaccharides and proteinaceous structures, and has characteristics close to those of aquatic humic acids. On the other hand, humic acids from manure and worm compost are similar to the humic acids originating from soil.

Deiana, S.; Gessa, C.; Manunza, B.; Seeber, R. (Universita di Sassari (Italy)); Rausa, R. (Eniricerche S.p.A., Milanese (Italy))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A DISTENSIBLETUBE WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER WITH A DISTRIBUTED POWERTAKEOFF R.C.T.Rainey, Atkins Ltd., Woodcote Grove, Epsom KT18 5BW, U.K. rod.rainey@atkinsglobal.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A DISTENSIBLETUBE WAVE ENERGY CONVERTER WITH A DISTRIBUTED POWERTAKEOFF R.C.T.Rainey, Atkins Ltd., Woodcote Grove, Epsom KT18 5BW, U.K. rod.rainey@atkinsglobal.com 1. Summary this problem. References [1] Farley F.J.M., Rainey R.C.T, & Chaplin J.R. Rubber tubes in the sea. Phil

176

BIO-WASTE COMPOSTING FACILITY AT THE WASTE AUTHORITY OF S.O.W., HOORN/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIO-WASTE COMPOSTING FACILITY AT THE WASTE AUTHORITY OF S.O.W., HOORN/ NETHERLANDS ·· ·· T. SCHUTTE, B. GOGGEL, AND U. MAIRE Buhler Inc. Minneapolis, Minnesota INTRODUCfION Wastes Processed Bio-wastes are predominantly those wastes which are disposed of in the kitchen and are collected separately from the rest

Columbia University

177

Compost filters for H/sub 2/S removal from anaerobic digestion and rendering exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for the disposal of anaerobic digester gas from meat waste treatment plants has been developed as an alternative to atmospheric disposal. Hydrogen sulfide waste gases are filtered through by-product compost. Operation and effectiveness of such a treatment process are detailed. (2 diagrams, 5 references, 4 tables)

Rands, M.B.; Cooper, D.E.; Woo, C.; Fletcher, G.C.; Rolfe, K.A.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparative efficacy of compost, poultry litter, IPM Lab Biopesticide and BAU-Biofungicde in controlling early blight of tomato  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compost, poultry litter, IPM Lab Biopesticide and BAU-Biofungicide, either alone or in combinations, were assessed for their effect in controlling early blight disease, and on growth and yield parameters of tomato. The lowest early blight incidence and severity were recorded in T13 (compost tea + poultry litter extract + BAU-Bio-fungicide) followed by T12 (compost tea + poultry litter extract + IPM Lab Biopesticide). Early blight incidence and severity were observed lower in case of both single and combined applications of compost, poultry litter, IPM lab Biopesticide and BAU-Biofungicide. Besides the lowest early blight infection, T13 also yielded the highest plant height, number of secondary branches per plant, number of fruits per plant, and yield of tomato per hectare.

S. M. E. Kabir; M. R. Islam; M. M. R. Khan; I. Hossain

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: South Compost Facility #2 Da  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

South Compost Facility #2 Da South Compost Facility #2 Da te: 1-6-10 DOE Code: 6730.020.0000 Contracto r Code: 8067-788 Project Lead: Anthony Bowler Project Ove rview The purpose of the project is to build an additional compos ling facility at RMOTC to allow for 1. Bnef project description [include anything that increased soil remediation capabilities. The project will involve removing the top soil and placing could impact the environment] it adjacent to the operational area ,in a "signed" pile for reclamation . Additional scraping of the 2. Legal location area (6"-8'1 will generate material which will be used to erect a 2' berm around the location to 3. Duration of the project control runon/runoff. A perimeter fence and a locking gate will be installed around the facility's

180

Design of passively aerated compost piles: Vertical air velocities between the pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passively aerated compost piles are built on a base of porous materials, such as straw or wood chips, in which perforated air supply pipes are distributed. The piles are not turned during composting, nor is forced-aeration equipment used, which significantly reduces the operating and capital expenses associated with these piles. Currently, pile configurations and materials are worked out by trial and error. Fundamentally based design procedures are difficult to develop because the natural convection air flow rate is not explicitly known, but rather is closely coupled with the pile temperature. This paper develops a mathematical model to analytically determine the maximum upward air flow velocity over an air supply pipe and the drop in vertical velocity away from the pipe. This model has one dimensionless number, dependent on the pile and base properties, which fully characterizes the velocity profile between the pipes. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Lynch, N.J.; Cherry, R.S. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Induction of enhanced methane oxidation in compost: Temperature and moisture response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfilling is one of the most common ways of municipal solid waste disposal. Degradation of organic waste produces CH{sub 4} and other landfill gases that significantly contribute to global warming. However, before entering the atmosphere, part of the produced CH{sub 4} can be oxidised while passing through the landfill cover. In the present study, the oxidation rate of CH{sub 4} was studied with various types of compost as possible landfill cover. The influence of incubation time, moisture content and temperature on the CH{sub 4} oxidation capacity of different types of compost was examined. It was observed that the influence of moisture content and temperature on methane oxidation is time-dependent. Maximum oxidation rates were observed at moisture contents ranging from 45% to 110% (dry weight basis), while the optimum temperature ranged from 15 to 30 deg. C.

Mor, Suman [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India) and Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)]. E-mail: sumanmor@yahoo.com; Visscher, Alex de [Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Ravindra, Khaiwal [Micro and Trace Analysis Centre, Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Antwerp (Belgium); Dahiya, R.P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Chandra, A. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Cleemput, Oswald van [Department of Applied Analytical and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, Coupure Links 653, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Field Demonstration of Acetone Pretreatment and Composting of Particulate-TNT-Contaminated Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid fragments of explosives in soil are common in explosives testing and training areas. In this study we initially sieved the upper 6 in of contaminated soil through a 3-mm mesh, and found 2, 4, 6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) fragments. These contributed to an estimated concentration of 1.7 kg per cubic yard soil, or for 2000 ppm TNT in the soil. Most of the fragments ranged 4 mm to 10 mm diameter in size, but explosives particles weighing up to 56 g (about 4 cm diameter) were frequently observed. An acetone pretreatment/composting system was then demonstrated at field scale. The amount of acetone required for a TNT-dissolving slurry process was controlled by the viscosity of the soil/acetone mix rather than the TNT dissolution rate. The amount needed was estimated at about 55 gallons acetone per cubic yard soil. Smaller, 5- to 10-mm-diameter fragments went into solution in less than 15 min at a mixer speed of 36 rpm, with a minimum of 2 g TNT going into solution per 30 min for the larger chunks. The slurries were than mixed with compost starting materials and composted in a vented 1 yd3 container. After 34 days incubation time TNT was below the site-specific regulatory threshold of 44 ppm. TNT metabolites and acetone were also below their regulatory thresholds established for the site.

Radtke, Corey William; Smith, D.; Owen, S.; Roberto, Francisco Figueroa

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

A model for determining the fate of hazardous constituents in waste during in-vessel composting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composting is one of the techniques that has evolved as a safe disposal and predisposal alternative to the stringent regulations on hazardous waste disposal. The implementation of this technique needs careful evaluation of the processes a hazardous compound undergoes when subjected to composting. The purpose of this thesis is to define these processes and develop a model for determining the fate of organic compounds in waste during in-vessel composting Volatilization and biodegradation are found to be the major fate determining processes. Following mass balance approach the compound's loss through these processes is evaluated by developing a fate model. Fate of six aromatic compounds which fall into three categories-volatile, semi-volatile, and non volatile, is determined and the results compared to the experimental values for validating the model. A sensitivity analysis has been performed to determine which parameters most influence the model behavior and quantitatively describe their effects on model performance. The results obtained from the model show close agreement with the experimental results. More data is required to quantify the slight differences observed. The volatilization loss is found to exist only for first few hours. Biodegradation rates are found to have very little impact on volatilization of the compound. Air flow rate and volume of the waste are found to have a noticeable effect on the volatilization of a compound. Bulk density is found to effect volatilization to a small extent. Air quality control measures are recommended for the first few days to deal with the volatilized gases.

Bollineni, Prasanthi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of coal fly ash-amended organic compost as a manure for agricultural crops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal-fired electric power plants generate large quantities of fly ash as a byproduct. In continuation of previous studies on the utilization of fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for use as a manure for agricultural crops, the authors have now determined the effects of this manure on the yield and uptake of selected elements by several plants including collard green, corn, mustard green, bell pepper, egg plant, and climbing beans. An amended compost containing 30-40% fly ash with a compost:soil ratio of 1:3 was found to be most effective to enhance the yield and nutrient uptake of most of the plants. At 20% fly ash level, no increase in yield of any of the above crops was observed. The uptake of K, Mg, Mn, and P was increased in most plants. Boron which is known to be detrimental to the growth of plants above certain level was also found to be increased in plants nourished with the manure.

Ghuman, G.S.; Menon, M.P.; James, J.; Chandra, K.; Sajwan, K. (Savannah State College, GA (United States))

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Urban waste compost: Effects on physical, chemical, and biochemical soil properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-term field experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the additions of urban waste compost on the physical and chemical properties and enzymatic activities in a calcareous soil (Fluventic Xerochrept). Total Porosity (pores >50 pm measured on thin soil sections from undisturbed samples by image analysis) was greater in the plots treated with compost than the control plots due to a larger amount of elongated pores. In the amended plots total and humified organic C, Pb, Cu, and Zn showed a significant increase compared with nonamended plots. Enzymatic activities (L-asparaginase, arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and alkaline phosphomonoesterase) were significantly enhanced by the compost addition thus indicating no inhibiting influence of the heavy metals present. The increased levels of the arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, phosphodiesterase, and phosphomonoesterase activities were significantly correlated with total porosity: the first three with pores ranging from 50 to 1000 {mu}m, mainly with pores 50 to 200 {mu}m in size and phosphomonoesterase only with pores whose size was <500 {mu}m. L-asparaginase activity was not correlated with porosity. Only arylsulphatase, dehydrogenase, and phosphodiesterase were negatively correlated with bulk density. 44 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Giusquiani, P.L.; Gigliotti, G.; Businelli, D. [Istituto di Chimica Agraria dell`Universita, Perugia (Italy)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Home composting as an alternative treatment option for organic household waste in Denmark: An environmental assessment using life cycle assessment-modelling  

SciTech Connect

An environmental assessment of the management of organic household waste (OHW) was performed from a life cycle perspective by means of the waste-life cycle assessment (LCA) model EASEWASTE. The focus was on home composting of OHW in Denmark and six different home composting units (with different input and different mixing frequencies) were modelled. In addition, incineration and landfilling was modelled as alternatives to home composting. The most important processes contributing to the environmental impact of home composting were identified as greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions (load) and the avoided emissions in relation to the substitution of fertiliser and peat when compost was used in hobby gardening (saving). The replacement of fertiliser and peat was also identified as one of the most sensible parameters, which could potentially have a significant environmental benefit. Many of the impact categories (especially human toxicity via water (HTw) and soil (HTs)) were affected by the heavy metal contents of the incoming OHW. The concentrations of heavy metals in the compost were below the threshold values for compost used on land and were thus not considered to constitute a problem. The GHG emissions were, on the other hand, dependent on the management of the composting units. The frequently mixed composting units had the highest GHG emissions. The environmental profiles of the home composting scenarios were in the order of -2 to 16 milli person equivalents (mPE) Mg{sup -1} wet waste (ww) for the non-toxic categories and -0.9 to 28 mPE Mg{sup -1} ww for the toxic categories. Home composting performed better than or as good as incineration and landfilling in several of the potential impact categories. One exception was the global warming (GW) category, in which incineration performed better due to the substitution of heat and electricity based on fossil fuels.

Andersen, J.K.; Boldrin, A.; Christensen, T.H. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Scheutz, C., E-mail: chas@env.dtu.dk [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Risk assessment of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This thesis assesses the risk of the health liabilities from exposure to toxic metals found in the composted material of Air Force municipal solid waste (MSW). The goal is to determine the probability that the composted MSW could be a health hazard if it were used as a soil amendment. The research limited the assessment of the exposure risk to heavy metals found in raw MSW and its resulting compost. The thesis uses reviews of present literature to examine the food and soil ingestion exposure pathways. These pathways are assessed using the heavy metal concentrations found in MSW compost and the soil-plant partition coefficients of vegetables grown in soil mixed with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge or soil irrigated with sewage sludge leachate. The recommendation resulting from this research is that the Air Force should not use MSW composting as part of its future solid waste management plan. This alternative to landfilling contains a chronic health risk that is greater than the Environmental Protection Agency's guideline. If the Air Force would use MSW composting in the future, it may endanger Air Force personnel and others who use the compost created from Air Force MSW. Risk assessment, Heavy metals, Recycling municipal solid waste, Pollution, Composting.

Merrymon, T.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Study of Sustainable Compost Micro-Enterprise In Chimaltenango, Guatemala: Profitability and Employee Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over 13 million people live in Guatemala, and among this population more than 50% live below the poverty line. One proposed solution to mitigate the large percentage of poverty in the country is micro-entrepreneurship. A compost micro-enterprise is a small business, which collects organic raw material and processes it into stable humus material for the purpose of applying to soils to increase crop yields. Developing such micro-enterprises could not only indirectly improve current soil nutrient deficiencies specific to the region, but also provide alternative incomes for the already agriculturally involved community. The success or failure of enterprises practicing composting may be measured by a plethora of figures or outcomes. Employee characteristics are one variable that should be taken into consideration when estimating the efficiency of an agricultural enterprise's operations and productivity. While a variable, such as an employee characteristic, may not be able to be quantified exactly it should be argued that this variable can have a structural impact on productivity. Another crucial variable considered when developing such a micro-enterprise is accounting for its input and output. It is explained the issue of costs within micro-enterprises is complex and should be considered not only in terms of fees but also in terms of payments in any kind, such as entry and exit presence, and the duration of the apprenticeship. When an enterprise has failed to account for its various inputs and consequent output, it has become unsustainable because it has not satisfied basic economic, social and security needs presently and for its future. This study identified and described employee characteristics and documented the inputs and outputs of compost micro-enterprises in Chimaltenango, Guatemala. The study found that employee characteristics, particularly gender, age, and occupation affected a micro-enterprise's access to markets as well as row materials, and how efficiently tasks were completed. Costs of labor, raw material, transport, packaging, energy and the location the micro-enterprise itself heavily influenced profitability. The production of any product on a large scale must anticipate how positive financial outcomes will occur because profitability may not arrive as planned. If the revenue cannot be determined and/or made, compost micro-enterprise may fail to be a sustainable, much less a viable option for alternative income streams.

Silberg, Timothy

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Toxicity of lead to soil respiration: mediation by clay minerals, humic acids, and compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Pb has no known biological function, elevated levels of Pb in soils and in other natural environments may adversely affect the indigenous biota, including the microbiota. Elevated levels of Pb in soil may also adversely affect microbemediated ecologic processes. There is, however, relatively little information on the mediating influence of the physicochemical factors of the recipient environment on the toxicity of Pb to microbe-mediated ecologic processes. This present study evaluated the influence of the clay minerals, kaolinite and montmorillonite, particulate humic acids, and compost on the degradation of glucose in soil.

Debosz, K.; Babich, H.; Stotzky, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy or compost from green waste? - A CO{sub 2} - Based assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Green waste is increasingly extracted from the material recycling chain and, as a result of the financial subsidy arising from the German renewable energy law for the generation of energy from renewable raw materials; it is fed into the energy recovery process in biomass power stations. A reduction in climate relevant gases is also linked to the material recovery of green waste - in particular when using composts gained from the process as a new raw material in different types of potting compost and plant culture media as a replacement for peat. Unlike energy recovery, material valorisation is not currently subsidised. Through the analysis of material and energy valorisation methods for green waste, with particular emphasis on primary resource consumption and CO{sub 2}-balance, it could be determined that the use of green waste for energy generation and its recovery for material and peat replacement purposes can be considered to be on a par. Based on energy recovery or material oriented scenarios, it can be further deduced that no method on its own will achieve the desired outcome and that a combination of recycling processes is more likely to lead to a significant decrease of greenhouse gas emissions.

