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Sample records for groups radiative processes

  1. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan - February 4,...

  2. Radiative Processes Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J-C. Dupont, M. Haeffelin Institut Pierre et Simon Laplace, Ecole Polytechnique, France ... clouds from the dataset hazy cases Dupont et al., 2008 ShortWave Clear-Sky Model ...

  3. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 (114.02 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup

  4. Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the ...

  5. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Route Identification Process TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process Route Identification Process Items Available for Download Routing Discussion Paper (April 1998) (71.87 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1998

  6. Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computer Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group (650) 926-2901 | email ...

  7. QER- Comment of Process Gas Consumer Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Hello, Attached are comments offered by the Process Gas Consumers Group in response to the August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice soliciting comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. Please let us know if you have any questions or would like any additional information.

  8. National group honors Sandia radiation effects expert | National Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Administration | (NNSA) National group honors Sandia radiation effects expert Monday, July 21, 2014 - 1:26pm NNSA Blog Sandia radiation effects researcher Jim Schwank has won the 2014 IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society Merit Award, which recognizes outstanding technical contributions to the fields of nuclear and plasma sciences. The award is based on the importance of individual technical contributions, importance of technical contributions made by teams the individual led,

  9. Process Technology Group of Warwick School of Engineering | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Group of Warwick School of Engineering Jump to: navigation, search Name: Process Technology Group of Warwick School of Engineering Place: Coventry, United Kingdom Zip:...

  10. KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    provider of engineering, procurement, and contracting. Operates both greenfield and brownfield projects. References: KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group)1 This...

  11. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui Yunfeng; Galvin, James M.; Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania ; Parker, William; Breen, Stephen; Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing; Papiez, Lech S.; Li, X. Allen; Bednarz, Greg; Chen Wenzhou; Xiao Ying

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  12. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be appointed by the Laboratory Director for three year renewable terms on the basis of knowledge of the principles and practices of the control of radiation hazards and on...

  13. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Lena; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Illidge, Tim; Wilson, Lynn D.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  14. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CITES WASHINGTON GROUP INTERNATIONAL, INC. FOR RADIATION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    FLUOR B&W PORTSMOUTH, LLC FOR NUCLEAR SAFETY AND RADIATION PROTECTION VIOLATIONS January 30, 2015 - 4:14pm Share on emailShare on facebook NEWS MEDIA CONTACT * 202 586 4940 * DOENews@hq.doe.gov Department of Energy Cites Fluor B&W Portsmouth, LLC for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Violations WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Fluor B&W Portsmouth (FBP) for violations of the DOE's nuclear safety and

  15. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA NDCX NDCX Gretina Gamma particle device PET Scanner APEX APEX APEX LASER LASER Rifle, CO Rifle, CO The group: Authorizes work with...

  16. Evolution of the radiation processing industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleland, Marshall R.

    2013-04-19

    Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

  17. Positive anisotropic group scattering cross sections for radiation transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DelGrande, J.M.

    1999-05-01

    In solving the Boltzmann transport equation, most discrete ordinates codes calculate the source term by first approximating the scattering cross section using a Legendre polynomial expansion. Such expansions are insufficient when scattering is anisotropic and the Legendre expansion is truncated prematurely. This can lead to nonphysical negative cross sections, negative source terms and negative angular fluxes. While negative sources are problematic for standard discrete ordinates methods leading to poor convergence or convergence to incorrect results, they are of particular concern to exponential methods, causing such calculations to fail. The authors` have developed and tested a new technique to solve this problem called the Monte Carlo Facet Method. This method is an extension of standard Monte Carlo techniques. It guarantees non-negative cross sections at all directional ordinates. It also ensures within group and next group scatter. This dissertation outlines previous attempts to handle anisotropic scattering to achieve non-negative sources. It develops the theory of the Monte Carlo facet method and its first angular moment conservation. Results are presented examining the scattering matrices for various materials, and finally demonstrating that these scattering matrices perform exceptionally well in a multi-group, anisotropic, unstructured mesh discrete ordinates transport code.

  18. Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Church, Mike; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

  19. Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schryver, Jack C; Begoli, Edmon; Jose, Ajith; Griffin, Christopher

    2011-02-01

    Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

  20. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, Carol S.; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Reed, Scott; Walko, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  1. Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

    1993-08-31

    The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

  2. Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties and Dynamical Processes at Two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Si...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties and Dynamical Processes at Two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Sites in the Tropical Western Pacific J. M. Comstock, J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Upper tropospheric humidity plays an important role in the formation and maintenance of tropical cirrus clouds. Deep convection is crucial for the transport of water vapor from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere and is

  3. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  4. Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ratner, Buddy D.; Hoffman, Allan S.

    1976-01-01

    An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

  5. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaska, W.C.; Jensen, C.M.

    1998-07-14

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  6. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaska, William C.; Jensen, Craig M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  7. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines.

  8. Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and Nonradiative Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3: Competing Radiative and Nonradiative Processes - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste

  9. Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birkmire, Robert W.; Schultz, Jerold M.; Marudachalam, Matheswaran; Hichri, Habib

    1997-01-01

    Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells.

  10. Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Birkmire, R.W.; Schultz, J.M.; Marudachalam, M.; Hichri, H.

    1997-10-07

    Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells. 4 figs.

  11. Validation and Simplification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification for Glioblastoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Jing; Wang Meihua; Won, Minhee; Shaw, Edward G.; Coughlin, Christopher; Curran, Walter J.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: Previous recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of patients with malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] and anaplastic astrocytoma [AA]) produced six prognostic groups (I-VI) classified by six factors. We sought here to determine whether the classification for GBM could be improved by using an updated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) GBM database excluding AA and by considering additional baseline variables. Methods and Materials: The new analysis considered 42 baseline variables and 1,672 GBM patients from the expanded RTOG glioma database. Patients receiving radiation only were excluded such that all patients received radiation+carmustine. 'Radiation dose received' was replaced with 'radiation dose assigned.' The new RPA models were compared with the original model by applying them to a test dataset comprising 488 patients from six other RTOG trials. Fitness of the original and new models was evaluated using explained variation. Results: The original RPA model explained more variations in survival in the test dataset than did the new models (20% vs. 15%) and was therefore chosen for further analysis. It was reduced by combining Classes V and VI to produce three prognostic classes (Classes III, IV, and V+VI), as Classes V and VI had indistinguishable survival in the test dataset. The simplified model did not further improve performance (explained variation 18% vs. 20%) but is easier to apply because it involves only four variables: age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. Applying this simplified model to the updated GBM database resulted in three distinct classes with median survival times of 17.1, 11.2, and 7.5 months for Classes III, IV, and V+VI, respectively. Conclusions: The final model, the simplified original RPA model combining Classes V and VI, resulted in three distinct prognostic groups defined by age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. This classification will be used

  12. Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  13. Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alivisatos, A. Paul; Peng, Xiaogang; Manna, Liberato

    2001-01-01

    A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

  14. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  15. Feasibility of Economic Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 91-11 Using Medicare Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konski, Andre; Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Owen, Jean; Paulus, Rebecca; Cooper, Jay; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: The specific aim of this analysis was to evaluate the feasibility of performing a cost-effectiveness analysis using Medicare data from patients treated on a randomized Phase III clinical trial. Methods and Materials: Cost data included Medicare Part A and Part B costs from all providers-inpatient, outpatient, skilled nursing facility, home health, hospice, and physicians-and were obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services for patients eligible for Medicare, treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9111 between 1992 and 1996. The 47-month expected discounted (annual discount rate of 3%) cost for each arm of the trial was calculated in 1996 dollars, with Kaplan-Meier sampling average estimates of survival probabilities for each month and mean monthly costs. Overall and disease-free survival was also discounted 3%/year. The analysis was performed from a payer's perspective. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were calculated comparing the chemotherapy arms to the radiation alone arm. Results: Of the 547 patients entered, Medicare cost data and clinical outcomes were available for 66 patients. Reasons for exclusion included no RTOG follow-up, Medicare HMO enrollment, no Medicare claims since trial entry, and trial entry after 1996. Differences existed between groups in tumor characteristics, toxicity, and survival, all which could affect resource utilization. Conclusions: Although we were able to test the methodology of economic analysis alongside a clinical trial using Medicare data, the results may be difficult to translate to the entire trial population because of non-random missing data. Methods to improve Medicare data capture and matching to clinical trial samples are required.

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The group's current task is to examine different aspects of rail transportation including inspections, tracking and radiation monitoring, planning and process, and review of ...

  17. Thin layer imaging process for microlithography using radiation at strongly attenuated wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheeler, David R.

    2004-01-06

    A method for patterning of resist surfaces which is particularly advantageous for systems having low photon flux and highly energetic, strongly attenuated radiation. A thin imaging layer is created with uniform silicon distribution in a bilayer format. An image is formed by exposing selected regions of the silylated imaging layer to radiation. The radiation incident upon the silyliated resist material results in acid generation which either catalyzes cleavage of Si--O bonds to produce moieties that are volatile enough to be driven off in a post exposure bake step or produces a resist material where the exposed portions of the imaging layer are soluble in a basic solution, thereby desilylating the exposed areas of the imaging layer. The process is self limiting due to the limited quantity of silyl groups within each region of the pattern. Following the post exposure bake step, an etching step, generally an oxygen plasma etch, removes the resist material from the de-silylated areas of the imaging layer.

  18. Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Varma, Ravi; Vaughn, Worth E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

  19. Investigation of radiation keeping property of barite coated cloth via image processing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilincarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.; Molla, T.; Akarslan, F.

    2012-09-06

    Preservative clothes which are able to absorb radiation beam are needed not only for saving people working at radioactive environment but also for saving others from natural and man-made radiation sources we are exposed in daily life. Barite is a mineral which can be used for armour plating because of high atomic numbered element barium constituent of barite. In this study, armour plating property of barite was applied to fabrics. Barite coated fabric having characteristic of keeping radiation was obtained by penetrating barite on cloth via coating method. Radiation keeping property of fabrics obtained was determined via image processing. The results of experiments showed that barite coated fabrics have blocked radiation more than normal fabrics have done.

  20. Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

  1. Mathematical modeling of sulfide flash smelting process. Part 2; Quantitative analysis of radiative heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, Y.B. ); Sohn, H.Y. )

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on a mathematical model developed to describe the rate processes in an axisymmetric copper flash smelting furnace shaft. A particular feature of the model is the incorporation of the four-flux model to describe the radiative heat transfer by combining the absorbing, emitting, and anisotropic scattering phenomena. The importance of various subprocesses of the radiative heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace has been studied. Model predictions showed that the radiation from the furnace walls and between the particles and the surrounding is the dominant mode of heat transfer in a flash smelting furnace.

  2. Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Washington Group International, Inc. (WGI) for a September 2010 incident that violated the...

  3. Enhancing Cloud Radiative Processes and Radiation Efficiency in the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iacono, Michael J.

    2015-03-09

    The objective of this research has been to evaluate and implement enhancements to the computational performance of the RRTMG radiative transfer option in the Advanced Research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Efficiency is as essential as accuracy for effective numerical weather prediction, and radiative transfer is a relatively time-consuming component of dynamical models, taking up to 30-50 percent of the total model simulation time. To address this concern, this research has implemented and tested a version of RRTMG that utilizes graphics processing unit (GPU) technology (hereinafter RRTMGPU) to greatly improve its computational performance; thereby permitting either more frequent simulation of radiative effects or other model enhancements. During the early stages of this project the development of RRTMGPU was completed at AER under separate NASA funding to accelerate the code for use in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Goddard Earth Observing System GEOS-5 global model. It should be noted that this final report describes results related to the funded portion of the originally proposed work concerning the acceleration of RRTMG with GPUs in WRF. As a k-distribution model, RRTMG is especially well suited to this modification due to its relatively large internal pseudo-spectral (g-point) dimension that, when combined with the horizontal grid vector in the dynamical model, can take great advantage of the GPU capability. Thorough testing under several model configurations has been performed to ensure that RRTMGPU improves WRF model run time while having no significant impact on calculated radiative fluxes and heating rates or on dynamical model fields relative to the RRTMG radiation. The RRTMGPU codes have been provided to NCAR for possible application to the next public release of the WRF forecast model.

  4. GANEX: Adaptation of the DIAMEX-SANEX Process for the Group Actinide Separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miguirditchian, M.; Chareyre, L.; Heres, X.; Hill, C.; Baron, P.; Masson, M.

    2007-07-01

    The DIAMEX-SANEX process using the solvent HDEHP/DMDOHEMA/TPH was adapted to manage the separation of neptunium and plutonium along with americium and curium in the second cycle of the GANEX process. Distribution ratios of Np and Pu depending on their initial oxidation states, actinide/lanthanide separation factor and loading capacity of the solvent were measured after batch experiments in order to verify the behaviour of Np and Pu in this process and check their impact on the hydrodynamics. Results show that after some experimental optimizations, the group separation seems possible using this process. A demonstrative test will be carried out on a high active feed in 2008 at CEA Marcoule. (authors)

  5. Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tom, Glenn M.; McManus, James V.; Luxon, Bruce A.

    1991-08-06

    Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

  6. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodward, Wendy A. Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen Yuhchyau

    2009-08-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  7. Value of increasing film processing time to reduce radiation dose during mammography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skubic, S.E.; Yagan, R.; Oravec, D.; Shah, Z. )

    1990-12-01

    We systematically tested the effects on radiation dose and image quality of increasing the mammographic film processing time from the standard 90 sec to 3 min. Hurter and Driffield curves were obtained for a Kodak Min-R-OM1-SO177 screen-film combination processed with Kodak chemistry. Image contrast and radiation dose were measured for two tissue-equivalent breast phantoms. We also compared sequential pairs of mammograms, one processed at 90 sec and one at 3 min, from 44 patients on the basis of nine categories of image quality. Increased processing time reduced breast radiation dose by 30%, increased contrast by 11%, and produced slight overall gains in image quality. Simple modifications can convert a 90-sec processor to a 3-min unit. We recommend that implementation of extended processing be considered, especially by those centers that obtain a large number of screening mammograms. Three-minute film processing can reduce breast radiation dose by 30% and increase contrast by 11% without compromising image quality.

  8. Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKee, Rodney A.; Walker, Frederick J.; Chisholm, Matthew F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

  9. General description of electromagnetic radiation processes based on instantaneous charge acceleration in ''endpoints''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Clancy W.; Falcke, Heino; Huege, Tim; Ludwig, Marianne

    2011-11-15

    We present a methodology for calculating the electromagnetic radiation from accelerated charged particles. Our formulation - the 'endpoint formulation' - combines numerous results developed in the literature in relation to radiation arising from particle acceleration using a complete, and completely general, treatment. We do this by describing particle motion via a series of discrete, instantaneous acceleration events, or 'endpoints', with each such event being treated as a source of emission. This method implicitly allows for particle creation and destruction, and is suited to direct numerical implementation in either the time or frequency domains. In this paper we demonstrate the complete generality of our method for calculating the radiated field from charged particle acceleration, and show how it reduces to the classical named radiation processes such as synchrotron, Tamm's description of Vavilov-Cherenkov, and transition radiation under appropriate limits. Using this formulation, we are immediately able to answer outstanding questions regarding the phenomenology of radio emission from ultra-high-energy particle interactions in both the earth's atmosphere and the moon. In particular, our formulation makes it apparent that the dominant emission component of the Askaryan effect (coherent radio-wave radiation from high-energy particle cascades in dense media) comes from coherent 'bremsstrahlung' from particle acceleration, rather than coherent Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation.

  10. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Aleman, Berthe; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Dharmarajan, Kavita; Ng, Andrea; Ricardi, Umberto; Wirth, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  11. Radiation tolerant circuits designed in 2 commercial 0.25{micro} CMOS processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekkaoui, A.

    2001-03-08

    Characterization of simple devices as well as complex circuits, in two commercial 0.25{micro} processes, demonstrates a high level (up to 58 Mrad) radiation tolerance of these technologies. They are also very likely to be immune to single event gate damage according to the results from 200 MeV-protons irradiation.

  12. Systems and processes for identifying features and determining feature associations in groups of documents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rose, Stuart J.; Cowley, Wendy E.; Crow, Vernon L.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and computer-implemented processes for identification of features and determination of feature associations in a group of documents can involve providing a plurality of keywords identified among the terms of at least some of the documents. A value measure can be calculated for each keyword. High-value keywords are defined as those keywords having value measures that exceed a threshold. For each high-value keyword, term-document associations (TDA) are accessed. The TDA characterize measures of association between each term and at least some documents in the group. A processor quantifies similarities between unique pairs of high-value keywords based on the TDA for each respective high-value keyword and generates a similarity matrix that indicates one or more sets that each comprise highly associated high-value keywords.

