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1

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

2

Radiative Processes Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323Program Accomplishments of themeeting, 10-14

3

Radiation Processing -an overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

4

Radiation Protection Group Annual Report 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RP Annual Report summarises the activities carried out by CERNs Radiation Protection Group in the year 2003. It includes contribution from the EN section of the TIS/IE Group on environmental monitoring. Chapter 1 reports on the measurements and estimations of the impact on the environment and public exposure due to the Organisations activities. Chapter 2 provides the results of the monitoring of CERNs staff, users and contractors to occupational exposure. Chapter 3 deals with operational radiation protection around the accelerators and in the experimental areas. Chapter 4 reports on RP design studies for the LHC and CNGS projects. Chapter 5 addresses the various services provided by the RP Group to other Groups and Divisions at CERN, which include managing radioactive waste, high-level dosimetry, lending radioactive test sources and shipping radioactive materials. Chapter 6 describes activities other than the routine and service tasks, i.e. development work in the field of instrumentation and res...

Silari, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group andCompositional Variation The Computationalof

6

Diffusion processes in general relativistic radiating spheres  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The influence of diffusion processes on the dynamics of general relativistic radiating spheres is systematically studied by means of two examples. Differences between the streaming-out limit and the diffusion limit are exhibited, for both models, through the evolution curves of dynamical variables. In particular it is shown the Bondi mass decreases, for both models, in the diffusion limit as compared with its value at the streaming-out regime. 15 refs.

Barreto, W.; Herrera, L.; Santos, N.O. (Oriente Universidad, Cumana (Venezuela); Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas; Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

2 OVERVIEW OF THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 OVERVIEW OF THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS 2.1 Introduction This chapter provides a brief overview of the Radiation Survey and Site Investigation (RSSI) Process, several important aspects of this Process, and its underlying principles. The concepts introduced here are discussed

8

Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a ...

Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

consider the issue of radiation monitoring exclusively within the context of dedicated trains. Pat Edwards asked how many states currently had FRA Hazmat inspectors. Kevin...

10

Evolution of the radiation processing industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early investigations of the effects of treating materials with ionizing radiations began in 1894 with the irradiation of gases at atmospheric pressure using cathode rays from a Crookes gas-discharge tube, in 1895 with the discovery of X-rays emitted from a Crookes tube, and in 1896 with the discovery of radioactivity in uranium. In 1897, small electrically charged particles were detected and identified in the gas discharges inside Crookes tubes. These particles were then named electrons. During the next three decades, it was found that these novel forms of energy could produce ions to initiate chemical reactions in some gases and liquids. By 1921, it had also been shown that insects, parasites and bacteria could be killed by treatment with ionizing radiation. In 1925, a high-vacuum tube with a thermionic cathode and a thin metallic anode was developed to produce electron beams in air by using accelerating potentials up to 250 kilovolts. That unique apparatus was the precursor of the many types of electron accelerators that have been developed since then for a variety of industrial applications. In 1929, the vulcanization of natural rubber without using any chemical additives was achieved by irradiation with electrons from a 250 kilovolt accelerator. In 1939, several liquid monomers were polymerized by treatment with gamma rays from radioactive nuclides. These early results were not exploited before the end of World War II because intense sources of ionizing radiation were not available then. Shortly after that war, there was increased interest in developing the peaceful uses of atomic energy, which included the chemical and biological effects of radiation exposures. Many uses that have been developed since then are described briefly in this paper. These industrial applications are now producing billions of US dollars in revenue every year.

Cleland, Marshall R. [IBA Industrial, Inc., 151 Heartland Boulevard, Edgewood, NY 11717 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, Carol S. (14316 Bauer Rd., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Reed, Scott (10308 Leymon Court, N.W., Albuquerque, NM 87114); Walko, Robert J. (3215 Blume, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

http://gpi.sagepub.com/ Group Processes & Intergroup  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.htmlCitations: What is This? - Feb 15, 2011OnlineFirst Version of Record - Jun 14, 2011Version of Record>> at TEXAS to successful real (Marx & Roman, 2002) or fictitious role models (McIntyre, Paulson, & Lord, 2003). When Barack Obama's Article 382680GPIXXX10.1177/1368430210382680Taylor et al.Group Processes & Intergroup Relations

Cooper, Brenton G.

14

Summary report of working group 5: Beam and radiation generation, monitoring, and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the activities and presentations of Working Group 5 of the Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop held at Annapolis, Maryland in June 2010. Working Group 5 touched on a broad range of topics in the fields of beam and radiation generation and their monitoring and control. These topics were not comprehensively covered in this Workshop, but rather the Working Group concentrated on specific new developments and recent investigations. The Working Group divided its sessions into four broad categories: cathodes and electron guns, radiation generation, beam diagnostics, and beam control and dynamics. This summary is divided into the same structure.

Church, Mike; /Fermilab; Kim, Ki-Yong; /Maryland U.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense.

H. Dong; Qing-yu Cai; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Paul Sellin, Radiation Imaging Group The role of defects on CdTe detector performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Paul Sellin, Radiation Imaging Group The role of defects on CdTe detector performance P.J. Sellin1-destructive material characterisation techniques have been applied to CdTe wafers grown by the Travelling Heater Method Imaging Group PL mapping of whole CdTe wafers PL ( =819 nm) scan for two CdTe wafers, (left: wafer L700

Sellin, Paul

18

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells.

Birkmire, Robert W. (Churchville, MD); Schultz, Jerold M. (Newark, DE); Marudachalam, Matheswaran (Newark, DE); Hichri, Habib (Newark, DE)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells. 4 figs.

Birkmire, R.W.; Schultz, J.M.; Marudachalam, M.; Hichri, H.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

12010-10-21 ESDSWG -Technolgy Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

12010-10-21 ESDSWG - Technolgy Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process Steve Olding 9th Infusion Working Group Technology Infusion Process 2009 Stakeholder needs identification Science needs End technologies Candidate technologies Known infusion barriers Infusion planning Technology matching Identified

Christian, Eric

23

Validation and Simplification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification for Glioblastoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Previous recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of patients with malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] and anaplastic astrocytoma [AA]) produced six prognostic groups (I-VI) classified by six factors. We sought here to determine whether the classification for GBM could be improved by using an updated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) GBM database excluding AA and by considering additional baseline variables. Methods and Materials: The new analysis considered 42 baseline variables and 1,672 GBM patients from the expanded RTOG glioma database. Patients receiving radiation only were excluded such that all patients received radiation+carmustine. 'Radiation dose received' was replaced with 'radiation dose assigned.' The new RPA models were compared with the original model by applying them to a test dataset comprising 488 patients from six other RTOG trials. Fitness of the original and new models was evaluated using explained variation. Results: The original RPA model explained more variations in survival in the test dataset than did the new models (20% vs. 15%) and was therefore chosen for further analysis. It was reduced by combining Classes V and VI to produce three prognostic classes (Classes III, IV, and V+VI), as Classes V and VI had indistinguishable survival in the test dataset. The simplified model did not further improve performance (explained variation 18% vs. 20%) but is easier to apply because it involves only four variables: age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. Applying this simplified model to the updated GBM database resulted in three distinct classes with median survival times of 17.1, 11.2, and 7.5 months for Classes III, IV, and V+VI, respectively. Conclusions: The final model, the simplified original RPA model combining Classes V and VI, resulted in three distinct prognostic groups defined by age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. This classification will be used in future RTOG GBM trials.

Li Jing [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang Meihua; Won, Minhee [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Coughlin, Christopher [Federal Bureau of Prisons, Butner, NC (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory Clinic, Atlanta, GA (United States); Mehta, Minesh P., E-mail: mehta@humonc.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Minority Group Interests and Political Representation: Gay Elected Officials in the Policy Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Of key importance to groups in a democracy is the political representation of their interests in the policy process. The most obvious strategy of groups to achieve representation is to elect officials that identify with ...

Haider-Markel, Donald P.; Joslyn, Mark R.; Kniss, Chad J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DISSERTATION THE EFFECTS OF RADIATIVE AND MICROPHYSICAL PROCESSES ON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

model is coupled in a consistent fashion to the bulk microphysical parameterization of Walko et al. (1995), an explicit liquid bin microphysical model (e.g. Feingold et al. 1996a) and a mixed­phase that boundary layer stability is strongly dependent upon ice processes, illustrating that the rapid reduction

Harrington, Jerry Y.

28

Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

Autrique, D. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany) [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Gornushkin, I. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Alexiades, V. [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States); Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Rethfeld, B. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)] [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Political science is the study of governments, political processes, public policies and political behavior by groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Political science is the study of governments, political processes, public policies and political behavior by groups or individuals. Coursework is divided into four areas of study: American Politics. U.S. political institutions at the national level (e.g., Congress, Presidency, Judiciary), state and local

Saldin, Dilano

30

Standard Guide for Absorbed-Dose Mapping in Radiation Processing Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This document provides guidance in determining absorbed-dose distributions in products, materials or substances irradiated in gamma, X-ray (bremsstrahlung) and electron beam facilities. Note 1For irradiation of food and the radiation sterilization of health care products, other specific ISO and ISO/ASTM standards containing dose mapping requirements exist. For food irradiation, see ISO/ASTM 51204, Practice for Dosimetry in Gamma Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing and ISO/ASTM 51431, Practice for Dosimetry in Electron and Bremsstrahlung Irradiation Facilities for Food Processing. For the radiation sterilization of health care products, see ISO 11137: 1995, Sterilization of Health Care Products Requirements for Validation and Routine Control Radiation Sterilization. In those areas covered by ISO 11137, that standard takes precedence. ISO/ASTM Practice 51608, ISO/ASTM Practice 51649, and ISO/ASTM Practice 51702 also contain dose mapping requirements. 1.2 Methods of analyzing the dose map data ar...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A-1 PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau on several projects: near-surface atmospheric temperature profiles, radiosonde performance at low images, and improvement of calibration procedures for interferometers. In the proposed work, analyses

Walden, Von P.

32

Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climatic Impact of Global-Scale Deforestation: Radiative versus Nonradiative Processes EDOUARD L­ocean­atmosphere GCM is used to explore the biogeophysical impact of large-scale deforestation on surface climate that the surface albedo increase owing to deforestation has a cooling effect of 21.36 K globally. On the other hand

Haak, Hein

33

Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chisholm, Matthew F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup October 11, 2007 More...

35

A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

Radiation reaction and renormalization via conservation laws of the Poincare group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the self-action problem in classical electrodynamics of a point-like charge arbitrarily moving in flat space-time of four or six dimensions. A consistent regularization procedure is proposed which exploits the symmetry properties of the theory. The energy-momentum and angular momentum balance equations allow us to derive the radiation reaction forces in both 4D and 6D. It is shown that a point-like source in 6D possesses an internal angular momentum with magnitude which is proportional to the square of acceleration. 6D action functional contains, apart from usual "bare" mass, an additional renormalization constant which corresponds to the curvature of the world line (i.e. to the magnitude of internal angular momentum of "bare" particle). It is demonstrated that the {\\it Poincar\\'e-invariant} six-dimensional electrodynamics is renormalizable theory.

Yurij Yaremko

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

POTENTIAL AND FUTURE TRENDS ON INDUSTRIAL RADIATION PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY APPLICATION IN EMERGING COUNTRY - BRAZIL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brazil started the use of radiation technology in the seventies on crosslinking polyethylene for insulation of wire and electronic cables and sterilization of medical care devices. The present status of industrial applications of radiation shows that the use of this technology is increasing according to the economical development and the necessity to become the products manufactured in the local industries competitive in quality and price for internal and external market. The on going development activities in this area are concentrated on polymers processing (materials modification), foodstuff treatment and environmental protection. The development, the promotion and the technical support to consolidate this technology to the local industries is the main attribution of Institute for Energetic and Nuclear Research-IPEN, a governmental Institution.