Kranert, Martin, E-mail: martin.kranert@iswa.uni-stuttgart.d [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Gottschall, Ralf; Bruns, Christian [Humus and Erden Kontor GmbH, Karlsbrunnenstrasse 11, D-37249 Neu-Eichenberg (Germany); Hafner, Gerold [Universitaet Stuttgart, Institute for Sanitary Engineering, Water Quality and Solid Waste Management, Bandtaele 2, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

191

Characterization and modelling of the heat transfers in a pilot-scale reactor during composting under forced aeration  

SciTech Connect

The paper focused on the modelling of the heat transfers during composting in a pilot-scale reactor under forced aeration. The model took into account the heat production and the transfers by evaporation, convection between material and gas crossing the material, conduction and surface convection between gas and material in bottom and upper parts of the reactor. The model was adjusted thanks to the measurements practised during fifteen composting experiments in which five organic wastes were, each, composted under three constant aeration rates. Heat production was considered proportional to oxygen consumption rate and the enthalpy per mole oxygen consumed was assumed constant. The convective heat transfer coefficients were determined on basis of the continuous measurements of the temperatures of both the lid and the bottom part of the reactor. The model allowed a satisfying prediction of the temperature of the composting material. In most cases, the mean absolute discard between the experimental and the simulated temperatures was inferior to 2.5 Degree-Sign C and the peaks of temperature occurred with less than 8 h delay. For the half of the experiments the temperature discard between the simulated peak and the experimental one was inferior to 5 Degree-Sign C. On basis of the calculation of a stoichiometric production of water through oxidation of the biodegradable organic matter, the simulation of water going out from material as vapour also allowed a rather satisfying prediction of the mass of water in final mixture. The influence of the aeration rate on every type of heat loss was characterized. Finally, the model was used to evaluate the impacts on material temperature caused by the change of the insulation thickness, the ambient temperature, take the lid away, the increase or the decrease of the mass of waste to compost.

Guardia, A. de, E-mail: amaury.de-guardia@irstea.fr [Irstea/Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France); Petiot, C.; Benoist, J.C.; Druilhe, C. [Irstea/Cemagref, UR GERE, 17 Avenue de Cucille, CS 64427, F-35044 Rennes (France); Universite Europeenne de Bretagne, F-35000 Rennes (France)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Characterization of a compost biofiltration system degrading dichloromethane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of acclimatization of microbial populations, compound concentration, and media pH on the biodegradation of low concentration dichloromethane emissions in biofiltration systems was evaluated. Greater than 98% removal efficiency was achieved for dichloromethane at superficial velocities from 1 to 15 m[sup 3]/m[sup 2][center dot]min and inlet concentrations of 3 and 50 ppm[sub v]. Although acclimatization of microbial populations to toluene occurred within 2 weeks of operation start-up, initial dichloromethane acclimatization took place over a period of 10 weeks. This period was shortened to 10 days when a laboratory grown consortium of dichloromethane degrading organisms, isolated from a previously acclimatized column, was introduced into fresh biofilter media. The mixed culture consisted of 12 members, which together were able to degrade dichloromethane at concentrations up to 500 mg/L. Only one member of the consortium was able to degrade dichloromethane in pure culture, and the presence of the other members did not affect the rate of biodegradation in solution culture. Although high removal efficiencies for dichloromethane were sustained for more than 4 months in a biofilter column receiving an inlet gas stream with 3 ppm[sub v] of dichloromethane, acidification of the column and resulting decline in performance occurred when a 50-ppm[sub v] inlet concentration was used. A biofilm model incorporating first order biodegradation kinetics provided a good fit to observed concentration profiles, and may prove to be a useful tool for designing biofiltration systems for low concentration VOC emissions.

Ergas, S.J. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering); Kinney, K.; Fuller, M.E.; Scow, K.M. (Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States))

1994-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Degradation of degradable starch-polyethylene plastics in a compost environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Degradable plastics have differing degradation rates. Three types of degradation of polyethylene in the starch-polyethylene polymers can occur: chemical degradation, photodegradation, and biological degradation. This study examines all three types of degradation in 11 commercially produced degradable starch-polyethylene bags. Different rates for chemical and photo-degradation were found within a 20 day or an 8-week period. Results indicated that both the 70[degree]C oven and HT-HH film treatments were appropriate methods to evaluate oxidative degradation. In a compost environment, oxygen tension on the surface of the film appears to be the rate-limiting component for both chemical and biological degradation. Levels of starch in all bags was similar, so the prooxidant additive was critical in promoting the oxidative degradation of polyethylene. The Fe-Mn additive displayed the best catalytic activity. This study overall confirms degradation of starch-polyethylene plastics in a natural environment. 17 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, K.E.; Pometto, A.L. III; Nikolov, Z.L. (Iowa State Univ., Ames (United States))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

COMPOST: a client-server model for applications using text-to-speech systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents a Client-Server Model for multilingual text-to-speech synthesis. The server maintains a collection of TTS systems together with related recongurable descriptions, called scenarios. Applications of an authorized client can access to this collection via an Ethernet network on a simple request to the server. This server allows the client to customize the TTS processing (language, speaker, speech rate, intonation. . . ) to its requirements by switching between different systems and/or reconfiguring the one it is currently using. The working environment, called COMPOST, has a three layered architecture: the development layer including a powerfull rule-compiler [3] and language-independent processing facilities (linguistic analyzers, PSOLA and Klatt synthesizers . . . ), the system construction layer including the Scenario Definition Language, and the server layer which has two main components: the process manager and the ressource manager.

Mamoun Alissali; Grard Bailly

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

McMinnville Cottage Grove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a River R oaring R iver S alm o n b e r r y River Fall R iv C ultus River ver CollawashRiver Breitenbush

196

Performance of a pilot-scale compost biofilter treating gasoline vapor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pilot-scale compost biofiltration system was operated as gasoline soil vapor extraction site in Hayward, California for one year. The media was composed of equal volumes of compost and perlite, a bulking agent. Supplements added included nitrogen (as KNO{sub 3}), a gasoline degrading microbial inoculum, buffer (crushed oyster shell), and water. The biofiltration system was composed of four identical units with outside dimensions of 1.2 x 1.2 x 1.2 m (4 x 4 x 4 ft) operated in an up-flow mode. The units were configured in parallel during the first eight months and then reconfigured to two parallel systems of two units in series. Air flux values ranged from 0.29 to 1.0 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2} per min. Inlet total petroleum hydrogen hydrocarbon (TPH{sub gas}) concentrations ranged from 310 to 2,700 mg/m{sup 3}. The average empty bed contact time was 2.2 min. Following start-up, performance of the individual biofilters varied considerably for a seven-month period. The principal factor affecting performance appeared to be bed moisture content. Overall TPH{sub gas} removals reached 90% for short periods in one unit, and BTEX removals were typically above 90%. Drying resulted in channeling and loss of bed activity. Management of bed moisture content improved over the study period, and recovery of system performance was achieved without replacement of bed media. Overall TPH{sub gas} removals exceeded 90% during the final 50 days of the study.

Wright, W.F.; Schroeder, E.D.; Chang, D.P.Y. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Romstad, K. [Environmental Resolutions, Inc., Novato, CA (United States)

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Effect of fresh green waste and green waste compost on mineral nitrogen, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide from a Vertisol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incorporation of organic waste amendments to a horticultural soil, prior to expected risk periods, could immobilise mineral N, ultimately reducing nitrogen (N) losses as nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and leaching. Two organic waste amendments were selected, a fresh green waste (FGW) and green waste compost (GWC) as they had suitable biochemical attributes to initiate N immobilisation into the microbial biomass and organic N forms. These characteristics include a high C:N ratio (FGW 44:1, GWC 35:1), low total N (14%). Both products were applied at 3 t C/ha to a high N (plus N fertiliser) or low N (no fertiliser addition) Vertisol soil in PVC columns. Cumulative N{sub 2}O production over the 28 day incubation from the control soil was 1.5 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2}, and 11 mg/N{sub 2}O/m{sup 2} from the control + N. The N{sub 2}O emission decreased with GWC addition (P < 0.05) for the high N soil, reducing cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions by 38% by the conclusion of the incubation. Analysis of mineral N concentrations at 7, 14 and 28 days identified that both FGW and GWC induced microbial immobilisation of N in the first 7 days of incubation regardless of whether the soil environment was initially high or low in N; with the FGW immobilising up to 30% of available N. It is likely that the reduced mineral N due to N immobilisation led to a reduced substrate for N{sub 2}O production during the first week of the trial, when soil N{sub 2}O emissions peaked. An additional finding was that FGW + N did not decrease cumulative N{sub 2}O emissions compared to the control + N, potentially due to the fact that it stimulated microbial respiration resulting in anaerobic micro sites in the soil and ultimately N{sub 2}O production via denitrification. Therefore, both materials could be used as post harvest amendments in horticulture to minimise N loss through nitrate-N leaching in the risk periods between crop rotations. The mature GWC has potential to reduce N{sub 2}O, an important greenhouse gas.

Vaughan, Sarah M., E-mail: s.vaughan@uq.edu.au [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Dalal, Ram C. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Department of Environment and Resource Management, 80 Meiers Rd., Indooroopilly, QLD 4068 (Australia); Harper, Stephen M. [Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation, Warrego Highway, Gatton, QLD 4343 (Australia); Menzies, Neal W. [School of Land, Crop and Food Sciences, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Mixtures of a Coal Combustion By-Product and Composted Yard Wastes for Use as Soil Substitutes and Amendments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, the physical and chemical properties of coal combustion by-products (CCBPs) can be conducive to plant growth. As one means of increasing use rates, EPRI and several utilities have studied CCBP applications as a soil amendment and soil substitute when mixed with varying proportions of yard waste compost, sand, and soil. This report presents the results of green-house studies on the use of CCBP mixtures in growing shrubs, trees, and ground cover plants.

1996-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

199

Growth and elemental accumulation of plants grown in acidic soil amended with coal fly ash-sewage sludge co-compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A greenhouse experiment was conducted to evaluate the growth and heavy-metal accumulation of Brassica chinensis and Agropyron elongatum in 10 and 25% ash-sludge co-compost (ASC)-amended loamy acidic soil (pH 4.51) at two different application rates: 20% and 40% (v/v). Soil pH increased, whereas electrical conductivity decreased with the amendment of ASC to soil. Bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn contents of ASC-amended soil decreased, whereas Ni, Pb, and B contents increased. Concentrations of bioavailable Cu, Zn, and Mn in sludge compost (SC)-amended soils were 5.57, 20.8, and 8.19 mg kg{sup -1}, respectively. These concentrations were significantly lower than those in soil receiving an application rate of 20 or 25% ASC as 2.64, 8.48, and 5.26 mg kg(-1), respectively. Heavy metals and B contents of the composting mass significantly increased with an increase in ASC application rate from 20 to 40% (6.2 to 16.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 10% ASC- and 9.4 to 18.6 mg kg{sup -1} for 25% ASC-amended soil. However, when the ash content in co-compost increased from 10 to 25% during composting, bioavailable heavy-metal contents decreased. However, B contents increased with an increase in ash content. Addition of co-composts increased the dry-weight yield of the plants, and this increase was more obvious as the ash amendment rate in the co-composts and the ASC application rate increased. In case of B. chinensis, the biomass of 2.84 g/plant for 40% application of 25% ASC was significantly higher than SC (0.352 g/plant), which was 40% application of 10% ASC (0.434 g/plant) treatments. However, in A. elongatum, the differences between biomass of plants grown with 10% (1.34-1.94 g/ plant) and 25% ASC (2.12-2.21 g/plant) were not significantly different. ASC was favorable in increasing the growth of B. chinensis and A. elongatum. The optimal ash amendment to the sludge composting and ASC application rates were at 25 and 20%, respectively.

Wong, J.W.C.; Selvam, A. [Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Effect of sewage sludge or compost on the sorption and distribution of copper and cadmium in soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of biosolids such as sewage sludge is a concern, because of the potential release of toxic metals after decomposition of the organic matter. The effect of application of sewage sludge (Sw) and compost (C) to the soil (S) on the Cu and Cd sorption, distribution and the quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the soil, was investigated under controlled conditions. Visible spectrophotometry, infrared spectroscopy, sorption isotherms (simple and competitive sorption systems), and sequential extraction methods were used. The E {sub 4}/E {sub 6} ({lambda} at 465 and 665 nm) ratio and the infrared spectra (IR) of DOM showed an aromatic behaviour in compost-soil (C-S); in contrast sewage sludge-soil (Sw-S) showed an aliphatic behaviour. Application of either Sw or C increased the Cu sorption capacity of soil. The Cd sorption decreased only in soil with a competitive metal system. The availability of Cu was low due to its occurrence in the acid soluble fraction (F3). The Cu concentration varied in accordance with the amounts of Cu added. The highest Cd concentration was found in the exchangeable fraction (F2). The Sw and C applications did not increase the Cd availability in the soil.

Vaca-Paulin, R. [Laboratorio de Edafologia y Ambiente, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100, Toluca 50000 (Mexico)]. E-mail: rvp@uaemex.mx; Esteller-Alberich, M.V. [Centro Interamericano de Recursos del Agua, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Toluca 50000 (Mexico); Lugo-de la Fuente, J. [Laboratorio de Edafologia y Ambiente, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Instituto Literario No. 100, Toluca 50000 (Mexico); Zavaleta-Mancera, H.A. [Colegio de Postgraduados, Instituto de Recursos Naturales. km 36.5 Carr, Mexico-Texcoco, Montecillo 56230 (Mexico)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A water quality assessment of the import of turfgrass sod grown with composted dairy manure into a suburban watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) have caused water quality concerns in many rural watersheds, sometimes forcing the State of Texas to conduct Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) assessments of stream nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). One suggested Best Management Practice (BMP) is the export of phosphorus (P) through turfgrass sod produced with composted dairy manure from an impaired rural watershed to an urban watershed. The manure-grown sod releases P slowly and would not require additional P fertilizer for up to 20 years in the receiving watershed. This would eliminate P application to the sod and improve the water quality of urban streams. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was used to model a typical suburban watershed that would receive the transplanted sod. The objective of the modeling was to determine the water quality changes due to the import of sod transplanted from turf fields and grown with composted dairy manure. The SWAT model was calibrated to simulate historical flow and sediment and nutrient loading to Mary's Creek. The total P stream loading to Mary's Creek was lower when manure-grown sod was imported instead of commercial sod grown with inorganic fertilizers. Yet, flow, sediment yield, and total N yield increased equally for both cases at the watershed outlet. The SWAT simulations indicate that a turfgrass BMP can be used effectively to import manure P into an urban watershed and reduce in-stream P levels when compared to sod grown with inorganic fertilizers.

Richards, Chad Edward

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Leaching and standing water characteristics of bottom ash and composted manure blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal burning electrical generating facilities produce roughly 91 million metric tons of ash byproducts annually. Typically, this ash is retained at the power plant sites, adding to the cost of managing wastes at the plants. Another waste material requiring significant management efforts and costs is manure. Repeated application of manure on small parcels of land can contribute to environmental problems such as impaired water quality due to nitrate (NO?) leaching into the groundwater and phosphorus (P) runoff into surface water bodies. Alternative uses of bottom ash (BA) and composted manure (CM) such as a soil amendment for landscapes or potting media need to be explored. Before an alternative is adopted at a large scale, however, it must be evaluated for its effectiveness and environmental integrity. Two column studies were conducted to evaluate three blends of acidic and alkaline BA and CM, namely B1 (95:5%), B2 (90:10%), and B3 (80:20%). Samples from standing water (top) and leachate (bottom) were collected at weekly intervals to evaluate the effects of different blend ratios and time on chemical and physical properties. It was found that higher CM content in acidic and alkaline raw blends (no-de-ionized water added) resulted in significantly higher concentrations of total Kjeldahl nitrogen (TKN), P, and potassium (K). Generally, a higher CM content in acidic and alkaline blends resulted in higher leachate concentrations for total solids (TS), total dissolved solids (TDS), total volatile solids (TVS), total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), TKN, NO?-N, ammonium (NH?-N), P, and K. Concentrations of nearly all chemicals were lower in standing water (top) compared to leachate (bottom) for acidic and alkaline blends. Alkaline blends had higher leachate and standing water TKN, NH?-N, N0?-N, P, and K compared to the acidic blends. After day 28, standing water TDS concentrations for all acidic blends were below the USEPA drinking water standard for TDS. Standing water for alkaline blends remained below the USEPA drinking water standard for TDS for the entire duration of the study. Leachate and standing water concentrations for all blends were below the USEPA drinking water standard for NO?-N for acidic blends. Standing water and leachate for alkaline blends B1 and B2 were below the USEPA drinking water standard for NO?-N while standing water was well below the standard for the entire duration of the study. P concentrations were low in leachate and nonexistent in standing water for both acidic and alkaline blends. Based on these findings, it is concluded that acidic and alkaline B1 (95:5%) and B2 (90:10%) may be considered as a soil amendment substitute.