  13. Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance | Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term

  14. Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. )

    1991-02-01

    Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

  15. Process for regenerating a spent resid hydroprocessing catalyst using a Group IV metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, F.T.; Springman, M.C.

    1993-08-03

    A method is described for regenerating a contaminant metal-containing, resid hydroprocessing molecular sieve-free catalyst for use with an ebullated bed reaction process wherein said catalyst contains a pore volume of pores having a diameter greater than 1200 Angstroms of at least 0.05 cc/gm, comprising the steps of: (a) partially decoking said catalyst in an initial coke-burning step wherein said catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature ranging from about 400 F to about 700 F; (b) incorporating a Group IV metal onto said partially decoked catalyst such that the partially decoked catalyst contains about 0.1 to about 20.0 wt % of said Group IV metal calculated as the oxide and based on the fresh weight of said catalyst; and (c) decoking said partially decoked, Group IV metal-containing catalyst in a final coke-burning step wherein said catalyst is contacted with an oxygen-containing gas at a temperature ranging from about 600 F to about 1,400 F, thereby removing a substantial amount of said coke, wherein the loss on attrition of said resid hydroprocessing molecular sieve-free catalyst after step (c) is less than 9 weight percent fines per day calculated based on a regeneration temperature of 1,000 F.

  16. POTENTIAL AND FUTURE TRENDS ON INDUSTRIAL RADIATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN EMERGING COUNTRY - BRAZIL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampa, M.H.O.; Omi, N.M.; Rela, C.S.; Tsai, D.

    2004-10-06

    Brazil started the use of radiation technology in the seventies on crosslinking polyethylene for insulation of wire and electronic cables and sterilization of medical care devices. The present status of industrial applications of radiation shows that the use of this technology is increasing according to the economical development and the necessity to become the products manufactured in the local industries competitive in quality and price for internal and external market. The on going development activities in this area are concentrated on polymers processing (materials modification), foodstuff treatment and environmental protection. The development, the promotion and the technical support to consolidate this technology to the local industries is the main attribution of Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Research-IPEN, a governmental Institution.

  17. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  18. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooraghi, Michael

    2015-09-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related to radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere, particularly the interactions among clouds and aerosols. ARM obtains continuous measurements and conducts field campaigns to provide data products that aid in the improvement and further development of climate models. All of the measurement campaigns include a suite of solar measurements. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory supports ARM's full suite of stations in a number of ways, including troubleshooting issues that arise as part of the data-quality reviews; managing engineering changes to the standard setup; and providing calibration services and assistance to the full fleet of solar-related instruments, including pyranometers, pyrgeometers, pyrheliometers, as well as the temperature/relative humidity probes, multimeters, and data acquisition systems that are used in the calibrations performed at the Southern Great Plains Radiometer Calibration Facility. This paper discusses all aspects related to the support provided to the calibration of the instruments in the solar monitoring fleet.

  19. System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Kimura, Shigeru; Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Noboru; Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu; Takata, Masaki

    2013-06-15

    We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

  20. Accuracy and calibration of integrated radiation output indicators in diagnostic radiology: A report of the AAPM Imaging Physics Committee Task Group 190

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Pei-Jan P.; Schueler, Beth A.; Balter, Stephen; Strauss, Keith J.; Wunderle, Kevin A.; LaFrance, M. Terry; Kim, Don-Soo; Behrman, Richard H.; Shepard, S. Jeff; Bercha, Ishtiaq H.

    2015-12-15

    Due to the proliferation of disciplines employing fluoroscopy as their primary imaging tool and the prolonged extensive use of fluoroscopy in interventional and cardiovascular angiography procedures, “dose-area-product” (DAP) meters were installed to monitor and record the radiation dose delivered to patients. In some cases, the radiation dose or the output value is calculated, rather than measured, using the pertinent radiological parameters and geometrical information. The AAPM Task Group 190 (TG-190) was established to evaluate the accuracy of the DAP meter in 2008. Since then, the term “DAP-meter” has been revised to air kerma-area product (KAP) meter. The charge of TG 190 (Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators in Diagnostic Radiology) has also been realigned to investigate the “Accuracy and Calibration of Integrated Radiation Output Indicators” which is reflected in the title of the task group, to include situations where the KAP may be acquired with or without the presence of a physical “meter.” To accomplish this goal, validation test protocols were developed to compare the displayed radiation output value to an external measurement. These test protocols were applied to a number of clinical systems to collect information on the accuracy of dose display values in the field.

  1. Interobserver Variability in Target Definition for Hepatocellular Carcinoma With and Without Portal Vein Thrombus: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Bosch, Walter R.; Krishnan, Sunil; Kim, Tae K.; Mamon, Harvey J.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Seong, Jinsil; Haddock, Michael G.; Cheng, Jason C.; Feng, Mary U.; Stephans, Kevin L.; Roberge, David; and others

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Defining hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gross tumor volume (GTV) requires multimodal imaging, acquired in different perfusion phases. The purposes of this study were to evaluate the variability in contouring and to establish guidelines and educational recommendations for reproducible HCC contouring for treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Anonymous, multiphasic planning computed tomography scans obtained from 3 patients with HCC were identified and distributed to a panel of 11 gastrointestinal radiation oncologists. Panelists were asked the number of HCC cases they treated in the past year. Case 1 had no vascular involvement, case 2 had extensive portal vein involvement, and case 3 had minor branched portal vein involvement. The agreement between the contoured total GTVs (primary + vascular GTV) was assessed using the generalized kappa statistic. Agreement interpretation was evaluated using Landis and Koch's interpretation of strength of agreement. The S95 contour, defined using the simultaneous truth and performance level estimation (STAPLE) algorithm consensus at the 95% confidence level, was created for each case. Results: Of the 11 panelists, 3 had treated >25 cases in the past year, 2 had treated 10 to 25 cases, 2 had treated 5 to 10 cases, 2 had treated 1 to 5 cases, 1 had treated 0 cases, and 1 did not respond. Near perfect agreement was seen for case 1, and substantial agreement was seen for cases 2 and 3. For case 2, there was significant heterogeneity in the volume identified as tumor thrombus (range 0.58-40.45 cc). For case 3, 2 panelists did not include the branched portal vein thrombus, and 7 panelists contoured thrombus separately from the primary tumor, also showing significant heterogeneity in volume of tumor thrombus (range 4.52-34.27 cc). Conclusions: In a group of experts, excellent agreement was seen in contouring total GTV. Heterogeneity exists in the definition of portal vein thrombus that may impact treatment planning

  2. Very Low-Power Consumption Analog Pulse Processing ASIC for Semiconductor Radiation Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wessendorf, K.O.; Lund, J.C.; Brunett, B.A.; Laguna, G.R.; Clements, J.W.

    1999-08-23

    We describe a very-low power consumption circuit for processing the pulses from a semiconductor radiation detector. The circuit was designed for use with a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector for unattended monitoring of stored nuclear materials. The device is intended to be battery powered and operate at low duty-cycles over a long period of time. This system will provide adequate performance for medium resolution gamma-ray pulse-height spectroscopy applications. The circuit incorporates the functions of a charge sensitive preamplifier, shaping amplifier, and peak sample and hold circuit. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) version of the design has been designed, built and tested. With the exception of the input field effect transistor (FET), the circuit is constructed using bipolar components. In this paper the design philosophy and measured performance characteristics of the circuit are described.

  3. Non-radiative carrier recombination enhanced by two-level process: A first-principles study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Ji -Hui; Shi, Lin; Wang, Lin -Wang; Wei, Su -Huai

    2016-02-16

    In this study, non-radiative recombination plays an important role in the performance of optoelectronic semiconductor devices such as solar cells and light-emitting diodes. Most textbook examples assume that the recombination process occurs through a single defect level, where one electron and one hole are captured and recombined. Based on this simple picture, conventional wisdom is that only defect levels near the center of the bandgap can be effective recombination centers. Here, we present a new two-level recombination mechanism: first, one type of carrier is captured through a defect level forming a metastable state; then the local defect configuration rapidly changesmore » to a stable state, where the other type of carrier is captured and recombined through another defect level. This novel mechanism is applied to the recombination center Te2+cd in CdTe. We show that this two-level process can significantly increase the recombination rate (by three orders of magnitude) in agreement with experiments. We expect that this two-level recombination process can exist in a wide range of semiconductors, so its effect should be carefully examined in characterizing optoelectronic materials.« less

  4. U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to an error when processing Novell Address Book (".nab") files and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via an overly long email address.

  5. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R.; Boecker, Bruce B.; Grissom, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are already present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.

  6. Application of an Informatics-Based Decision-Making Framework and Process to the Assessment of Radiation Safety in Nanotechnology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoover, Mark D.; Myers, David S.; Cash, Leigh J.; Guilmette, Raymond A.; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Oberdörster, Günter; Smith, Rachel; Cassata, James R.; Boecker, Bruce B.; Grissom, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has established NCRP Scientific Committee 2-6 to develop a report on the current state of knowledge and guidance for radiation safety programs involved with nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is the understanding and control of matter at the nanoscale, at dimensions between approximately 1 and 100 nanometers, where unique phenomena enable novel applications. While the full report is in preparation, this article presents and applies an informatics-based decision-making framework and process through which the radiation protection community can anticipate that nano-enabled applications, processes, nanomaterials, and nanoparticles are likely to become present or are alreadymore » present in radiation-related activities; recognize specific situations where environmental and worker safety, health, well-being, and productivity may be affected by nano-related activities; evaluate how radiation protection practices may need to be altered to improve protection; control information, interpretations, assumptions, and conclusions to implement scientifically sound decisions and actions; and confirm that desired protection outcomes have been achieved. This generally applicable framework and supporting process can be continuously applied to achieve health and safety at the convergence of nanotechnology and radiation-related activities.« less

  7. Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Pilot Study of Processed Ultra Emu Oil Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Radiation Dermatitis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollmann, Denise C.; Novotny, Paul J.; Petersen, Ivy A.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Bauer, Heather J.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Wahner-Roedler, Dietlind; Vincent, Ann; Sloan, Jeff A.; Issa Laack, Nadia N.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this single-institution pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of an oil-based skin agent, Ultra Emu Oil, on skin-related toxicity in patients undergoing radiation therapy to the breast or chest wall. Methods and Materials: Patients were randomized 2:1 in a double-blind fashion and were instructed to apply processed Ultra Emu Oil or placebo (cottonseed oil) twice daily during the course of radiation therapy. The oils were applied before the third fraction and continued for 6 weeks after completion of treatment. The primary endpoint was the area under the curve (AUC) of Skindex-16 scale scores over time. Secondary outcomes included maximum grade of radiation dermatitis using the Common Terminology Criteria (CTC) for Adverse Events (CTCAE 3.0), the Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool, quality of life (QOL) measured by Linear Analogue Self-Assessment, and a symptom experience diary (SED). Results: In all, 42 of 45 patients completed the study and were evaluable. The median times to peak rash, skin redness, peeling, and skin swelling were weeks 6, 6, 7, and 7, respectively as measured by the SED. The Skindex AUC scores tended to be lower in emu oil patients than in placebo patients (mean total AUC 7.2 vs 10.4, respectively). This trend was also seen in all the Skindex subdomains. The overall QOL was slightly better in the emu oil group but remained stable throughout the study for both arms. Peak CTC toxicity occurred at week 6. Patients using emu oil appeared slightly worse on maximum CTC grade, but the difference was not significant. Conclusions: This pilot study confirmed the safety of oil-based skin treatments during radiation therapy and suggests a trend for reduced skin toxicity for patients receiving emu oil. A larger study is needed to evaluate the efficacy of emu oil in reducing radiation dermatitis in patients receiving breast radiation.

  8. Phase I Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Dose Escalation Study in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 98-03

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsien, Christina Moughan, Jennifer; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gilbert, Mark R.; Purdy, James; Simpson, Joseph; Kresel, John J.; Curran, Walter J.; Diaz, Aidnag; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate in a Phase I trial the feasibility and toxicity of dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) concurrent with chemotherapy in patients with primary supratentorial glioblastoma (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 209 patients were enrolled. All received 46 Gy in 2-Gy fractions to the first planning target volume (PTV{sub 1}), defined as the gross tumor volume (GTV) plus 1.8 cm. A subsequent boost was given to PTV{sub 2}, defined as GTV plus 0.3 cm. Patients were stratified into two groups (Group 1: PTV{sub 2} <75 cm{sup 3}; Group 2: PTV{sub 2} {>=}75 cm{sup 3}). Four RT dose levels were evaluated: 66, 72, 78, and 84 Gy. Carmustine 80 mg/m{sup 2} was given during RT, then every 8 weeks for 6 cycles. Pretreatment characteristics were well balanced. Results: Acute and late Grade 3/4 RT-related toxicities were no more frequent at higher RT dose or with larger tumors. There were no dose-limiting toxicities (acute Grade {>=}3 irreversible central nervous system toxicities) observed on any dose level in either group. On the basis of the absence of dose-limiting toxicities, dose was escalated to 84 Gy in both groups. Late RT necrosis was noted at 66 Gy (1 patient), 72 Gy (2 patients), 78 Gy (2 patients), and 84 Gy (3 patients) in Group 1. In Group 2, late RT necrosis was noted at 78 Gy (1 patient) and 84 Gy (2 patients). Median time to RT necrosis was 8.8 months (range, 5.1-12.5 months). Median survival in Group 1 was 11.6-19.3 months. Median survival in Group 2 was 8.2-13.9 months. Conclusions: Our study shows the feasibility of delivering higher than standard (60 Gy) RT dose with concurrent chemotherapy for primary GBM, with an acceptable risk of late central nervous system toxicity.

  9. Ab initio calculation of the $$np \\to d ³$$ radiative capture process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beane, Silas R.; Chang, Emmanuel; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Parreño, Assumpta; Savage, Martin J.; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2015-09-24

    In this study, lattice QCD calculations of two-nucleon systems are used to isolate the short-distance two-body electromagnetic contributions to the radiative capture processmore » $$np \\to d\\gamma$$, and the photo-disintegration processes $$\\gamma^{(\\ast)} d \\to np$$. In nuclear potential models, such contributions are described by phenomenological meson-exchange currents, while in the present work, they are determined directly from the quark and gluon interactions of QCD. Calculations of neutron-proton energy levels in multiple background magnetic fields are performed at two values of the quark masses, corresponding to pion masses of $$m_\\pi \\sim 450$$ and 806 MeV, and are combined with pionless nuclear effective field theory to determine these low-energy inelastic processes. Extrapolating to the physical pion mass, a cross section of $$\\sigma^{lqcd}(np\\to d\\gamma)=332.4({\\tiny \\begin{array}{l}+5.4 \\\\ - 4.7\\end{array}})\\ mb$$ is obtained at an incident neutron speed of $$v=2,200\\ m/s$$, consistent with the experimental value of $$\\sigma^{expt}(np \\to d\\gamma) = 334.2(0.5)\\ mb$$.« less

  10. PROCESS OF REMOVING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION WITH GROUP IVB METAL PHOSPHO-SILICATE COMPOSITIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russell, E.R.; Adamson, A.W.; Schubert, J.; Boyd, G.E.

    1957-10-29

    A process for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions which contain the plutonium in minute concentrations is described. These values can be removed from an aqueous solution by taking an aqueous solution containing a salt of zirconium, titanium, hafnium or thorium, adding an aqueous solution of silicate and phosphoric acid anions to the metal salt solution, and separating, washing and drying the precipitate which forms when the two solutions are mixed. The aqueous plutonium containing solution is then acidified and passed over the above described precipi-tate causing the plutonium values to be adsorbed by the precipitate.

  11. Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hondorp, Hugh L.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

  12. Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A.; Loupias, B.; Falize, E.

    2013-05-15

    We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (∼100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

  13. Improved energy efficiency by use of the new ultraviolet light radiation paint curing process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grosset, A.M.; Su, W.-F.A.