Sampa, M.H.O.; Omi, N.M.; Rela, C.S.; Tsai, D.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Impact of Ultrahigh Baseline PSA Levels on Biochemical and Clinical Outcomes in Two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Prostate Clinical Trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess ultrahigh (UH; prostate-specific antigen [PSA]levels {>=}50 ng/ml) patient outcomes by comparison to other high-risk patient outcomes and to identify outcome predictors. Methods and Materials: Prostate cancer patients (PCP) from two Phase III Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials (studies 9202 and 9413) were divided into two groups: high-risk patients with and without UH baseline PSA levels. Predictive variables included age, Gleason score, clinical T stage, Karnofsky performance score, and treatment arm. Outcomes included overall survival (OS), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF). Unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using either the Cox or Fine and Gray's regression model with associated 95% confidence intervals (CI) and p values. Results: There were 401 patients in the UH PSA group and 1,792 patients in the non-UH PSA PCP group of a total of 2,193 high-risk PCP. PCP with UH PSA were found to have inferior OS (HR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.02-1.39, p = 0.02), DM (HR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.19-1.92; p = 0.0006), and BF (HR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.29-1.73; p < 0.0001) compared to other high-risk PCP. In the UH cohort, PSA level was found to be a significant factor for the risk of DM (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.02) but not OS and BF. Gleason grades of 8 to 10 were found to consistently predict for poor OS, DM, and BF outcomes (with HR estimates ranging from 1.41-2.36) in both the high-risk cohort and the UH cohort multivariable analyses. Conclusions: UH PSA levels at diagnosis are related to detrimental changes in OS, DM, and BF. All three outcomes can be modeled by various combinations of all predictive variables tested.

Rodrigues, George, E-mail: george.rodrigues@lhsc.on.c [Department of Oncology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Donnelly, Bryan [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Grignon, David [Department of Pathology, Indiana Pathology Institute, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Hanks, Gerald [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Porter, Arthur [Department of Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Lepor, Herbert [Department of Urology, NY University Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Sandler, Howard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Relative Effectiveness of Positive Interdependence and Group Processing on Student Achievement, Interaction, and Attitude in Online Cooperative Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of positive interdependence and group processing on student achievement, interaction, and attitude in online cooperative learning. All of the participants, 144 college students...

Nam, Chang Woo

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

40

Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko V. [UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Roach, Mack [UCSF, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

QED radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons with the next-to-leading accuracy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated with the next-to-leading (NLO) accuracy. The contributions of loops and two photon emission were presented in analytical form. The covariant approach of Bardin and Shumeiko was used to extract the infrared divergence. All contributions to the radiative correction were presented in the form of the correction to the leptonic tensor thus allowing for further applications in other experiments, e.g., deep inelastic scattering. The radiative corrections (RC) to the cross sections and polarization asymmetries were analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of the current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Specific attention was paid on analyzing kinematical conditions for the process with large radiative effect when momenta of two photons in the final state are collinear to momenta of initial and final electrons, respectively.

Akushevich, Igor V. [Duke University, JLAB; Ilyichev, Alexander [Byelorussian State University; Shumeiko, Nikolai M [Byelorussian State University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, Hugh L. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shanmugam and Moiola (1994a, b, 1995) have generated substantial controversy and reexamination of what was originally thought to be a well-understood stratigraphic interval of deep-water origin in the Carboniferous Jackfork Group of Arkansas and Oklahoma. This reexamination of interpretation is good in that it forces sedimentologists, sequence stratigraphers, and reservoir geologists to reconsider their understanding of deep-water processes and products, usage of scientific terms to communicate interpretations, and the economic consequences of being nearly right or certainly wrong. Examination of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) prompts brief comments on three issues: (1) the classification of a sedimentary deposit based on the sedimentary process during the final moments of deposition, (2) the use of apparently irrelevant analogs to interpret depositional and postdepositional processes and products, and (3) the regional interpretation of overall depositional environment from very specific and very local observations of sedimentary products.

Coleman, J.L. Jr. [Amoco Worldwide Exploration Business Group, Houston, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

Laderman, S. (Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Pianetta, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: ? Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. ? Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. ? Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

Kinetic simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes: Ethane hydrogenolysis over supported group VIII metals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A kinetic model for ethane hydrogenolysis over Pt, Pd, Ir, and Co was formulated in terms of essentially two chemical parameters: the strength of bonding between atomic hydrogen and the metal surface and the strength of carbon-metal bonding between hydrocarbon fragments and the surface. These two surface bond strengths were estimated by calorimetric measurements of the heats of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption, combined with bond order conservation calculations. The results of the kinetic simulations suggest that ethane hydrogenolysis over Pt, Pd, Ir and Co takes place through irreversible C-C rupture of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 3} surface species. Hydrogenation of monocarbon CH{sub y} fragments is kinetically insignificant. Dissociative adsorption of hydrogen is an equilibrated process, while dissociative adsorption of ethane is slow and reversible. Finally, the role of kinetic modeling in the formulation, interpretation, and generalization of experimental research in heterogeneous catalysis is discussed.

Goddard, S.A.; Amiridis, M.D.; Rekoske, J.E.; Cardona-Martinez, N.; Dumesic, J.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Materials and Processes for Direct Sun-to-Fuel Chemical Transformations Solar radiation can be used to drive heterogeneous electrochemical reactions at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials and Processes for Direct Sun-to-Fuel Chemical Transformations Solar radiation can be used and an efficient means for solar radiation delivery and trapping, poses a major challenge to the commercialization material with superior intrinsic properties, but a synergetic and intimately coupled combination of solar

Li, Mo

49

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED MELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT DENSITY A Thesis by ROBIN KENT DEVORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1973 Major Subject: Industrial Hygiene THE EFFECTIVE SPECTRAL IRRADIANCE OF ULTRAVIOLET RADIATIONS FROM INERT-GAS-SHIELDED WELDING PROCESSES IN RELATION TO THE ARC CURRENT...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Information visualization for in-car communication processes Michael Sedlmair, BMW Group Research and Technology, Germany, Michael.Sedlmair@bmw.de  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information visualization for in-car communication processes Michael Sedlmair, BMW Group Research and Technology, Germany, Michael.Sedlmair@bmw.de Supervisor: Andreas Butz, University of Munich, Germany, Andreas

53

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeVries, M.B. [Exxon Company, Houston, TX (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Dental Budget Process: Determination Schema Industry Sponsored, Industry Supported, University to University, Co-operative Group or Foundation Supported Clinical Trials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11/5/2013 Dental Budget Process: Determination Schema Industry Sponsored, Industry Supported, University to University, Co-operative Group or Foundation Supported Clinical Trials DENTAL BUDGET PROCESS to have a Budget Workbook done by staff in the Office of Clinical & Translational Research (OCTR) before

Oliver, Douglas L.

55

Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using ?-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

Caylar, Beno?-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Phase 3 Trial of Whole Brain Radiation Therapy and Stereotactic Radiosurgery Alone Versus WBRT and SRS With Temozolomide or Erlotinib for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and 1 to 3 Brain Metastases: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0320  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: A phase 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) study subset analysis demonstrated improved overall survival (OS) with the addition of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases. Because temozolomide (TMZ) and erlotinib (ETN) cross the blood-brain barrier and have documented activity in NSCLC, a phase 3 study was designed to test whether these drugs would improve the OS associated with WBRT + SRS. Methods and Materials: NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases were randomized to receive WBRT (2.5 Gy 15 to 37.5 Gy) and SRS alone, versus WBRT + SRS + TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}/day 21 days) or ETN (150 mg/day). ETN (150 mg/day) or TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/day 5 days/month) could be continued for as long as 6 months after WBRT + SRS. The primary endpoint was OS. Results: After 126 patients were enrolled, the study closed because of accrual limitations. The median survival times (MST) for WBRT + SRS, WBRT + SRS + TMZ, and WBRT + SRS + ETN were qualitatively different (13.4, 6.3, and 6.1 months, respectively), although the differences were not statistically significant. Time to central nervous system progression and performance status at 6 months were better in the WBRT + SRS arm. Grade 3 to 5 toxicity was 11%, 41%, and 49% in arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P<.001). Conclusion: The addition of TMZ or ETN to WBRT + SRS in NSCLC patients with 1 to 3 brain metastases did not improve survival and possibly had a deleterious effect. Because the analysis is underpowered, these data suggest but do not prove that increased toxicity was the cause of inferior survival in the drug arms.

Sperduto, Paul W., E-mail: psperduto@mropa.com [Metro MN CCOP, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Wang, Meihua [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Robins, H. Ian [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [University of Wisconsin Medical School Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Schell, Michael C. [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Komaki, Ritsuko [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Khuntia, Deepak [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [University of Wisconsin Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Demas, William [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States)] [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shah, Sunjay A. [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States)] [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, CCOP, Newark, Delaware (United States); Nedzi, Lucien A. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, Dallas, Texas (United States); Perry, Gad [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)] [The Ottawa Hospital Cancer Centre, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Suh, John H. [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)] [Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) put forth a new interpretation of sandstone depositional processes in the Jackfork Group exposed in the spillway at DeGray Lake, near Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Their novel interpretation of deposition dominated by sandy, matrix-supported debris flows is at odds with nearly every other investigation of the Jackfork to date. One key to their interpretation is their contention that the Jackfork sandstones have a high matrix content (as high as 25%). The high matrix content is critical to their arguments about the textural characteristics and flow properties of debris flows vs. turbidites. In our guidebook, we presented a large volume of petrographic data collected from samples taken from the Jackfork exposed on the east and west sides of the Spillway at DeGray Lake (and other locations as well). D`Agostino performed nearly al of the petrographic analyses presented in that guidebook. We disagree strongly with the reinterpretations of Shanmugam and Moiola and believe we can confidently address issues of petrography and matrix content. Specifically, we wish to address four points: (1) the amount of petrographic sampling done by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995); i.e., sampling density in a 327-m- (1072-ft) thick section, (2) overall matrix content of Jackfork sandstones, and Shanmugam and Moiola`s misrepresentation of our data, plus their apparent unfamiliarity with pertinent published data on the petrography of the Jackfork, (3) the distinction among authigenic clay, density in a 327-m- (1072-ft-) thick section, (2) overall matrix content of Jackfork sandstones, and Shanmugam and Moiola`s misrepresentation of our data, plus their apparent unfamiliarity with pertinent published data on the petrography of the Jackfork, (3) the distinction among authigenic clay, detrital clay, and other matrix materials, which Shanmugam and Moiola do not adequately discuss, and (4) the relationship of matrix content to their own facies classification scheme.

D`Agostino, A.E.; Jordan, D.W. [TD Geoscience, Midland, TX (United States); Jordan, D.W. [ARCO International Oil & Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Evolution in the H I Gas Content of Galaxy Groups: Pre-Processing and Mass Assembly in the Current Epoch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (HI) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey alpha.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the HI properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the SDSS and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA HI detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS DR7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group "proximity" membership to HI detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude--thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group HI mass. We find that only 25% of the HI detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and HI detections in groups as a function of parent dark matt...