Mathis, James Gregory

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Technical Note: Evaluation of Effective Microorganisms (EM) In Solid Waste Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

produces a high quality compost, which contributes towardorganic matters, compost, effective microorganisms (EM). Athis point, the finished compost was collected and sieved.

Sekeran, V.; Balaji, C.; Bhagavathipushpa, T.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, lighting Abstract The paper presents...

205

Investigation on the utilization of coal fly ash as amendment to compost for vegetation in acid soil: Progress report, 1 June 1988--15 March 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first progress report that is submitted to the US Department of Energy on the research performed during the first year of the project which started on June 1, 1988. This project for coal fly ash research was approved to study the chemical composition of fly ashes collected from several coal-powered power plants located in Savannah River Plant (SRP) facilities and explore the possibility of utilizing the fly ash as an amendment to organic compost for vegetation. The schedule for the first year of the project includes the construction of a greenhouse, analysis of fly ash samples, preparation of compost, planting the seeds for and harvesting the fall-winter plants, analysis of the winter plant materials and potting the spring-summer plants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Menon, M.P.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal Innovative Drying Technology Extracts More Energy from High Moisture Coal March 11, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative coal-drying technology that will extract more energy from high moisture coal at less cost and simultaneously reduce potentially harmful emissions is ready for commercial use after successful testing at a Minnesota electric utility. The DryFining(TM) technology was developed with funding from the first round of the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Coal Power Initiative (CCPI). Great River Energy of Maple Grove, Minn., has selected the WorleyParsons Group to exclusively distribute licenses for the technology, which essentially uses waste heat from a power plant to reduce moisture content

207

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Summary Our short-term outlook for a wide array of energy prices has been adjusted upward as international and domestic energy supply conditions have tightened. We think that crude oil prices are as likely as not to end the year $2 to $3 per barrel higher than our previous projections. Thus, we think that the probability of West Texas Intermediate costing an average of $30 per barrel or more at midwinter is about 50 percent. On their current track, heating oil prices are likely to be about 30 percent above year-ago levels in the fourth quarter. Prices for Q1 2001 seem more likely now to match or exceed the high level seen in Q1 2000. Tight oil markets this year and an inherent propensity for high gas utilization in incremental power supply have resulted in rising North American natural gas

208

Performance evaluation of an anaerobic/aerobic landfill-based digester using yard waste for energy and compost production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biochemical methane potential decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Net energy produced was 84.3 MWh or 46 kWh per million metric tons (Mg). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was 96-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average removal efficiency of non-methane organic compounds (NMOCs) was 68-99%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The two-stage batch digester proved to be simple to operate and cost-effective. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to evaluate a new alternative for yard waste management by constructing, operating and monitoring a landfill-based two-stage batch digester (anaerobic/aerobic) with the recovery of energy and compost. The system was initially operated under anaerobic conditions for 366 days, after which the yard waste was aerated for an additional 191 days. Off gas generated from the aerobic stage was treated by biofilters. Net energy recovery was 84.3 MWh, or 46 kWh per million metric tons of wet waste (as received), and the biochemical methane potential of the treated waste decreased by 83% during the two-stage operation. The average removal efficiencies of volatile organic compounds and non-methane organic compounds in the biofilters were 96-99% and 68-99%, respectively.

Yazdani, Ramin, E-mail: ryazdani@sbcglobal.net [Yolo County Planning and Public Works Department, Division of Integrated Waste Management, Woodland, CA 95776 (United States); Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@eos.ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Augenstein, Don, E-mail: iemdon@aol.com [Institute for Environmental Management, Inc., Palo Alto, CA 94306 (United States); Kayhanian, Masoud, E-mail: mdkayhanian@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Tchobanoglous, George, E-mail: gtchobanoglous@ucdavis.edu [Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, One Shields Avenue, Ghausi Hall, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Nitrate removal using compost and pine bark as a carbon source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions resulting from waste degradation processes have a high polluting potential and are responsible for negative impacts on the environment. Landfill leachate is hazardous for (more)

Pisano, Giulia.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have raised our world oil price projection by about $2 per barrel for this month because of assumed greater compliance by OPEC to targeted cuts, especially for the second quarter of 2000 (Figure 1). The expected decline in world petroleum inventories continues (Figure 2), and, given the generally stiff resolve of OPEC members to maintain production cuts, any sign of a turnaround in stocks may be postponed until later this year than previously assumed (Q3 instead of Q2). Our current estimate for the average import cost this past January is now $25 per barrel, a nearly $15-per-barrel increase from January 1999. Crude oil prices are expected to remain at relatively high levels for the first half of 2000, but

211

BioCycle, Advancing Composting, Organics Recycling & Renewable E... http://www.jgpress.com/archives/_free/001332.html 1 of 4 6/19/2007 5:04 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in public draft format. The protocol specifically addresses the following: A biogas control system systems to a biogas control system, the digestion project is avoiding methane emissions to the atmosphere. The OWD protocol also identifies that while composting may be associated with the development of a biogas

Lovley, Derek

212

Gasification of Low Ash Partially Composted Dairy Biomass with Enriched Air Mixture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomass is one of the renewable and non-conventional energy sources and it includes municipal solid wastes and animal wastes in addition to agricultural residue. Concentrated animal feeding operations produce large quantities of cattle biomass which might result in land and water pollution if left untreated. Different methods are employed to extract the available energy from the cattle biomass (CB) which includes co-firing and gasification. There are two types of CB: Feedlot biomass (FB), animal waste from feedlots and dairy biomass (DB), animal waste from dairy farms. Experiments were performed in the part on gasification of both FB and DB. Earlier studies on gasification of DB with different steam-fuel ratios resulted in increased production of hydrogen. In the present study, dairy biomass was gasified in a medium with enriched oxygen percentage varying from 24% to 28%. The effect of enriched air mixture, equivalence ratio and steam-fuel ratio on the performance of gasifier was studied. Limited studies were done using a mixture of carbon dioxide and oxygen as the gasification medium and also a methodology was developed to determine the gasification efficiency based on mass and heat contents of gas. The results show that the peak temperature within the bed increases with increase in oxygen concentration in the gasification medium. Also carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture increases with corresponding decrease in carbon monoxide with increase in oxygen concentration of the incoming gasification medium. The peak temperature increased from 988C to 1192C as the oxygen concentration increased from 21% to 28% at ER=2.1. The upper limit on oxygen concentration is limited to 28% due to high peak temperature and resulting ash agglomeration. Higher heating value (HHV) of the gases decreases with increase in equivalence ratio. The gases produced using carbon dioxide and oxygen mixture had a higher HHV when compared to that of air and enriched air gasification. Typically the HHV of the gases increased from 2219 kJ/m to 3479 kJ/m when carbon dioxide and oxygen mixture is used for gasification instead of air at ER=4.2 in the absence of steam.

Thanapal, Siva Sankar

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Urban food waste composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a study was undertaken on the premise that the world population living in urban centers is expected to increase from 3.8 billion (more)

Adhikari, Bijaya K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Compost Production from Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL EMISSIONS Table 1: Contribution to total emissions of the CORINAIR90 inventory (28 countries) Source-activity SNAP-code * Contribution to total emissions [%

Nfr Code; So Nox; Nmvoc Ch; Co Co; No Nh

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4E 4E The Advantages of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings F. Rubinstein & D. Bolotov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory M. Levi & K. Powell U.S. General Services Administration P. Schwartz Peter Schwartz, & Associates, LLC August 2008 Presented at the 2008 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, CA, August 17-22, 2008, and published in the Proceedings DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes

216

High-pressure Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-pressure magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR capability, consisting of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor, a high-pressure loading/reaction chamber for in situ sealing and re-opening of the high-pressure MAS rotor, and a MAS probe with a localized RF coil for background signal suppression, is reported. The unusual technical challenges associated with development of a reusable high-pressure MAS rotor are addressed in part by modifying standard ceramics for the rotor sleeve to include micro-groves at the internal surface at both ends of the cylinder. In this way, not only is the advantage of ceramic cylinders for withstanding very high-pressure utilized, but also plastic bushings can be glued tightly in place so that other plastic sealing mechanisms/components and O-rings can be mounted to create the desired high-pressure seal. Using this strategy, sealed internal pressures exceeding 150 bars have been achieved and sustained under ambient external pressure with minimal penetration loss of pressure for 72 hours. As an application example, in situ 13C MAS NMR studies of mineral carbonation reaction intermediates and final products of forsterite (Mg2SiO4) reacted with supercritical CO2 and H2O at 150 bar and 50?C are reported, with relevance to geological sequestration of carbon dioxide.

Hoyt, David W.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Sears, Jesse A.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Burton, Sarah D.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Hu, Jian Z.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Controlling Capital Costs in Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

218

UCSD Biomass to Power Economic Feasibility Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highqualitymulch, compostandwoodchipsaremadeattheinordertoproducemulch,compostand woodchipsthatareprocessedgreenwastevs. compost). Furthermore,inthe

Cattolica, Robert

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Electrical power generation: comparative risks and benefits. Final report, August 6, 1973--August 10, 1973. A one-week workshop for high school science teachers  

SciTech Connect

A live-in type workshop available for academic credit covering basic nuclear power generation and the tradeoffs and problems that exist between nuclear power and alternative means to generate electricity was held for 37 high- school teachers at the Madison campus for the University of Wisconsin. Significant improvements over last year's program included the distribution of a large amount of information and the distribution of two minicourse outlines on the subject of power and the environment entitled: The Environmental Impact of Electrical Power Generation: Nuclear and Fossil'' prepared by the Pennsylvania State Dept. of Education, and Science II Matter-Energy Interactions in Natural Systems'' prepared by Carl Pfeiffer of Monona Grove High School, Monona, Wisconsin. (MCW)

Carbon, M.W.; Hartwig, K.T.

1973-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

220

JPL Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Oak Grove Drive Pasadena, CA 91109 Notes to Coaches The registration fee covers the cost of food provided throughout the day as well as any prizesgifts given to the teams....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

well-written  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abell Galaxy Cluster Catalog Gina Castelvecchi (Cary Grove High School), Alex Fitch (Hinsdale Central High School), Nick Gebbia (Hoffman Estates High School), Braven Leung (Maine...

222

Oak Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

167863°, -122.6400934° 167863°, -122.6400934° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.4167863,"lon":-122.6400934,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Cherry Grove, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

39.0725616°, -84.3218825° 39.0725616°, -84.3218825° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.0725616,"lon":-84.3218825,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Sugar Grove, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40.5078434°, -80.6570193° 40.5078434°, -80.6570193° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5078434,"lon":-80.6570193,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

Washington Grove, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

398296°, -77.1752588° 398296°, -77.1752588° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1398296,"lon":-77.1752588,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Pecan Grove, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas: Energy Resources Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.6260681°, -95.7316156° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.6260681,"lon":-95.7316156,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Maple Grove, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minnesota: Energy Resources Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.0724642°, -93.4557877° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0724642,"lon":-93.4557877,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Cottage Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3.0761082°, -89.1995593° 3.0761082°, -89.1995593° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0761082,"lon":-89.1995593,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Cedar Grove, West Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2278534°, -81.5065113° 2278534°, -81.5065113° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2278534,"lon":-81.5065113,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Green Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4.9055292°, -90.5068824° 4.9055292°, -90.5068824° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9055292,"lon":-90.5068824,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Linn Grove, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

916443°, -95.2466637° 916443°, -95.2466637° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8916443,"lon":-95.2466637,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Buffalo Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7°, -87.963323° 7°, -87.963323° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.166307,"lon":-87.963323,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Cedar Grove, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1708774°, -106.1900242° 1708774°, -106.1900242° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1708774,"lon":-106.1900242,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Golden Grove, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Carolina: Energy Resources South Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.7340068°, -82.4437372° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.7340068,"lon":-82.4437372,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Pine Grove Mills, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7336739°, -77.8855567° 7336739°, -77.8855567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7336739,"lon":-77.8855567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Forest Grove, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oregon: Energy Resources Oregon: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.5198364°, -123.1106631° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5198364,"lon":-123.1106631,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Blooming Grove, Wisconsin: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

704632°, -89.2514718° 704632°, -89.2514718° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0704632,"lon":-89.2514718,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

Cedar Grove, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9734511°, -74.1684738° 9734511°, -74.1684738° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9734511,"lon":-74.1684738,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Elk Grove Village, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

039178°, -87.9703461° 039178°, -87.9703461° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0039178,"lon":-87.9703461,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Grove City, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8814519°, -83.0929644° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8814519,"lon":-83.0929644,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

River Grove, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8642°, -87.8358943° 8642°, -87.8358943° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9258642,"lon":-87.8358943,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

242

OxfordMusicOnline (GroveMusicOnline)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and links on the left-hand side: Search terms are highlighted in yellow. A "Search within this article under the call number ML102.J3 N48 2001. Enter keyword(s) in either open field and click the box or choose Advanced Search links for more options, such as combining keywords. From the opening screen

243

Oak Grove, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2593136°, -96.5835994° 2593136°, -96.5835994° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.2593136,"lon":-96.5835994,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

244

Wilders Grove Solid Waste Service Center Geothermal Project ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and morale of City employees. In their design, the new facilities will reduce fossil fuel consumption in support of the City's 20% fossil fuel reduction goal, reduce green house...

245

Lake Grove, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York: Energy Resources New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8528761°, -73.1151102° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8528761,"lon":-73.1151102,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Intermediate-Scale High-Solids Anaerobic Digestion System Operational Development  

SciTech Connect

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. During the first 1.5 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements, which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using ,the NREL high-solids digester design are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C. J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

High School  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High School Please click on the title for more information about each program. Nano*High Nano High Saturday presentations for Bay Area high school students Science Bowl Science...

248

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

SWEAP, Solid Waste Environmental Assessment Plan: Component 3, technology evaluation: Discussion paper No. 3. 5 A,B,C, addendum to documents: Extension of process to identify candidate sites (step 2) and the development of comparative evaluation process for step 3 of the site selection process for a materials recovery facility, compost facility and energy from waste facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The facility design assumptions for a materials recovery facility, a compost facility and an energy from waste facility were intended to result in a facility with minimal impact on the natural environment. The criteria described in discussion paper 3.5A were based on this assumption. This addendum describes the additional criteria identified for use in Step 2 of the site selection process, the revised criteria to be used in Step 3 and the method that will be used to apply the revised Step 3 criterial. Step 2 addresses the type of technology used to minimize adverse effects on the natural environment. Step 3 addresses the selection of short-listed sites from a longer list and the methods used.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Zebra mussels enter the compost pile  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zebra mussels, introduced accidentally into the Great Lakes, are overpopulating at phenomenal rates, especially in Lake Erie, where they damage oyster beds, foster excessive algae growth and cling to boats. They also clog the intake pipes of city water systems and power generating plants. The expense of cleaning intake screens is considerable, since they have to be physically removed and cleaned. Then the mussels must be disposed of, costing some power plants as much as $50,000 a year to landfill, says Wayne Koser of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Removal of ammonia from contaminated air in a biotrickling filter Denitrifying bioreactor combination system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights reserved. 1. Introduction Ammonia emissions are very common in operations such as composting of the difficulty of closing the nitrogen balance in systems such as compost beds which already contain signifi., Smet, E., 2002. Regeneration of a compost biofilter degrading high loads of ammonia by addition

252

Binding forms of sulphur in an Orthic Luvisol after 45 years of different organic and inorganic fertilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FYM2), 7.25 t and 29 t compost from organic household waste1 year -1 , 10 and 30 t compost h -1 year -1 and 1.67 andof the high amounts of compost and sewage sludge resulted in

Scherer, Heinrich Wilhelm

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The use of spectroscopic techniques (especially phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance [31  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the apparent environmental problems. Spent mushroom compost (high fungal content) was applied to soil at a rate replaced by transplanting strawberry seedlings in plugs containing compost colonised by a mixture of bacteria, fungi and their respective consumers. This compost promoted the establishment of a complex food

Sparks, Donald L.