    1984-08-01

    In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures is more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. The replacement of a conventional natural gas fired oven by an ultraviolet radiation curing line for paint curing could save quadrillions of joules per year for each finishing line. In this program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Programs, two photoinduced polymerizations, via free radical or cationic mechanisms, were considered in the formulation of UV curable paints. The spectral output of radiation sources was chosen so as to complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents; thus highly pigmented thick films could be cured fully by UV radiation. One coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be applied on three dimensional objects by spraying and can be cured by passing through a tunnel containing UV lamps.

  14. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-27

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results inmoreup to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.less

  15. Statistical characteristics of cloud variability. Part 2: Implication for parameterizations of microphysical and radiative transfer processes in climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Dong; Liu, Yangang

    2014-09-27

    The effects of subgrid cloud variability on grid-average microphysical rates and radiative fluxes are examined by use of long-term retrieval products at the Tropical West Pacific, Southern Great Plains, and North Slope of Alaska sites of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program. Four commonly used distribution functions, the truncated Gaussian, Gamma, lognormal, and Weibull distributions, are constrained to have the same mean and standard deviation as observed cloud liquid water content. The probability density functions are then used to upscale relevant physical processes to obtain grid-average process rates. It is found that the truncated Gaussian representation results in up to 30% mean bias in autoconversion rate, whereas the mean bias for the lognormal representation is about 10%. The Gamma and Weibull distribution function performs the best for the grid-average autoconversion rate with the mean relative bias less than 5%. For radiative fluxes, the lognormal and truncated Gaussian representations perform better than the Gamma and Weibull representations. The results show that the optimal choice of subgrid cloud distribution function depends on the nonlinearity of the process of interest, and thus, there is no single distribution function that works best for all parameterizations. Examination of the scale (window size) dependence of the mean bias indicates that the bias in grid-average process rates monotonically increases with increasing window sizes, suggesting the increasing importance of subgrid variability with increasing grid sizes.

  16. Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

    1997-02-24

    Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation

  17. Racial Differences in CYP3A4 Genotype and Survival Among Men Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9202: A Phase III Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, Mack Silvio, Michelle de; Rebbick, Timothy; Grignon, David; Rotman, Marvin; Wolkov, Harvey; Fisher, Barbara; Hanks, Gerald; Shipley, William U.; Pollack, Alan; Sandler, Howard; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah Ph.D.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Inherited genotypes may explain the inferior outcomes of African American (AA) men with prostate cancer. To understand how variation in CYP3A4 correlated with outcomes, a retrospective examination of the CYP3A4*1B genotype was performed on men treated with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 92-02. Methods and Materials: From 1,514 cases, we evaluated 56 (28.4%) of 197 AA and 54 (4.3%) of 1,274 European American (EA) patients. All patients received goserelin and flutamide for 2 months before and during RT (STAD-RT) {+-} 24 months of goserelin (long-term androgen deprivation plus radiation [LTAD-RT]). Events studied included overall survival and biochemical progression using American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology consensus guidelines. Results: There were no differences in outcome in patients in with or without CYP3A4 data. There was an association between race and CYP3A4 polymorphisms with 75% of EAs having the Wild Type compared to only 25% of AA men (p <0.0001). There was no association between CYP3A4 classification or race and survival or progression. Conclusions: The samples analyzed support previously reported observations about the distribution of CYP3A4*1B genotype by race, but race was not associated with poorer outcome. However, patient numbers were limited, and selection bias cannot be completely ruled out.

  18. Code System to Process WIMSD4 Interface Output Files and Generate Two-Group Data for Reactor Calculations.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-12-03

    Version 00 The code processes the WIMS-D/4 binary output files for producing two-group microscopic cross sections and macroscopic lattice cell constants (zone and cell macroscopic cross sections, D, M, and K-infinity) in a more flexible format needed for reactor burnup codes like CITATION, for reactor dynamics codes like NADYP-W and for other reactor codes. The purpose of the WIMSCORE-ENEA code is to facilitate the automation of data transfer between the cell calculation code WIMS andmore » the diffusion-burnup codes. Use is made of the VARY storage manipulation package. WIMSCORE generates output files to be used by the codes TDB, TRITON, CITATION.« less

  19. Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lessing, Paul A.; Kong, Peter C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

  20. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komaki, Ritsuko; Paulus, Rebecca; Ettinger, David S.; Videtic, Gregory M.M.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.; Choy, Hak

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  1. The radiation chemistry of CCD-PEG, a solvent-extraction process for Cs and Sr from dissolved nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mincher, B.J.; Herbst, R.S.; Tillotson, R.D.; Mezyk, S.P.

    2008-07-01

    Cobalt dicarbollide and polyethylene glycol in phenyl-trifluoromethyl sulfone (HCCD/PEG in FS- 13) is currently under consideration for use in the process-scale selective extraction of fission- product cesium and strontium from dissolved nuclear fuel. This solvent will be exposed to high radiation doses during use and has not been adequately investigated for radiation stability. Here, HCCD/PEG was y-irradiated to various absorbed doses, to a maximum of 432 kGy, using {sup 60}Co. Irradiations were performed for the neat organic phase and also for the organic phase in contact with 1 M-nitric acid mixed by air sparging. Post-irradiation solvent-extraction measurements showed that Cs distribution ratios were unaffected; however, Sr extraction efficiency decreased with absorbed dose under both conditions and was greater when in contact with the aqueous phase. Stripping performance was not affected. A mechanism, initiated by direct radiolysis of the sulfone diluent, is proposed. (authors)

  2. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan (206.83 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  3. Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun

    2011-02-15

    This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

  4. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Planning Subgroup Current FRA State Rail Safety ...

  5. A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperduto, Paul W.; Wang, Meihua; Robins, H. Ian; Schell, Michael C.; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Komaki, Ritsuko; Souhami, Luis; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Khuntia, Deepak; Demas, William; Shah, Sunjay A.; Nedzi, Lucien A.; Perry, Gad; Suh, John H.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2013-04-01

    Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

  6. Real-Time Pretreatment Review Limits Unacceptable Deviations on a Cooperative Group Radiation Therapy Technique Trial: Quality Assurance Results of RTOG 0933

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondi, Vinai; Cui, Yunfeng; Mehta, Minesh P.; Manfredi, Denise; Xiao, Ying; Galvin, James M.; Rowley, Howard; Tome, Wolfgang A.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: RTOG 0933 was a phase II trial of hippocampal avoidance during whole brain radiation therapy for patients with brain metastases. The results demonstrated improvement in short-term memory decline, as compared with historical control individuals, and preservation of quality of life. Integral to the conduct of this trial were quality assurance processes inclusive of pre-enrollment credentialing and pretreatment centralized review of enrolled patients. Methods and Materials: Before enrolling patients, all treating physicians and sites were required to successfully complete a “dry-run” credentialing test. The treating physicians were credentialed based on accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging–computed tomography image fusion and hippocampal and normal tissue contouring, and the sites were credentialed based on protocol-specified dosimetric criteria. Using the same criteria, pretreatment centralized review of enrolled patients was conducted. Physicians enrolling 3 consecutive patients without unacceptable deviations were permitted to enroll further patients without pretreatment review, although their cases were reviewed after treatment. Results: In all, 113 physicians and 84 sites were credentialed. Eight physicians (6.8%) failed hippocampal contouring on the first attempt; 3 were approved on the second attempt. Eight sites (9.5%) failed intensity modulated radiation therapy planning on the first attempt; all were approved on the second attempt. One hundred thirteen patients were enrolled in RTOG 0933; 100 were analyzable. Eighty-seven cases were reviewed before treatment; 5 (5.7%) violated the eligibility criteria, and 21 (24%) had unacceptable deviations. With feedback, 18 cases were approved on the second attempt and 2 cases on the third attempt. One patient was treated off protocol. Twenty-two cases were reviewed after treatment; 1 (4.5%) violated the eligibility criteria, and 5 (23%) had unacceptable deviations. Conclusions: Although >95% of the

  7. A novel experimental approach to investigate radiolysis processes in liquid samples using collimated radiation sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polin, Chris Wardlow, Nathan; McQuaid, Harold; Orr, Philip; Villagomez-Bernabe, Balder; Figueira, Catarina; Alexander, Grace; Currell, Fred J.; Srigengan, Shajeth; Brun, Emilie; Gilles, Manon; Sicard-Roselli, Ccile

    2015-03-15

    Here is detailed a novel and low-cost experimental method for high-throughput automated fluid sample irradiation. The sample is delivered via syringe pump to a nozzle, where it is expressed in the form of a hanging droplet into the path of a beam of ionising radiation. The dose delivery is controlled by an upstream lead shutter, which allows the beam to reach the droplet for a user defined period of time. The droplet is then further expressed after irradiation until it falls into one well of a standard microplate. The entire system is automated and can be operated remotely using software designed in-house, allowing for use in environments deemed unsafe for the user (synchrotron beamlines, for example). Depending on the number of wells in the microplate, several droplets can be irradiated before any human interaction is necessary, and the user may choose up to 10 samples per microplate using an array of identical syringe pumps, the design of which is described here. The nozzles consistently produce droplets of 25.1 0.5 ?l.

  8. Dose Recalculation and the Dose-Guided Radiation Therapy (DGRT) Process Using Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, Joey Aubry, Jean-Francois; Yom, Sue S.; Gottschalk, Alexander R.; Celi, Juan Carlos; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: At University of California San Francisco, daily or weekly three-dimensional images of patients in treatment position are acquired for image-guided radiation therapy. These images can be used for calculating the actual dose delivered to the patient during treatment. In this article, we present the process of performing dose recalculation on megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography images and discuss possible strategies for dose-guided radiation therapy (DGRT). Materials and Methods: A dedicated workstation has been developed to incorporate the necessary elements of DGRT. Patient image correction (cupping, missing data artifacts), calibration, completion, recontouring, and dose recalculation are all implemented in the workstation. Tools for dose comparison are also included. Examples of image correction and dose analysis using 6 head-and-neck and 2 prostate patient datasets are presented to show possible tracking of interfraction dosimetric endpoint variation over the course of treatment. Results: Analysis of the head-and-neck datasets shows that interfraction treatment doses vary compared with the planning dose for the organs at risk, with the mean parotid dose and spinal cord D{sub 1} increasing by as much as 52% and 10%, respectively. Variation of the coverage to the target volumes was small, with an average D{sub 5} dose difference of 1%. The prostate patient datasets revealed accurate dose coverage to the targeted prostate and varying interfraction dose distributions to the organs at risk. Conclusions: An effective workflow for the clinical implementation of DGRT has been established. With these techniques in place, future clinical developments in adaptive radiation therapy through daily or weekly dosimetric measurements of treatment day images are possible.

  9. JLF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    jlf user group JLF User Group 2015 NIF and JLF User Group Meeting Links: Send request to join the JLF User Group Join the NIF User Group Dr. Carolyn Kuranz - JLF User Group Dr. Carolyn Kuranz received her Ph.D. in Applied Physics from the University of Michigan in 2009. She is currently an Assistant Research Scientist at the Center for Laser Experimental Astrophysical Research and the Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics at the University of Michigan. Her research involves hydrodynamic

  10. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Kian Ang, K.; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  11. Modeling Local Control After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Report From the Elekta Collaborative Lung Research Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohri, Nitin; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Grills, Inga S.; Belderbos, Jose; Hope, Andrew; Yan Di; Kestin, Larry L.; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Bissonnette, Jean-Pierre; Xiao, Ying

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) has emerged as an effective treatment option for early-stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using data collected by the Elekta Lung Research Group, we generated a tumor control probability (TCP) model that predicts 2-year local control after SBRT as a function of biologically effective dose (BED) and tumor size. Methods and Materials: We formulated our TCP model as follows: TCP = e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k} Division-Sign (1 + e{sup [BED10-c Asterisk-Operator L-TCD50]/k}), where BED10 is the biologically effective SBRT dose, c is a constant, L is the maximal tumor diameter, and TCD50 and k are parameters that define the shape of the TCP curve. Least-squares optimization with a bootstrap resampling approach was used to identify the values of c, TCD50, and k that provided the best fit with observed actuarial 2-year local control rates. Results: Data from 504 NSCLC tumors treated with a variety of SBRT schedules were available. The mean follow-up time was 18.4 months, and 26 local recurrences were observed. The optimal values for c, TCD50, and k were 10 Gy/cm, 0 Gy, and 31 Gy, respectively. Thus, size-adjusted BED (sBED) may be defined as BED minus 10 times the tumor diameter (in centimeters). Our TCP model indicates that sBED values of 44 Gy, 69 Gy, and 93 Gy provide 80%, 90%, and 95% chances of tumor control at 2 years, respectively. When patients were grouped by sBED, the model accurately characterized the relationship between sBED and actuarial 2-year local control (r=0.847, P=.008). Conclusion: We have developed a TCP model that predicts 2-year local control rate after hypofractionated SBRT for early-stage NSCLC as a function of biologically effective dose and tumor diameter. Further testing of this model with additional datasets is warranted.

  12. Effect of coolant chemistry on PWR radiation transport processes. Progress report on reactor loop studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.J.; Flynn, G.; Haynes, J.W.; Kitt, G.P.; Large, N.R.; Lawson, D.; Mead, A.P.; Nichols, J.L.; Woodwark, D.R.

    1986-05-01

    The effect of various PWR-type coolant chemistry regimes on the behavior of corrosion products has been studied in the DIDO Water Loop at Harwell. There are strong indications that the in-core deposition behavior of corrosion product species is not fully accounted for by the solubility model based on nickel ferrite; boric acid plays a role apart from its influence on pH, and corrosion products are adsorbed to some extent in the zirconium oxide film on the fuel cladding. In DWL, soluble species appear to be dominant in deposition processes. A most important factor governing deposition behavior is surface condition; the influence of weld regions and the effect of varying pretreatment conditions have both been demonstrated. 13 figs.

  13. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarasevich, B.J.; Rieke, P.C.

    1998-06-02

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups. 5 figs.

  14. Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Rieke, Peter C.

    1998-01-01

    A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups.

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Rail Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup Tracking Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Intermodel Subgroup

  16. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Safety Home MSDS Search MSDS Help Safety Training and Tests Contact Links LSU Campus Safety Glossary Radiation Safety Manual Radiation Safety Test NOTE: All Training and Testing Material is for LSU CAMD Users ONLY! **Please allow two weeks for your badge to be processed.** Regulations and Hierarchy The CAMD Safety Officer reports to two separate individuals regarding safety. These are the Radiation Safety Officer for the University, and the Campus Safety Officer in all other matters. Thus safety

  17. Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety ... oversight mechanisms, better integration of radiation work planning ...

  18. Dummy Run of Quality Assurance Program in a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Investigating the Role of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Patients: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, Yoonsun; Kim, Jun Won; Shin, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Su Ssan; Ahn, Sung-Ja; Park, Won; Lee, Hyung-Sik; Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Kyu Chan; Suh, Hyun Suk; Kim, Jin Hee; Shin, Hyun Soo; Kim, Yong Bae; Suh, Chang-Ok

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 study protocol allowed radiation therapy (RT) technique to include or exclude breast cancer patients from receiving radiation therapy to the internal mammary lymph node (IMN). The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric differences between the 2 groups and potential influence on clinical outcome by a dummy run procedure. Methods and Materials: All participating institutions were asked to produce RT plans without irradiation (Arm 1) and with irradiation to the IMN (Arm 2) for 1 breast-conservation treatment case (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and 1 mastectomy case (modified radical mastectomy [MRM]) whose computed tomography images were provided. We assessed interinstitutional variations in IMN delineation and evaluated the dose-volume histograms of the IMN and normal organs. A reference IMN was delineated by an expert panel group based on the study guidelines. Also, we analyzed the potential influence of actual dose variation observed in this study on patient survival. Results: Although physicians intended to exclude the IMN within the RT field, the data showed almost 59.0% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the IMN in Arm 1. However, the mean doses covering the IMN in Arm 1 and Arm 2 were significantly different for both cases (P<.001). Due to the probability of overdose in Arm 1, the estimated gain in 7-year disease-free survival rate would be reduced from 10% to 7.9% for BCS cases and 7.1% for MRM cases. The radiation doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and coronary artery were lower in Arm 1 than in Arm 2. Conclusions: Although this dummy run study indicated that a substantial dose was delivered to the IMN, even in the nonirradiation group, the dose differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant. However, this dosimetric profile should be studied further with actual patient samples and be taken into consideration when analyzing clinical outcomes according to IMN

  19. SSRL ETS Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint ASD: Schedule Priorites Accelerator tech support - Call List Documentation: Engineering Notes, Drawings, and Accelerator Safety Documents Mechanical Systems: Accelerator Drawings Accelerator Pictures Accelerator Vacuum Systems (SSRL) LCW Vacuum Projects: Last Updated: February 8, 2007 Ben Scott

  20. Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children's Oncology Group Phase 2 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, Kristin A.; Zhou Tianni; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Jakacki, Regina I.; Pollack, Ian F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects on 1-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining motexafin and gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiation therapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5- to 10-min intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2 to 5 h prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated 1-year EFS was 18% {+-} 5%, and the estimated 1-year OS was 53% {+-} 6.5%. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusions: Compared to historical controls, the addition of MGd to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas.