Hess, Kelley M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Combustion Group Group members  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combustion Group Group members: Thierry Poinsot, Emilien Courtine, Luc Vervisch, Benjamin Farcy 2014 #12;Combustion Group Combustion Physics and Modeling Pollutants, Emissions, and Soot Formation Thermoacoustics and Combustion Dynamics Research focus § Examine mechanisms responsible for flame stabilization

Wang, Wei

60

Radiation- and Depleted Uranium-Induced Carcinogenesis Studies: Characterization of the Carcinogenic Process and Development of Medical Countermeasures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

External or internal contamination from radioactive elements during military operations or a terrorist attack is a serious threat to military and civilian populations. External radiation exposure could result from conventional military scenarios including nuclear weapons use and low-dose exposures during radiation accidents or terrorist attacks. Alternatively, internal radiation exposure could result from depleted uranium exposure via DU shrapnel wounds or inhalation. The long-term health effects of these types of radiation exposures are not well known. Furthermore, development of pharmacological countermeasures to low-dose external and internal radiological contamination is essential to the health and safety of both military and civilian populations. The purpose of these studies is to evaluate low-dose radiation or DU-induced carcinogenesis using in vitro and in vivo models, and to test safe and efficacious medical countermeasures. A third goal of these studies is to identify biomarkers of both exposure and disease development. Initially, we used a human cell model (human osteoblast cells, HOS) to evaluate the carcinogenic potential of DU in vitro by assessing morphological transformation, genotoxicity (chromosomal aberrations), mutagenic (HPRT loci), and genomic instability. As a comparison, low-dose cobalt radiation, broad-beam alpha particles, and other military-projectile metals, i.e., tungsten mixtures, are being examined. Published data from

A. C. Miller; D. Beltran; R. Rivas; M. Stewart; R. J. Merlot; P. B. Lison

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) presented a novel reinterpretation of the Jackfork Group in the DeGray Spillway and Kiamichi Mountain sections, Arkansas and Oklahoma, suggesting that thick-bedded sandstones in these sections, previously interpreted as turbidites, are debris-flow deposits. Careful assessment of this reinterpretation is critical because the Jackfork serves as a classic North American sediment-gravity flow sequence and because the techniques of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), if applied widely, would lead to reinterpretation, and in my view, misinterpretation, of virtually every sediment-gravity flow sequence in the geologic record. In this discussion, I focus on only three of the many issues raised by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995): (1) their rejection of the concept of high density turbidity currents; (2) their description of the Jackfork Group in DeGray Spillway; and (3) their criteria for distinguishing between turbidites and debris-flow deposits.

Lowe, D.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Reply  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in science is often made when we make new observations, question old paradigms that do not work, and introduce new concepts. We attempted to do all this in our paper on the Jackfork Group (Shanmugam and Moiola, 1995). To allow Bulletin readers to appreciate the sequence of events leading to our controversial paper that provoked the preceding critiques, we need to place our contributions in a historical perspective. Our involvement with the Ouachitas began in the late 1960s when Moiola initiated a study of the Upper Carboniferous deep-water succession. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, we perpetuated the {open_quotes}turbidite{close_quotes} paradigm by continuing to interpret the Jackfork Group and associated strata according to conventional wisdom. However, we were always troubled by the virtual absence of normal grading in these classic turbidite deposits.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS high sampling resolution to study the twilight zone around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARMs 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARMs operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

Simon Phillpot; James Tulenko

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

High-Temperature Processing of Solids Through Solar Nebular Bow Shocks: 3D Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations with Particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fundamental, unsolved problem in Solar System formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks has been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H$_2$ is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulati...

Boley, A C; Desch, S J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} deep-water outcrops of the Pennsylvanian upper Jackfork Group in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, recently discussed by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), are especially significant to the petroleum industry because they have long been used as an analog to fine-grained, deep-water clastic reservoirs throughout the world. Numerous industry, academic, and government geoscientists have studied these outcrops for many years. As Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) point out, several interpretations of these outcrops have been made through the years. These changing interpretations coincide with the evolution of knowledge about deep-marine sedimentation and reservoirs. These outcrops have been constantly reexamined as petroleum geoscientists have brought their global exploration and production experience to the field.

Slatt, R.M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Weimer, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma and Its Application to Plasma Diagnostics Takayoshi Ohji1 and Thomas W. Eagar Received May 16 ifinfraredradiation from an arc plasma can fie used for diagnostic purposes. Tire properties of IR radiation to be solved in arc plasma diagnostics. For example, the spectro- s~opic method, while powerful, requires

Eagar, Thomas W.

68

Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children's Oncology Group Phase 2 Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the effects on 1-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining motexafin and gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiation therapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5- to 10-min intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2 to 5 h prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated 1-year EFS was 18% {+-} 5%, and the estimated 1-year OS was 53% {+-} 6.5%. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusions: Compared to historical controls, the addition of MGd to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas.

Bradley, Kristin A., E-mail: bradley@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Zhou Tianni [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); McNall-Knapp, Rene Y. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Jakacki, Regina I. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Levy, Adam S. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Vezina, Gilbert [Department of Radiology, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

HIGH-TEMPERATURE PROCESSING OF SOLIDS THROUGH SOLAR NEBULAR BOW SHOCKS: 3D RADIATION HYDRODYNAMICS SIMULATIONS WITH PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental, unsolved problem in solar system formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks have been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through three-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H{sub 2} is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulations and their thermal histories are recorded. Adiabatic expansion creates rapid cooling of the gas, and tail shocks behind the embryo can cause secondary heating events. Radiative transport is efficient, and bow shocks around planetoids can have luminosities ?few 10{sup 8} L{sub ?}. While barred and radial chondrule textures could be produced in the radiative shocks explored here, porphyritic chondrules may only be possible in the adiabatic limit. We present a series of predicted cooling curves that merit investigation in laboratory experiments to determine whether the solids produced by bow shocks are represented in the meteoritic record by chondrules or other solids.

Boley, A. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Morris, M. A. [Center for Meteorite Studies, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 876004, Tempe, AZ 88287-6004 (United States); Desch, S. J. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

70

Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through the largest gift in kind in the history of Penn State's College of Information Sciences and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through, Armstrong Process Group (APG), a leading enterprise architecture service provider, is contributing software, research collaboration and organizational guidance to the Center. "We are very happy to have the Armstrong

Petrick, Irene J.

71

ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A ADAPTIVE RADIATION ROSEMARY G. GILLESPIE University of California, Berkeley Adaptive radiation- tions and convergence of species groups on different land masses. Since then, adaptive radiation has diversity within a rapidly multiplying lineage." There are radiations that are not adaptive

Gillespie, Rosemary

72

Kinetics and radiative processes in Xe/I{sub 2} inductively coupled rf discharges at low pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental concern over the presence of mercury in conventional fluorescent lamps has motivated research into alternative electrically efficient near UV plasma lighting sources. One such candidate is multi-wavelength UV emission from Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures, including excimer radiation from XeI at 253 nm. Previous studies of the XeI system were performed at high pressures and were intended for laser applications. Practical Xe/I{sub 2} lamps will likely operate in the 0.5--10 torr regime and use electrodeless excitation to avoid issues related to electrode erosion by the halogen. In this paper, the authors report on an experimental investigation of low pressure, inductively coupled plasmas sustained in Xe/I{sub 2} mixtures. The goals of this work are to characterize the UV emission and determine excitation mechanisms in a parameter space of interest to lighting applications.

Barnes, P.N.; Verdeyen, J.T.; Kushner, M.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

O'Neil, Peter

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dosevolume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dosevolume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

Kron, Tomas, E-mail: Tomas.Kron@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Willis, David; Link, Emma [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lehman, Margot [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Campbell, Gillian [Auckland City Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland (New Zealand); O'Brien, Peter [Newcastle Calvary Mater Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Chua, Boon [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume 2, Appendix A: Process and protocol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix contains documentation prepared by the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Working Group for conducting the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Assessment and training the assessment teams. It has the following five parts. (1) The Project Plan describes the genesis of the project, sets forth the goals, objectives and scope, provides definitions, the projected schedule, and elements of protocol. (2) The Assessment Plan provides a detailed methodology necessary to guide the many professionals who have been recruited to conduct the DOE-wide assessment. It provides guidance on which types and forms of plutonium are to be considered within the scope of the assessment, and lays out the assessment methodology to be used. (3) The memorandum from the Project to Operations Office Managers provides the protocol and direction for participation in the assessment by external stakeholders and members of the public; and the guidance for the physical inspection of plutonium materials in storage. (4) The memorandum from the Project to the assessment teams provides guidance for vulnerability screening criteria, vulnerability evaluation and prioritization process, and vulnerability quantification for prioritization. (5) The Team Training manual was used at the training session held in Colorado Springs on April 19--21, 1994 for all members of the Working Group Assessment Teams and for the leaders of the Site Assessment Teams. The goal was to provide the same training to all of the individuals who would be conducting the assessments, and thereby provide consistency in the conduct of the assessments and uniformity in reporting of the results. The training manual in Section A.5 includes supplemental material provided to the attendees after the meeting.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radiation analysis devices, radiation analysis methods, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation analysis devices include circuitry configured to determine respective radiation count data for a plurality of sections of an area of interest and combine the radiation count data of individual of sections to determine whether a selected radioactive material is present in the area of interest. An amount of the radiation count data for an individual section is insufficient to determine whether the selected radioactive material is present in the individual section. An article of manufacture includes media comprising programming configured to cause processing circuitry to perform processing comprising determining one or more correction factors based on a calibration of a radiation analysis device, measuring radiation received by the radiation analysis device using the one or more correction factors, and presenting information relating to an amount of radiation measured by the radiation analysis device having one of a plurality of specified radiation energy levels of a range of interest.

Roybal, Lyle Gene

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

78

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the ?¢????solar-background?¢??? mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM?¢????s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS?¢???? 1 Hz sampling to study the ?¢????twilight zone?¢??? around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM?¢????s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM?¢????s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

79

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Whole-pelvis, 'mini-pelvis,' or prostate-only external beam radiotherapy after neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy in patients treated in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9413 trial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 9413 trial demonstrated a better progression-free survival (PFS) with whole-pelvis (WP) radiotherapy (RT) compared with prostate-only (PO) RT. This secondary analysis was undertaken to determine whether 'mini-pelvis' (MP; defined as {>=}10 x 11 cm but <11 x 11 cm) RT resulted in progression-free survival (PFS) comparable to that of WP RT. To avoid a timing bias, this analysis was limited to patients receiving neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy (N and CHT) in Arms 1 and 2 of the study. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had a risk of lymph node (LN) involvement >15%. Neoadjuvant and concurrent hormonal therapy (N and CHT) was administered 2 months before and during RT for 4 months. From April 1, 1995, to June 1, 1999, a group of 325 patients were randomized to WP RT + N and CHT and another group of 324 patients were randomized to receive PO RT + N and CHT. Patients randomized to PO RT were dichotomized by median field size (10 x 11 cm), with the larger field considered an 'MP' field and the smaller a PO field. Results: The median PFS was 5.2, 3.7, and 2.9 years for WP, MP, and PO fields, respectively (p = 0.02). The 7-year PFS was 40%, 35%, and 27% for patients treated to WP, MP, and PO fields, respectively. There was no association between field size and late Grade 3+ genitourinary toxicity but late Grade 3+ gastrointestinal RT complications correlated with increasing field size. Conclusions: This subset analysis demonstrates that RT field size has a major impact on PFS, and the findings support comprehensive nodal treatment in patients with a risk of LN involvement of >15%.

Roach, Mack [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: roach@radonc17.ucsf.edu; De Silvio, Michelle [RTOG Statistical Headquarters, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Valicenti, Richard [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Grignon, David [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Asbell, Sucha O. [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland OR (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

82

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned Small BusinessEMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION ATSubgroup | DepartmentDepartment

83

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

none,

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Galaxy formation with radiative and chemical feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we introduce GAMESH, a novel pipeline which implements self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback in a computational model of galaxy formation. By combining the cosmological chemical-evolution model GAMETE with the radiative transfer code CRASH, GAMESH can post process realistic outputs of a N-body simulation describing the redshift evolution of the forming galaxy. After introducing the GAMESH implementation and its features, we apply the code to a low-resolution N-body simulation of the Milky Way formation and we investigate the combined effects of self-consistent radiative and chemical feedback. Many physical properties, which can be directly compared with observations in the Galaxy and its surrounding satellites, are predicted by the code along the merger-tree assembly. The resulting redshift evolution of the Local Group star formation rates, reionisation and metal enrichment along with the predicted Metallicity Distribution Function of halo stars are critically compared with observations. We dis...

Graziani, L; Schneider, R; Kawata, D; de Bennassuti, M; Maselli, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Group X  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

Fields, Susannah

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome toResearchInnovationSPEAR3Deadlines Beam7 - March

88

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects theEnvironment, SafetyEHSSafety Committee

89

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects theEnvironment, SafetyEHSSafety

90

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and Cloud Processes in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and long-range levels. The author here offers a systematic discussion of the transfer of solar and thermal important topics in atmospheric radiation, cloud physics, and thermal equilibrium. Aspects

Liou, K. N.