254

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

Thermophilic microbial communities that are active in a high-solids environment offer great potential for the discovery of industrially relevant enzymes that efficiently deconstruct bioenergy feedstocks. In this study, finished green waste compost was used as an inoculum source to enrich microbial communities and associated enzymes that hydrolyze cellulose and hemicellulose during thermophilic high-solids fermentation of the bioenergy feedstocks switchgrass and corn stover. Methods involving the disruption of enzyme and plant cell wall polysaccharide interactions were developed to recover xylanase and endoglucanase activity from deconstructed solids. Xylanase and endoglucanase activity increased by more than a factor of 5, upon four successive enrichments on switchgrass. Overall, the changes for switchgrass were more pronounced than for corn stover; solids reduction between the first and second enrichments increased by a factor of four for switchgrass while solids reduction remained relatively constant for corn stover. Amplicon pyrosequencing analysis of small-subunit ribosomal RNA genes recovered from enriched samples indicated rapid changes in the microbial communities between the first and second enrichment with the simplified communities achieved by the third enrichment. The results demonstrate a successful approach for enrichment of unique microbial communities and enzymes active in a thermophilic high-solids environment.

Reddy, A. P.; Allgaier, M.; Singer, S.W.; Hazen, T.C.; Simmons, B.A.; Hugenholtz, P.; VanderGheynst, J.S.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

High PRF high current switch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

Moran, Stuart L. (Fredericksburg, VA); Hutcherson, R. Kenneth (College Park, MD)

1990-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

256

Joseph M. Groves | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Film and Henninger Media Services; and as a designerhelp desk support for Blue Water Media. Joey holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in art & technology with a minor in...

257

Groves and the scientists: Compartmentalization and the building of the bomb  

SciTech Connect

The general understood that although the contributions of the scientists were crucial, their work was only one of a host of critical components that made up the totality of the Manhattan Project. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

Goldberg, S. [Birkhaeser Boston, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Post-Project Appraisal for the Winter Creek Restoration Redwood Grove, UC Botanical Gardens at Berkeley  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) license or anamendment to a FERC license unless the pertinentspecifically identified that a FERC license or amendment to

Fiala, Shannon; Janes, Kelly; Sousa, Ricardo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Moving Toward Zero Energy Homes: Lakeside, Elk Grove, California (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet describes the energy efficient and solar energy features of the Lakeside Zero Energy Home, participant in the Zero Energy Homes initiative.

Not Available

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Hard probes 2006 Asilomar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The second international conference on hard and electromagnetic probes of high-energy nuclear collisions was held June 9 to 16, 2006 at the Asilomar Conference grounds in Pacific Grove, California" (photo and 1/2 page)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Marketing Compost A Guide for Compost Producers in Low and Middle-Income Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Nizarazu, Department of crop and Soil Science, Oregon state university, Corvallis, OR 97331, USA Theor Appl Genet (2001 Chromosome analysis and sorting was performed using a FAC- Vantage flow cytometer and sorter (Becton

Richner, Heinz

262

Federal Energy Management Program: Municipal Solid Waste Resources...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's high-solids digester converts wastes to biogas and compost for energy production. This page provides a brief overview of municipal...

263

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

some field applications where minimal operating support is provided. VPBs packed with compost-based materials are also capable of achieving high BTEX removal efficiencies. In...

264

High Performance Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Performance Computing. Summary: High Performance Computing (HPC) enables work on challenging problems that ...

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

265

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Temperatures & Electricity Demand An Assessment of Supply Adequacy in California Trends.......................................................................................................1 HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND.....................................................................................................................7 SECTION I: HIGH TEMPERATURES AND ELECTRICITY DEMAND ..........................9 BACKGROUND

266

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math High Performance Computing High Performance Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables...

267

High Speed High Dynamic Range High Accuracy Measurement System  

Disclosure Number 201102747 Technology Summary The present invention measures a beam of protons that has a high dynamic range. Typically, one uses ...

268

Gibson Grove A.M.E. Zion Church Gone But Not Forgotten: The Archaeology of an African American Church  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I chose to conduct further investigations into the historyI want to conduct further investigations into this fraternalI would conduct the archaeological investigations for the

Jones, Alexandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Oil transport inside the oil control ring grove and its interaction with surrounding areas in internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In piston ring pack design, there is a tradeoff between reducing friction and increasing oil consumption. While friction reduces engine efficiency, oil consumption can poison exhaust aftertreatment systems. The primary ...

Senzer, Eric B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gibson Grove A.M.E. Zion Church Gone But Not Forgotten: The Archaeology of an African American Church  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of 10 YR 5/4 yellowish brown sandy silt loam with about 30%of 10 YR 5/4 yellowish brown sandy silt loam with about 30%loam 30% rock 2) 10YR 5/6 sandy loam STP No: 3 Location: W

Jones, Alexandra

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Texas connects watershed protection and erosion through compost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEXAS CONNECTS WATERSHED PROTECTION AND EROSION THROUGHLandscape Architect, Texas Department of Transportation, 125E. 11 th Street Austin, Texas 78701, Fax: 512-416-3098 Scott

Cogburn, Barrie; McCoy, Scott

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

APPLICATION OF SEWAGE SLUDGES AND COMPOSTS BPG NOTE 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-start vegetation establishment on poor soils. The success of organic `wastes' as soil improvers in agriculture and creating a more favourable environment for the establishment of vegetation. They stabilise soil structure if carbon:nitrogen (C:N) ratio is above 25:1 · Possible heavy metal contamination · Presence of potentially

273

Reuse of Spent Mushroom Compost for Production of Agaricus bisporus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Annual (2011-2012) revenue from production of Agaricus bisporus in the United States has risen to 1.1 billion dollars. In southeastern PA, more than 2.7 M (more)

Warnstrom, Emmie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

MOISTURE CONTROL METHODOLOGY FOR GAS PHASE COMPOST BIOFILTERS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas phase biofilters are used for controlling odors from animal facilities. Some characteristics can affect their performance and moisture content is one very important. A (more)

Dutra de Melo, Lucas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Production of a granular compost carrier for bacterial inoculants .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bacterial inoculants play an important role in both agriculture and bioremediation. The long-term use of Rhizobium inoculants in agriculture has resulted in increased demands on (more)

Wall, Cindy Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Estudio del compost de corcho como sustrato hortcola y silvcola.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Se ha estudiado la utilidad que los Residuos de la Industria Corchera, material con alto contenido en sustancias fenlicas de carcter fitotxico, tendran, tras ser (more)

CARMONA CHIARA, EUSEBIO

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Biodegradation and phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using mushroom compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Soils contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly found in petroleum, gas-work and wood-impregnation sites. Interest in the biodegradation and environmental fate of PAHs (more)

Kodjo-Wayo, Lina Korkor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High Performance Rooftop Units  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentationname High Performance RTUs Life Cycle Cost Comparison Calculator * Web-based tool for comparing costs of standard and high performance RTUs. * Weather data for 237...

279

High Performance Networks for High Impact Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This workshop was the first major activity in developing a strategic plan for high-performance networking in the Office of Science. Held August 13 through 15, 2002, it brought together a selection of end users, especially representing the emerging, high-visibility initiatives, and network visionaries to identify opportunities and begin defining the path forward.

Scott, Mary A.; Bair, Raymond A.

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

280

Soil sterilization and organic carbon, but not microbial inoculants, change microbial communities in replanted peach orchards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bromide fumigation; above, compost spread down the row priorpeach trees i n February 2001. Compost and native soil werein two of the three compost-amended treatments. Composted

Drenovsky, Rebecca E.; Duncan, Roger A.; Scow, Kate M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Food Safety versus Environmental Protection on the Central California Coast: Exploring the Science Behind an Apparent Conflict  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

O157: H7 in cow manure compost. Journal of Food Protectionduring manure composting. Compost Science & Utilization 12(with contaminated manure composts or irrigation water. Food

Stuart, Diana; Shennan, Carol; Brown, Martha

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

An overview of the sustainability of solid waste management at military installations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPA (1997). " Innovative Uses of Compost Bioremediation andEPA (1997). "Innovative Uses of Compost Composting of Soils1997). "Innovative Uses of Compost Erosion Control, Turf

Borglin, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Effects of Organic Material and Mycorrhizal Inoculation On Horticultural Seedling Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

colonization and two levels of compost supply on nutrientH, 2007. Effects of compost addition on extra-radical growthchemical properties of composts. N Compost materials 1.

Ortas, Ibrahim; Demirbas, Ahmet; Akpinar, a?da?; ?im?ek, Murat; Kaya, Zlkf

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High Speed Electronics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Speed Electronics. ... optic sampling system provides traceability for our electrical waveform measurements ... Metrology for Electronic Packaging. ...

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

285

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, C.A.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

286

High power microwave generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

High Performance Computing in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing in Bioinformatics Thomas Ludwig (t.ludwig@computer.org) Ruprecht PART I: High Performance Computing Thomas Ludwig PART II: HPC Computing in Bioinformatics Alexandros #12;© Thomas Ludwig, Alexandros Stamatakis, GCB'04 3 PART I High Performance Computing Introduction

Stamatakis, Alexandros

288

High performance systems  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

Vigil, M.B. [comp.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, Clifford B. (Livermore, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

High-Dielectric Constant, High-Temperature Ceramic Capacitors for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Growth of Thick, On-Axis SiC Epitaxial Layers by High Temperature Halide CVD for High Voltage Power Devices High-Dielectric Constant, High-Temperature...

292

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science, Computing, Applied Math » Information Science, Computing, Applied Math » High Performance Computing High Performance Computing Providing world-class high performance computing capability that enables unsurpassed solutions to complex problems of strategic national interest Gary Grider High Performance Computing Division Leader Randal Rheinheimer High Performance Computing Deputy Division Leader Contact Us Carol Hogsett Student/Internship Opportunities Email Division Office Email Managing world-class supercomputing centers Powerall simulations modeling Read caption + The Powerwall is used by LANL scientists to view objects and processes in 3D. High Performance Computing video 13:01 Gary Grider, HPC Divison Leader The High Performance Computing (HPC) Division supports the Laboratory mission by managing world-class Supercomputing Centers.

293

Brookhaven High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High-Energy Physics High-Energy Physics High-energy physicists probe the properties and behavior of the most elementary particles in the universe. At the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), they perform experiments of unique sensitivity using high-intensity, intermediate-energy beams. The AGS currently provides the world's most intense high-energy proton beam. It is also the world's most versatile accelerator, accelerating protons, polarized protons, and heavy ions to near the speed of light. Magnet system at Brookhaven used to measure the magnetic moment of the muon. Important discoveries in high-energy physics were made at the AGS within the last decade. An international collaboration, including key physicists from Brookhaven, performed a very high-precision measurement of a property

294

HIGH VOLTAGE, HIGH CURRENT SPARK GAP SWITCH  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage and current spark gap switch comprising two main electrodes insulatingly supported in opposed spaced relationship and a middle electrode supported medially between the main electrodes and symmetrically about the median line of the main electrodes is described. The middle electrode has a perforation aligned with the median line and an irradiation electrode insulatingly supported in the body of the middle electrode normal to the median line and protruding into the perforation. (AEC)

Dike, R.S.; Lier, D.W.; Schofield, A.E.; Tuck, J.L.

1962-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

High output lamp with high brightness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra bright, low wattage inductively coupled electrodeless aperture lamp is powered by a solid state RF source in the range of several tens to several hundreds of watts at various frequencies in the range of 400 to 900 MHz. Numerous novel lamp circuits and components are disclosed including a wedding ring shaped coil having one axial and one radial lead, a high accuracy capacitor stack, a high thermal conductivity aperture cup and various other aperture bulb configurations, a coaxial capacitor arrangement, and an integrated coil and capacitor assembly. Numerous novel RF circuits are also disclosed including a high power oscillator circuit with reduced complexity resonant pole configuration, parallel RF power FET transistors with soft gate switching, a continuously variable frequency tuning circuit, a six port directional coupler, an impedance switching RF source, and an RF source with controlled frequency-load characteristics. Numerous novel RF control methods are disclosed including controlled adjustment of the operating frequency to find a resonant frequency and reduce reflected RF power, controlled switching of an impedance switched lamp system, active power control and active gate bias control.

Kirkpatrick, Douglas A. (Great Falls, VA); Bass, Gary K. (Mt. Airy, MD); Copsey, Jesse F. (Germantown, MD); Garber, Jr., William E. (Poolesville, MD); Kwong, Vincent H. (Vancouver, CA); Levin, Izrail (Silver Spring, MD); MacLennan, Donald A. (Gaithersburg, MD); Roy, Robert J. (Frederick, MD); Steiner, Paul E. (Olney, MD); Tsai, Peter (Olney, MD); Turner, Brian P. (Damascus, MD)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Page 1 of 9 Park Scholarships, North Carolina State University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, High School Name, City ALABAMA ALABAMA SCHOOL MATH & SCIENCE Mobile ALABAMA SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS Marietta HAWAII NANAKULI HIGH INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL Waianae RADFORD HS Honolulu ILLINOIS BUFFALO GROVE HS HS Naperville NEW TRIER TOWNSHIP HS Winnetka PALATINE HS Palatine TRINITY HS River Forest UNIV

Buckel, Jeffrey A.

297

High temperature refrigerator  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature magnetic refrigerator which uses a Stirling-like cycle in which rotating magnetic working material is heated in zero field and adiabatically magnetized, cooled in high field, then adiabatically demagnetized. During this cycle said working material is in heat exchange with a pumped fluid which absorbs heat from a low temperature heat source and deposits heat in a high temperature reservoir. The magnetic refrigeration cycle operates at an efficiency 70% of Carnot.

Steyert, Jr., William A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

High temperature furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature furnace for use above 2000.degree.C is provided that features fast initial heating and low power consumption at the operating temperature. The cathode is initially heated by joule heating followed by electron emission heating at the operating temperature. The cathode is designed for routine large temperature excursions without being subjected to high thermal stresses. A further characteristic of the device is the elimination of any ceramic components from the high temperature zone of the furnace.

Borkowski, Casimer J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

299

High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untitled Document Argonne Logo DOE Logo High Energy Physics Division Home Division ES&H Personnel Publications HEP Awards HEP Computing HEP Committees Administration...

300

High-Tc Superconductor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 High-temperature superconductors (HTSC's), following their remarkable discovery in 1986, continue to be at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

.NET High Performance Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) have been extensively applied in the High Performance Computing (HPC) community. HPC applications require additional special programming environments to improve (more)

Ou, Hsuan-Hsiu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

High-Dose Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... web page below. Service descriptions and price schedule for NIST high-dose services are found in this link. The intention ...

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

High Temperature Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2010 ... Protective Coatings for Corrosion Resistance at High Temperatures: Vilupanur Ravi1; Thuan Nguyen1; Alexander Ly1; Kameron Harmon1;...

304

High Performance Tooling Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High performance tools are necessary for the successful manufacturing of every consumer product as well as oil drilling and mining operations. Increasing...

305

High power, high frequency, vacuum flange  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an improved waveguide flange is disclosed for high power operation that helps prevent arcs from being initiated at the junctions between waveguide sections. The flanges at the end of the waveguide sections have counterbores surrounding the waveguide tubes. When the sections are bolted together the counterbores form a groove that holds a fully annealed copper gasket. Each counterbore has a beveled step that is specially configured to insure the gasket forms a metal-to-metal vacuum seal without gaps or sharp edges. The resultant inner surface of the waveguide is smooth across the junctions between waveguide sections, and arcing is prevented.