  1. 66 Neutron, 22 Gamma-Ray Group Cross Sections for Radiation Transport for Neutron Energies Up to 400 MeV.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-12-12

    Version 00 For a variety of applications (accelerator shielding, the use of neutrons in radiotherapy, radiation damage studies, etc.) It is necessary to carry out transport calculations involving medium-energy neutrons. HILO86R multigroup cross sections are in the form needed for the CCC-254/ANISN-ORNL and CCC-543/TORT-DORT discrete ordinates codes and in the CCC-474/MORSE-CGA Monte Carlo code.

  2. On-line spectroscopic studies of group IV alkoxides and their interactions with organic additives during the sol-gel process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wettling, D.; Truchet, S.; Guilment, J.; Poncelet, O.

    1996-12-31

    The potential of vibrational spectroscopy for the study of group 4 alkoxides M(OR){sub 4} has been demonstrated in several papers, but only a few of these papers have presented results from online measurements. The monitoring of different reactions such as the stabilization of the alkoxides with organic additives, the exchange processes between different metal alkoxides (R exchange or M exchange) and the hydrolysis process can be of great importance for the development of new synthetic routes leading to materials which are easier to process. NIR spectroscopy is a very versatile technique but lacks specificity while IR and Raman give more interpretive results but are not always easy during processing. The authors used both techniques along with chemometric tools to extract relevant information on their processes. The 2D correlation allowed benefits from the specificity of IR and Raman to develop robust NIR methods which are able to be used on line to monitor the different steps of the sol-gel process.

  3. "Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the ...

  4. Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine

    2014-04-10

    This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

  5. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-15

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO{sub 2} supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H{sub 2} adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Now the Synchrotron Medical Imaging Team, a group of Canadian, US, and European scientists (including scientists from the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource) are using ...

  7. Research Highlights Sorted by Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Aerosol Life Cycle | Cloud Life Cycle | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Aerosol | Cloud Modeling | Cloud Properties | Radiative Processes Aerosol Life Cycle 2016 Berg, L. Two-Column Aerosol Project: Impact of Elevated Particle Layers on Particle Optical Depth ASR Ching, J. Three Dimensions Are Better Than Two, When It Comes to Representing Aerosols ASR de Boer, G. An Update on Unmanned Platforms at Oliktok Point ARM ASR Fast, J. D. Impact of External Industrial Sources

  8. Study of the processes of degradation of the optical properties of mesoporous and macroporous silicon upon exposure to simulated solar radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitskii, V. S.; Lenshin, A. S. Seredin, P. V.; Terukov, E. I.

    2015-11-15

    The effect of solar radiation on the surface composition of mesoporous and macroporous silicon is studied by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and photoluminescence measurements in order to analyze the possibility of using these materials as a material for solar-power engineering. The studies are conducted in the laboratory environment, with the use of a solar-radiation simulator operating under conditions close to the working conditions of standard silicon solar cells. The studies show that, in general, the materials meet the requirements of solar-power engineering, if it is possible to preclude harmful effects associated with the presence of heat-sensitive and photosensitive bonds at the nanomaterial surface by standard processing methods.

  9. Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kron, Tomas; Willis, David; Link, Emma; Lehman, Margot; Campbell, Gillian; O'Brien, Peter; Chua, Boon

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dosevolume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dosevolume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

  10. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macann, Andrew; Fua, Tsien; Milross, Chris G.; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Penniment, Michael; Wratten, Chris; Krawitz, Hedley; Poulsen, Michael; Tang, Colin I.; Morton, Randall P.; Hay, K. David; Thomson, Vicki; Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T.; Fraser-Browne, Carol L.; Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  11. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, Theodore S.; Moughan, Jennifer; Garofalo, Michael C.; Bendell, Johanna; Berger, Adam C.; Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E.; Anne, Pramila Rani; Perera, Francisco; Jabbour, Salma K.; Nowlan, Adam; DeNittis, Albert; Crane, Christopher

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  12. On Baryon-Antibaryon Cross Sections from Initial State Radiation Processes at BABAR and their Surprising Threshold Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacetti, Simone

    2015-04-14

    BABAR has measured with unprecedented accuracy the e+e- → pp-bar and e+e- → ΛΛ-bar cross sections by means of the initial state radiation technique, which has the advantages of good efficiency and energy resolution, and full angular acceptance in the threshold region. A striking feature of these cross sections is their non-vanishing values at threshold. In the case of charged baryons, the phenomenon is well understood in terms of the Coulomb interaction between the outgoing baryon and antibaryon. However, such an effect is not expected for neutral baryons. We suggest a simple explanation for both charged and neutral baryon pairs based on Coulomb interactions at the valence quark level.

  13. Phase III Study of Radiation Therapy With or Without Cis-Platinum in Patients With Unresectable Squamous or Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: An Intergroup Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (E2382)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quon, Harry; Leong, Traci; Haselow, Robert; Leipzig, Bruce; Cooper, Jay; Forastiere, Arlene

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The Head and Neck Intergroup conducted a Phase III randomized trial to determine whether the addition weekly cisplatin to daily radiation therapy (RT) would improve survival in patients with unresectable squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were randomized to RT (70 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/day) or to the identical RT with weekly cisplatin dosed at 20 mg/m{sup 2}. Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log rank test. Results: Between 1982 and 1987, 371 patients were accrued, and 308 patients were found eligible for analysis. Median follow-up was 62 months. The median FFS was 6.5 and 7.2 months for the RT and RT + cisplatin groups, respectively (p = 0.30). The p value for the treatment difference was p = 0.096 in multivariate modeling of FFS (compared to a p = 0.30 in univariate analysis). Expected acute toxicities were significantly increased with the addition of cisplatin except for in-field RT toxicities. Late toxicities were not significantly different except for significantly more esophageal (9% vs. 3%, p = 0.03) and laryngeal (11% vs. 4%, p = 0.05) late toxicities in the RT + cisplatin group. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent weekly cisplatin at 20 mg/m{sup 2} to daily radiation did not improve survival, although there was evidence of activity. Low-dose weekly cisplatin seems to have modest tumor radiosensitization but can increase the risk of late swallowing complications.

  14. Alpha Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments

  15. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  16. GEA Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GEA Group Place: Bochum, Germany Zip: 44809 Sector: Biofuels, Solar Product: Bochum-based, engineering group specialising in process engineering...

  17. SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Beam line 14-3 is a bending magnet side station dedicated to X-ray imaging and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biological, biomedical, materials, and geological samples. BL ...

  18. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of ?{sub matter}?0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Archives TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links: Communications Consolidated Grant Topic Group Training - Medical Training Protocols Route Identification Process Mechanics of Funding and Technical Assistance

  20. THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

    2011-06-30

    Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

  1. Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roybal, Lyle Gene

    2010-06-08

    Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

  2. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Issues Topic Group Judith Holm, Chair April 21, 2004 Albuquerque, NM Tribal Issues Topic Group * February Tribal Summit with Secretary of Energy (Kristen Ellis, CI) - Held in conjunction with NCAI mid-year conference - First Summit held in response to DOE Indian Policy - Addressed barriers to communication and developing framework for interaction Tribal Issues Topic Group * Summit (continued) - Federal Register Notice published in March soliciting input on how to improve summit process

  3. Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

    2011-05-01

    This presentation provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

  4. Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

    2011-11-01

    This paper provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

  5. Beta Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells ...

  6. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  7. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan; Paulus, Rebecca; Edelman, Martin J.; Krasna, Mark; Burrows, Whitney; Gore, Elizabeth; Wilson, Lynn D.; Choy, Hak

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  8. Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-03-01

    This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocols TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols The Transportation Protocols Topic Group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the protocols process. The Topic Group was formed to review a series of transportation protocols developed in response to a request for DOE to be more consistent in its approach to transportation.

  10. Complexity reduction of collisional-radiative kinetics for atomic plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, Hai P.; Karagozian, Ann R.; Cambier, Jean-Luc

    2013-12-15

    Thermal non-equilibrium processes in partially ionized plasmas can be most accurately modeled by collisional-radiative kinetics. This level of detail is required for an accurate prediction of the plasma. However, the resultant system of equations can be prohibitively large, making multi-dimensional and unsteady simulations of non-equilibrium radiating plasma particularly challenging. In this paper, we present a scheme for model reduction of the collisional-radiative kinetics, by combining energy levels into groups and deriving the corresponding macroscopic rates for all transitions. Although level-grouping is a standard approach to this type of problem, we provide here a mechanism for achieving higher-order accuracy by accounting for the level distribution within a group. The accuracy and benefits of the scheme are demonstrated for the generic case of atomic hydrogen by comparison with the complete solution of the master rate equations and other methods.

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    If you have any questions regarding the completion of this process please contact Matt Padilla (mpadilla@slac.stanford.edu, 1-650-926-3861 or Radiation Protection Field Operations ...

  12. Higher Biologically Effective Dose of Radiotherapy Is Associated With Improved Outcomes for Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Treated With Chemoradiation: An Analysis of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machtay, Mitchell; Movsas, Benjamin; Paulus, Rebecca; Gore, Elizabeth M.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Albain, Kathy; Sause, William T.; Curran, Walter J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (LA-NSCLC) were analyzed for local-regional failure (LRF) and overall survival (OS) with respect to radiotherapy dose intensity. Methods and Materials: This study combined data from seven Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials in which chemoradiotherapy was used for LA-NSCLC: RTOG 88-08 (chemoradiation arm only), 90-15, 91-06, 92-04, 93-09 (nonoperative arm only), 94-10, and 98-01. The radiotherapeutic biologically effective dose (BED) received by each individual patient was calculated, as was the overall treatment time-adjusted BED (tBED) using standard formulae. Heterogeneity testing was done with chi-squared statistics, and weighted pooled hazard ratio estimates were used. Cox and Fine and Gray's proportional hazard models were used for OS and LRF, respectively, to test the associations between BED and tBED adjusted for other covariates. Results: A total of 1,356 patients were analyzed for BED (1,348 for tBED). The 2-year and 5-year OS rates were 38% and 15%, respectively. The 2-year and 5-year LRF rates were 46% and 52%, respectively. The BED (and tBED) were highly significantly associated with both OS and LRF, with or without adjustment for other covariates on multivariate analysis (p < 0.0001). A 1-Gy BED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 4% relative improvement in survival; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio for survival as a function of BED was 0.96. Similarly, a 1-Gy tBED increase in radiotherapy dose intensity was statistically significantly associated with approximately 3% relative improvement in local-regional control; this is another way of expressing the finding that the pool-adjusted hazard ratio as a function of tBED was 0.97. Conclusions: Higher radiotherapy dose intensity is associated with improved local-regional control and

  13. Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Groups Research Group Homepages: Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Sherry Yennello's Research Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Group...

  14. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Seth A.; Hunt, Daniel; Sartor, A. Oliver; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J.; Jones, Christopher U.; Dobelbower, Michael; Shipley, William U.; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Donavanik, Viroon; Rotman, Marvin; Hartford, Alan C.; Michalski, Jeffrey; Seider, Michael; Kim, Harold; and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  15. ARM - Measurement - Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govMeasurementsPhotosynthetically Active Radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Photosynthetically Active Radiation Photosynthetically Active Radiation (PAR) designates the spectral range (wave band) of solar radiation from 400 to 700 nanometers that photosynthetic organisms are able to use in the process of photosynthesis Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is

  16. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  17. Ken Hogstrom, PI, & Medical Physics Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMD Targets Cancer Ken Hogstrom, Marie Varnes, Kip Matthews, Erno Sajo, Medical Physics Group Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Current radiation therapy techniques treat cancer by irradiating a volume of tissue that contains both healthy and cancerous tissue. Potential damage to healthy tissue can limit the amount of radiation dose to the cancer. Professor Hogstrom and his crew search for drugs that will allow radiation dose to preferentially target the

  18. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric Radiation Measurement A Little Background 3.5 x 3.5 degree 23 ARM Extended ... Current ARM SGP Observation Network ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Issues with ...

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

    1993-10-01

    We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  1. Vikram Group of Industries | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vikram Group of Industries Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vikram Group of Industries Place: Kolkatta, West Bengal, India Zip: 700001 Product: Kolkata-based tea processing...

  2. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Communications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications The Communications Topic Group was convened in April 1998 to improve internal and external strategic level communications regarding DOE shipments of radioactive and other hazardous materials. Major issues under consideration by this Topic Group include: - Examination of DOE external and internal communications processes; - Roles and responsibilities when communicating with a diverse range of stakeholders; and -

  3. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  4. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  5. Facilities removal working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  6. Interagency Committees and Working Groups | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Environment » Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment » Interagency Committees and Working Groups Interagency Committees and Working Groups DOE is actively involved with other Federal agencies that have responsibilities for the radiation protection of the public and the environment. This site provides the different committees and working groups that DOE is involved with. Interagency Steering Committee on Radiation Standards (ISCORS): The ISCORS is comprised of 8

  7. Measuring Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Measurement Activity: How Much Is Present? The size or weight of a container or shipment does not indicate how much radioactivity is in it. The amount of radioactivity in a quantity of material can be determined by noting how many curies of the material are present. This information should be found on labels and/or shipping

  8. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  9. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  10. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  11. The Light-Weight Group Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-07-02

    The Light-Weight Group (LWGRP) bibrary provides data structures and collective routines to define and operate on groups of MPI processes. Groups can be created and freed efficiently in O(log N) time space requiring less overhead that constructing full MPI communicators. This facilitates faster development of applications and libraries that need to rapidly create, use, and destroy process groups.

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes

  13. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  14. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  15. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  16. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent T.

    1983-01-01

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  17. Definition of Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of ...

  18. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clouds and Cloud Microphysical Properties Millimeter-wavelength cloud radar Micropulse Lidars Laser Ceilometers Aircraft Microwave Radiometers Surface Radiation Radiometric ...

  19. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  20. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  1. Abandoning wells working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    The primary objective of this working group is to identify major technical, regulatory, and environmental issues that are relevant to the abandonment of offshore wellbores. Once the issues have been identified, the working group also has the objective of making recommendations or providing potential solutions for consideration. Areas for process improvement will be identified and {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} will be discussed and compared to {open_quotes}minimum standards.{close_quotes} The working group will primarily focus on wellbore abandonment in the Gulf of Mexico. However, workshop participants are encouraged to discuss international issues which may be relevant to wellbore abandonment practices in the Gulf of Mexico. The Abandoning Wells Group has identified several major areas for discussion that have concerns related to both operators and service companies performing wellbore abandonments in the Gulf of Mexico. The following broad topics were selected for the agenda: (1) MMS minimum requirements and state regulations. (2) Co-existence of best practices, new technology, and P & A economics. (3) Liability and environmental issues relating to wellbore abandonment.

  2. Radiation Detector & Imaging | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Detector & Imaging At Jefferson Lab, scientists, engineers and technicians in the Radiation Detector & Imaging Group adapt cutting-edge nuclear physics research detector technology to develop application-specific, radioisotope imaging systems. Technology has been developed for a variety of bio-medical applications such as medical-oriented clinical and preclinical research as well as for plant biology research. Jefferson Lab's Radiation Detector and Imaging Group Members of

  3. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  4. Radiation Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd James

    2015-06-15

    We present an overview of radiation transport, covering terminology, blackbody raditation, opacities, Boltzmann transport theory, approximations to the transport equation. Next we introduce several transport methods. We present a section on Caseology, observing transport boundary layers. We briefly broach topics of software development, including verification and validation, and we close with a section on high energy-density experiments that highlight and support radiation transport.