91

Abdominal radiation causes bacterial translocation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to determine if a single dose of radiation to the rat abdomen leads to bacterial translocation into the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN). A second issue addressed was whether translocation correlates with anatomic damage to the mucosa. The radiated group (1100 cGy) which received anesthesia also was compared with a control group and a third group which received anesthesia alone but no abdominal radiation. Abdominal radiation lead to 100% positive cultures of MLN between 12 hr and 4 days postradiation. Bacterial translocation was almost nonexistent in the control and anesthesia group. Signs of inflammation and ulceration of the intestinal mucosa were not seen until Day 3 postradiation. Mucosal damage was maximal by Day 4. Bacterial translocation onto the MLN after a single dose of abdominal radiation was not apparently dependent on anatomical, histologic damage of the mucosa.

Guzman-Stein, G.; Bonsack, M.; Liberty, J.; Delaney, J.P.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

93

Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Decline in Tested and Self-Reported Cognitive Functioning After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation for Lung Cancer: Pooled Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Trials 0212 and 0214  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the impact of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on self-reported cognitive functioning (SRCF), a functional scale on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0214 randomized patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer to PCI or observation; RTOG 0212 randomized patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer to high- or standard-dose PCI. In both trials, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)-Recall and -Delayed Recall and SRCF were assessed at baseline (after locoregional therapy but before PCI or observation) and at 6 and 12 months. Patients developing brain relapse before follow-up evaluation were excluded. Decline was defined using the reliable change index method and correlated with receipt of PCI versus observation using logistic regression modeling. Fisher's exact test correlated decline in SRCF with HVLT decline. Results: Of the eligible patients pooled from RTOG 0212 and RTOG 0214, 410 (93%) receiving PCI and 173 (96%) undergoing observation completed baseline HVLT or EORTC QLQ-C30 testing and were included in this analysis. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was associated with a higher risk of decline in SRCF at 6 months (odds ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval 2.34-6.37, P<.0001) and 12 months (odds ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.84-6.44, P<.0001). Decline on HVLT-Recall at 6 and 12 months was also associated with PCI (P=.002 and P=.002, respectively) but was not closely correlated with decline in SRCF at the same time points (P=.05 and P=.86, respectively). Conclusions: In lung cancer patients who do not develop brain relapse, PCI is associated with decline in HVLT-tested and self-reported cognitive functioning. Decline in HVLT and decline in SRCF are not closely correlated, suggesting that they may represent distinct elements of the cognitive spectrum.

Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: vgondi@chicagocancer.org [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States) [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wolfson, Aaron [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)] [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sun, Alexander Y. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States)] [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)] [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 1999 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program................................................................. 1 INFORMATION PROCESSING ............................................. 2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ........................ 2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS) ............ 3

Toronto, University of

96

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Automata groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-presentation. We also find the L-presentation for several other groups generated by three-state automata, and we describe the defining relations in the Grigorchuk groups G_w. In case when the sequence w is almost periodic these relations provide an L...

Muntyan, Yevgen

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

99

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

External Coordination Working Group: Background and Process Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 TEC History * DOE's Office of...

100

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Mechanisms of radiation interaction with DNA: Potential implications for radiation protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) of the US Department of Energy conducts a broad multidisciplinary research program which includes basic biophysics, biophysical chemistry, molecular and cellular biology as well as experimental animal studies and opportunistic human studies. This research is directed at understanding how low levels of radiation of various qualities produce the spectrum of biological effects that are seen for such exposures. This workshop was entitled ''Mechanisms of Radiation Interaction with DNA: Potential Implications for Radiation Protection.'' It ws jointly sponsored by the Department of Energy and the Commission of European Communities. The aim of the workshop was to review the base of knowledge in the area of mechanisms of radiation action at the DNA level, and to explore ways in which this information can be applied to the development of scientifically sound concepts and procedures for use in the field of radiation protection. The overview of research provided by this multidisciplinary group will be helpful to the Office in program planning. This report includes a summary of the presentations, extended abstracts, the meeting agenda, research recommendations, and a list of participants. Individual papers are processed separately for the data base.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

College of Health Sciences RAS Radiation Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; excitation and ionization processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RM 546.) RAS 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

105

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned Small BusinessEMPLOYMENT VERIFICATION AT SAVANNAHSummariesDepartment of

106

Radiation and Health Thormod Henriksen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. These subjects wereRadiation and Health by Thormod Henriksen and Biophysics group at UiO #12;Preface The present book is an update and extension of three previous books from groups of scientists at the University of Oslo

Johansen, Tom Henning

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - applying ionizing radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The two distinct regimes for coupling of the intense radiation... - second and nanosecond radiation excitation of large molecules. Both groups found enhanced ionization... , this...

108

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

110

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and the batteries found in small electronic devices. Innovative Solar Cells A new process that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate...

112

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Local Group as an Astrophysical Laboratory for Massive Star Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feedback effects of massive stars on their galactic and intergalactic environments can dominate evolutionary processes in galaxies and affect cosmic structure in the Universe. Only the Local Group offers the spatial resolution to quantitatively study feedback processes on a variety of scales. Lyman continuum radiation from hot, luminous stars ionizes HII regions and is believed to dominate production of the warm component of the interstellar medium (ISM). Some of this radiation apparently escapes from galaxies into the intergalactic environment. Supernovae and strong stellar winds generate shell structures such as supernova remnants, stellar wind bubbles, and superbubbles around OB associations. Hot (10^6 K) gas is generated within these shells, and is believed to be the origin of the hot component of the ISM. Superbubble activity thus is likely to dominate the ISM structure, kinematics, and phase balance in star-forming galaxies. Galactic superwinds in starburst galaxies enable the escape of mass, ionizing radiation, and heavy elements. Although many important issues remain to be resolved, there is little doubt that feedback processes plays a fundamental role in energy cycles on scales ranging from individual stars to cosmic structure. This contribution reviews studies of radiative and mechanical feedback in the Local Group.

M. S. Oey

2003-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

116

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

117

Illinois Wind Workers Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

David G. Loomis

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

Working Group Report: Sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

Artuso, M.; et al.,

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiation issues for the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings are organized under the following categories: Radiation Control: New Issues; Exploring the Use of a De Minimus Concept in Radiation Protection; Evolving Radiation Protection Standards; Occupational Radiation Protection: Are We Doing Enough; and Emergency Planning: the Potassium Iodide Issue. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 22 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 6 of the papers are included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). Three papers were processed earlier.

Harward, E.D. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

RADIATION RESEARCH 160, 174185 (2003) 0033-7587/03 $5.00  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

174 RADIATION RESEARCH 160, 174­185 (2003) 0033-7587/03 $5.00 2003 by Radiation Research Society Backbone Radicals. Radiat. Res. 160, 174­185 (2003). In this study, the effects of high-LET radiation inherent in the two radiations. 2003 by Radiation Research Society INTRODUCTION The processes of energy

Simons, Jack

123

Cataractogenic effects of proton radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vulnerable organs, created an urgent need for investigation of proton radiation cataracto- genesis. In a statistical analysis of collected data on solar proton events taking into consideration possible shield- ing and mission duration, an investigator... energy group to a high of 74 for the 20 Mev proton energy group. As previously stated, the maximum possible numerical value was 400. The mean values for degree of lens opacities for the controls and the five dosage subgroups within the 10 Mev, 20 Mev...

Kyzar, James Ronald

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

127

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

modelling effort indicate that hyporheic and dead zone heat fluxes are important, whereas solar radiationHYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. 23, 29022914 (2009) Published online 24 July 2009 in Wiley the significance of individual heat fluxes within streams with an emphasis on testing (i.e. identification

Kienzle, Stefan W.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

130

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Annual Report: Hydrodynamics and Radiative Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiative hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining high-quality scaling data using a backlit pinhole and obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) Thomson-scattering data from a radiative shock. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, obtaining the first (ever, anywhere) dual-axis radiographic data using backlit pinholes and ungated detectors. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers either in print or in preparation. We also have obtained preliminary radiographs of experimental targets using our x-ray source. The targets for the experiments have been assembled at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

R. Paul Drake

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermal SolarAllocatioBasics of Radiation Gamma

133

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, for other contaminants studied for the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction are presented in several other technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. Be sure to place the asterisk after the base number so your search can list the complete series of reports related to Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction.

Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ultraviolet-radiation-curable paints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In product finishing lines, ultraviolet radiation curing of paints on prefabricated structures could be more energy efficient than curing by natural gas fired ovens, and could eliminate solvent emission. Diffuse ultraviolet light can cure paints on three dimensional metal parts. In the uv curing process, the spectral output of radiation sources must complement the absorption spectra of pigments and photoactive agents. Photosensitive compounds, such as thioxanthones, can photoinitiate unsaturated resins, such as acrylated polyurethanes, by a free radical mechanism. Newly developed cationic photoinitiators, such as sulfonium or iodonium salts (the so-called onium salts) of complex metal halide anions, can be used in polymerization of epoxy paints by ultraviolet light radiation. One-coat enamels, topcoats, and primers have been developed which can be photoinitiated to produce hard, adherent films. This process has been tested in a laboratory scale unit by spray coating these materials on three-dimensional objects and passing them through a tunnel containing uv lamps.

Grosset, A M; Su, W F.A.; Vanderglas, E

1981-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)] [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

College of Medicine RM Radiation Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry. Prereq: PHY 213 or 232; MA, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RAS 546.) RM 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Program Building Committee's Central Planning Group.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tooe ZTA245.7 8873 Y)O./3~ The Texas A&M (stem r ultural ~ion ~ervrce Damet C Plannstlel. Director College Stallon Program Building Committee's CENTRAL PLANNING GROUP 8-1344 Authors: Burl B. Richardson , Extension Program Specialist... and Mary G. Marshall, Extension Program Specialist Program -Building Committee's CENTRAL PLANNING GROUP This leaflet describes the role of the central planning group in the program development process_ The central planning group is the highest...

Richardson, Burl B.; Marshall, Mary G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2. Radiation Safety Committee (RSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.4. Radiation Safety Office (RSO

Rubloff, Gary W.

143

Phosphors containing boron and metals of Group IIIA and IIIB  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A phosphor comprises: (a) at least a first metal selected from the group consisting of yttrium and elements of lanthanide series other than europium; (b) at least a second metal selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, indium, and scandium; (c) boron; and (d) europium. The phosphor is used in light source that comprises a UV radiation source to convert UV radiation to visible light.

Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National...

145

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

146

Selmer groups as flat cohomology groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Given a prime number p, Bloch and Kato showed how the p Selmer group of an abelian variety A over a number field K is determined by the p-adic Tate module. In general, the pm1-Selmer group Selpmn A need not be determined ...

?esnavi?ius, K?stutis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

optical fiber Test of the law of gravitation at extremely small distance references [1] Y. Aso, M. Ando1. Tsubono Group 1 1 Tsubono Group Research Subjects: Experimental Relativity, Gravitational Wave Physics, Laser Inter- ferometer Member: Kimio TSUBONO and Masaki ANDO The detection of gravitational waves

Ejiri, Shinji

148

QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a framework that details timelines, leadership, resource allocation, and an assessment plan that is clearlyQEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group The topic of the QEP should fit should be supported by a thorough understanding of the institutional context and by assessment data

Liu, Paul

149

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description AHR Scholar-Architecture Scholar ART Honors - Architecture Honors H04 Honors - Allied Medical Prof Honors H05 Honors - Arts & Sciences Honors H14 Honors - Envir&Natural Resources Honors H15 Honors - Food, Agr, & Envir Sci Honors H16 Honors

150

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

National group honors Sandia radiation effects expert | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNational Nuclearhas 'Natitude' | NationalADR services areAmericaSecurity

153

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects theEnvironment, SafetyEHS

154

Process for functionalizing alkanes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Process for functionalizing saturated hydrocarbons selectively in the terminal position comprising: (a) reacting said saturated hydrocarbons of the formula: RH where: H represents a hydrogen atom, and R represents a saturated hydrocarbon radical, with a metal complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 H.sub.2 where: Cp represents a pentamethylated cyclopentadienyl radical, Rh represents a rhodium atom, P represents a phosphorous atom, Me represents a methyl group, H represents a hydrogen atom, in the presence of ultraviolet radiation at a temperature maintained at about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form a hydridoalkyl complex of the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RH (b) reacting said hydridoalkyl complex with a haloform of the formula: CHX.sub.3 where: X represents a bromine, iodine or chlorine atom, at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to -17.degree. C. to form the corresponding haloalkyl complex of step (a) having the formula: CpRhPMe.sub.3 RX; and, (c) reacting said haloalkyl complex formed in (b) with halogen (X.sub.2) at a temperature in the range of about -60.degree. to 25.degree. C. (i.e. ambient) to form a functional haloalkyl compound.