Felker, B.; McDaniel, M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

High density photovoltaic  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

307

High temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1,000 to 2,000 K.). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Tokarz, Richard D. (West Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrolysis High Temperature Hydrogen  

INL has developed a high-temperature process the utilizes solid oxide fuel cells that are operated in the electrolytic mode. The first process includes combining a high-temperature heat source (e.g. nuclear reactor) with a hydrogen production facility ...

309

High Performance Sustainable Buildings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

become a High Performance Sustainable Building in 2013. On the former County landfill, a photovoltaic array field uses solar energy to provide power for Los Alamos County and the...

310

High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing Managing world-class supercomputing centers Read caption + The Powerwall is used by LANL scientists to view objects and processes in 3D. 13:01 Gary...

311

Creating high performance enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do enterprises successfully conceive, design, deliver, and operate large-scale, engineered systems? These large-scale projects often involve high complexity, significant technical challenges, a large number of diverse ...

Stanke, Alexis K. (Alexis Kristen), 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

Morris, D.E.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

316

High-temperature sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature sensor is described which includes a pair of electrical conductors separated by a mass of electrical insulating material. The insulating material has a measurable resistivity within the sensor that changes in relation to the temperature of the insulating material within a high temperature range (1000 to 2000/sup 0/K). When required, the sensor can be encased within a ceramic protective coating.

Not Available

1981-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

High Performance Window Attachments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance Window High Performance Window Attachments D. Charlie Curcija Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory dccurcija@lbl.gov 510-495-2602 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Impact of Project: * Motivate manufacturers to make improvements in Window systems U-Factors, SHGC and daylighting utilization * Increase awareness of benefits from energy efficient window attachments Problem Statement: * A wide range of residential window attachments are available, but they have widely unknown

318

High Burnup Effects Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of the High Burnup Effects Program (HBEP). It has been prepared to present a summary, with conclusions, of the HBEP. The HBEP was an international, group-sponsored research program managed by Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW). The principal objective of the HBEP was to obtain well-characterized data related to fission gas release (FGR) for light water reactor (LWR) fuel irradiated to high burnup levels. The HBEP was organized into three tasks as follows: Task 1 -- high burnup effects evaluations; Task 2 -- fission gas sampling; and Task 3 -- parameter effects study. During the course of the HBEP, a program that extended over 10 years, 82 fuel rods from a variety of sources were characterized, irradiated, and then examined in detail after irradiation. The study of fission gas release at high burnup levels was the principal objective of the program and it may be concluded that no significant enhancement of fission gas release at high burnup levels was observed for the examined rods. The rim effect, an as yet unquantified contributor to athermal fission gas release, was concluded to be the one truly high-burnup effect. Though burnup enhancement of fission gas release was observed to be low, a full understanding of the rim region and rim effect has not yet emerged and this may be a potential area of further research. 25 refs., 23 figs., 4 tabs.

Barner, J.O.; Cunningham, M.E.; Freshley, M.D.; Lanning, D.D.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

High Temperature Capacitor Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The absence of high-temperature electronics is an obstacle to the development of untapped energy resources (deep oil, gas and geothermal). US natural gas consumption is projected to grow from 22 trillion cubic feet per year (tcf) in 1999 to 34 tcf in 2020. Cumulatively this is 607 tcf of consumption by 2020, while recoverable reserves using current technology are 177 tcf. A significant portion of this shortfall may be met by tapping deep gas reservoirs. Tapping these reservoirs represents a significant technical challenge. At these depths, temperatures and pressures are very high and may require penetrating very hard rock. Logistics of supporting 6.1 km (20,000 ft) drill strings and the drilling processes are complex and expensive. At these depths up to 50% of the total drilling cost may be in the last 10% of the well depth. Thus, as wells go deeper it is increasingly important that drillers are able to monitor conditions down-hole such as temperature, pressure, heading, etc. Commercial off-the-shelf electronics are not specified to meet these operating conditions. This is due to problems associated with all aspects of the electronics including the resistors and capacitors. With respect to capacitors, increasing temperature often significantly changes capacitance because of the strong temperature dependence of the dielectric constant. Higher temperatures also affect the equivalent series resistance (ESR). High-temperature capacitors usually have low capacitance values because of these dielectric effects and because packages are kept small to prevent mechanical breakage caused by thermal stresses. Electrolytic capacitors do not operate at temperatures above 150oC due to dielectric breakdown. The development of high-temperature capacitors to be used in a high-pressure high-temperature (HPHT) drilling environment was investigated. These capacitors were based on a previously developed high-voltage hybridized capacitor developed at Giner, Inc. in conjunction with a unique high-temperature electrolyte developed during the course of the program. During this program the feasibility of operating a high voltage hybridized capacitor at 230oC was demonstrated. Capacitor specifications were established in conjunction with potential capacitor users. A method to allow for capacitor operation at both ambient and elevated temperatures was demonstrated. The program was terminated prior to moving into Phase II due to a lack of cost-sharing funds.

John Kosek

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

320

High Risk Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Risk Plan Risk Plan John Bashista Melissa Rider Jeff Davis Timeline to date * OMB memo on Improving Government Acquisition issued July 29, 2009 - Review existing contracts and acquisition practices to save 7% of baseline contract spending (3.5% in FY 2010 and 3.5% in FY 2011) - Reduce high risk contracts by 10% the share of dollars obligated in FY2010 - Final plan was due and submitted on November 2, 2009 - OMB reviewed and requested revision Dec 23, 2009 - Revision submitted April 21, 2010 M&Os are an Issue * With respect to reductions in high risk contracting strategies, the M&O contracts was also a challenge since the opportunity to further influence competition and contract type was highly constrained. The Department had already competed approximately 85 percent of its M&O

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

HIGHLY AUTOMATED MACROMOLECULAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMATED MACROMOLECULAR AUTOMATED MACROMOLECULAR CRYSTALLOGRAPHY BEAMLINE (AMX) Group Leader: Dieter Schneider Proposal Team: M. Allaire 1 , L. Berman 1 , M. Chance 2 , W. Hendrickson 3 , A. Héroux 1 , J. Jakoncic 1 , A. Orville 1 , H. Robinson 1 , D. Schneider 1 , W. Shi 2 , A. Soares 1 , V. Stojanoff 1 , R. Sweet 1 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory, 2 Case Western Reserve University, 3 Columbia University MISSION APPLICATIONS AND CAPABILITIES ADDITIONAL INFORMATION * AMX at NSLS-II will provide structural biologists with ready access to an advanced macromolecular crystallography (MX) beamline for the elucidation of structure and function of macromolecular complexes. * Its high flux, tunable energy, and natively small focal spot will make it a crystallographer's preferred beamline. * Its high degree of automation will provide a high throughput

322

High brightness electron accelerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high brightness linear accelerator is provided for use, e.g., in a free electron laser. The accelerator has a first plurality of acclerating cavities having end walls with four coupling slots for accelerating electrons to high velocities in the absence of quadrupole fields. A second plurality of cavities receives the high velocity electrons for further acceleration, where each of the second cavities has end walls with two coupling slots for acceleration in the absence of dipole fields. The accelerator also includes a first cavity with an extended length to provide for phase matching the electron beam along the accelerating cavities. A solenoid is provided about the photocathode that emits the electrons, where the solenoid is configured to provide a substantially uniform magnetic field over the photocathode surface to minimize emittance of the electrons as the electrons enter the first cavity.

Sheffield, R.L.; Carlsten, B.E.; Young, L.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

High resolution data acquisition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high resolution event interval timing system measures short time intervals such as occur in high energy physics or laser ranging. Timing is provided from a clock pulse train and analog circuitry for generating a triangular wave synchronously with the pulse train. The triangular wave has an amplitude and slope functionally related to the time elapsed during each clock pulse in the train. A converter forms a first digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the start of the event interval and a second digital value of the amplitude and slope of the triangle wave at the end of the event interval. A counter counts the clock pulse train during the interval to form a gross event interval time. A computer then combines the gross event interval time and the first and second digital values to output a high resolution value for the event interval.

Thornton, G.W.; Fuller, K.R.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

High-energy detector  

SciTech Connect

The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

Bolotnikov, Aleksey E. (South Setauket, NY); Camarda, Giuseppe (Farmingville, NY); Cui, Yonggang (Upton, NY); James, Ralph B. (Ridge, NY)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

325

High strength alloys  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one composition of a metal alloy includes chromium, nickel, copper, manganese, silicon, niobium, tungsten and iron. System, methods, and heaters that include the high strength metal alloys are described herein. At least one heater system may include a canister at least partially made from material containing at least one of the metal alloys. At least one system for heating a subterranean formation may include a tubular that is at least partially made from a material containing at least one of the metal alloys.

Maziasz, Phillip James [Oak Ridge, TN; Shingledecker, John Paul [Knoxville, TN; Santella, Michael Leonard [Knoxville, TN; Schneibel, Joachim Hugo [Knoxville, TN; Sikka, Vinod Kumar [Oak Ridge, TN; Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; John, Randy Carl [Houston, TX; Kim, Dong Sub [Sugar Land, TX

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

High intensity hadron accelerators  

SciTech Connect

This rapporteur report consists mainly of two parts. Part I is an abridged review of the status of all High Intensity Hadron Accelerator projects in the world in semi-tabulated form for quick reference and comparison. Part II is a brief discussion of the salient features of the different technologies involved. The discussion is based mainly on my personal experiences and opinions, tempered, I hope, by the discussions I participated in in the various parallel sessions of the workshop. In addition, appended at the end is my evaluation and expression of the merits of high intensity hadron accelerators as research facilities for nuclear and particle physics.

Teng, L.C.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

High Availability Electronics Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Availability modeling of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) predicts unacceptably low uptime with current electronics systems designs. High Availability (HA) analysis is being used as a guideline for all major machine systems including sources, utilities, cryogenics, magnets, power supplies, instrumentation and controls. R&D teams are seeking to achieve total machine high availability with nominal impact on system cost. The focus of this paper is the investigation of commercial standard HA architectures and packaging for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation. Application of HA design principles to power systems and detector instrumentation are also discussed.

Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

328

High-beta tokamak  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Calculations are made to study the stability and accessibility of tokamak plasmas in the high energy density regime which is desirable for economical reactor operation. Results are given from flux conserving tokamak (FCT) models, classical models, and more complete models with spatially resolved (R,Z) transport, including effects from sawtooth oscillations and magnetic islands. MHD equilibrium, stability, and transport calculations are made to study the accessibility and behavior of high-beta tokamak plasmas in the range {beta} {approx} 5-15%. For next-generation devices, beta values of, at least, 8% appear to be accessible and stable if there is a conducting surface nearby.

Dory, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berger, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Charlton, L. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Munro, J.K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Nelson, D. B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Sigma, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Strickler, Dennis J [ORNL

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program to someone by E-mail Share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Facebook Tweet about High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Twitter Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Google Bookmark High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Delicious Rank High Performance Windows Volume Purchase: About the High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program on Digg Find More places to share High Performance Windows Volume Purchase:

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High

331

High expression Zymomonas promoters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Identified are mutants of the promoter of the Z. mobilis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene, which direct improved expression levels of operably linked heterologous nucleic acids. These are high expression promoters useful for expression of chimeric genes in Zymomonas, Zymobacter, and other related bacteria.

Viitanen, Paul V. (West Chester, PA); Tao, Luan (Havertown, PA); Zhang, Yuying (New Hope, PA); Caimi, Perry G. (Kennett Square, PA); McCole, Laura (East Fallowfield, PA): Zhang, Min (Lakewood, CO); Chou, Yat-Chen (Lakewood, CO); McCutchen, Carol M. (Wilmington, DE); Franden, Mary Ann (Centennial, CO)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

332

High availability using virtualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High availability has always been one of the main problems for a data center. Till now high availability was achieved by host per host redundancy, a highly expensive method in terms of hardware and human costs. A new approach to the problem can be offered by virtualization. Using virtualization, it is possible to achieve a redundancy system for all the services running on a data center. This new approach to high availability allows to share the running virtual machines over the servers up and running, by exploiting the features of the virtualization layer: start, stop and move virtual machines between physical hosts. The system (3RC) is based on a finite state machine with hysteresis, providing the possibility to restart each virtual machine over any physical host, or reinstall it from scratch. A complete infrastructure has been developed to install operating system and middleware in a few minutes. To virtualize the main servers of a data center, a new procedure has been developed to migrate physical to virtu...

Calzolari, Federico

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

High speed flywheel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to flywheels and relates more particularly to the construction of a high speed, low-mass flywheel. Flywheels with which this invention is to be compared include those constructed of circumferentially wound filaments or fibers held together by a matrix or bonding material. Flywheels of such construction are known to possess a relatively high hoop strength but a relatively low radial strength. Hoop-wound flywheels are, therefore, particularly susceptible to circumferential cracks, and the radial stress limitations of such a flywheel substantially limit its speed capabilities. It is an object of the present invention to provide a new and improved flywheel which experiences reduced radial stress at high operating speeds. Another object of the present invention is to provide flywheel whose construction allows for radial growth as flywheel speed increases while providing the necessary stiffness for transferring and maintaining kinetic energy within the flywheel. Still another object of the present invention is to provide a flywheel having concentrically-disposed component parts wherein rotation induced radial stresses at the interfaces of such component parts approach zero. Yet another object of the present invention is to provide a flywheel which is particularly well-suited for high speed applications. 5 figs.

McGrath, S.V.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known synthesis in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed. 16 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

Highly oxidized superconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel superconducting materials in the form of compounds, structures or phases are formed by performing otherwise known syntheses in a highly oxidizing atmosphere rather than that created by molecular oxygen at atmospheric pressure or below. This leads to the successful synthesis of novel superconducting compounds which are thermodynamically stable at the conditions under which they are formed.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

High Energy Photoproduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The experimental and phenomenological status of high energy photoproduction is reviewed. Topics covered include the structure of the photon, production of jets, heavy flavours and prompt photons, rapidity gaps, energy flow and underlying events. The results are placed in the context of the current understanding of QCD, with particular application to present and future hadron and lepton colliders.

J. M. Butterworth; M. Wing

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

High Efficiency Steam Electrolyzer  

SciTech Connect

A novel steam electrolyzer has been developed. In conventional electrolyzers, oxygen produced from electrolysis is usually released in the air stream. In their novel design, natural gas is used to replace air in order to reduce the chemical potential difference across the electrolyzer, thus minimizing the electrical consumption. The oxygen from the electrolysis is consumed in either a total oxidation or a partial oxidation reaction with natural gas. Experiments performed on single cells shown a voltage reduction as much as 1 V when compared to conventional electrolyzers. Using thin film materials and high performance cathode and anode, electrolysis could be done at temperatures as low as 700 C with electrolytic current as high as 1 A/cm{sup 2} at a voltage of 0.5 V only. The 700 C operating temperature is favorable to the total oxidation of natural gas while minimizing the need for steam that is otherwise necessary to avoid carbon deposition. A novel tubular electrolyzer stack has been developed. The system was designed to produce hydrogen at high pressures, taking advantage of the simplicity and high efficiency of the electrochemical compressors. A complete fabrication process was developed for making electrolyzer tubes with thin film coatings. A 100 W stack is being built.

Pham, A.Q.