  5. DOE 2008 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE. The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  6. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  7. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  8. RADIATION INTEGRATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, F.M.; Wilson, H.N.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation detecting and measuring systems, particularly a compact, integrating, background monitor, are discussed. One of the principal features of the system is the use of an electrometer tube where the input of the tube is directly connected to an electrode of the radiation detector and a capacitor is coupled to the tube input. When a predetermined quantity of radiation has been integrated, a trigger signal is fed to a recorder and a charge is delivered to the capacitor to render the tube inoperative. The capacitor is then recharged for the next period of operation. With this arrangement there is a substantial reduction in lead lengths and the principal components may be enclosed and hermetically sealed to insure low leakage.

  9. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  10. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  11. Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer | Jefferson Lab Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Detector Group Leader Accepts Additional Role as Lab's Chief Technology Officer Drew Weisenberger Drew Weisenberger, who has led the Radiation Detector and Imaging Group at Jefferson Lab since 2008, recently accepted the additional role of Chief Technology Officer (CTO) for the lab. Andrew "Drew" Weisenberger, head of the Experimental Nuclear Physics Division's Radiation Detector

  12. How to Detect Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How to Detect Radiation Radiation cannot be detected by human senses. A variety of instruments are available for detecting and measuring radiation. Examples of radiation survey meters: photos of survey meters alphacounter1.JPG (28857 bytes) This probe is used for the detection of alpha radiation. The most common type of

  13. radiation.p65

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that ...

  14. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  15. M Torres Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: MTORRES is a group of companies dedicated to the Design, Development and Manufacturing of Systems for industrial processes automation and solutions for the energy and...

  16. ASRAC MREF Working Group Notice of Intent

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    rulemaking process, and instead explore openly with other parties all ideas that may emerge from the working group's discussions. E. Facilitator The facilitator will act as a...

  17. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Technology Group, Inc. related to a form wood timber fire caused by nearby propane heaters during construction of the Salt Waste Processing Facility at DOE's Savannah River Site. ...

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 06 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report The DOE 2006 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2006. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 95 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2006 have been grouped into 34 sites across the complex. This

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report The DOE 2002 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2002. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 102 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2002 have been grouped into 29 geographic sites across the complex.

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report The DOE 2004 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2004. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 96 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2004 have been grouped into 25 geographic sites across the complex. This

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report The DOE 2005 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2005. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 101 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2005 have been grouped into 26 geographic sites across the complex.

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 7 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report The DOE 2007 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2007. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 90 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2007 have been grouped into 29 sites across the complex. This

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 8 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report The DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2008. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 92 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2008 have been grouped into 30 sites across the complex. This

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report The DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2011. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 107 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2011 have been grouped into 32 sites. This information has been

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 2 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2012. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 94 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2012 have been grouped into 32 sites. This information has been analyzed

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 0 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report The DOE 2000 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2000. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 104 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2000 have been grouped into 28 geographic sites across the complex.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 1 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report The DOE 2001 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report analyzes occupational radiation exposures at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities during 2001. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The 107 DOE organizations submitting radiation exposure reports for 2001 have been grouped into 30 geographic sites across the complex.

  8. Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Protection and Safety Training (3 hrs) Instructors: John Seaman and Neil Miller ... with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. ...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contacts Hirohito Ogasawara, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Dennis Nordlund, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Anders Nilsson, Stanford Synchrotron ...

  10. Types of Radiation Exposure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation ...

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This group is responsible for the update of DOE Manual 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual.  This manual was issued on September 23, 2002, and establishes a set of...

  13. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, James; Buden, David; Williams, Kenneth

    1989-01-01

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometeorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length.

  14. Survivable pulse power space radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

    1988-03-11

    A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

  15. JLab Users Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Users Group Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? JLab Users Group User Liaison Home Users Group Program Advisory Committee User/Researcher Information print version UG Resources Background & Purpose Users Group Wiki By Laws Board of Directors Board of Directors Minutes Directory of Members Events At-A-Glance Member Institutions News Users Group Mailing

  16. Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David Shuh (CS) Amy Kronenberg (LSD) Jim O'Neil (LSD) Jeff Kortright (MSD) Henrik Scheller (PBD) John Christensen (ESD), SAC Liaison Marty White (NSD, PH), DSC Liaison Link to...

  17. Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Moltech Power Systems Group (MPS Group) Place: China Product: China-based subsidiary of Shanghai Huayi Group...

  18. Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group aka Huarui Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd (formerly Farsighted Group, aka...

  19. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pion Group

  20. Photoelectrochemical Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Photoelectrochemical Working Group Photoelectrochemical Working Group The Photoelectrochemical Working Group meets regularly to review technical progress, develop synergies, and collaboratively develop common tools and processes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. Its members include principal investigators and supporting personnel from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded photoelectrochemical projects. More information on planned DOE photoelectrochemical activities can be found in

  1. Long-Term Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9903: A Randomized Phase 3 Trial to Assess the Effect of Erythropoietin on Local-Regional Control in Anemic Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenouda, George; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, K. Kian; Machtay, Mitchell; Parliament, Matthew B.; Hershock, Diane; Suntharalingam, Mohan; Lin, Alexander; Rotman, Marvin; Nabid, Abdenour; Hong, Susan; Shehata, Sarwat; Cmelak, Anthony J.; Sultanem, Khalil; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This paper reports long-term results of RTOG 9903, to determine whether the addition of erythropoietin (EPO) would improve the outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) in mildly to moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa). Methods and Materials: The trial included HNSCCa patients treated with definitive RT. Patients with stage III or IV disease received concomitant chemoradiation therapy or accelerated fractionation. Pretreatment hemoglobin levels were required to be between 9.0 and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for females). EPO, 40,000 U, was administered weekly starting 7 to 10 days before RT was initiated in the RT + EPO arm. Results: A total of 141 of 148 enrolled patients were evaluable. The baseline median hemoglobin level was 12.1 g/dL. In the RT + EPO arm, the mean hemoglobin level at 4 weeks increased by 1.66 g/dL, whereas it decreased by 0.24 g/dL in the RT arm. With a median follow-up of 7.95 years (range: 1.66-10.08 years) for surviving patients and 3.33 years for all patients (range: 0.03-10.08 years), the 5-year estimate of local-regional failure was 46.2% versus 39.4% (P=.42), local-regional progression-free survival was 31.5% versus 37.6% (P=.20), and overall survival was 36.9% versus 38.2% (P=.54) for the RT + EPO and RT arms, respectively. Late toxicity was not different between the 2 arms. Conclusions: This long-term analysis confirmed that despite the ability of EPO to raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients with HNSCCa, it did not improve outcomes when added to RT. The possibility of a detrimental effect of EPO could not be ruled out.

  2. Collaborations with Other ARM Working Groups and with ASP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Collaborations with Other ARM Working Groups and with ASP * Cloud Properties - Aerosol indirect effects remote sensing * Cloud Modeling - Aerosol indirect effects modeling * Radiative Properties - BBHRP aerosol best estimate * ASP - CCN closure - Aerosol extinction closure

  3. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muenchausen, Ross E.

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  4. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  5. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

  6. UFD Working Group 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group 2015 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare UFD Working Group 2015 HomeStationary ...

  7. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:04

  8. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:43

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on July 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Cindy Taylor, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the June 12, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on June 18, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the May 21, 2013 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  11. NIF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    group NIF User Group The National Ignition Facility User Group provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who use NIF for "Science Use of NIF" experiments and NIF management. Responsibility for NIF and the research programs carried out at NIF resides with the NIF Director. The NIF User Group advises the NIF Director on matters of concern to users, as well as providing a channel for communication for NIF users with funding agencies and

  12. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procurement - Routing criteriaemergency preparedness Tribal Issues Topic Group * TEPP Navajo Nation (Tom Clawson) - 1404 - Needs Assessment * Identified strengths and...

  13. Tritium Focus Group- INEL

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from the 34th Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Idaho Falls, Idaho on September 23-25, 2014.

  14. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  15. Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

    2006-10-31

    A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

  16. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    The Office of Analysis within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past five-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information has been analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site.

  17. RADIATION COUNTER

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsworthy, W.W.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

  18. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W.; Hegland, Joel E.; Braunlich, Peter F.; Tetzlaff, Wolfgang

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  19. Large Group Visits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Group Visits Large Group Visits All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Contact Us thumbnail of 1350 Central Avenue (505) 667-4444 Email Let us know if you plan to bring a group of 10 or more. All tours of the Museum are self-guided, but please schedule in advance so we can best accommodate your group. Parking for buses and RVs is available on Iris Street behind the Museum off of 15th St. See attached map (pdf). Contact

  20. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  1. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J.; Coit, William George; Griffin, Peter Terry; Hamilton, Paul Taylor; Hsu, Chia-Fu; Mason, Stanley Leroy; Samuel, Allan James; Watkins, Ronnie Wade

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  2. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  3. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  4. Biosphere Process Model Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Schmitt

    2000-05-25

    To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor

  5. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

    1983-07-26

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

  6. Radiation imaging apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anger, Hal O.; Martin, Donn C.; Lampton, Michael L.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 15, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on January 15, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the December 18, 2012 meeting. One issue

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on December 17, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:05 PM on October 22, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Joan Kessner (Washington Closure Hanford (WCH)), Karl Pool (Pacific

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2016 The meeting was called to order by Jonathan Sanwald, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on January 26, 2016 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)), Jeff Cheadle (DOE-ORP), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 The meeting was called to order by Jonathan Sanwald, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 19, 2016 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (Mission Support Alliance (MSA)), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Marcus Aranda (Wastren Advantage Inc. Wastren Hanford Laboratory (WHL)), Joe Archuleta (CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company

  12. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all...

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on October 16, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. New personnel have joined the Focus Group since the last

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on November 27, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Steve Trent, and Rich Weiss. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the October 16, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on August 20, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Steve Smith, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the July 23, 2013 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they had

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 15, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the March 18, 2014 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they

  17. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  18. The Chaninik Wind Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Chaninik Wind Group Villages Kongiganak pop.359 Kwigillingok pop. 388 Kipnuk pop.644 Tuntutuliak pop. 370 On average, 24% of families are below the poverty line. ...

  19. Buildings Sector Working Group

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Group Forrestal 2E-069 July 22, 2013 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Lighting model - Equipment, shell subsidies - ENERGY STAR benchmarking - Housing stock formation ...

  20. Tritium Focus Group Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meeting Information Tritium Focus Group Charter (pdf) Hotel Information Classified Session Information Los Alamos Restaurants (pdf) LANL Information Visiting Los Alamos Area Map ...

  1. SCM Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Working Group Translator Update Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Outline 1. Data development in support of CMWG * Climate modeling best estimate data * ...

  2. Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Paul Drake

    2005-12-01

    We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sheep Cortical Bone Using Synchrotron Radiation Transmission X-ray Microscopy", PLoS ONE ... Garry R. Brock, Cornell University Joy C. Andrews, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation ...

  4. Radiation Effects Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Reasearch Facility Geomechanics and ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Radiation Effects Sciences Home...

  5. Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on

  6. Unix File Groups at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A user's default group is the same as their username. NERSC users usually belong to ... Useful Unix Group Commands Command Description groups username List group membership id ...

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary (101.72 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January - February 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group PDF icon May 17, 2007 PDF icon January 16, 2007 PDF icon...

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on June 12, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thomson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on August 21, 2012 in an alternate Conference Room in 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton. Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, and Rich Weiss. I. Because the meeting was scheduled to take place in Room 308 and a glitch in

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 The beginning of the meeting was delayed due to an unannounced loss of the conference room scheduled for the meeting. After securing another meeting location, the meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:18 PM on April 16, 2013 in Conference Room 156 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool,

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    19, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on November 19, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Mike Barnes, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 28, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 28, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on February 25, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 18, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the February 25, 2014

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on May 20, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on June 12, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Sara Champoux, Glen Clark, Jim Douglas, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the presence of new and/or infrequent

  18. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on June 17, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Robert Elkins, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton and Rich Weiss. I. Because of the short time since the last meeting, Huei Meznarich stated that the minutes from the June 12, 2014 meeting have not yet

  19. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet

  20. Group key management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

    1997-08-01

    This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

  1. Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Materials Science in Radiation and Dynamics Extremes Our combination of modeling and experimental testing capabilities opens up unparalleled opportunities to do fundamental research leading to physics-based predictive models. Contact Us Group Leader Ellen Cerreta Email Deputy Group Leader Christopher Stanek Email Group Office (505) 665-4735 We predict structure/property relationships of materials, perform computational materials modeling, characterize thermophysical properties, and measure the

  2. Tritium Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matters related to tritium. Contacts Mike Rogers (505) 665-2513 Email Chandra Savage Marsden (505) 664-0183 Email The Tritium Focus Group consists of participants from member...

  3. Strategic Initiatives Work Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Work Group, comprised of members representing DOE, contractor and worker representatives, provides a forum for information sharing; data collection and analysis; as well as, identifying best practices and initiatives to enhance safety performance and safety culture across the Complex.

  4. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore » a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  5. Date Times Group Speakers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Research Meeting Toms Arias Mon, 3-10 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Richard Robinson Fri, 3-14 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Michael Zachman (Kourkoutis) & Deniz...

  6. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Huei Meznarich, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Andrew Stevens, Genesis Thomas, ... the radar of the DOE- HQ QA group. Noe'l Smith-Jackson commented that Ecology was always ...

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elkins, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rick ... Noe'l Smith-Jackson stated that the HASQARD document is the work of the Focus Group not ...

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Dave St. John, Steve Smith, Steve Trent and Eric Wyse. ... On January 31, the Secretary received a call from the QA Sub-Group Chair, Steve Smith. ...

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been distributed to the Focus Group prior to the meeting. The comments that required editorial changes to the document were made in the working electronic version. b. At the June...

  10. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sigg, Raymond A.

    1994-01-01

    A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

  11. Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sigg, R.A.

    1994-12-13

    A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

  12. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2007 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2007-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Safety Analysis (HS-30) within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The annual DOEOccupational Radiation Exposure 2007 Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and ALARA process requirements. In addition the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. This report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past five years.

  13. ARM - VAP Process - beflux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Productsbeflux Documentation & Plots Technical Report Data Management Facility Plots (Quick Looks) ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send VAP : Best-Estimate Radiative Flux (BEFLUX) Instrument Categories Radiometric The Best-Estimate Surface Radiative Flux (BEFLUX) VAP processes data from three Southern Great Plains Central Facility radiometer systems when all are available. Before 2001, this VAP used

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:03 PM on November 16, 2010 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Paula Ciszak, Glen Clark, Doug Duvon, Kathi Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Thompson, Eric Wyse. New members to the Focus Group were

  15. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, and Keri Troutman. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and publicity, and

  16. DOE STGWG Group

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia,

  17. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with

  18. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, and Keri Troutman. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and publicity, and

  19. System and method for secure group transactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsmith, Steven Y.

    2006-04-25

    A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Washington, DC TEC Meeting - 180(c) Group Summary - March 15, 2006 (29.33 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - July 2007 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries

  1. Wireless radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamberti, Vincent E.; Howell, Jr, Layton N.; Mee, David K.; Kress, Reid L.

    2016-08-09

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting radiation. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a radiation sensitive material coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The radiation sensitive material is operable to change a tensile stress of the ferromagnetic metal upon exposure to radiation. The radiation is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the changes in the tensile stress.

  2. Finite groups and quantum physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornyak, V. V.

    2013-02-15

    Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive 'finite' point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution-only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers-a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories-in particular, within the Standard Model.

  3. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon Atlanta TEC...

  4. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter ...

  5. Good Energy Group Plc previously Monkton Group Plc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plc previously Monkton Group Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Good Energy Group Plc (previously Monkton Group Plc) Place: Chippenham, Wiltshire, United Kingdom Zip: SN15 1EE...

  6. Posters Diagnostic Analysis of Cloud Radiative Properties R.C...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are extremely sensitive to parameterizations of certain poorly understood physical processes, most notably cloud-radiation interactions. As a result, models with different...