Bergman, Robert G. (Kensington, CA); Janowicz, Andrew H. (Wilmington, DE); Periana-Pillai, Roy A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call...

156

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system,...

157

Pending Jobs by Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

158

Long Term by Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

159

Pollutant Assessments Group Procedures Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This procedures manual combines the existing procedures for radiological and chemical assessment of hazardous wastes used by the Pollutant Assessments Group at the time of manuscript completion (October 1, 1990). These procedures will be revised in an ongoing process to incorporate new developments in hazardous waste assessment technology and changes in administrative policy and support procedures. Format inconsistencies will be corrected in subsequent revisions of individual procedures.

Chavarria, D.E.; Davidson, J.R.; Espegren, M.L.; Kearl, P.M.; Knott, R.R.; Pierce, G.A.; Retolaza, C.D.; Smuin, D.R.; Wilson, M.J.; Witt, D.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Conklin, N.G.; Egidi, P.V.; Ertel, D.B.; Foster, D.S.; Krall, B.J.; Meredith, R.L.; Rice, J.A.; Roemer, E.K. (Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Interagency Sustainability Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Enforcement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

13, 2009 Issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site On July...

163

Review Article: The Effects of Radiation Chemistry on Solvent Extraction 3: A Review of Actinide and Lanthanide Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partitioning of the long-lived ?-emitters and the high-yield fission products from dissolved nuclear fuel is a key component of processes envisioned for the safe recycling of nuclear fuel and the disposition of high-level waste. These future processes will likely be based on aqueous solvent extraction technologies for light water reactor fuel and consist of four main components for the sequential separation of uranium, fission products, group trivalent actinides and lanthanides, and then trivalent actinides from lanthanides. Since the solvent systems will be in contact with highly radioactive solutions, they must be robust toward radiolytic degradation in an irradiated mixed organic, aqueous acidic environment. Therefore, an understanding of their radiation chemistry is important to the design of a practical system. In the first paper in this series we reviewed the radiation chemistry of irradiated aqueous nitric acid and the tributyl phosphate ligand for uranium extraction in the first step of these extractions. In the second, we reviewed the radiation chemistry of the ligands proposed for use in the extraction of cesium and strontium fission products. Here, we review the radiation chemistry of the ligands that might be used in the third step in the series of separations, for the group extraction of the lanthanides and actinides. This includes traditional organophosphorous reagents such as CMPO and HDEHP, as well as novel reagents such as the amides and diamides currently being investigated.

Bruce J. Mincher; Giuseppe Modolo; Stephen P. Mezyk

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

165

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

E-Print Network 3.0 - atlas transition radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atlas transition radiation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lund University -the ATLAS group...

168

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA BARRETT, CIAN ADAMS, NICOLE BARTON, MICHAEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUP 1 GROUP 2 GROUP 3 GROUP 4 GROUP 5 GROUP 6 ANDERSON, JENNIFER AYENI, MARY ABATE BESSOMO, ANNA ANDERSON FITZSIMONS, DENISEBINCHY, SUSAN CARLEY, JESSE CONWAY, AILBHE BROOKE, HENRY CONLAN, DEIRDRE, CAOIMHE HESKIN, CLODAGH MC GOVERN, MARIE-CLAIREMURRAY, AINE GROGAN, CLARE GERARD, ALLISON MC QUAID, RACHEL

O'Mahony, Donal E.

169

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

170

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

173

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

174

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

175

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the B-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8 MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3% and 0.001 at 90% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed. 1 Introduction Silica aerogels(aerogels) are a colloidal form of glass, in which globules of silica are connected in three dimensional networks with siloxan bonds. They are solid, very light, transparent and their refractive index can be controlled in the production process. Many high energy and nuclear physics experiments have used aerogels instead of pressurized gas for their Cerenkov coun...

Belle Preprint; Sahu Wang; M. Z. Wang; R. Suda; R. Enomoto; K. C. Peng; C. H. Wang; I. Adachi; M. Amami

176

A Second Poincare' Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solutions of the sourceless Einstein's equation with weak and strong cosmological constants are discussed by using In\\"on\\"u-Wigner contractions of the de Sitter groups and spaces. The more usual case corresponds to a weak cosmological-constant limit, in which the de Sitter groups are contracted to the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to the Minkowski space. In the strong cosmological-constant limit, however, the de Sitter groups are contracted to another group which has the same abstract Lie algebra of the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to a 4-dimensional cone-space of infinite scalar curvature, but vanishing Riemann and Ricci curvature tensors. In such space, the special conformal transformations act transitively, and the equivalence between inertial frames is that of special relativity.

R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Galaxies that Shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disk galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy disks of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photo-ionisation heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multi-scattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photo-heating smooths and thickens the disks and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of ("thermal dump") supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but ...

Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

179

Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Damping with Inhomogeneous Broadening: Limitations of the Single Bloch Vector Model of inhomoge- neous broadening on radiation damping of free precession signals have been described using 13: 1 7, 2001 KEY WORDS: radiation damping; FID shape; inhomogeneous broadening The phenomenon

Augustine, Mathew P.

180

astroph/9507030 Gravitational Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

astro­ph/9507030 10 Jul 95 Gravitational Radiation and Very Long Baseline Interferometry Ted Pyne of gravitational radiation on astrometric observations. We derive an equation for the time delay measured by two antennae observing the same source in an Einstein­de Sitter spacetime containing gravitational radiation

Fygenson, Deborah Kuchnir

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Caucus created a mission statement and resolution: - All Tribes with cultural ties to Yucca Mountain should be invited to join TEC - Ongoing funds to support Tribal Topic Group...

182

Trails Working Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA...

183

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A preamplifier circuit for processing a signal provided by a radiation detector includes a transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a detector and generate a voltage signal at its output. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifier for providing an amplified voltage signal. Detector electronics include a preamplifier circuit having a first and second transimpedance amplifier coupled to receive a current signal from a first and second location on a detector, respectively, and generate a first and second voltage signal at respective outputs. A second amplification stage has an input coupled to an output of the transimpedance amplifiers for amplifying the first and said second voltage signals to provide first and second amplified voltage signals. A differential output stage is coupled to the second amplification stage for receiving the first and second amplified voltage signals and providing a pair of outputs from each of the first and second amplified voltage signals. Read out circuitry has an input coupled to receive both of the pair of outputs, the read out circuitry having structure for processing each of the pair of outputs, and providing a single digital output having a time-stamp therefrom.

Riedel, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN); Clonts, Lloyd G. (Knoxville, TN); Cooper, Ronald G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

185

Catalytic coal hydroliquefaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is described for the liquefaction of coal in a hydrogen donor solvent in the presence of hydrogen and a co-catalyst combination of iron and a Group VI or Group VIII non-ferrous metal or compounds of the catalysts.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Characterizing the hohlraum radiation via one-end driven experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new experiment is designed and performed on the Shenguang III laser facility with the first eight available beams to characterizing the hohlraum radiation, in which the hohlraum with laser entrance holes on both ends is driven through one-end only. The experiment enables us to identify the x-ray radiations originated from the hohlraum reemission wall and high-Z bubble plasmas utilizing their position and spectral characters, which provides a better test on the associated hohlraum models. The total and M-band x-ray radiation fluxes are measured with the flat response x-ray detectors and the filtered M-band x-ray detectors, respectively. Numerical simulations are conducted with the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-INTEGRATION using the multi-group radiation transfer and/or diffusion models. It is found that the experimentally measured temporal profiles and angular distributions of hohlraum radiation are in good agreement with the predictions of simulation using radiation transfer models, but differ significantly from the results obtained with the multi-group radiation diffusion calculations. We thus note that to accurately represent the hohlraum radiation, a true radiation transfer model is essential.

Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang, E-mail: zou-shiyang@iapacm.ac.cn [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational, Beijing 100094 (China); Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Shielding and Radiological Protection J. Kenneth Shultis Richard E. Faw Department@triad.rr.com Radiation Fields and Sources ................................................ . Radiation Field Variables........................................................... .. Direction and Solid Angle Conventions ......................................... .. Radiation Fluence

Shultis, J. Kenneth

188

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

189

Group Accident Insurance Certificate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group Accident Insurance Certificate Regents of the University of New Mexico #12;#12;Life Insurance Company GROUP ACCIDENT CERTIFICATE THIS CERTIFICATE PROVIDES LIMITED COVERAGE. PLEASE READ YOUR. THIS CERTIFICATE IS ISSUED UNDER AN ACCIDENT ONLY POLICY. IT DOES NOT PAY BENEFITS FOR LOSS CAUSED BY SICKNESS. GA

New Mexico, University of

190

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group | Focus Group Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibility ofSmall15.000 Rev.Group Members Sabina Aponte,

192

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms Radiation Radiation is energy in transit in the form of high not carry enough energy to separate molecules or remove electrons from atoms. Ionizing radiation Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy so that during an interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly

Vallino, Joseph J.

194

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

195

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNLs ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

196

The HERMES RICH group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging ?erenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide

N. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; K. Bailey; S. Bernreuther; N. Bianchi; G. P. Capitani; P. Carter; E. Cisbani; R. De Leo; E. De Sanctis; V. Djordjadze; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; J. -o. Hansen; B. Hommez; M. Iodice; H. E. Jackson; P. Jung; R. Kaiser; J. Kanesaka; R. Kowalczyk; L. Lagamba; A. Maas; V. Muccifora; K. Negodaeva; W. -d. Nowak; T. G. Oneill; D. H. Potterveld; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Sakemi; F. Sato; A. Schwind; T. -a. Shibata; K. Suetsugu; E. Thomas; M. Tytgat; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Van De Kerckhove; R. Van De Vyver; S. Yoneyama; H. Zohrabian; L. F. Zhang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studying the numerical solutions to the radiative transport equation (RTE) or the within-group neutron transport equation [4, 13] in the field of neutron transport [4], atmospheric radiative transfer [1], heatA FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO Abstract

Soatto, Stefano

198

The effects of diet and ionizing radiation on azoxymethane induced colon carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability of ionizing radiation to enhance colon carcinogenesis and the role of diet in this process has not been documented. We hypothesized that radiation would enhance the formation of aberrant crypt foci, ACF, known precursor lesions to colon...

Mann, John Clifford

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electric Vehicle Research Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................9 From diesel to electric: a new era in personnel transport for underground coal minesElectric Vehicle Research Group Annual Report 2012 #12;Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................8 C2-25 Electric Vehicle Drivetrain

Liley, David

200

Interactive visual intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation is omnipresent. It has many interesting applications: in medicine, where it allows curing and diagnosing patients; in communication, where modern communication systems make use of electromagnetic radiation; and in science, where it is used to discover the structure of materials; to name a few. Physically, radiation is a process in which particles or waves travel through any kind of material, usually air. Radiation can be very energetic, in which case it can break the atoms of ordinary matter (ionization). If this is the case, radiation is called ionizing. It is known that ionizing radiation can be far more harmful to living beings than non-ionizing radiation. In this dissertation, we are concerned with ionizing radiation. Naturally occurring ionizing radiation in the form of radioactivity is a most natural phenomenon. Almost everything is radioactive: there is radiation emerging from the soil, it is in the air, and the whole planet is constantly undergoing streams of energetic cosmic radiation. Sinc...