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

High Selectivity Oxygen Delignification  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this program was to develop improved extended oxygen delignification (EOD) technologies for current U.S. pulp mill operations. This was accomplished by: (1) Identifying pulping conditions that optimize O and OO performance; (2) Identifying structural features of lignin that enhance reactivity towards EOD of high kappa pulps; (3) Identifying factors minimizing carbohydrate degradation and improve pulp strength of EOD high kappa pulps; (4) Developing a simple, reproducible method of quantifying yield gains from EOD; and (5) Developing process conditions that significantly reduce the capital requirements of EOD while optimizing the yield benefits. Key research outcomes included, demonstrating the use of a mini-O sequence such as (E+O)Dkf:0.05(E+O) or Dkf:0.05(E+O)(E+O) without interstage washing could capture approximately 60% of the delignification efficiency of a conventional O-stage without the major capital requirements associated with an O-stage for conventional SW kraft pulps. The rate of formation and loss of fiber charge during an O-stage stage can be employed to maximize net fiber charge. Optimal fiber charge development and delignification are two independent parameters and do not parallel each other. It is possible to utilize an O-stage to enhance overall cellulosic fiber charge of low and high kappa SW kraft pulps which is beneficial for physical strength properties. The application of NIR and multi-variant analysis was developed into a rapid and simple method of determining the yield of pulp from an oxygen delignification stage that has real-world mill applications. A focus point of this program was the demonstration that Kraft pulping conditions and oxygen delignification of high and low-kappa SW and HW pulps are intimately related. Improved physical pulp properties and yield can be delivered by controlling the H-factor and active alkali charge. Low AA softwood kraft pulp with a kappa number 30 has an average improvement of 2% in yield and 4 cP in viscosity in comparison to high AA pulp for the oxygen delignification. This difference is also seen for high-kappa SW kraft pulps with an average improvement of {approx}3% in yield and 3 cP in viscosity for low AA high kappa number 50 pulp. Low AA hardwood kappa number 20 pulp had an average improvement of {approx}4% in yield and 6-12 cP in viscosity as compared to high AA pulp. Lower kraft cooking temperature (160 vs. 170 C) in combination with the medium AA provides a practical approach for integrating high kappa pulping of hardwoods (i.e., low rejects) with an advanced extended oxygen delignification stage. ECF pulp bleaching of low and high kappa kraft SW and HW pulps exhibit comparable optical and physical strength properties when bleached D(EPO)D.

Arthur J. Ragauskas

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

High Tc Superconductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) by C. Kim (SSRL), D. H. Lu (Stanford), K. M. Shen (Stanford) and Z.-X. Shen (Stanford/SSRL) Extensive research efforts to study the novel electronic properties of high-Tc superconductors and their related materials by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy at a recently commissioned Beam Line 5-4 (led by Z.-X. Shen) continue to be successful, producing many important results. These results, which are highlighted by five articles recently published in Physical Review Letters and one in Science, brought our understanding steps closer to solving the mystery of the high-Tc superconductivity. With the development of the latest generation of ultra-high resolution electron spectrometers in the past few years, the technique of angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) has recently experienced a renaissance. Nowhere is this revolution more evident than in the study of the high-temperature superconductors, which more than a decade after their discovery, continue to defy theoretical explanation. Recent ARPES experiments performed at Beam Line 5-4 have led to critical new discoveries about the fundamental nature of these mysterious superconductors and are now changing the way that the physics community views these materials. An excellent benchmark for the huge leap in detector resolution and technology is the recent work on Sr2RuO4. Although it belongs to a slightly different family than the high- temperature superconductors, its exotic superconducting mechanism (Tc = 1K) and complex electronic structure make it itself a fascinating material. In the past, due to poor resolutions, ARPES studies on this material were in disagreement with theory and other experimental techniques.

340

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

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341

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo'' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

342

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or halo' at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes. 4 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Highly Pipelined Asynchronous FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the design of a high-performance, highly pipelined asynchronous FPGA. We describe a very ne-grain pipelined logic block and routing interconnect architecture, and show how asynchronous logic can eciently take advantage of this large amount of pipelining. Our FPGA, which does not use a clock to sequence computations, automatically \\selfpipelines " its logic without the designer needing to be explicitly aware of all pipelining details. This property makes our FPGA ideal for throughput-intensive applications and we require minimal place and route support to achieve good performance. Benchmark circuits taken from both the asynchronous and clocked design communities yield throughputs in the neighborhood of 300-400 MHz in a TSMC 0.25m process and 500-700 MHz in a TSMC 0.18m process.

John Teifel; Rajit Manohar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High frequency reference electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high frequency reference electrode for electrochemical experiments comprises a mercury-calomel or silver-silver chloride reference electrode with a layer of platinum around it and a layer of a chemically and electrically resistant material such as TEFLON around the platinum covering all but a small ring or "halo" at the tip of the reference electrode, adjacent to the active portion of the reference electrode. The voltage output of the platinum layer, which serves as a redox electrode, and that of the reference electrode are coupled by a capacitor or a set of capacitors and the coupled output transmitted to a standard laboratory potentiostat. The platinum may be applied by thermal decomposition to the surface of the reference electrode. The electrode provides superior high-frequency response over conventional electrodes.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

High Temperature ESP Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Highly Insulating Window Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window Technology Window Technology Temperature differentials across a window, particularly with cold exterior environments in residential buildings, can lead to significant energy losses. Currently available low-emissivity coatings, gas-fills, and insulating frames provide significant energy savings over typical single or double glazed products. The EWC website provides information on how double glazed low-e gas-filled windows work as well as information on commercially available superwindows (three layer, multiple low-e coatings, high performance gas-fills). The next generation of highly insulating window systems will benefit from incremental improvements being made to current components (i.e. more insulating spacers and frame materials/designs, low-e coatings with improved performance properties). LBNL uses its experimental facilities and software tools to collaborate with window and glass industry representatives to better understand the impacts of new components on overall product performance.

347

Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria for Phytostabilization of Mine Tailings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eolian dispersion of mine tailings in arid and semiarid environments is an emerging global issue for which economical remediation alternatives are needed. Phytostabilization, the revegetation of these sites with native plants, is one such alternative. Revegetation often requires the addition of bulky amendments such as compost which greatly increases cost. We report the use of plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB) to enhance the revegetation of mine tailings and minimize the need for compost amendment. Twenty promising PGPB isolates were used as seed inoculants in a series of greenhouse studies to examine revegetation of an extremely acidic, high metal content tailings sample previously shown to require 15% compost amendment for normal plant growth. Several isolates significantly enhanced growth of two native species, quailbush and buffalo grass, in tailings. In this study, PGPB/compost outcomes were plant specific; for quailbush, PGPB were most effective in combination with 10% compost addition while for buffalo grass, PGPB enhanced growth in the complete absence of compost. Results indicate that selected PGPB can improve plant establishment and reduce the need for compost amendment. Further, PGPB activities necessary for aiding plant growth in mine tailings likely include tolerance to acidic pH and metals.

Grandlic, C.J.; Mendez, M.O.; Chorover, J.; Machado, B.; Maier, R.M.

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

348

High voltage pulse conditioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

Stringfield, R.M.; Wheat, R.M. Jr.

1989-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

349

High voltage pulse conditioning  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

High speed door assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a high speed door assembly, comprising an actuator cylinder and piston rods, a pressure supply cylinder and fittings, an electrically detonated explosive bolt, a honeycomb structured door, a honeycomb structured decelerator, and a structural steel frame encasing the assembly to close over a 3 foot diameter opening within 50 milliseconds of actuation, to contain hazardous materials and vapors within a test fixture.

Shapiro, C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

High current ion source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion source utilizing a cathode and anode for producing an electric arc therebetween. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma leaves the generation region and expands through another regon. The density profile of the plasma may be flattened using a magnetic field formed within a vacuum chamber. Ions are extracted from the plasma to produce a high current broad on beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); MacGill, Robert A. (645 Kern St., Richmond, CA 94805); Galvin, James E. (2 Commodore Dr. #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator for producing relatively large currents at high voltages is described. In general, the invention comprises a plurality of capacitors connected in series by a plurality of switches alternately disposed with the capacitors. The above-noted circuit is mounted for movement with respect to contact members and switch closure means so that a load device and power supply are connected across successive numbers of capacitors, while the other capacitors are successively charged with the same power supply.

Schwemin, A.J.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator is presented for producing relatively large currents at high voltages. In general, the invention comprises a plurality of capacitors connected in series by a plurality of switches alternately disposed with the capacitors. The circuit is mounted for movement with respect to contact members and switch closure means so that a load device and power supply are connected across successive numbers of capacitors, while the other capacitors are successively charged with the same power supply.

Schwemin, A.J.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures. 4 figures.

Ward, M.E.; Harkins, B.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

High pressure ceramic joint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

Ward, Michael E. (Poway, CA); Harkins, Bruce D. (San Diego, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

HIGH VOLTAGE ION SOURCE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for providing a source of molecular ions having a large output current and with an accelerated energy of the order of 600 kv. Ions are produced in an ion source which is provided with a water-cooled source grid of metal to effect maximum recombination of atomic ions to molecular ions. A very high accelerating voltage is applied to withdraw and accelerate the molecular ions from the source, and means are provided for dumping the excess electrons at the lowest possible potentials. An accelerating grid is placed adjacent to the source grid and a slotted, grounded accelerating electrode is placed adjacent to the accelerating grid. A potential of about 35 kv is maintained between the source grid and accelerating grid, and a potential of about 600 kv is maintained between the accelerating grid and accelerating electrode. In order to keep at a minimum the large number of oscillating electrons which are created when such high voltages are employed in the vicinity of a strong magnetic field, a plurality of high voltage cascaded shields are employed with a conventional electron dumping system being employed between each shield so as to dump the electrons at the lowest possible potential rather than at 600 kv.

Luce, J.S.

1960-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

High temperature interfacial superconductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High-temperature superconductivity confined to nanometer-scale interfaces has been a long standing goal because of potential applications in electronic devices. The spontaneous formation of a superconducting interface in bilayers consisting of an insulator (La.sub.2CuO.sub.4) and a metal (La.sub.1-xSr.sub.xCuO.sub.4), neither of which is superconducting per se, is described. Depending upon the layering sequence of the bilayers, T.sub.c may be either .about.15 K or .about.30 K. This highly robust phenomenon is confined to within 2-3 nm around the interface. After exposing the bilayer to ozone, T.sub.c exceeds 50 K and this enhanced superconductivity is also shown to originate from a 1 to 2 unit cell thick interfacial layer. The results demonstrate that engineering artificial heterostructures provides a novel, unconventional way to fabricate stable, quasi two-dimensional high T.sub.c phases and to significantly enhance superconducting properties in other superconductors. The superconducting interface may be implemented, for example, in SIS tunnel junctions or a SuFET.

Bozovic, Ivan (Mount Sinai, NY); Logvenov, Gennady (Port Jefferson Station, NY); Gozar, Adrian Mihai (Port Jefferson, NY)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

High-density Fuel Development for High Performance Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, High density UMo (7-12wt% Mo) fuel for high performance research ... High Energy X-ray Diffraction Study of Deformation Behavior of Alloy HT9.

359

California high speed rail proposal: High speed rail and wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wildlife and High Speed Rail C ALIFORNIA H IGH S PEED R AILLeavitt, California High Speed Rail Authority) Abstract TheCalifornia High Speed Rail (HSR) Proposal is in the initial

Wilkerson, Cynthia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

KENTUCKY - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

beech fork school db martin ky 159 004679 n 1941 beech grove mclean ky 149 051681 o 1948 beech grove east mclean ky 149 051712 o 1950

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CX-004519: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-004519: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cottage Grove Wastewater Treatment Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 11192010 Location(s): Cottage Grove,...

362

Luigi Boccherini: Dictionary of Persons, Places, and Terms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998; The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians,in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, Stanleydead or alive). In this Dictionary the entry "Boccherini"

Tortella, Jaime

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Radiation Effects on a High Strength, High Conductivity Copper Alloy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Radiation Effects on a High Strength, High Conductivity Copper ... of Zircaloy during Low Dose Neutron Irradiation at Nominally 375-440 C.

364

HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High performance steam development  

SciTech Connect

DOE has launched a program to make a step change in power plant to 1500 F steam, since the highest possible performance gains can be achieved in a 1500 F steam system when using a topping turbine in a back pressure steam turbine for cogeneration. A 500-hour proof-of-concept steam generator test module was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. It has four once-through steam generator circuits. The complete HPSS (high performance steam system) was tested above 1500 F and 1500 psig for over 102 hours at full power.

Duffy, T.; Schneider, P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

366

High speed flywheel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flywheel for operation at high speeds utilizes two or more ringlike coments arranged in a spaced concentric relationship for rotation about an axis and an expansion device interposed between the components for accommodating radial growth of the components resulting from flywheel operation. The expansion device engages both of the ringlike components, and the structure of the expansion device ensures that it maintains its engagement with the components. In addition to its expansion-accommodating capacity, the expansion device also maintains flywheel stiffness during flywheel operation.

McGrath, Stephen V. (Knoxville, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

High efficiency photoionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency photoionization detector is described using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36 [+-] 0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20 C. 6 figs.

Anderson, D.F.

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

High efficiency photoionization detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency photoionization detector using tetraaminoethylenes in a gaseous state having a low ionization potential and a relative photoionization cross section which closely matches the emission spectrum of xenon gas. Imaging proportional counters are also disclosed using the novel photoionization detector of the invention. The compound of greatest interest is TMAE which comprises tetrakis(dimethylamino)ethylene which has a measured ionization potential of 5.36.+-.0.02 eV, and a vapor pressure of 0.35 torr at 20.degree. C.

Anderson, David F. (3055 Trinity, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

High Performance Computing School COMSC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing School COMSC This module aims to provide the students with fundamental knowledge and understanding of techniques associated with High Performance Computing and its practical' skills in analysing and evaluating High Performance Computing and will be structured around

Martin, Ralph R.

371

Detachable high heel shoe construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal on this investigation was to develop a detachable high heel shoe construction that could enter the current high heel market. The impact of high heel shoes on women's fashion is enormous but there are associated ...

Morales, Alfredo Louis

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Highly Insulating Windows - Fram  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frames Frames Research performed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and LBNL has identified various highly insulating frame solutions. A report was released in 2007 describing some of these frames. This document reports the findings of a market and research review related to state-of-the-art highly insulating window frames. The market review focuses on window frames that satisfy the Passivhaus requirements (window U-value less or equal to 0.8 W/m2K ), while other examples are also given in order to show the variety of materials and solutions that may be used for constructing window frames with a low thermal transmittance (U-value). The market search shows that several combinations of materials are used in order to obtain window frames with a low U-value. The most common insulating material seems to be Polyurethane (PUR), which is used together with most of the common structural materials such as wood, aluminum, and PVC.

373

High throughput optical scanner  

SciTech Connect

A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

High temperature thermometric phosphors  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gillies, George T. (Earlysville, VA)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

375

High speed transient sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing. 17 figs.

McEwan, T.E.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

376

High speed transient sampler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high speed sampler comprises a meandered sample transmission line for transmitting an input signal, a straight strobe transmission line for transmitting a strobe signal, and a plurality of sampling gates along the transmission lines. The sampling gates comprise a four terminal diode bridge having a first strobe resistor connected from a first terminal of the bridge to the positive strobe line, a second strobe resistor coupled from the third terminal of the bridge to the negative strobe line, a tap connected to the second terminal of the bridge and to the sample transmission line, and a sample holding capacitor connected to the fourth terminal of the bridge. The resistance of the first and second strobe resistors is much higher than the signal transmission line impedance in the preferred system. This results in a sampling gate which applies a very small load on the sample transmission line and on the strobe generator. The sample holding capacitor is implemented using a smaller capacitor and a larger capacitor isolated from the smaller capacitor by resistance. The high speed sampler of the present invention is also characterized by other optimizations, including transmission line tap compensation, stepped impedance strobe line, a multi-layer physical layout, and unique strobe generator design. A plurality of banks of such samplers are controlled for concatenated or interleaved sample intervals to achieve long sample lengths or short sample spacing.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

High-energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 22. High-energy collider parameters HIGH-ENERGY COLLIDER PARAMETERS: e + e - Colliders (I) The numbers here were received from representatives of the colliders in late 1999 (contact C.G. Wohl, LBNL). Many of the numbers of course change with time, and only the latest values (or estimates) are given here; those in brackets are for coming upgrades. Quantities are, where appropriate, r.m.s. H and V indicate horizontal and vertical directions. Parameters for the defunct SPEAR, DORIS, PETRA, PEP, and TRISTAN colliders may be found in our 1996 edition (Phys. Rev. D54, 1 July 1996, Part I). VEPP-2M (Novosibirsk) VEPP-2000 ∗ (Novosibirsk) VEPP-4M (Novosibirsk) BEPC (China) DAΦNE (Frascati) Physics start date 1974 2001 1994 1989 1999 Maximum beam energy (GeV) 0.7 1.0 6 2.2 0.510 (0.75 max.) Luminosity (10 30 cm -2 s -1 ) 5 100 50 10 at 2 GeV 5 at 1.55 GeV 50(→500) Time between collisions (µs)

378

High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation High Performance Computing: Modeling & Simulation Express Licensing Adaptive Real-Time Methodology for Optimizing Energy-Efficient...