  7. Jefferson Lab's Detector Group Wins Prestigious National Award |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jefferson Lab Detector Group Wins Prestigious National Award Jefferson Lab's Detector Group Wins Prestigious National Award NEWPORT NEWS, VA, May 15, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's Radiation Detector & Imaging Group, which developed a life-saving compact gamma camera for the improved detection of breast cancer, has been recognized with an award for "excellence in technology transfer" by the Federal Laboratory Consortium

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on March 20, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Larry Markel, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the February 21, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present

  9. SUB ZERO GROUP, INC.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SUB ZERO GROUP, INC. 4717 Hammersley Road. Madison, WI 53711 P: 800.532.7820 P: 608.271.2233 F: 608.270.3362 Memorandum To: David Foster, Senior Advisor, Office of the Secretary of Energy CQ Michael Lafave, Director of Production Workers, SMART Union Workers Marc Norberg, Assistant to the General President, SMART Union Workers From: Christopher Jessup, Corporate Compliance Manager, Sub-Zero Group, Inc. Date: June 21, 2016 Re: June 15, 2016 Meeting at Department of Energy Forrestal Building in

  10. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  11. ENN Group aka XinAo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENN Group aka XinAo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ENN Group (aka XinAo Group) Place: Langfang, Hebei Province, China Zip: 65001 Product: Chinese private industrial...

  12. Greenko Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenko Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenko Group Place: Hyderabad, India Zip: 500 033 Product: Focused on clean energy projects in Asia. References: Greenko Group1...

  13. Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinocome Group Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector...

  14. Valesul Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valesul Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Valesul Group Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian ethanol producer. References: Valesul Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  15. Angeleno Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angeleno Group Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Angeleno Group Name: Angeleno Group Address: 2029 Century Park East, Suite 2980 Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90067 Region:...

  16. MTorres Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: MTorres Group Place: Murcia, Spain Zip: 30320 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturer References: MTorres Group1 This...

  17. Ferrari Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ferrari Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ferrari Group Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Sao Paulo-based ethanol producer. References: Ferrari Group1 This article is a...

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications Topic Group Summary - July 1998 (58.3 KB) Inaugural Group Meeting - April 1998 (83.34 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup April 6, 2006 (14.05 KB) February 23, 2006 Draft (20.29 KB) January 24, 2006 (27.44 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference

  20. Radiation Safety Poster | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Poster Radiation Safety Poster Radiation Safety Poster

  1. Process for functionalizing alkanes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bergman, Robert G.; Janowicz, Andrew H.; Periana-Pillai, Roy A.

    1985-01-01

    Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

  2. Plutonium radiation surrogate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Michael I.

    2010-02-02

    A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

  3. MEA BREAKOUT GROUP

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS

  4. Helms Research Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helms Group Home Research Members Publications Collaborations Connect Physical Organic Materials Chemistry Our research is devoted to understanding transport phenomena in mesostructured systems assembled from organic, organometallic, polymeric and nanocrystalline components. Enhanced capabilities relevant to energy, health, water, and food quality are enabled by our unique approaches to the modular design of their architectures and interfaces.

  5. NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface ...

  6. Collisional-Radiative Modeling for Radiation Hydrodynamics (Book...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: Modern Methods in Collisional-Radiative Modelling of Plasmas, Collisional-Radiative Modeling for Radiation Hydrodynamics, Springer International Publishing, unknown, ...

  7. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MEASURING RADIATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reeder, S.D.

    1962-04-17

    A chemical dosimeter for measuring the progress of a radiation-induced oxidation-reduction reaction is described. The dosimeter comprises a container filled with an aqueous chemical oxidation-reduction system which reacts quantitatively to the radiation. An anode of the group consisting of antimony and tungsten and a cathode of the group consisting of gold and platnium are inserted into the system. Means are provided to stir the system and a potential sensing device is connected across the anode and cathode to detect voltage changes. (AEC)

  8. Focus Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Forums » Focus Group and Work Group Activities » Focus Group Focus Group The Focus Group was formed in March 2007 to initiate dialogue and interface with labor unions, DOE Program Secretarial Offices, and stakeholders in areas of mutual interest and concern related to health, safety, security, and the environment. Meeting Documents Available for Download November 13, 2012 Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements This Focus Group Work Group telecom was held with the Work

  9. Rejuvenated by environmental groups' support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, E.

    1993-05-12

    A letter of conditional support last week from seven environmental groups reinvigorated the North American Free Trade Agreement. The likelihood of NAFTA ratification in Congress seemed to hit its nadir when Office of Management and Budget chief Leon Panetta declared that the Canada-US-Mexico pact was dead. Observers say that ratification, said to be stalled because of a lack of public support, could be jump-started by the proposal. The seven groups offered to back NAFTA on more conciliatory terms than they had previously demanded. They proposed that the North American Commission on the Environment (NACE), which is to be defined by the side agreements, be given power and finances to investigate environmental offenses. The signatories would also negotiate criteria for process standards. Public participation must be built into the side agreements, they said. Non-binding NACE recommendations must then be considered by the governments. The Sierra Club broke ranks, demanding more power for NACE, with a specific emphasis on industry accountability. [open quotes]NAFTA must insure that industries bear the responsibility for their actions,[close quotes] said Sierra trade and environmental program director John Audley. Sierra Club called for funding for cleanup under a [open quotes]polluter pays[close quotes] principle, legal avenues for NACE information gathering, industry-specific sanctions, and consideration of production processes in addition to product qualities.

  10. Radiation.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation is a natural part of our everyday environment. Cosmic rays showering the Earth ... and radon gas seeping up from the soil are only two examples of natural radiation. ...

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:08 PM on January 18, 2011 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Heather Anastos, Paula Ciszak, Jim Conca, Scott Conley, Glen Clark, Scott Conley, Jim Douglas, Scot Fitzgerald, Stewart Huggins, Jim Jewett, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Karl Pool, Dave Shea, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss, Eric Wyse. Dave

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich who was acting for the absent Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:04 PM on April 19, 2011 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Acting Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Heather Anastos, Courtney Blanchard, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Kathie Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Greg Holte, Joan Kessner, Noe'l Smith- Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle,

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:03 PM on May 17, 2011 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Courtney Blanchard, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Al Hawkins, Greg Holte, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, Eric Wyse. I. Dave Crawford

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on November 8, 2011 in Conference Room 126 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Courtney Blanchard, Jeff Cheadle, Scot Fitzgerald, Jim Jewett, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Steve Smith, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle and Eric

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Mike Barnes, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the December 13, 2011 meeting.

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on February 21, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Courtney Blanchard, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on

  17. Working Group Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K.

  18. Yennello Group Home Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cyclotron Chemistry Dept. Physics Dept. College of Science Texas A&M University The Group Activities Publications Articles Talks and Posters Detectors Links Pictures Women in Nuclear Science Internal Documents Contacts run photos people photos equipment photos Copyright © 2009 Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute MS #3366 College Station TX 77843-3366 Phone: 979-845-1411 Fax: 979-845-1899

  19. Tritium Focus Group Meeting:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    32 nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting: Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Masashi Shimada Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory April 25 th 2013, Germantown, MD STI #: INL/MIS-13-28975 Outlines 1. Motivation of tritium research activity in STAR facility 2. Unique capabilities in STAR facility 3. Research highlights from tritium retention in HFIR neutron- irradiated tungsten April 25th 2013 Germantown, MD STAR

  20. Environmental/Interest Groups

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Environmental/Interest Groups Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation (MMCIC) Mike J. Grauwelman President P.O. Box 232 Miamisburg, OH 45343-0232 (937) 865-4462 Email: mikeg@mound.com Mound Reuse Committee See MMCIC Mound Environmental Safety and Health Sharon Cowdrey President 5491 Weidner Road Springboro, OH 45066 (937) 748-4757 No email address available Mound Museum Association Dr. Don Sullenger President Mound Advanced Technology Center 720 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 45342-6714

  1. TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan -

  3. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  4. THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC DIFFUSION FOR EXAFLAG Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH ...

  5. THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH MIMETIC DIFFUSION FOR EXAFLAG Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE VEX RADIATION MODULE: 2D RADIATION TRANSPORT WITH...

  6. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Bauman, Robert

    2006-11-14

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  7. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R.; Baumann, Robert

    2003-08-26

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  8. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, Richard R. (Winchester, MA); Baumann, Robert (Cambridge, MA)

    1999-01-01

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  9. Living olefin polymerization processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schrock, R.R.; Baumann, R.

    1999-03-30

    Processes for the living polymerization of olefin monomers with terminal carbon-carbon double bonds are disclosed. The processes employ initiators that include a metal atom and a ligand having two group 15 atoms and a group 16 atom or three group 15 atoms. The ligand is bonded to the metal atom through two anionic or covalent bonds and a dative bond. The initiators are particularly stable under reaction conditions in the absence of olefin monomer. The processes provide polymers having low polydispersities, especially block copolymers having low polydispersities. It is an additional advantage of these processes that, during block copolymer synthesis, a relatively small amount of homopolymer is formed.

  10. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment This tip sheet describes how to save process heating energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces. PROCESS HEATING TIP SHEET #7 Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment (January 2006) (277.28 KB) More Documents & Publications Waste Heat Reduction and Recovery for Improving Furnace Efficiency, Productivity and Emissions Performance: A

  11. Solar Radiation Data from the World Radiation Data Centre (WRDC) Online Archive

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The WRDC, located at the Main Geophysical Observatory in St. Petersburg, Russia, serves as a central depository for solar radiation data collected at over 1000 measurement sites throughout the world. The WRDC was established in accordance with Resolution 31 of WMO Executive Committee XVIII in 1964. The WRDC centrally collects, archives and published radiometric data from the world to ensure the availability of these data for research by the international scientific community. The WRDC archive contains the following measurements (not all observations are made at all sites): • Global solar radiation • Diffuse solar radiation • Downward atmospheric radiation • Sunshine duration • Direct solar radiation (hourly and instantaneous) • Net total radiation • Net terrestrial surface radiation (upward) • Terrestrial surface radiation • Reflected solar radiation • Spectral radiation components (instantaneous fluxes) At present, this online archive contains a subset of the data stored at the WRDC. As new measurements are received and processed, they are added to the archive. The archive currently contains all available data from 1964-1993.[From ôBackground on the WRDCö at http://wrdc-mgo.nrel.gov/html/about.html

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18, 2010 The meeting was called to order by Don Hart, Focus Group Chairman, at 2:00 PM on February 18, 2010 in Conference Room 199 at 2430 Stevens. Those attending were: Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Heather Anastos, Glen Clark, Doug Duvon, Kathi Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Cindy English, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Andrew Stevens, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Wendy Thompson, Rich Weis, and Cliff Watkins. I. Because new

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, Focus Group Chairman at 2:10 PM on December 13, 2010 in Conference Room 199 at 2430 Stevens. Those attending were: Dave Crawford (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Dave Shea, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Rich Weiss, Eric Wyse. I. Dave Crawford requested approval of the minutes from the November 16

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Dave Crawford, HASQARD Focus Group Chairman at 2:07 PM on August 16, 2011 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Jeff Cheadle, Kathi Dunbar, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Jim Jewett, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Huei Meznarich, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Dave Crawford requested comments on the

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2011 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on October 4, 2011 in Conference Room 208 at 2425 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Dave Shea, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Mary Ryan, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on December 13, 2011 in Conference Room 126 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on April 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the March 20, 2012

  18. # Energy Measuremenfs Group

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of

  19. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  20. RADIATION WAVE DETECTOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1958-10-28

    The detection of the shape and amplitude of a radiation wave is discussed, particularly an apparatus for automatically indicating at spaced lntervals of time the radiation intensity at a flxed point as a measure of a radiation wave passing the point. The apparatus utilizes a number of photomultiplier tubes surrounding a scintillation type detector, For obtainlng time spaced signals proportional to radiation at predetermined intervals the photolnultiplier tubes are actuated ln sequence following detector incidence of a predetermined radiation level by electronic means. The time spaced signals so produced are then separately amplified and relayed to recording means.

  1. PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

    1961-12-26

    A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

  2. Radiation detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riedel, Richard A.; Wintenberg, Alan L.; Clonts, Lloyd G.; Cooper, Ronald G.

    2012-02-14

    A preamplifier circuit for processing a signal provided by a radiation detector includes a transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a detector and generate a voltage signal at its output. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifier for providing an amplified voltage signal. Detector electronics include a preamplifier circuit having a first and second transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a first and second location on a detector, respectively, and generate a first and second voltage signal at respective outputs. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifiers for amplifying the first and said second voltage signals to provide first and second amplified voltage signals. A differential output stage is coupled to the second amplification stage for receiving the first and second amplified voltage signals and providing a pair of outputs from each of the first and second amplified voltage signals. Read out circuitry has an input coupled to receive both of the pair of outputs, the read out circuitry having structure for processing each of the pair of outputs, and providing a single digital output having a time-stamp therefrom.

  3. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

    2012-03-29

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum

  4. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  5. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco

  6. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries | Department of Energy Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summary April 2000 (91.86 KB) Conference Call Summary February 1999 (11.81 KB) Conference Call Summary November 1998 (54.77 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Protocols Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Protocols Topic Group Summary - July 1999 (110.63 KB) Jacksonville TEC Meeting, Protocols Topic Group Summary - January 1999 (102.04 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Archived Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents ARCHIVED DOCUMENTS Inspections Summary Matrix (49.36 KB) TEC Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison (130.46 KB) Regulatory Summary Matrix (62.08 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2005 Presentations

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents Key Documents Security TG Work Plan August 7, 2006 (24.31 KB) Security Lessons Learned Document August 2, 2006 (40.77 KB) Security Module (635.1 KB) STG Terms and Definitions from DOE 470.4 (18.54 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - April 2005 Presentations TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries

  10. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Green Bay STG Meeting Summary- September 14, 2006 (28.22 KB) Washington STG Meeting Summary - March 14, 2006 (25.61 KB) Pueblo STG Meeting Summary - September 22, 2005 (18.7 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - September 2006 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents

  11. Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC) Feb 22 - Mar 14, 2007 Dave Turner, Eli Mlawer RHUBC Breakout Session ARM Science Team Meeting Monterey, California 27 March 2007 Not a Lot of Time Between IOP and STM! RHUBC Motivation * Radiative cooling due to water vapor in mid- to-upper trop contribute significantly to the dynamical processes and radiative balance the regulate Earth's climate * ~40% of the OLR comes from far-IR (wavelengths > 15 µm) * Far-IR has not been well studied because: -

  12. Radiation shielding properties of barite coated fabric by computer programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akarslan, F.; Molla, T.; nc, I. S.; K?l?ncarslan, S.; Akkurt, I.

    2015-03-30

    With the development of technology radiation started to be used in variety of different fields. As the radiation is hazardous for human health, it is important to keep radiation dose as low as possible. This is done mainly using shielding materials. Barite is one of the important materials in this purpose. As the barite is not used directly it can be used in some other materials such as fabric. For this purposes barite has been coated on fabric in order to improve radiation shielding properties of fabric. Determination of radiation shielding properties of coated fabric has been done by using computer program written C# language. With this program the images obtained from digital Rontgen films is used to determine radiation shielding properties in terms of image processing numerical values. Those values define radiation shielding and in this way the coated barite effect on radiation shielding properties of fabric has been obtained.

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup PDF icon April 6, 2006 PDF icon February 23,...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon March 12, 2008 PDF icon October 3, 2007 PDF icon...

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon Conference Call Summary...

  17. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications...

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 PDF icon Executive Summary...

  19. September 2012, HSS Focus Group Strategic Initiatives Work Group...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Strategic Initiatives Work Group Status Overview Accomplishments: 1. June 26. Telecom with ... reporting improvements are planned for the next Strategic Initiatives Work Group meeting. ...

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  1. TRIBAL ISSUES TOPIC GROUP MEETING SUMMARY Milwaukee, WI July 1998

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Milwaukee, WI July 1998 The Topic Group is developing a process to identify appropriate Topic Group membership, and will be working on a protocol for identifying and inviting individual tribes to participate he group identified five actions: (1) catalogue tribal transportation issues; (2) identify a level of tribal awareness of DOE transportation issues; (3) examine funding and tribal support; (4) develop a process for Tribal Topic Group membership; and (5) review the best channels to

  2. Schuck Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction Schools Move Forward with Idle Reduction November 2, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Senior Writer/Editor, Office of Science With schools back in session returns the inevitable procession of parents waiting for their children in parking lots. Unfortunately, many of these parents idle their vehicles, wasting fuel and producing both smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. As children are particularly susceptible to pollution, reducing these

  3. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected Thursdays; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) October 1 1 Dylan B ayerl ( Kioupakis g roup) 3:00---4:00pm November 1 Andy M artin ( Millunchick g roup) 2:00---3:00pm December 1 3 Brian R oberts ( Ku g roup) 2:00---3:00pm Thrust II --- s elected T hursdays, 3 :30---4:30pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) September 2 7 Hang C hi ( Uher g roup) October 1 8 Reddy g roup November 2 9 Gunho Kim (Pipe group) Thrust III --- s elected

  4. Radiation transport. Progress report, October 1, 1982-March 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1984-05-01

    Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the first half of FY 83 is reported. Included are tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, and Monte Carlo Radiation Transport.