Fabry, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

Proga, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Solar radiation intensity calculations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partia'l fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Physics SOLAR RADIATION INTENSITY CALCULATIONS A Thesis by RANDOLPH STEVEN LEVINE Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Member) (Member) ( member) (Head of Department) December 1978 f219 037 ABSTRACT Solar Radiation...

Levine, Randolph Steven

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

205

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

206

Rotating bubble membrane radiator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat radiator useful for expelling waste heat from a power generating system aboard a space vehicle is disclosed. Liquid to be cooled is passed to the interior of a rotating bubble membrane radiator, where it is sprayed into the interior of the bubble. Liquid impacting upon the interior surface of the bubble is cooled and the heat radiated from the outer surface of the membrane. Cooled liquid is collected by the action of centrifical force about the equator of the rotating membrane and returned to the power system. Details regarding a complete space power system employing the radiator are given.

Webb, Brent J. (West Richland, WA); Coomes, Edmund P. (West Richland, WA)

1988-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

207

US Department of Energy standardized radiation safety training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following working groups were formed under the direction of a radiological training coordinator: managers, supervisors, DOE auditors, ALARA engineers/schedulers/planners, radiological control personnel, radiation-generating device operators, emergency responders, visitors, Pu facilities, U facilities, tritium facilities, accelerator facilities, biomedical researchers. General courses for these groups are available, now or soon, in the form of handbooks.

Trinoskey, P.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

209

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

210

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

211

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

212

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

213

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Finite group symmetry breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite group symmetry is commonplace in Physics, in particular through crystallographic groups occurring in condensed matter physics -- but also through the inversions (C,P,T and their combinations) occurring in high energy physics and field theory. The breaking of finite groups symmetry has thus been thoroughly studied, and general approaches exist to investigate it. In Landau theory, the state of a system is described by a finite dimensional variable (the {\\it order parameter}), and physical states correspond to minima of a potential, invariant under a group. In this article we describe the basics of symmetry breaking analysis for systems described by a symmetric polynomial; in particular we discuss generic symmetry breakings, i.e. those determined by the symmetry properties themselves and independent on the details of the polynomial describing a concrete system. We also discuss how the plethora of invariant polynomials can be to some extent reduced by means of changes of coordinates, i.e. how one can reduce to consider certain types of polynomials with no loss of generality. Finally, we will give some indications on extension of this theory, i.e. on how one deals with symmetry breakings for more general groups and/or more general physical systems.

G. Gaeta

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

215

Radiative feedback from ionized gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H2 formation in metal-free gas occurs via the intermediate H- or H2+ ions. Destruction of these ions by photodissociation therefore serves to suppress H2 formation. In this paper, I highlight the fact that several processes that occur in ionized primordial gas produce photons energetic enough to photodissociate H- or H2+ and outline how to compute the photodissociation rates produced by a particular distribution of ionized gas. I also show that there are circumstances of interest, such as during the growth of HII regions around the first stars, in which this previously overlooked form of radiative feedback is of considerable importance.

S. C. O. Glover

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

Dissecting Soft Radiation with Factorization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An essential part of high-energy hadronic collisions is the soft hadronic activity that underlies the primary hard interaction. It includes soft radiation from the primary hard partons, secondary multiple parton interactions (MPI), and factorization-violating effects. The invariant mass spectrum of the leading jet in $Z$+jet and $H$+jet events is directly sensitive to these effects, and we use a QCD factorization theorem to predict its dependence on the jet radius $R$, jet $p_T$, jet rapidity, and partonic process for both the perturbative and nonperturbative components of primary soft radiation. We prove that the nonperturbative contributions involve only odd powers of $R$, and the linear $R$ term is universal for quark and gluon jets. The hadronization model in PYTHIA8 agrees well with these properties. The perturbative soft initial state radiation (ISR) has a contribution that depends on the jet area in the same way as the underlying event, but this degeneracy is broken by dependence on the jet $p_T$. The size of this soft ISR contribution is proportional to the color state of the initial partons, yielding the same positive contribution for $gg\\to Hg$ and $gq\\to Zq$, but a negative interference contribution for $q\\bar q\\to Z g$. Hence, measuring these dependencies allows one to separate hadronization, soft ISR, and MPI contributions in the data.

Iain W. Stewart; Frank J. Tackmann; Wouter J. Waalewijn

2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

Radiation-tolerant imaging device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bell, group and tangle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u [Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Two-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiative transfer equation has been derived with full mathematical rigor [13,14]. In the case the wave nature of the process and is not just about energy transport. Hence the governing equation cannotTwo-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution Albert C. Fannjiang* Department

Fannjiang, Albert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SCIENTIFIC CORRESPONDENCE Radiation doses and cancert-A T. w- - SIR- In February 1990, the Soviet. Nikipelov et al. published in g Priroda (Nature)' the radiation doses for each year, averaged over environmental impact on the Gulf waters is rapidly ex- ported to the Arabian Sea and then to the Indian Ocean

Shlyakhter, Ilya

222

Radiative Flux Analysis  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

Long, Chuck [NOAA

223

Radiation-resistant microorganism  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An isolated and purified bacterium is provided which was isolated from a high-level radioactive waste site of mixed waste. The isolate has the ability to degrade a wide variety of organic contaminants while demonstrating high tolerance to ionizing radiation. The organism is uniquely suited to bioremediation of a variety or organic contaminants while in the presence of ionizing radiation.

Fliermans, Carl B.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radiation Damage in Polarized Ammonia Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solid NH3 and ND3 provide a highly polarizable, radiation resistant source of polarized protons and deuterons and have been used extensively in high luminosity experiments investigating the spin structure of the nucleon. Over the past twenty years, the UVA polarized target group has been instrumental in producing and polarizing much of the material used in these studies, and many practical considerations have been learned in this time. In this discussion, we analyze the polarization performance of the solid ammonia targets used during the recent JLab Eg4 run. Topics include the rate of polarization decay with accumulated charge, the annealing procedure for radiation damaged targets to recover polarization, and the radiation induced change in optimum microwave frequency used to polarize the sample. We also discuss the success we have had in implementing frequency modulation of the polarizing microwave frequency.

K. Slifer

2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH J.H . Park et al. #12;'s of FeinCsm e tal The chargeandorbitalordering geom etryin YB a C o 2 O 5 S. K. Kwon etal .Magnetism Theory

Min, Byung Il

227

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeV. Ramanathan (2008), Solar radiation budget and radiativeapproximation for solar radiation in the NCAR Community

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Electromagnetics, 26:335, 2006 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetics, 26:3­35, 2006 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 0272-6343 print/1532 the statistical properties of the impedance (Z) and scattering (S) matrices of open electromagnetic cavities. Introduction The problem of the coupling of electromagnetic radiation in and out of structures is a general one

Anlage, Steven

229

Department of Organismal Biology Scientific reports -research groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Eriksson/Viberg research group works with developmental neurotoxicology induced by low dose exposure from. Research about how chemicals of anthropogenic origin inter- act with cellular functions and give rise environmental pollutants, pharmaceuticals and ionizing radiation, during the brain growth spurt in rodents

Uppsala Universitet

230

National Solar Radiation Database 1991-2010 Update: User's Manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This user's manual provides information on the updated 1991-2010 National Solar Radiation Database. Included are data format descriptions, data sources, production processes, and information about data uncertainty.

Wilcox, S. M.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Coherent Radiation in an Undulator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solving the particle-radiation system in a self-consistentto clarify the coherent radiation mechanism. References 1.the Proceedings Coherent Radiation in an Undulator Y,H. Chin

Chin, Y.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

The Properties of Undulator Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a Dedicated Synchrotron Radiation Facility," IEEE Trans.1983), "Characteristics of Synchrotron Radiation and of itsHandbook on Synchrotron Radiation, E. -E. Koch.1A. 65-172,

Howells, M.R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated December 2012 Stanford University, Stanford California #12; #12; Radiation Safety Manual (Revised March 2010) Updated Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University, Stanford California #12; CREDITS This Radiation Safety

Kay, Mark A.

234

ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data transmission in place of NSA Type 1 devices.

Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation is a very bright, broadband, polarized, pulsed source of light extending from the infrared to the x-ray region. It is an extremely important source of Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation. Brightness is defined as flux per unit area per unit solid angle and is normally a more important quantity than flux alone particularly in throughput limited applications which include those in which monochromators are used. It is well known from classical theory of electricity and magnetism that accelerating charges emit electromagnetic radiation. In the case of synchrotron radiation, relativistic electrons are accelerated in a circular orbit and emit electromagnetic radiation in a broad spectral range. The visible portion of this spectrum was first observed on April 24, 1947 at General Electric's Schenectady facility by Floyd Haber, a machinist working with the synchrotron team, although the first theoretical predictions were by Lienard in the latter part of the 1800's. An excellent early history with references was presented by Blewett and a history covering the development of the utilization of synchrotron radiation was presented by Hartman. Synchrotron radiation covers the entire electromagnetic spectrum from the infrared region through the visible, ultraviolet, and into the x-ray region up to energies of many 10's of kilovolts. If the charged particles are of low mass, such as electrons, and if they are traveling relativistically, the emitted radiation is very intense and highly collimated, with opening angles of the order of 1 milliradian. In electron storage rings there are three possible sources of synchrotron radiation; dipole (bending) magnets; wigglers, which act like a sequence of bending magnets with alternating polarities; and undulators, which are also multi-period alternating magnet systems but in which the beam deflections are small resulting in coherent interference of the emitted light.

HULBERT,S.L.; WILLIAMS,G.P.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Radiation Protection | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Radiation Protection Regulations: The Federal Regulation governing the use of radioactive materials at Ames Laboratory is 10 CFR 835. To implement this...

237

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

238

KKG Group Paraffin Removal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed a test of a paraffin removal system developed by the KKG Group utilizing the technology of two Russian scientists, Gennady Katzyn and Boris Koggi. The system consisting of chemical ''sticks'' that generate heat in-situ to melt the paraffin deposits in oilfield tubing. The melted paraffin is then brought to the surface utilizing the naturally flowing energy of the well.

Schulte, Ralph

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Information Security Group IY5512 Computer Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for process that controls interactions between users and resources. · Access control system implements Information Security Group Agenda · Access control basics · ACLs and capabilities · Information flow policies· Information flow policies · Bell-LaPadula Model · Role-Based Access Control · Resources 3 Information Security

Mitchell, Chris

240

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

243

-THERMODYNAMICS AND PROCESS MODELLING GROUP --NPL MATERIALS CENTRE -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_DATA/RESULTS SYSTEM SOURCE STOP DEFINE WHAT ? system ENTER : 'Fe,Ni,Al,Mo,Nb,C' ! SEARCHING by Dr H K D H Bhadeshia at University of Cambridge under the terms and conditions of NPL 79 IN OPENING DATAFILE DEFINE WHAT ? system ENTER : Fe,Ni,Al,Mo,Nb,C^[[D^[[D^[[D FE KEYWORD

Cambridge, University of

244

Integrating grouped and ungrouped data: the point process case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be located in the Black Hills National Forest. The causes ofin the Black Hills National Forest. It could be explored forthat is the Black Hills National Forest. It is interesting

Hernandez Magallanes, Irma del Consuelo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Improving Educational Multimedia Selection Process Using Group Decision Support Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the adoption of new educational technologies to expand their markets and improve the flexibility and Technology United Arab Emirates staff.mohamed.a@alainuniversity.ac.ae Shervin Shirmohammadi Distributed of their offerings. These technologies include the Internet and Multimedia, used in an educational context

Ottawa, University of

246

Dr. sc. Christoph Studer Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. July 2009: Ph.D. in Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Doctoral dissertation: "Iterative MIMO Decoding: Algorithm Zurich) and Prof. H. B¨olcskei (Communication Technology Laboratory, ETH Zurich). Jan. 2006 ­ July 2009

247

Dr. sc. Christoph Studer Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology and Electrical Engineer- ing, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. July 2009: Ph.D. in Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Doctoral dissertation: "Iterative (Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zurich) and Prof. H. B¨olcskei (Communication Technology Laboratory, ETH

248

Chemical and kinetic equilibrations via radiative parton transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A hot and dense partonic system can be produced in the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. How it equilibrates is important for the extraction of Quark-Gluon Plasma properties. We study the chemical and kinetic equilibrations of the Quark-Gluon Plasma using a radiative transport model. Thermal and Color-Glass-Condensate motivated initial conditions are used. We observe that screened parton interactions always lead to partial pressure isotropization. Different initial pressure anisotropies result in the same asymptotic evolution. Comparison of evolutions with and without radiative processes shows that chemical equilibration interacts with kinetic equilibration and radiative processes can contribute significantly to pressure isotropization.