379

LANL | Physics | High Energy Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring high energy physics Physics Division scientists and engineers investigate the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our fundamental...

380

Air Kerma - High Energy Xray  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... such as high energy megavoltage x rays with peak voltages of at least 5 MV. Currently, air-kerma measurements at these high energies are not ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

HIGH-FIELD SUPERCONDUCTING ACCELERATOR MAGNETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research , Office of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, HighOffice of High Energy and Nuclear Physics, High Energy

Taylor, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Highly Insulating Windows - Publ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highly Insulating Windows - Publications Future Advanced Windows for Zero-Energy Homes, J. Apte, D. Arasteh, J. Huang, 2003 ASHRAE Annual Meeting, 2002 Nine representative window products are examined in eight representative U.S. climates. Annual energy and peak demand impacts are investigated. We conclude that a new generation of window products is necessary for zero-energy homes if windows are not to be an energy drain on these homes. Performance Criteria for Residential Zero Energy Windows, D. Arasteh, H. Goudey, J. Huang, C. Kohler, R. Mitchell, 2006, submitted to ASHRAE Through the use of whole house energy modeling, typical efficient products are evaluated in five US climates and compared against the requirements for ZEHs. Products which meet these needs are defined as a function of climate.

383

Highly stable pulse stretchers  

SciTech Connect

Highly stable pulse stretchers are described that are designed for fine control of pulse duration in digital pulse shapers of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers with a quantization step of 0.1 ..mu..sec. The fine-control range is 20-150 nsec. The stretchers employ a circuit to compensate for the logic-0 voltage and the time delays of the logic elements. The instability of the trailing-edge delay for a supply variation of +/- 0.5 V is less than 0.1%, and the temperature instability in the range of 20-80/sup 0/C is not over (60/t/sub d/)-0.3%, where t/sub d/ is the trailing-edge delay. The inputs and outputs of the pulse stretchers are matcher to TTL and Schottky TTL levels.

Svintenok, V.A.; Nikiforov, E.A.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

High Efficiency, Clean Combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy use in trucks has been increasing at a faster rate than that of automobiles within the U.S. transportation sector. According to the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Annual Energy Outlook (AEO), a 23% increase in fuel consumption for the U.S. heavy duty truck segment is expected between 2009 to 2020. The heavy duty vehicle oil consumption is projected to grow between 2009 and 2050 while light duty vehicle (LDV) fuel consumption will eventually experience a decrease. By 2050, the oil consumption rate by LDVs is anticipated to decrease below 2009 levels due to CAFE standards and biofuel use. In contrast, the heavy duty oil consumption rate is anticipated to double. The increasing trend in oil consumption for heavy trucks is linked to the vitality, security, and growth of the U.S. economy. An essential part of a stable and vibrant U.S. economy is a productive U.S. trucking industry. Studies have shown that the U.S. gross domestic product (GDP) is strongly correlated to freight transport. Over 90% of all U.S. freight tonnage is transported by diesel power and over 75% is transported by trucks. Given the vital role that the trucking industry plays in the economy, improving the efficiency of the transportation of goods was a central focus of the Cummins High Efficient Clean Combustion (HECC) program. In a commercial vehicle, the diesel engine remains the largest source of fuel efficiency loss, but remains the greatest opportunity for fuel efficiency improvements. In addition to reducing oil consumption and the dependency on foreign oil, this project will mitigate the impact on the environment by meeting US EPA 2010 emissions regulations. Innovation is a key element in sustaining a U.S. trucking industry that is competitive in global markets. Unlike passenger vehicles, the trucking industry cannot simply downsize the vehicle and still transport the freight with improved efficiency. The truck manufacturing and supporting industries are faced with numerous challenges to reduce oil consumption and greenhouse gases, meet stringent emissions regulations, provide customer value, and improve safety. The HECC program successfully reduced engine fuel consumption and greenhouse gases while providing greater customer valve. The US EPA 2010 emissions standard poses a significant challenge for developing clean diesel powertrains that meet the DoE Vehicle Technologies Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for fuel efficiency improvement while remaining affordable. Along with exhaust emissions, an emphasis on heavy duty vehicle fuel efficiency is being driven by increased energy costs as well as the potential regulation of greenhouse gases. An important element of the success of meeting emissions while significantly improving efficiency is leveraging Cummins component technologies such as fuel injection equipment, aftertreatment, turbomahcinery, electronic controls, and combustion systems. Innovation in component technology coupled with system integration is enabling Cummins to move forward with the development of high efficiency clean diesel products with a long term goal of reaching a 55% peak brake thermal efficiency for the engine plus aftertreatment system. The first step in developing high efficiency clean products has been supported by the DoE co-sponsored HECC program. The objectives of the HECC program are: (1) To design and develop advanced diesel engine architectures capable of achieving US EPA 2010 emission regulations while improving the brake thermal efficiency by 10% compared to the baseline (a state of the art 2007 production diesel engine). (2) To design and develop components and subsystems (fuel systems, air handling, controls, etc) to enable construction and development of multi-cylinder engines. (3) To perform an assessment of the commercial viability of the newly developed engine technology. (4) To specify fuel properties conducive to improvements in emissions, reliability, and fuel efficiency for engines using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) technologies. To demonstrate the technology is compatible with B2

Donald Stanton

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to high voltage supply circuits adapted for providing operating voltages for GeigerMueller counter tubes, and is especially directed to an arrangement for maintaining uniform voltage under changing conditions of operation. In the usual power supply arrangement for counter tubes the counter voltage is taken from across the power supply output capacitor. If the count rate exceeds the current delivering capaciiy of the capacitor, the capacitor voltage will drop, decreasing the counter voltage. The present invention provides a multivibrator which has its output voltage controlled by a signal proportional to the counting rate. As the counting rate increases beyond the current delivering capacity of the capacitor, the rectified voltage output from the multivibrator is increased to maintain uniform counter voltage.

Zito, G.V.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

386

High voltage feedthrough bushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A feedthrough bushing for a high voltage diode provides for using compression sealing for all sealing surfaces. A diode assembly includes a central conductor extending through the bushing and a grading ring assembly circumferentially surrounding and coaxial with the central conductor. A flexible conductive plate extends between and compressively seals against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, wherein the flexibility of the plate allows inner and outer portions of the plate to axially translate for compression sealing against the central conductor and the grading ring assembly, respectively. The inner portion of the plate is bolted to the central conductor for affecting sealing. A compression beam is also bolted to the central conductor and engages the outer portion of the plate to urge the outer portion toward the grading ring assembly to obtain compression sealing therebetween.

Brucker, J.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

Y High-Resolution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Y Y High-Resolution . __ DO NOT M I C PET COVER for medical science studies Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California September 1989 DlSTRlBUTlGN OF THIS DOCUMENT IS U#LIIY/ITEE Acknowledgments This booklet was prepared under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Health Effects Research, the National Institutes of Health, and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division. We thank Sarah Cahn and Douglas Vaughan for coordination of this booklet. esolution PET for Medical Science Studies Thomas F. Budinger Stephen E. Derenzo Ronald H. Huesman William J. Jagust Peter E. Valk CONTENTS A PET Primer Positron Emission Tomography: Evolution of a Technology 7 PET Theory: Emission, Detection, and Reconstruction

388

High energy photon emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal of this work was to initiate the use of BaF2 arrays for detection of high energy photon emission from nuclear reactions. A beam from the Texas A&M University K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron, and a variety of detectors for hard photons, neutrons, charged particles, and fission fragments were used to study the reaction 160 + 238 U at a projectile energy of 50 MeV/u. Inverse slope values of the photon spectra were extracted for inclusive data and data of higher multiplicities at angles of 90' and 135'. Two 19-element barium fluoride (BaF2) arrays, an array of liquid scintillation fast neutron detectors and plastic scintillation charged-particle veto detectors, together with a silicon-cesium iodide (Si-CsI) telescope and a silicon fission fragment detector allowed the possibility of impact parameter selection through neutron and charged particle multiplicities. The associated multiplicity distributions of photon and fast neutron triggers were compared at 30' and 90' angles. The hardware and electronics layout of the experimental set up are described. Fundamental properties of the various detectors are explained and typical spectra are shown as examples for each detector system. The data acquisition and data compression is described in Chap. III, and followed by the calibration methods used for the BaF2 and Nal(TI) detectors. A description of a dynamic pedestal (zero level) correction mechanism, is followed by a description of several cosmic ray background reduction methods, including the highly effective centrality condition. A summary is given to compare the various methods. After a description of the other types of detectors used in the experiment, an example is given how the final photon spectra were produced. In Chap. IV the measured results are presented and compared to those in the literature. The last chapter provides the conclusions of this work.

Jabs, Harry

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

High Performance Buildings Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The High Performance Buildings Database is a shared resource for the building industry. The Database, developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is a unique central repository of in-depth information and data on high-performance, green building projects across the United States and abroad. The Database includes information on the energy use, environmental performance, design process, finances, and other aspects of each project. Members of the design and construction teams are listed, as are sources for additional information. In total, up to twelve screens of detailed information are provided for each project profile. Projects range in size from small single-family homes or tenant fit-outs within buildings to large commercial and institutional buildings and even entire campuses.

The Database is a data repository as well. A series of Web-based data-entry templates allows anyone to enter information about a building project into the database. Once a project has been submitted, each of the partner organizations can review the entry and choose whether or not to publish that particular project on its own Web site. Early partners using the database include:

  • The Federal Energy Management Program
  • The U.S. Green Building Council
  • The American Institute of Architects' Committee on the Environment
  • The Massachusetts Technology Collaborative
  • Efficiency Vermont
    • Copied (then edited) from http://eere.buildinggreen.com/partnering.cfm

390

High Performance Network Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Functionalized High Voltage Spinel Composite for High Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, spinel LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 with high working voltage and long cycle life makes it become the one of most promising cathode for high power delivery.

392

High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Overview Other Facilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting Six corrosion test facilities and two thermogravimetric systems for conducting corrosion tests in complex mixed gas environments, in steam and in the presence of deposits, and five facilities for metal dusting degradation Bookmark and Share The High Temperature Corrosion Test Facilities and High Pressure Test Facilities for Metal Dusting include: High Pressure Test Facility for Metal Dusting Resistance:

393

UESC and High Tech Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Energy Management Program UESC and High Tech Facilities Charles Williams, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab 2 | FUPWG April 2012 High Tech Building UESC Partnership Leveraging Technical Potential, Market Opportunity, Program Resources * Energy-intensive facilities with high savings potential * PG&E service territory - high concentration of high-technology buildings * PG&E UESC program, new and growing * DOE FEMP programs for UESC and High-Tech Buildings * LBNL expertise in labs, data centers, clean rooms * LBNL support for UESC program * UESC potential for innovation * Presidential "We Can't Wait $2 Billion challenge to Federal agencies 3 | FUPWG April 2012 UESC project support at LBNLL Training /Education

394

Presented at the 2000 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, August 20-25, 2000 in Pacific Grove, CA, and published in the Proceedings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial and residential buildings with data from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) residential potentials for DOE's research and market transformation activities in building energy efficiency building stock are derived through statistical analysis of energy consumption data from utility

395

Technical/commercial feasibility study of the production of fuel-grade ethanol from corn: 100-million gallon-per-year production facility in Myrtle Grove, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following engineering drawings: plot plans, fire protection yards, process flow diagrams, general plant arrangements for each area, equipment layouts, electrical diagrams, and power distribution centers.

Not Available

1982-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

ACEEE 2000 Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Efficiency and Sustainability, August 20-25, 2000, Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, CA, and published in the Proceedings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a commercial office building Case Study: Model-Based Monitoring of Chiller Performance Selection of the Model to be accurate to about 1 percent. The condenser duty was determined in order to be able to perform an energy of Energy under Contract No. DE- AC03-76SF00098. Model-Based Performance Monitoring: Review of Diagnostic

397

PROCEEDINGS OF THE THIRD CONFERENCE ON REACTIONS BETWEEN COMPLEX NUCLEI, HELD AT ASILOMAR (PACIFIC GROVE, CALIFORNIA) APRIL 14-18, 1963  

SciTech Connect

The goals of the meeting were: to provide information on the developments in the field of reactions between complex nuclei since the second conference held in Gatlinburg, TN in 1960; to allow an informal exchange of ideas bwtween scientists of universities/laboratories participating in heavy-ion research; and, to point to fruitful research for the future. Conference papers and a conference summary are included in these proceedings.

Ghiorso, A.; Diamond, R.M.; Conzett, H.E. (eds.)

1963-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost.

Nguyen-Tuong, Viet (Seaford, VA); Dylla, III, Henry Frederick (Yorktown, VA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Ultra high vacuum broad band high power microwave window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved high vacuum microwave window has been developed that utilizes high density polyethylene coated on two sides with SiOx, SiNx, or a combination of the two. The resultant low dielectric and low loss tangent window creates a low outgassing, low permeation seal through which broad band, high power microwave energy may be passed. No matching device is necessary and the sealing technique is simple. The features of the window are broad band transmission, ultra-high vacuum compatibility with a simple sealing technique, low voltage standing wave ratio, high power transmission and low cost. 5 figs.

Nguyen-Tuong, V.; Dylla, H.F. III

1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013 ... Shape Memory Response of NiTiHfPd High Strength and High Hysteresis Shape Memory Alloys: Emre Acar1; Haluk Karaca1; Hirobumi Tobe1;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Introduction to High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction to High Performance Computing Introduction to High Performance Computing June 10, 2013 Photo on 7 30 12 at 7.10 AM Downloads Download File Gerber-HPC-2.pdf...

402

High Speed Particle Image Velocimetry  

This patent application discloses a novel method to simultaneously track the motion of high numbers of object images under extreme, high concen-tration conditions. Although the software is designed to simultaneously track large numbers of particle ...

403

High-Resolution Separations Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC/MS) provides relatively high efficiency separations, the analysis of some complex, natural-matrix ...

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

High Performance Computing contributions to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Performance Computing contributions to DoD Mission Success 2002 #12;Approved for public/C nanotube in a field emitter configuration #12;HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING contributions tocontributions ­ SECTION 1 INTRODUCTION 1 Introduction 3 Overview of the High Performance Computing Modernization Program 3

405

Highlighting High Performance: Whitman Hanson Regional High School; Whitman, Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure describes the key high-performance building features of the Whitman-Hanson Regional High School. The brochure was paid for by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative as part of their Green Schools Initiative. High-performance features described are daylighting and energy-efficient lighting, indoor air quality, solar and wind energy, building envelope, heating and cooling systems, water conservation, and acoustics. Energy cost savings are also discussed.

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Temperature Superconductivity Partners High Temperature Superconductivity Partners Map showing DOE's partnersstakeholders in the High Temperature Superconductivity Program...

407

High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance More Documents &...

408

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

409

Real Time Synchrotron Radiography of High Temperature High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Magnetic Composite Materials X-Ray Studies of Structural Effects Induced by Pulsed (30 Tesla), High Magnetic Fields at the Advanced Photon Source...

410

Soft Magnetic Materials for High Power and High Frequency Power ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Advanced Materials for Power Electronics, Power Conditioning, and ... are in high demand for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics.