  5. GROUP THEORETICAL STUDY OF LEPTONIC PROCESSES (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 1965-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 4641809 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Canadian Journal of Physics (Canada); Journal Volume: Vol: 43; ...

  6. "Group IV Nanomembranes, Nanoribbons, and Quantum Dots: Processing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: liu, feng Publication Date: 2014-08-28 OSTI Identifier: 1150736 Report Number(s): DOE-Utah-46027 DOE Contract Number: FG02-03ER46027 Resource Type: Technical Report ...

  7. Tecate Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tecate Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tecate Group Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92108-4400 Product: The Tecate Group is a global supplier of electronic components and...

  8. USJ Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USJ Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: USJ Group Place: So Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 04534 000 Product: Sao Paulo based ethanol producer. References: USJ Group1 This...

  9. Rowan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rowan Group Place: United Kingdom Product: ( Private family-controlled ) References: Rowan Group1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rowan Group is a...

  10. ERIC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ERIC Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ERIC Group Place: Italy Product: Italian project developer of PV power plants. References: ERIC Group1 This article is a stub. You...

  11. Estimation of diffuse from measured global solar radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, W.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A data set of quality controlled radiation observations from stations scattered throughout Australia was formed and further screened to remove residual doubtful observations. It was then divided into groups by solar elevation, and used to find average relationships for each elevation group between relative global radiation (clearness index - the measured global radiation expressed as a proportion of the radiation on a horizontal surface at the top of the atmosphere) and relative diffuse radiation. Clear-cut relationships were found, which were then fitted by polynomial expressions giving the relative diffuse radiation as a function of relative global radiation and solar elevation. When these expressions were used to estimate the diffuse radiation from the global, the results had a slightly smaller spread of errors than those from an earlier technique given by Spencer. It was found that the errors were related to cloud amount, and further relationships were developed giving the errors as functions of global radiation, solar elevation, and the fraction of sky obscured by high cloud and by opaque (low and middle level) cloud. When these relationships were used to adjust the first estimates of diffuse radiation, there was a considerable reduction in the number of large errors.

  12. Enforcement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC,- July 13, 2009

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

  13. ASRAC Fans and Blower Working Group Creation Notice of Intent

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rulemaking process, and instead explore openly with other parties all ideas that may emerge from the working group's discussions. E. Facilitator The facilitator will act as a...

  14. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The objective of these biannual Working Group meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes. PDF ...

  15. Westly Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Westly Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Westly Group Place: Menlo Park, California Zip: 94025 Product: Clean technology-oriented venture capital firm. References: Westly...

  16. Enerbio Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enerbio Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enerbio Group Place: Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Zip: 90480-003 Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: Brazilian...

  17. BOC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: BOC Group Place: United Kingdom Zip: GU20 6HJ Sector: Services Product: UK-based industrial gases, vacuum technologies and distribution...

  18. Jinglong Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jinglong Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jinglong Group Place: Ningjin, Hebei Province, China Product: Chinese manufacturer and supplier of monocrystalline silicon and...

  19. Verdeo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Verdeo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Verdeo Group Place: Washington, DC Zip: 20006 Sector: Carbon Product: Washington based integrated carbon solutions company....

  20. Bazan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bazan Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bazan Group Place: Pontal, Brazil Zip: 14180-000 Product: Bioethanol production company Coordinates: -21.023149, -48.037099 Show...

  1. Delaney Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Delaney Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Delaney Group Place: Gloversville, New York Zip: 12078 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Services company focused on...

  2. Ramky Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ramky Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ramky Group Place: Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500082 Product: Focussed on construction, infrastructure development and waste...

  3. Samaras Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samaras Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Samaras Group Place: Greece Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: Greek consultancy services provider with specialization in...

  4. Altira Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Altira Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Altira Group Address: 1675 Broadway, Suite 2400 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80202 Region: Rockies Area Product: Venture Capital...

  5. Sunvim Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunvim Group Place: Gaomi, Shandong Province, China Zip: 261500 Product: Sunvim, a Chinese home textile maker, is also engaged in the...

  6. Balta Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Balta Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Balta Group Place: Sint Baafs Vijve, Belgium Zip: 8710 Product: Belgium-based manufacturer of broadloom carpets, rugs and laminate...

  7. Noribachi Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Noribachi Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Noribachi Group Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip: 87104 Product: New Mexico-based private equity firm focused on investing in...

  8. Lucas Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lucas Group Place: Chicago, Illinois Sector: Services Product: Renewable Energy Recruiters Year Founded: 1970 Coordinates: 41.850033,...

  9. Humus Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Humus Group Place: Brazil Product: Stakeholder in the Vertente ethanol mill in Brazil. References: Humus Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  10. Bumlai Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bumlai Group Place: Brazil Product: Investor in ethanol plant So Fernando Acar e lcool. References: Bumlai Group1 This...

  11. Paro group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paro group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Paro group Place: Brazil Product: Ethanol producer that plans to jointly own an ethanol plant in Minas Gerais. References: Paro...

  12. Reservoir Modeling Working Group Meeting

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reservoir Modeling Working Group Meeting 2012 GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM PEER REVIEW ... History Past Meetings: March 2010 IPGT Modeling Working Group Meeting May 2010 GTP Peer ...

  13. Mouratoglou Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mouratoglou Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mouratoglou Group Place: France Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Investment parent-company of EDF Energies Nouvelles, involved...

  14. Poyry Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poyry Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Poyry Group Place: Vantaa, Finland Zip: 1621 Product: Vantaa-based consulting and engineering firm, specialising in issues regarding...

  15. Richway Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by expanding it. Richway Group is a company based in Richmond, British Columbia. FROM WASTE TO ENERGY, YOUR WISE CHOICE Vision and Objectives Richway Group (Richway) is located...

  16. Copisa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Copisa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Copisa Group Place: Barcelona, Spain Zip: 8029 Product: Barcelona-based, construction company. Copisa is involved in building three...

  17. Emte Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Emte Group Place: Spain Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: String representation "EMTE is the ben ... ctor companies." is too long....

  18. Schaffner Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schaffner Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schaffner Group Place: Switzerland Zip: 4542 Product: Switzerland-based company supplier of components that support the efficient...

  19. Schulthess Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schulthess Group Place: Wolfhausen, Switzerland Zip: CH-8633 Product: A company with activities in regenerative energy production,...

  20. TRITEC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRITEC Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: TRITEC Group Place: Basel, Switzerland Zip: CH-4123 Product: Basel-based installer and distributor for PV products. Coordinates:...

  1. Swatch Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Swatch Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Swatch Group Place: Switzerland Product: String representation "The Swatch Grou ... ther industries" is too long. References: Swatch...

  2. Anel Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anel Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Anel Group Place: ISTANBUL, Turkey Zip: 34768 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Istanbul-based technological and engineering...

  3. Aksa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aksa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aksa Group Place: Istanbul, Turkey Zip: 34212 Sector: Wind energy Product: Turkey-based international company recently involved in the...

  4. Daesung Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Daesung Group Place: Jongno-Gu Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip: 110-300 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Daesung Group, a Korea-based energy provider and electric machinary...

  5. Electrocell Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrocell Group Place: Sao Paolo, Brazil Zip: 05508-000 Product: Producer of fuel cells, accessories and controls. The company...

  6. Pohlen Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pohlen Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pohlen Group Place: Geilenkirchen, Germany Product: Specialises in roof engineering, including installing and maintaining PV systems...

  7. Vaillant Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vaillant Group Place: Remscheid, Germany Zip: 42859 Product: For nearly 130 years Vaillant has been at the forefront of heating technology....

  8. Ostwind Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ostwind Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ostwind Group Place: Regensburg, Germany Zip: D-93047 Sector: Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product: Develops wind projects, and also...

  9. Shenergy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shenergy Group Place: Shanghai Municipality, China Product: Gas and power project investor and developer based in Shanghai. References: Shenergy Group1 This article is a stub....

  10. Ralos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ralos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ralos Group Place: Michelstadt, Germany Zip: D-64720 Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based solar project developer that specialises in...

  11. Enovos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enovos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enovos Group Place: Germany Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based utility. The utility has interests in solar energy. References:...

  12. Rioglass Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rioglass Group Place: Spain Product: A Spanish glass company supplying the automotive sector, who has recently announced to launch...

  13. Training Work Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Forums Focus Group and Work Group Activities Focus Group Training Work Group 10 CFR 851 Implementation Work Group Workforce Retention Work Group Strategic Initiatives Work ...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 (29.33 KB) Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 (27.82 KB) Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 (31.56 KB) Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 (39.76 KB) Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 (40.34 KB) Phoenix TEC

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 (29.33 KB) Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 (27.82 KB) Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 (31.56 KB) Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 (39.76 KB) Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 (40.34 KB) Phoenix TEC

  16. Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

    2013-09-24

    Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for

  17. Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were

  18. RADIATION WAVE DETECTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wouters, L.F.

    1960-08-30

    Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

  19. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Date: September 13, 2012 In conjunction with the HAMMER Steering Committee meeting the HSS Focus Group Training Working Group Meeting was conducted from 2:00 PM to 4:30 PM at the HAMMER Training Facility in Richland, WA. Documents Available for Download Meeting Agenda (43.92 KB) Meeting Summary (1.22 MB) More Documents & Publications Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting DOE Training Reciprocity Program Training Work Group Charter

  20. ORISE Video: What is the difference between radiation exposure and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation contamination?

  1. RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D.

    1997-10-01

    A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRLUO functions include: sponsoring and presenting the Annual Farrel W. Lytle Award to promote important technical or scientific accomplishments in synchrotron radiation-based ...

  3. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomozawa, M.; Watson, E.B.; Acocella, J.

    1986-11-04

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10[sup 7] rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency. 3 figs.

  4. Radiation coloration resistant glass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomozawa, Minoru; Watson, E. Bruce; Acocella, John

    1986-01-01

    A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This work demonstrates that synchrotron radiation-based spectroscopies provide invaluable, atom-specific tools to determine the electronic properties of different dopant and defect ...

  6. Rotating bubble membrane radiator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Webb, Brent J.; Coomes, Edmund P.

    1988-12-06

    A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

  7. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steering Group, Fermilab; /Fermilab

    2007-12-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOvA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components

  8. Fermilab Steering Group Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beier, Eugene; Butler, Joel; Dawson, Sally; Edwards, Helen; Himel, Thomas; Holmes, Stephen; Kim, Young-Kee; Lankford, Andrew; McGinnis, David; Nagaitsev, Sergei; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

    2007-01-01

    The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components

  9. Science Education Group | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Group View larger image Sci Ed Group 15 View larger image Group 21

  10. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    2008-05-14

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  11. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2007-01-09

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  12. Radiation-resistant microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fliermans, Carl B.

    2010-06-15

    An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

  13. Instrument for assaying radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Jody Rustyn; Farfan, Eduardo B.

    2016-03-22

    An instrument for assaying radiation includes a flat panel detector having a first side opposed to a second side. A collimated aperture covers at least a portion of the first side of the flat panel detector. At least one of a display screen or a radiation shield may cover at least a portion of the second side of the flat panel detector.

  14. Electromagnetic radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, Jay L.; Hansen, Gordon J.

    1976-01-01

    An electromagnetic radiation detector including a collimating window, a cathode member having a photoelectric emissive material surface angularly disposed to said window whereby radiation is impinged thereon at acute angles, an anode, separated from the cathode member by an evacuated space, for collecting photoelectrons emitted from the emissive cathode surface, and a negatively biased, high transmissive grid disposed between the cathode member and anode.

  15. September 13, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 082912 HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Meeting September 13, 2012 Room 67 HAMMER 2:00 PM - 4:30 PM Time Topic Lead 2:00 p.m. Safety Minute Welcome and ...

  16. Catalytic coal hydroliquefaction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

    1984-01-01

    A process is described for the liquefaction of coal in a hydrogen donor solvent in the presence of hydrogen and a co-catalyst combination of iron and a Group VI or Group VIII non-ferrous metal or compounds of the catalysts.

  17. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Training - Medical Training TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training The TEC Training and Medical Training Issues Topic Group was formed to address the training issues for emergency responders in the event of a radioactive material transportation incident. The Topic Group first met in 1996 to assist DOE in developing an approach to address radiological emergency response training needs and to avoid redundancy of existing training materials. The

  18. Underwater radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W.; McKnight, Richard P.

    1986-01-01

    A detector apparatus for differentiating between gamma and neutron radiation is provided. The detector includes a pair of differentially shielded Geiger-Mueller tubes. The first tube is wrapped in silver foil and the second tube is wrapped in lead foil. Both the silver and lead foils allow the passage of gamma rays at a constant rate in a gamma ray only field. When neutrons are present, however, the silver activates and emits beta radiation that is also detected by the silver wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube while the radiation detected by the lead wrapped Geiger-Mueller tube remains constant. The amount of radiation impinging on the separate Geiger-Mueller tubes is then correlated in order to distinguish between the neutron and gamma radiations.

  19. Nuclear radiation actuated valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, David W.; Schively, Dixon P.

    1985-01-01

    A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

  20. Radiation Effects In Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2011-06-01

    Protecting space missions from severe exposures from radiation, in general, and long duration/deep space human missions, in particular, is a critical design driver, and could be a limiting factor. The space radiation environment consists of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar particle events (SPE), trapped radiation, and includes ions of all the known elements over a very broad energy range. These ions penetrate spacecraft materials producing nuclear fragments and secondary particles that damage biological tissues and microelectronic devices. One is required to know how every element (and all isotopes of each element) in the periodic table interacts and fragments on every other element in the same table as a function of kinetic energy ranging over many decades. In addition, the accuracy of the input information and database, in general and nuclear data in particular, impacts radiation exposure health assessments and payload penalty. After a brief review of effects of space radiation on materials and electronics, human space missions to Mars is discussed.

  1. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, Nicholas J. (Livermore, CA); Kimbrough, Joseph R. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1996-01-01

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO.sub.2 insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron's generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO.sub.2 layer.

  2. Radiation-tolerant imaging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

    1996-11-19

    A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

  3. Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Radiation Measurement Program (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Broadband Outdoor Radiometer Calibration Process for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM) maintains a fleet of monitoring stations to aid in the improved scientific understanding of the basic physics related

  4. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

  5. Research Group Websites - Links - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Group Websites Dr. Sherry J. Yennello's Research Group Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Research Group...

  6. Non-LTE Radiation Transport in High Radiation Plasmas (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Non-LTE Radiation Transport in High Radiation Plasmas Citation Details ... DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: ...

  7. Sova Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sova Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sova Group Place: Kolkata, West Bengal, India Zip: 700012 Product: Kolkatta-based iron and steel major. The firm plans to foray into PV...

  8. Minoan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minoan Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Minoan Group Place: Kent, England, United Kingdom Zip: BR5 1XB Sector: Solar Product: UK-based developer of resorts in Greece that...

  9. ESV Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ESV Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ESV Group Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W1K 4QH Sector: Biofuels Product: UK-based investment agri-business involved in...

  10. Ensus Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ensus Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ensus Group Place: Stockton-on-Tees, England, United Kingdom Zip: TS15 9BW Product: North Yorkshire-based developer & operator of...

  11. Camco Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Camco Group Place: Jersey, United Kingdom Zip: JE2 4UH Sector: Carbon, Renewable Energy, Services Product: UK-based firm that provides...

  12. Weighted Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weighted Running Jobs by Group Weighted Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:54

  13. Klebl Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 6388 Product: Construction and engineering group with some experience building PV plants. References: Klebl Group1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  14. Evaluation of a performance appraisal framework for radiation therapists in planning and simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Jillian; Bridge, Pete; Brown, Elizabeth; Lusk, Ryan; Ferrari-Anderson, Janet

    2015-06-15

    Constantly evolving technology and techniques within radiation therapy require practitioners to maintain a continuous approach to professional development and training. Systems of performance appraisal and adoption of regular feedback mechanisms are vital to support this development yet frequently lack structure and rely on informal peer support. A Radiation Therapy Performance Appraisal Framework (RT-PAF) for radiation therapists in planning and simulation was developed to define expectations of practice and promote a supportive and objective culture of performance and skills appraisal. Evaluation of the framework was conducted via an anonymous online survey tool. Nine peer reviewers and fourteen recipients provided feedback on its effectiveness and the challenges and limitations of the approach. Findings from the evaluation were positive and suggested that both groups gained benefit from and expressed a strong interest in embedding the approach more routinely. Respondents identified common challenges related to the limited ability to implement suggested development strategies; this was strongly associated with time and rostering issues. This framework successfully defined expectations for practice and provided a fair and objective feedback process that focussed on skills development. It empowered staff to maintain their skills and reach their professional potential. Management support, particularly in regard to provision of protected time was highlighted as critical to the framework's ongoing success. The demonstrated benefits arising in terms of staff satisfaction and development highlight the importance of this commitment to the modern radiation therapy workforce.