Bin Zhang; Warner A. Wortman

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

249

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES INTEGRATED WASTE MANAGEMENT LABORATORY SAFETY AUDITS & COMPLIANCE BIOSAFETY and ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT and MISSION CONTINUITY FIRE PREVENTION and LIFE SAFETY GENERAL SAFETY TRAINING

250

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification.

Street, Robert A. (Palo Alto, CA); Perez-Mendez, Victor (Berkeley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Amorphous silicon radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hydrogenated amorphous silicon radiation detector devices having enhanced signal are disclosed. Specifically provided are transversely oriented electrode layers and layered detector configurations of amorphous silicon, the structure of which allow high electric fields upon application of a bias thereby beneficially resulting in a reduction in noise from contact injection and an increase in signal including avalanche multiplication and gain of the signal produced by incoming high energy radiation. These enhanced radiation sensitive devices can be used as measuring and detection means for visible light, low energy photons and high energy ionizing particles such as electrons, x-rays, alpha particles, beta particles and gamma radiation. Particular utility of the device is disclosed for precision powder crystallography and biological identification. 13 figs.

Street, R.A.; Perez-Mendez, V.; Kaplan, S.N.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

252

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Method of enhancing radiation response of radiation detection materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is a method of increasing radiation response of a radiation detection material for a given radiation signal by first pressurizing the radiation detection material. Pressurization may be accomplished by any means including mechanical and/or hydraulic. In this application, the term "pressure" includes fluid pressure and/or mechanical stress.

Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL For Columbia University NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital New York State Psychiatric Institute Barnard College December 2012 #12;Radiation Safety Manual ­ Dec 2012 Page 1 Table of Contents Introduction Chapter I: Radiation Safety Program A. Program

Grishok, Alla

255

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

256

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

257

Solar thermal aerosol flow reaction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides an environmentally beneficial process using concentrated sunlight to heat radiation absorbing particles to carry out highly endothermic gas phase chemical reactions ultimately resulting in the production of hydrogen or hydrogen synthesis gases.

Weimer, Alan W.; Dahl, Jaimee K.; Pitts, J. Roland; Lewandowski, Allan A.; Bingham, Carl; Tamburini, Joseph R.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

RADIATION CHEMISTRY 2010 GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JULY 18-23  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2010 Gordon Conference on Radiation Chemistry will present cutting edge research regarding the study of radiation-induced chemical transformations. Radiation Chemistry or 'high energy' chemistry is primarily initiated by ionizing radiation: i.e. photons or particles with energy sufficient to create conduction band electrons and 'holes', excitons, ionic and neutral free radicals, highly excited states, and solvated electrons. These transients often interact or 'react' to form products vastly different than those produced under thermal equilibrium conditions. The non-equilibrium, non-thermal conditions driving radiation chemistry exist in plasmas, star-forming regions, the outer solar system, nuclear reactors, nuclear waste repositories, radiation-based medical/clinical treatment centers and in radiation/materials processing facilities. The 2010 conference has a strong interdisciplinary flavor with focus areas spanning (1) the fundamental physics and chemistry involved in ultrafast (atto/femtosecond) energy deposition events, (2) radiation-induced processes in biology (particularly spatially resolved studies), (3) radiation-induced modification of materials at the nanoscale and cosmic ray/x-ray mediated processes in planetary science/astrochemistry. While the conference concentrates on fundamental science, topical applied areas covered will also include nuclear power, materials/polymer processing, and clinical/radiation treatment in medicine. The Conference will bring together investigators at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present work in poster format or as contributors to the Young Investigator session. The program and format provides excellent avenues to promote cross-disciplinary collaborations.

Thomas Orlando

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

259

Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Quantum Mechanics associated with a Finite Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I describe, in the simplified context of finite groups and their representations, a mathematical model for a physical system that contains both its quantum and classical aspects. The physically observable system is associated with the space containing elements fxf for f an element in the regular representation of a given finite group G. The Hermitian portion of fxf is the Wigner distribution of f whose convolution with a test function leads to a mathematical description of the quantum measurement process. Starting with the Jacobi group that is formed from the semidirect product of the Heisenberg group with its automorphism group SL(2,F{N}) for N an odd prime number I show that the classical phase space is the first order term in a series of subspaces of the Hermitian portion of fxf that are stable under SL(2,F{N}). I define a derivative that is analogous to a pseudodifferential operator to enable a treatment that parallels the continuum case. I give a new derivation of the Schrodinger-Weil representation of the Jacobi group. Keywords: quantum mechanics, finite group, metaplectic. PACS: 03.65.Fd; 02.10.De; 03.65.Ta.

Robert W. Johnson

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHORIECONOMIQUELYONSTTIENNE CSRfirmprofilesandinnovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for innovation. Key words: Corporate Social Responsibility, Innovation, Organizational, Practices, Product, Process Résumé Cet article étudie les relations entre la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE) et l'innovation. Mots clefs:Responsabilité sociale des entreprises, Innovation, Organisation, Pratiques, Produit

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

263

Personality and group interaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that "prize Chips will be awarded equally to each person in the group based on the total number of blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds". b) In the contrient condition, subjects were told that "Prize Chips will be awarded only... to the individual with the most blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds. If there are any ties in terms of the number blocks on the tower and there is no clear winner, then no prize chips will be distributed". 6. Only one tower may...

Hair, Elizabeth Catherine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

ALS Communications Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01) (See95TI07)Operations During theALSSafetyCommunications Group

265

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

266

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

267

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

268

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

269

Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

Cambridge, University of

270

Processing Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

271

Selection Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Selection Process Selection Process Fellowships will be awarded based on academic excellence, relevance of candidate's research to the laboratory mission in fundamental nuclear...

272

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Process Network R&D Overview Experimental Network Testbeds 100G SDN Testbed Testbed Description Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and...

273

Chemical Kinetics and Properties from the Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC) is a focal point for the compilation and evaluation of kinetic, spectroscopic and thermodynamic data for processes in solution involving reactive intermediates, including free radicals and excited states. These data are primarily derived from the published literature on radiation chemistry and quantitative aspects of photochemistry. The compilations are presented as individual groups of pages corresponding to each published work. Each compilation consists of an introductory article, describing the scope of the compilation, with the considerations and criteria for data evaluation discussed. Nomenclature for the compilation is also described here. For several compilations the introduction is followed by one or more pages of links organized as an index or table of contents to the individual pages of the compilation. These links allow the browsing of the data by species name. Each page tabulates the reaction of a transient species with a particular reactant. RCDC was established at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory in 1965, as part of the National Standard Reference Data System.

274

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Process for manufacturing multilayer capacitors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method of manufacture of multilayer electrical components, especially capacitors, and components made by such a method. High capacitance dielectric materials and low cost metallizations layered with such dielectrics may be fabricated as multilayer electrical components by sintering the metallizations and the dielectrics during the fabrication process by application of microwave radiation.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Dykes, Norman L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Composition and apparatus for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation detector and a radioluminescent composition for use therein. The detector includes a radioluminescent composition that emits light in a characteristic wavelength region when exposed to gamma radiation, and means for detecting said radiation. The composition contains a scintillant such as anglesite (PbSO[sub 4]) or cerussite (PbCO[sub 3]) incorporated into an inert, porous glass matrix via a sol-gel process. Particles of radiation-sensitive scintillant are added to, a sol solution. The mixture is polymerized to form a gel, then dried under conditions that preserve the structural integrity and radiation sensitivity of the scintillant. The final product is a composition containing the uniformly-dispersed scintillant in an inert, optically transparent and highly porous matrix. The composition is chemically inert and substantially impervious to environmental conditions including changes in temperature, air pressure, and so forth. It can be fabricated in cylinders, blocks with holes therethrough for flow of fluid, sheets, surface coatings, pellets or other convenient shapes. 3 figs.

Hofstetter, K.J.

1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

277

1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a variety of time scales. There is a noted association between solar wind speed and relativistic elec- tron and external processes. This paper reviews what is currently understood of the interactions between energetic, A Review of ULF Interactions with Radiation Belt Electrons Scot R. Elkington Laboratory for Atmospheric

Elkington, Scot R.

278

Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise in Radiation Oncology Plug and Play-The Future of Radiation Oncology?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the processes and benefits of the integrating healthcare enterprises in radiation oncology (IHE-RO). Methods: The IHE-RO process includes five basic steps. The first step is to identify common interoperability issues encountered in radiation treatment planning and the delivery process. IHE-RO committees partner with vendors to develop solutions (integration profiles) to interoperability problems. The broad application of these integration profiles across a variety of vender platforms is tested annually at the Connectathon event. Demonstration of the seamless integration and transfer of patient data to the potential users are then presented by vendors at the public demonstration event. Users can then integrate these profiles into requests for proposals and vendor contracts by institutions. Results: Incorporation of completed integration profiles into requests for proposals can be done when purchasing new equipment. Vendors can publish IHE integration statements to document the integration profiles supported by their products. As a result, users can reference integration profiles in requests for proposals, simplifying the systems acquisition process. These IHE-RO solutions are now available in many of the commercial radiation oncology-related treatment planning, delivery, and information systems. They are also implemented at cancer care sites around the world. Conclusions: IHE-RO serves an important purpose for the radiation oncology community at large.

Abdel-Wahab, May, E-mail: mwahab@med.miami.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Curran, Bruce [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rhode Island Hospital, Brown University, City, Rhode Island (United States); Swerdloff, Stuart [Elekta, Sunnyvale, California (United States); Miettinen, Mika [Varian Systems, Palo Alto, California (United States); Field, Colin [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Ranjitkar, Sunita [American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Palta, Jatinder [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Institute, La Jolla, California (United States)

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ANSI and IEC standards for, and evaluation of, radiation detection instrumentation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last quarter of 2002, an effort was started to develop performance requirements for radiation instrumentation used for the detection of illicit trafficking of radioactive material. Coordinated by the US National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST), a team was formed to establish writing committees for the development of these requirements as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. The core of the new area was developed as ANSI N42, Homeland Security Instruments. A series of standards were developed followed by testing and evaluation (T&E) protocols that would be used for specific testing. Four US National Laboratories provided T&E support and work commenced to test instruments provided by manufacturers at no cost. During this time, discussions began regarding the formation of a new work group within the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). This new work group would be located within technical committee (TC) 45 which addresses nuclear instrumentation. This new work group, 15B, also began developing international standards to address the same instrument types. Following development of ANSI standards, the testing and evaluation process began, running for two distinct rounds. The results of the work was consolidated by NIST and released back to individual companies as well as the user community in a controlled manner. This document will provide details regarding the standards and their basis and status, as well as some information regarding the T&E process used in the USA.

Chiaro Jr, Peter John [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Uzbekistan Radiation Portal Monnitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work proposed in this presentation builds on the foundation set by the DTRA funded demonstration project begun in 2000 and completed in December of 2003. This previous work consisted of two phases whose overall objective was to install portal radiation monitors at four select ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan (Tashkent International Airport, Gisht-Kuprik (Kazakhstan border), Alat (Turkmenistan border), and Termez (Afghanistan border)) in order to demonstrate their effectiveness in preventing the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objectives also included developing and demonstrating capabilities in the design, installation, operation, training, and maintenance of a radiation portal monitoring system. The system and demonstration project has proved successful in many ways. An effective working relationship among the Uzbekistan Customs Services, Uzbekistan Border Guards, and Uzbekistan Institute of Nuclear Physics has been developed. There has been unprecedented openness with the sharing of portal monitor data with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The system has proved to be effective, with detection of illicit trafficking, and, at Alat, an arrest of three persons illegally transporting radioactive materials into Turkmenistan. The demonstration project has made Uzbekistan a model nonproliferation state in Central Asia and, with an expanded program, places them in a position to seal a likely transit route for illicit nuclear materials. These results will be described. In addition, this work is currently being expanded to include additional ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan. The process for deciding on which additional ports-of-entry to equip will also be described.