411

Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

material, creat- ing rich compost that can be used forcrops. Manage Solids Compost: Pig waste and carcasses can bematerials such as mats. Compost Solid waste from the solid

Timothy Duane

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Effect of Organic Farming on Soil Fertility , Yield and Quality of Crops in the Tropics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vegetable production. Vermi compost, which is produced byT 4 : Full recommended dose as Vermi compost; T 5 : Fullrecommended dose as Vermi compost + P solubilising micro

Bhaskaran, Usha Pankajam; Krishna, Devi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

An Economic Assessment of Market-Based Approaches to Regulating the Municipal Solid Waste Stream  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Total (lbs) Total recycle compost Community Characteristicsdiscards percent diverted compost Waste/HH/Day after PAYTof recycled waste streams, compost, and possibly from energy

Menell, Peter S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Strategies for Enhancing the Effectiveness of Metagenomic-based Enzyme Discovery in Lignocellulolytic Microbial Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

str. Mature mushroom compost isolate Solirubrobacter sp.Rican soil or green waste compost under precisely definedcompared to the native compost inoculum. The selective

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nitrogen Assimilation Ability of Three Cauliflower Cultivars in Relation to Reduced Post-Transplanting Nitrogen Supply  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was amended using chicken compost, applied at the rate oftransplanting. The chicken compost contained 92% of organiccredit values in the chicken compost, the total inputs were

Li, Hong; Gordon, Robert J.; Lada, Raj; Asiedu, Samuel K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Complete genome sequence of Saccharomonospora viridis type strain (P101T)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

diversity in hot synthetic compost as revealed by PCR-isolated from mushroom compost. Soil Biol Biochem 2001, 33:thermophile, hot compost, Gram-negative actinomycete,

Pati, Amrita

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Teaching Direct Marketing and Small Farm Viability: Resources for Instructors - Part 4, Community Supported Agriculture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management practices a. Compost application rates i. 1989to fertility management, compost, crop rotations, cover5 to 10 tons per acre compost applied rye spaded garlic/

Miles, Albie; Brown, Martha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The Cultivar newsletter, Spring/Summer 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to disease; and incorporating compost to enhance biologicalways to adjust fertilizer and compost levels and applicationSUMMER 2005 ing pre-plant compost applications, especially

Brown, Martha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Forest nurseries face critical choices with the loss of methyl bromide fumigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings over mature composts in USDA Forest Serviceseedlings planted into compost-amended soil that had eitherbio- solid and bark-based composts had the highest average

Weiland, Jerry E; Littke, Will R; Haase, Diane L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Darrie Ganzhorn: Director of Programs and Operations, Homeless Garden Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

project, and learning a lot about compost and reallybeing excited about compost and how it worked in ourDavidson was working with compost and working with getting

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Post-Project Assessment of the 2003 Cerrito Creek Restoration and Recommendations for Additional Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. 2011. Evaluation of a Compost-Amended Biofiltration Swalefraction soil such as compost, which increases sorption of2011). Indeed, swales with compost-amended soil have been

Adlong, Michelle; Cook, Michael; Kennedy, Matthew

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Making sense of competing organizational goals : perspectives of practice that affect coordinated efforts and organizational learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrical energy, compost) services to the communities itelectrical energy, compost) services to the communities itwas currently working on, a compost storage area (called a

Price, Joanne Kirkpatrick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Cultivation, Capital, and Contamination: Urban Agriculture in Oakland, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

municipal solid waste composts. Journal of Environmentalin municipal solid waste compost Biomass and Energy 3 (3-4):of fertilizer and sewage sludge compost on yield and heavy

McClintock, Nathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

High pressure-high temperature effect on the HTSC ceramics structure and properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: high pressures-high temperatures, high temperature superconductors, mechanical properties, structure, superconductive

T. A. Prikhna

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Arthur Heights Baldwin City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fleming Flinn Floyd Forbes Ford City Forest City Fortescue Fountain Grove Galesburg Gallatin Galt Garden

Peterson, Blake R.

427

High resolution time interval meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus are provided for measuring the time interval between two events to a higher resolution than reliability available from conventional circuits and component. An internal clock pulse is provided at a frequency compatible with conventional component operating frequencies for reliable operation. Lumped constant delay circuits are provided for generating outputs at delay intervals corresponding to the desired high resolution. An initiation START pulse is input to generate first high resolution data. A termination STOP pulse is input to generate second high resolution data. Internal counters count at the low frequency internal clock pulse rate between the START and STOP pulses. The first and second high resolution data are logically combined to directly provide high resolution data to one counter and correct the count in the low resolution counter to obtain a high resolution time interval measurement.

Martin, A.D.

1986-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

428

High voltage variable diameter insulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

Vanecek, David L. (Martinez, CA); Pike, Chester D. (Pinole, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

NUCLEAR RESONANT SCATTERING AT HIGH PRESSURE AND HIGH TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NUCLEAR RESONANT SCATTERING AT HIGH PRESSURE AND HIGH TEMPERATURE JIYONG ZHAOa,? , WOLFGANG, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637, USA We introduce the combination of nuclear resonant inelastic X the thermal radiation spectra fitted to the Planck radiation function up to 1700 K. Nuclear resonant

Shen, Guoyin

430

High Temperature and Electrical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 5, 2013... and Nanomaterials: High Temperature and Electrical Properties ... thermomechanical (or in cyclic power) loading of electronic devices is an...

431

Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Climate Research Center for Geospatial Analysis Program Highlights Index Highly Enriched Uranium Transparency Program EVS staff members helped to implement transparency and...

432

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: V: BSCCO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Transport current properties in bias fields for the other magnet with the outer ... Two obstacles to high field Jc over long lengths are poor flux pinning and...

433

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTORS: I: BSCCO ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently the high tensile strength conductor 100 m long was successfully fabricated and wound for the energizing test at 21 Tesla back up filed. The coil was...

434

Nb Interstitial Free High - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2007 ... Effect of Aluminum Content on the Mechanical Properties of Dual Stabilized Ti- Nb Interstitial Free High Strength Steel (IF-HSS) by Heejae...

435

Thrusts in High Performance Computing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in HPC 1 Thrusts in High Performance Computing Science at Scale Petaflops to Exaflops Science through Volume Thousands to Millions of Simulations Science in Data Petabytes to...

436

High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 fuel cells - Demonstrate durability of the kinetic mass activity against DOE- specified voltage cycling tests in fuel cells - Achieve high current density performance in H 2 air...

437

Ultra High Temperature Ceramic Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... These ceramics, often combined with 20-30% SiC, have been studied extensively in monolithic form, demonstrating excellent high-temperature...

438

High Pressure Studies of Superconductivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our (more)

Hillier, Narelle Jayne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Problems in High Energy Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution discusses some of the main problems in high energy astrophysics, and the perspectives to solve them using different types of "messengers": cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos

Lipari, Paolo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Problems in High Energy Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This contribution discusses some of the main problems in high energy astrophysics, and the perspectives to solve them using different types of "messengers": cosmic rays, photons and neutrinos

Paolo Lipari

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "grove composting high" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Fractography of High Strength Silicon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Splitting Tension Test on High-Strength Concretes Studied by Artificial Intelligence and Response Surface Analysis Spring Failures -The Role of Corrosion in...

442

IDD High Performance Resilience Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... construction issues related to: Blast, earthquake, high wind, and flood resistance, and cyber ... 3D propagation ? FLEX finite element software is ...

443

High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Zonal Isolation Project Description For Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), high-temperature high-pressure zonal isolation tools capable of withstanding the downhole environment are needed. In these wells the packers must withstand differential pressures of 5,000 psi at more than 300°C, as well as pressures up to 20,000 psi at 200°C to 250°C. Furthermore, when deployed these packers and zonal isolation tools must form a reliable seal that eliminates fluid loss and mitigates short circuiting of flow from injectors to producers. At this time, general purpose open-hole packers do not exist for use in geothermal environments, with the primary technical limitation being the poor stability of existing elastomeric seals at high temperatures.

444

High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting For Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting Project Description The proposed scope of work is divided into three Phases. Overall system requirements will be established in Phase 1, along with an evaluation of existing lifting system capability, identification of technology limitations, and a conceptual design of an overall lifting system. In developing the system components in Phase 2, component-level tests will be conducted using GE facilities. Areas of development will include high-temperature drive system materials, journal and thrust bearings, and corrosion and erosion-resistant lifting pump components. Finally, in Phase 3, the overall lab-scale lifting system will be demonstrated in a flow loop that will be constructed at GE Global Research.

445

high  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

December 1999 December 1999 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. World oil prices for the remainder of 1999 and all of 2000 are expected to remain above $20 per barrel. EIA believes that prices will rise from average November levels (an estimated $23.50 per barrel for the price paid by U.S. refiners for imported crude) by about $1 per barrel by December, due to increased demand in the winter and Y2K precautionary building of end-user inventories (see a brief discussion on Y2K impacts below). The world oil price is then expected to dip slightly to an average of $24.00 per barrel in January 2000 as the peak of the winter stock build passes before gradually declining to $20.50 per barrel by December 2000. This forecast assumes that OPEC compliance remains relatively strong

446

HIGH  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

000 000 Highlights International Oil Markets Prices. We have found little need to adjust our oil price forecast from last month's report, since no evidence of significantly more bullish (or bearish) sentiment on the world oil market has arisen since last month. Our estimate from the December Outlook for the November imported oil cost still looks good at $23.50 and our current estimate for December's price at $24.75 is only slightly above last month's expected December level ($24.50). Thus, annual average prices remain, in our view, on a pace to show $5-per- barrel increases in both 1999 and 2000 (Figure 1). This pattern masks the more salient aspect of the forecast, which calls for steadily (but gradually) declining prices through 2000 and into 2001 when looking ahead by month from where we are today (Figure 2).

447

In today's highly competitive marketplace,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

today's highly competitive marketplace, rapid creation today's highly competitive marketplace, rapid creation and commercialization of scientific advances and innovative technologies are key to the continued prosperity of the United States. Scientists and engineers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) have achieved numerous science and technology breakthroughs that have led to new industries, spurred economic growth and benefited the national welfare.

448

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed. 3 figs.

Sugama, Toshifumi.

1989-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

450

High temperature lightweight foamed cements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Cement slurries are disclosed which are suitable for use in geothermal wells since they can withstand high temperatures and high pressures. The formulation consists of cement, silica flour, water, a retarder, a foaming agent, a foam stabilizer, and a reinforcing agent. A process for producing these cements is also disclosed.

Sugama, Toshifumi (Mastic Beach, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

High temperature electronic gain device  

SciTech Connect

An integrated thermionic device suitable for use in high temperature, high radiation environments. Cathode and control electrodes are deposited on a first substrate facing an anode on a second substrate. The substrates are sealed to a refractory wall and evacuated to form an integrated triode vacuum tube.

McCormick, J. Byron (Los Alamos, NM); Depp, Steven W. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Douglas J. (Tucson, AZ); Kerwin, William J. (Tucson, AZ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

High Performance Computing and Visualization Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High Performance Computing and Visualization Group. Welcome. The High Performance Computing and Visualization Group. ...

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

454

High Temperature | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature Temperature Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Sanyal Temperature Classification: High Temperature Dictionary.png High Temperature: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Sanyal Temp Classification This temperature scheme was developed by Sanyal in 2005 at the request of DOE and GEA, as reported in Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme. Extremely Low Temperature Very Low Temperature Low Temperature Moderate Temperature High Temperature Ultra High Temperature Steam Field Reservoir fluid between 230°C and 300°C is considered by Sanyal to be "high temperature." "Above a temperature level of 230°C, the reservoir would be expected to become two-phase at some point during exploitation. The next higher

455

Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

High-Efficiency Steam Electrolyzer  

SciTech Connect

We are developing a novel high-efficiency, high-temperature steam electrolyzer. Although water or steam electrolysis is well known to be one of the cleanest ways to produce hydrogen, widespread utilization is hindered by high operational costs because of high electricity consumption. To decrease the electrical power input requirements in electrolysis, our approach uses natural gas as an anode depolarizer. This approach essentially replaces one unit of electricity with one equivalent-energy unit of natural gas at much lower cost. The direct use of natural gas on the electrolyzer enables very high system efficiency with respect to primary energy. Experiments performed on single cells have shown a voltage reduction as much as 1 V when compared to conventional electrolyzers. System efficiency has been estimated to be 50 to 80%, depending on the electrolytic current. A 200-W prototype unit is being developed.

Pham, A Q

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

High Technology and Industrial Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor clean room Semiconductor clean room High Technology and Industrial Systems EETD's research on high technology buildings and industrial systems is aimed at reducing energy consumed by the industrial sector in manufacturing facilities, including high technology industries such as data centers, cleanrooms in the such industries as electronics and pharmaceutical manufacturing, and laboratories, improving the competitiveness of U.S. industry. Contacts William Tschudi WFTschudi@lbl.gov (510) 495-2417 Aimee McKane ATMcKane@lbl.gov (518) 782-7002 Links High-Performance Buildings for High-Tech Industries Industrial Energy Analysis Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

458

High Frequency High Power RF Generation using a Relativistic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FREQUENCY HIGH POWER RF GENERATION USING A RELATIVISTIC ELECTRON BEAM C. Jing , S. Antipov, P. Schoessow, and A. Kanareykin, Euclid Techlabs LLC, Solon, OH-44139 J.G. Power, M....

459

High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters Home Standards DOE Workshops Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference Proceedings Qualified Filter List News Items Related Sites HEPA Related Lessons Learned Contact Us HSS Logo High Efficiency Particulate Air Filters The HEPA Filter web site provides a forum for informing and reporting department-wide activities related to filtration and ventilation issues with special reference to the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters' use, inspection, and testing. This site contains essentials of DOE HEPA filter test program, procedures, requirements and quality assurance aspects applicable to HEPA filters used in DOE facilities. This site contains information about the DOE-accepted Filter Test Facility and its management, operation and quality assuranceprogram.

460

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 8 February 8 th , 2005 Mark J. Warner, P.E. Principal Engineer Quantum Technologies, Inc. Irvine, CA Low Cost, High Efficiency, Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage High Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. 70 MPa Composite Tanks Vent Line Ports Defueling Port (optional) Fill Port Filter Check Valve Vehicle Interface Bracket with Stone Shield In Tank Regulator with Solenoid Lock-off Pressure Relief Device Manual Valve Compressed Hydrogen Storage System In-Tank Regulator Pressure Sensor (not visible here) Pressure Relief Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Impact Resistant Outer Shell (damage resistant) Gas Outlet Solenoid Foam Dome (impact protection)

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461

High temperature structural insulating material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

Chen, W.Y.

1984-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Security tasks are highly interdependent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivation Security tasks are highly interdependent. To improve security tools, we need to understand how security practitioners collaborate in their organizations. Security practitioners in context Exchange of Information Develop security tools that: · Integrate information from different communication

463

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting.

464

Research in High Energy Physics  

SciTech Connect

This final report details the work done from January 2010 until April 2013 in the area of experimental and theoretical high energy particle physics and cosmology at the University of California, Davis.

Conway, John S.

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

465

The High-Radon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

indoor radon concentrations across the United States. The purpose of this work is to help state and other agencies identify high-radon counties and areas more precisely so that...

466

High compression rate text summarization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on methods for condensing large documents into highly concise summaries, achieving compression rates on par with human writers. While the need for such summaries in the current age of information overload ...

Branavan, Satchuthananthavale Rasiah Kuhan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

High pressure synthesis gas fermentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

High average power pockels cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high average power pockels cell is disclosed which reduces the effect of thermally induced strains in high average power laser technology. The pockels cell includes an elongated, substantially rectangular crystalline structure formed from a KDP-type material to eliminate shear strains. The X- and Y-axes are oriented substantially perpendicular to the edges of the crystal cross-section and to the C-axis direction of propagation to eliminate shear strains.

Daly, Thomas P. (Pleasanton, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

High-temperature ceramic receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An advanced ceramic dome cavity receiver is discussed which heats pressurized gas to temperatures above 1800/sup 0/F (1000/sup 0/C) for use in solar Brayton power systems of the dispersed receiver/dish or central receiver type. Optical, heat transfer, structural, and ceramic material design aspects of the receiver are reported and the development and experimental demonstration of a high-temperature seal between the pressurized gas and the high-temperature silicon carbide dome material is described.

Jarvinen, P. O.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

High resolution, high rate x-ray spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a pulse processing system for use with detected signals of a wide dynamic range which is capable of very high counting rates, with high throughput, with excellent energy resolution and a high signal-to-noise ratio. It is a further object to provide a pulse processing system wherein the fast channel resolving time is quite short and substantially independent of the energy of the detected signals. Another object is to provide a pulse processing system having a pile-up rejector circuit which will allow the maximum number of non-interfering pulses to be passed to the output. It is also an object of the invention to provide new methods for generating substantially symmetrically triangular pulses for use in both the main and fast channels of a pulse processing system.

Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

1983-07-14T23:59:59.000Z