  15. Physics-based dimension reduction in uncertainty quantification for radiative transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hetzler, A. C.; Adams, M. L.; Stripling Iv, H. F.; Hawkins, W. D.

    2013-07-01

    We present a physics-based methodology for quantifying the uncertainty in a given quantity of interest (QOI) that is contributed by uncertainties in opacities in radiation transport problems. Typically, opacities are tabulated as a function of density, temperature, and photon energy group. The size of this table makes a study of uncertainties at this level challenging because of the well-known 'curse of dimensionality.' We address this by studying uncertain parameters in the underlying physical model that generates the opacity tables. At this level, there are fewer uncertain parameters but still too many to analyze directly through computationally expensive radiation transport simulations. In order to explore this large uncertain parameter space, we develop two simplified radiation transport problems that are much less computationally demanding than the target problem of interest. An emulator is created for each QOI for each simplified problem using Bayesian Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (BMARS). This emulator is used to create a functional relationship between the QOIs and the uncertain parameters. Sensitivity analysis is performed using the emulator to determine which parameters contribute significantly to the uncertainty. This physics-based screening process reduces the dimension of the parameter space that is then studied via the computationally expensive radiation transport calculation to generate distributions of quantities of interest. Results of this research demonstrate that the QOIs for the target problem agree for varying screening criteria determined by the sensitivity analysis, and the QOIs agree well for varying Latin Hypercube Design (LHD) sample sizes for the uncertain space. (authors)

  16. Breakout Group 3: Water Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3: Water Management Participants Name Organization Tom Benjamin Argonne National ... National Laboratory Breakout Group 3: Water Management GAPSBARRIERS The Water ...

  17. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ?10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  18. Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Ingram, M.; Mason, W. B.; Whipple, G. H.; Howland, J. W.

    1952-04-07

    This report presents a review of present knowledge and concepts of the biological effects of ionizing radiations. Among the topics discussed are the physical and chemical effects of ionizing radiation on biological systems, morphological and physiological changes observed in biological systems subjected to ionizing radiations, physiological changes in the intact animal, latent changes following exposure of biological systems to ionizing radiations, factors influencing the biological response to ionizing radiation, relative effects of various ionizing radiations, and biological dosimetry.

  19. Estimation of solar radiation from Australian meteorological observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, W.W. )

    1991-01-01

    A carefully prepared set of Australian radiation and meteorological data was used to develop a system for estimating hourly or instantaneous broad direct, diffuse and global radiation from meteorological observations. For clear sky conditions relationships developed elsewhere were adapted to Australian data. For cloudy conditions the clouds were divided into two groups, high clouds and opaque (middle and low) clouds, and corrections were made to compensate for the bias due to reporting practices for almost clear and almost overcast skies. Careful consideration was given to the decrease of visible sky toward the horizon caused by the vertical extent of opaque clouds. Equations relating cloud and other meteorological observations to the direct and diffuse radiation contained four unknown quantities, functions of cloud amount and of solar elevation, which were estimated from the data. These were proportions of incident solar radiation passed on as direct and as diffuse radiation by high clouds, and as diffuse radiation by opaque clouds. When the resulting relationships were used to estimate global, direct and diffuse radiation on a horizontal surface, the results were good, especially for global radiation. Some discrepancies between estimates and measurements of diffuse and direct radiation were probably due to erroneously high measurements of diffuse radiation.

  20. Low Dose Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or

  1. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John; Wolf, Michael A.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  2. Radiation Safety System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vylet, Vaclav; Liu, James C.; Walker, Lawrence S.; /Los Alamos

    2012-04-04

    The goal of this work is to provide an overview of a Radiation safety system (RSS) designed for protection from prompt radiation hazard at accelerator facilities. RSS design parameters, functional requirements and constraints are derived from hazard analysis and risk assessment undertaken in the design phase of the facility. The two main subsystems of a RSS are access control system (ACS) and radiation control system (RCS). In this text, a common approach to risk assessment, typical components of ACS and RCS, desirable features and general design principles applied to RSS are described.

  3. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  4. Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biological Applications of Synchrotron Radiation: An Evaluation of the State of the Field ... Maxwell's equations show that electromagnetic radiation is generated when charged ...

  5. Radiation Safety Work Control Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-3) Rev. May 2014 Area: Form : ... Safety Office (namesignaturedate) Radiation Physics (namesignaturedate) Section 4: ...

  6. ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    West Antarctic Radiation Experiment of the most advanced atmospheric research ... From the fall of 2015 to early 2017, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) West ...

  7. US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinoskey, P.A.

    1997-02-01

    The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks.

  8. April 24, 2012, HSS Focus Group Training Working Group (TWG) Meeting - Agenda

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Group Charter Telecom April 24, 2012 11:00 am - 12:00 pm EST Central Call-in Locations: GTN C-411 / FORS 7G-040 Call-In: 301-903-6355 PROPOSED AGENDA Introductory Remarks......................................................Bill Eckroade Meeting Purpose/Process..........................................Mari-Jo Campagnone Pre-Decisional Draft Work Group Charter Discussion/Comment Resolution (1) 851............................Pat Worthington/Doug Stephens/Richard DeBusk - Implementation - Training

  9. Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy The objective of these biannual Working Group meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes. ssawg_summary_report.pdf (266.68 KB) More Documents & Publications Hydrgoen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting Summary Report Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report Hydrogen Storage Systems Anlaysis Working Group Meeting, December 12, 2006

  10. Studsvik Processing Facility Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

    2003-02-25

    Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

  11. Ionizing radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thacker, Louis H.

    1990-01-01

    An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

  12. RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . <' ," . . * . RADIATION APPLICATIONS INCORPORATED . 370 Lexl.ngton Avenue New York 17 New York jq.5' L- Contract No. A T (30-l)-2093 with the United States Atom ic Energy ...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 2021-08-11 SHANGHAI INST OF APPLIED PHYSICS CHINA 2020-10-23 SHANGHAI SYNCHROTRON RADIATION FACILITY 2020-10-23 SHANGHAI TECH UNIVERSITY 2019-01-23 SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY ...

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jorge L. Gardea-Torresdey, University of Texas at El Paso Joy C. Andrews, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Jose A. Hernandez-Viezcas, University of Texas at El Paso 2575 ...

  15. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

    1992-11-17

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

  16. Amorphous silicon radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Street, Robert A.; Perez-Mendez, Victor; Kaplan, Selig N.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

  17. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W.

    1985-01-01

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  18. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, L.W.

    1982-03-23

    A portal radiation monitor combines .1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES January 31, 2008 (11.6 KB) December 6, 2007 (11.96 KB) October 4, 2007 (16.46 KB) August 23, 2007 (26.38 KB) June 21, 2007 (41.02 KB) May 31, 2007 (31.04 KB) January 18, 2007 (93.16 KB) December 19, 2006 (28.83 KB) November 9, 2006 (19.84 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries August 17, 2006 (Draft) (17.12 KB) July 18, 2006 (Draft) (14.08 KB) June 20, 2006 (Draft) (16.18 KB) April 18, 2006 (27.83 KB) February 21, 2006 (32.98 KB) January 24, 2006 (19.36 KB) December 20, 2005 (13.79 KB) November 17, 2005 (17.52 KB) October 18, 2005 (18.51 KB) May 8, 2005 (29.42 KB) More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups

  1. ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

    2011-08-03

    Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data

  2. Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

  3. Serum Proteome Signature of Radiation Response: Upregulation of Inflammation-Related Factors and Downregulation of Apolipoproteins and Coagulation Factors in Cancer Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy—A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widlak, Piotr; Jelonek, Karol; Wojakowska, Anna; Pietrowska, Monika; Polanska, Joanna; Marczak, Łukasz; Miszczyk, Leszek; Składowski, Krzysztof

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation affects the proteome of irradiated cells and tissue, yet data concerning changes induced during radiation therapy (RT) in human blood are fragmentary and inconclusive. We aimed to identify features of serum proteome and associated processes involved in response to partial body irradiation during cancer treatment. Methods and Materials: Twenty patients with head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) and 20 patients with prostate cancer received definitive intensity modulated RT. Blood samples were collected before RT, just after RT, and 1 month after the end of RT. Complete serum proteome was analyzed in individual samples, using a shotgun liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry approach which allowed identification of approximately 450 proteins. Approximately 100 unique proteins were quantified in all samples after exclusion of immunoglobulins, and statistical significance of differences among consecutive samples was assessed. Processes associated with quantified proteins and their functional interactions were predicted using gene ontology tools. Results: RT-induced changes were marked in the HNSCC patient group: 22 upregulated and 33 downregulated proteins were detected in post-RT sera. Most of the changes reversed during follow-up, yet levels of some proteins remained affected 1 month after the end of RT. RT-upregulated proteins were associated with acute phase, inflammatory response, and complement activation. RT-downregulated proteins were associated with transport and metabolism of lipids (plasma apolipoproteins) and blood coagulation. RT-induced changes were much weaker in prostate cancer patients, which corresponded to differences in acute radiation toxicity observed in both groups. Nevertheless, general patterns of RT-induced sera proteome changes were similar in both of the groups of cancer patients. Conclusions: In this pilot study, we proposed to identify a molecular signature of radiation response, based on specific

  4. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E.

    1989-01-01

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  5. Electromagnetic radiation absorbers and modulators comprising polyaniline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, Arthur J.; Ginder, John M.; Roe, Mitchell G.; Hajiseyedjavadi, Hamid

    1992-01-01

    A composition for absorbing electromagnetic radiation, wherein said electromagnetic radiation possesses a wavelength generally in the range of from about 1000 Angstroms to about 50 meters, wherein said composition comprises a polyaniline composition of the formula ##STR1## where y can be equal to or greater than zero, and R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 are independently selected from the group containing of H, --OCH.sub.3, --CH.sub.3, --F, --Cl, --Br, --I, NR.sup.3 .sub.2, --NHCOR.sup.3, --OH, --O.sup.-, SR.sup.3, --OCOR.sup.3, --NO.sub.2, --COOH, --COOR.sup.3, --COR.sup.3, --CHO, and --CN, where R.sup.3 is a C.sub.1 to C.sub.8 alkyl, aryl or aralkyl group.

  6. Groups

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groupbig-clean-data" target"blank">read more

    Big Data Concentrated Solar Power DataAnalysis energy efficiency energy storage expert systems machine learning...

  7. Acoustic emission sensor radiation damage threshold experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beeson, K.M.; Pepper, C.E.

    1994-09-01

    Determination of the threshold for damage to acoustic emission sensors exposed to radiation is important in their application to leak detection in radioactive waste transport and storage. Proper response to system leaks is necessary to ensure the safe operation of these systems. A radiation impaired sensor could provide ``false negative or false positive`` indication of acoustic signals from leaks within the system. Research was carried out in the Radiochemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to determine the beta/gamma radiation damage threshold for acoustic emission sensor systems. The individual system consisted of an acoustic sensor mounted with a two part epoxy onto a stainless steel waveguide. The systems were placed in an irradiation fixture and exposed to a Cobalt-60 source. After each irradiation, the sensors were recalibrated by Physical Acoustics Corporation. The results were compared to the initial calibrations performed prior to irradiation and a control group, not exposed to radiation, was used to validate the results. This experiment determines the radiation damage threshold of each acoustic sensor system and verifies its life expectancy, usefulness and reliability for many applications in radioactive environments.

  8. Acute radiation syndrones and their management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1988-01-01

    Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

  9. The Global Environment Radiation Monitoring Network (GERMON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakheim, B.J.; Goellner, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Following the Chernobyl accident in 1986, a group of experts from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) met in France to discuss and develop the basic principles of a global environmental radiation monitoring network (GERMON). The basic functions of this network were to provide regular reports on environmental radiation levels and to be in a position to provide reliable and accurate radiation measurements on a quick and accurate radiation measurements on a quick turnaround basis in the event of a major radiation release. By 1992, although 58 countries had indicated an interest in becoming a part of the GERMON system, only 16 were providing data on a regular basis. This paper traces the history of GERMON from its inception in 1987 through its activities during 1993-4. It details the objectives of the network, describes functions, lists its participants, and presents obstacles in the current network. The paper examines the data requirements for radiological emergency preparedness and offers suggestions for the current system. The paper also describes the growing need for such a network. To add a domestic perspective, the authors present a summary of the environmental monitoring information system that was used by the NRC in 1986 in its analyses of the Chernobyl incident. Then we will use this 1986 experience to propose a method for the use of GERMON should a similar occasion arise in the future.

  10. National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, S. M.

    2012-08-01

    This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

  11. Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dosimetry Report Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835),

  12. Welcome - Modeling and Simulation Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCS Directorate ORNL Modeling and Simulation Group Computational Sciences & Engineering Division Home Organization Chart Staff Research Areas Major Projects Fact Sheets Publications M&S News Awards Contacts Intership Programs ORNL has lots of opportunities for students to conduct research in scientific fields. Check out our Fellowship and Intership programs Fellowships Interships RAMS Program Modeling and Simulation Group The ORNL Modeling and Simulation Group (MSG) develops

  13. HASQARD Focus Group - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contracting Wastren Advantage, Inc. HASQARD Focus Group Contracting ORP Contracts and Procurements RL Contracts and Procurements CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Mission Support Alliance Washington Closure Hanford HPM Corporation (HPMC) Wastren Advantage, Inc. Analytical Services HASQARD Focus Group Bechtel National, Inc. Washington River Protection Solutions HASQARD Focus Group Email Email Page | Print Print Page | Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size HASQARD Document HASQARD

  14. Creating Los Alamos Women's Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raeanna Sharp-Geiger-Creating a cleaner, greener environment March 28, 2014 Creating Los Alamos Women's Group Inspired by their informal dinner discussions, Raeanna Sharp-Geiger and a few of her female colleagues decided to create a new resource a few years ago, the Los Alamos Women's Group. They wanted to create a comfortable environment where women from all across the diverse Lab could network, collaborate, share ideas and gain a broader perspective of the Lab's mission. The Women's Group has

  15. Radiative transfer in atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Z.; Stamnes, K.; Weeks, W.F.; Tsay, S.C.

    1996-04-01

    Radiative energy is critical in controlling the heat and mass balance of sea ice, which significantly affects the polar climate. In the polar oceans, light transmission through the atmosphere and sea ice is essential to the growth of plankton and algae and, consequently, to the microbial community both in the ice and in the ocean. Therefore, the study of radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean system is of particular importance. Lacking a properly coupled radiative transfer model for the atmosphere-sea ice-ocean system, a consistent study of the radiative transfer in the polar atmosphere, snow, sea ice, and ocean system has not been undertaken before. The radiative transfer processes in the atmosphere and in the ice and ocean have been treated separately. Because the radiation processes in the atmosphere, sea ice, and ocean depend on each other, this separate treatment is inconsistent. To study the radiative interaction between the atmosphere, clouds, snow, sea ice, and ocean, a radiative transfer model with consistent treatment of radiation in the coupled system is needed and is under development.

  16. Data System Sciences & Engineering Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Architectures for National Security Risk Analysis Streaming Realtime Sensor Networks Visual Analytics Opportunities Contact Us Data System Sciences & Engineering Group DSSE goes...

  17. Schaeffler Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rolling bearings and linear products worldwide as well as a renowned supplier to the automotive industry. References: Schaeffler Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  18. Groups | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technologies. Groups Home Title Posts Members Subgroups Description Created sort icon Big Clean Data 2 We aim to bring together professionals who want to share ideas, knowledge...

  19. Marseglia Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diversified infrastructure developer. The firm is active in the fields of energy, tourism and hotels and real estate. References: Marseglia Group1 This article is a stub....

  20. Copelouzos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Copelouzos Group Place: Athens, Greece Product: Fully integrated business development organisation, servicing key industrial and technological sectors such...