Richardson, J; Knapp, R; Loshak, A; Yuldashev, B; Petrenko, V

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Packet personal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

Phelps, J.E.

1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

282

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Metrology of reflection optics for synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent years have seen an almost explosive growth in the number of beam lines on new and existing synchrotron radiation facilities throughout the world. The need for optical components to utilize the unique characteristics of synchrotron radiation has increased accordingly. Unfortunately, the technology to manufacture and measure the large, smooth, exotic optical surfaces required to focus and steer the synchrotron radiation beam has not progressed as rapidly as the operational demands on these components. Most companies do not wish to become involved with a project that requires producing a single, very expensive, aspheric optic with surface roughness and figure tolerances that are beyond their capabilities to measure. This paper will review some of the experiences of the National Synchrotron Light Source in procuring grazing incidence optical components over the past several years. We will review the specification process - how it is related to the function of the optic, and how it relates to the metrology available during the manufacturing process and after delivery to the user's laboratory. We will also discuss practical aspects of our experience with new technologies, such as single point diamond turning of metal mirrors and the use of SiC as a mirror material. Recent advances in metrology instrumentation have the potential to move the measurement of surface figure and finish from the research laboratory into the optical shop, which should stimulate growth and interest in the manufacturing of optics to meet the needs of the synchrotron radiation user community.

Takacs, P.Z.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Annual Report 2006 for Hydrodynamics and Radiation Hydrodynamics with Astrophysical Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the ongoing work of our group in hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics with astrophysical applications. During the period of the existing grant, we have carried out two types of experiments at the Omega laser. One set of experiments has studied radiatively collapsing shocks, obtaining data using a backlit pinhole with a 100 ps backlighter and beginning to develop the ability to look into the shock tube with optical or x-ray diagnostics. Other experiments have studied the deeply nonlinear development of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability from complex initial conditions, using dual-axis radiographic data with backlit pinholes and ungated detectors to complete the data set for a Ph.D. student. We lead a team that is developing a proposal for experiments at the National Ignition Facility and are involved in experiments at NIKE and LIL. All these experiments have applications to astrophysics, discussed in the corresponding papers. We assemble the targets for the experiments at Michigan, where we also prepare many of the simple components. We also have several projects underway in our laboratory involving our x-ray source. The above activities, in addition to a variety of data analysis and design projects, provide good experience for graduate and undergraduates students. In the process of doing this research we have built a research group that uses such work to train junior scientists.

R. Paul Drake

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

285

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole.

Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Cantilever epitaxial process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of growing a material on a substrate, particularly growing a Group II-VI or Group III-V material, by a vapor-phase growth technique where the growth process eliminates the need for utilization of a mask or removal of the substrate from the reactor at any time during the processing. A nucleation layer is first grown upon which a middle layer is grown to provide surfaces for subsequent lateral cantilever growth. The lateral growth rate is controlled by altering the reactor temperature, pressure, reactant concentrations or reactant flow rates. Semiconductor materials, such as GaN, can be produced with dislocation densities less than 10.sup.7 /cm.sup.2.

Ashby, Carol I.; Follstaedt, David M.; Mitchell, Christine C.; Han, Jung

2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

Wireless passive radiation sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

291

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

292

ACC115 High Volume Processing of Composites  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of newadvanced composite processing technologies Direct support of the Materials, Joining, and Carbon Fiber SMC Working Groups Direct collaboration Focal Project...

293

A project management focused framework for assuring quality work processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal Manufacturing & Technologies/New Mexico (FM&T/NM) of AlliedSignal is an organization of approximately 300 associates providing operations support, engineering, and other technical services for DOE, New Mexico`s National Laboratories, etc. Work performed is primarily project-oriented and ranges from executing a major long-term contract for retrofitting and maintaining a large fleet of escort vehicles to creating a single, small, prototype electronic device for measuring radiation in a unique environment. FM&T/NM is functionally organized and operates in a classic matrix format with functional departments providing personnel with technical expertise, necessary physical resources, and administrative support to several project-based groups. Like most matrix-based organizations that provide support to diverse customers, FM&T/NM has encountered problems that occur when a group of project managers is expected to work together in using and scheduling a shared set of limited resources for the good of the organization as a whole. The framework for managing projects that we present focuses on developing, understanding, and managing the relationships between the functional organization structure, the system of work processes, and the management of projects. FM&T/NM retains its functional structure which primarily assigns personnel to work processes. The evolving role of the process leader focuses primarily on designing, managing, and improving the process, and the interactions among the subprocesses. The project manager is responsible for (1) translating customer requirements into product specifications, (2) determining the sequence of activities needed to meet project goals, (3) scheduling the required work processes, (4) monitoring project progress, (5) providing liaison between the customer and process leaders, and (6) having the desired product and/or service delivered to a satisfied customer in a timely manner.

Gamsby, S.O.; Mize, J.D. [Allied Signal, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Federal Mfg. and Technologies; Reid, R.A. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Unruh radiation and Interference effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A uniformly accelerated charged particle feels the vacuum as thermally excited and fluctuates around the classical trajectory. Then we may expect additional radiation besides the Larmor radiation. It is called Unruh radiation. In this report, we review the calculation of the Unruh radiation with an emphasis on the interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the radiation from the fluctuating motion. Our calculation is based on a stochastic treatment of the particle under a uniform acceleration. The basics of the stochastic equation are reviewed in another report in the same proceeding. In this report, we mainly discuss the radiation and the interference effect.

Satoshi Iso; Yasuhiro Yamamoto; Sen Zhang

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Process Modeling for Process Improvement A Process Conformance Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Modeling for Process Improvement - A Process Conformance Approach Sigurd Thunem September processes. In order to improve these processes, knowledge about them is necessary. To support process improve- ment the organization should collect process data, transform process data into knowledge

296

Expanded Pending Jobs by Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:25...

297

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 2001 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program..............................................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ..........................................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS)..............................................3 Complex Data

Toronto, University of

298

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iv Data Management Group Annual Report 2003 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located ........................................................................................................ 3 Text-based Data Retrieval System `drs

Toronto, University of

299

INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

space exploration infrastructure standards facilitating interoperability through an international with relevant existing international working groups/ organisations. · Preparation and Organization of a WS1 INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP WORKPLAN Update following 3rd ISECG Meeting

300

Effects of radiation on materials: twelfth international symposium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication provides information on irradiation creep of structural metals; microstructural development, neutron-induced swelling and charged particle irradiation. The theory of swelling is discussed along with mechanical properties, pressure vessel steels and irradiation facilities. The influence of helium on radiation-induced microstructural development, and radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness of iron-based austenitic and ferrite alloys are presented. The final section on other radiation studies covers the following: a modified method of helium introduction into alloys via the tritium trick, radiation damage aspects of a novel method for providing safe storage of Krypton-85 from fuel re-processing, and radiation effects on resins and zeolites forming part of the waste stream from the clean-up effort at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant.

Garner, F.A. (ed.); Perrin, J.S. (ed)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design Effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOVA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac. Project X's intense proton beams would open a path to discovery in neutrino science and in precision physics with charged leptons and quarks. World-leading experiments would allow physicists to address key questions of the Quantum Universe: How did the universe come to be? Are there undiscovered principles of nature: new symmetries, new physical laws? Do all the particles and forces become one? What happened to the antimatter? Building Project X's ILC-like linac would offer substantial support for ILC development by accelerating the industrialization of ILC components in the U.S. and creating an engineering opportunity for ILC cost reductions. It offers an early and tangible application for ILC R&D in superconducting technology, attracting participation from accelerator scientists worldwide and driving forward the technology for still higher-energy accelerators of the future, such as a muon collider. To prepare for a future decision, the Fermilab Steering Group recommends that the laboratory seek R&D support for Project X, in order to produce an overall design of Project X and to spur the R&D and industrialization of ILC linac components needed for Project X. Advice from the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel will guide any future decision to upgrade the Fermilab accelerator complex, taking into account developments affecting the ILC schedule and the continuing evaluation of scientific priorities for U.S. particle physics. Fermilab should also work toward increased resources for longer-term future accelerators such as a muon collider, aiming at higher energies than the ILC would provide.

Beier, Eugene; /Pennsylvania U.; Butler, Joel; /Fermilab; Dawson, Sally; /Brookhaven; Edwards, Helen; /Fermilab; Himel, Thomas; /SLAC; Holmes, Stephen; /Fermilab; Kim, Young-Kee; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Lankford, Andrew; /UC, Irvine; McGinnis, David; /Fermilab; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab; Raubenheimer, Tor; /SLAC /Fermilab

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Military Munitions Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

303

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Thermostatic Radiator Valve Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large stock of multifamily buildings in the Northeast and Midwest are heated by steam distribution systems. Losses from these systems are typically high and a significant number of apartments are overheated much of the time. Thermostatically controlled radiator valves (TRVs) are one potential strategy to combat this problem, but have not been widely accepted by the residential retrofit market.

Dentz, Jordan [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Ansanelli, Eric [Advanced Residential Integrated Energy Solutions Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Photovoltaic radiation detector element  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector element is formed of a body of semiconductor material, a coating on the body which forms a photovoltaic junction therewith, and a current collector consisting of narrow metallic strips, the aforesaid coating having an opening therein in the edge of which closely approaches but is spaced from the current collector strips.

Agouridis, D.C.

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

308

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air and the Columbia River April 21,1994 TheTechnid Steering Panel of the Hanford - Environmental Dose Reconstruction than 40years, the U.S. Government made plutonium for nuclear weapons at the Hanford

310

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17 Monitoring possible radiation exposure while working with radionuclides Screening for environmental. Water can damage the circuitry and the mica surface of the Geiger tube. Do not put the Inspector

Haller, Gary L.

313

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the n umber of organic species generated and their concentrations.

J Abrefah GS Klinger

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

U. Baur

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 2004 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located of the funding partners: Ministry of Transportation, Ontario #12;SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG

Toronto, University of

316

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

Toronto, University of

317

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Data Management Group Annual Report 2000 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program the operation of the EMME/2 simu- lation package on the Data Management Group's computer system. During the year computing resource at the DMG. A major challenge in 2000 was to maintain this service while operating out

Toronto, University of

318

Water Resources Working Group Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

Sheridan, Jennifer

319

Photolytic Processes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

320

Radiative transfer with partial coherence in optically thick plasmas Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach to address radiative transfer prob- lems involves a transport equation of Boltzmann-type, referred to as "radiative transfer equation", accounting for radiation-matter interaction processes such as spon- taneous the use of a transport theory for photons unavoidable. Opac- ity models for radiative transfer are widely

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

322

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Betatron radiation from density tailored plasmas K. Tathe resulting betatron radiation spectrum can therefore bepro?le, the betatron radiation emitted by theses electrons

Ta Phuoc, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

324

Hydrocarbon Processing`s petrochemical processes `97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper compiles information on numerous petrochemical processes, describing the application, the process, yields, economics, commercial plants, references, and licensor. Petrochemicals which are synthesized include: alkylbenzene, methylamines, ammonia, benzene, bisphenol-A, BTX aromatics, butadiene, butanediol, butyraldehyde, caprolactam, cumene, dimethyl terephthalate, ethanolamines, ethylbenzene, ethylene, ethylene glycols, ethylene oxide, formaldehyde, maleic anhydride, methanol, olefins, paraxylene, phenol, phthalic anhydride, polycaproamide, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, polypropylene, PVC, styrene, terephthalic acid, urea, vinyl chloride, and xylene isomers.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

326

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

LET dependence of radiation-induced bystander effects using human prostate tumor cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the past fifteen years, evidence provided by many independent research groups have indicated higher numbers of cells exhibiting damage than expected based on the number of cells traversed by the radiation. This phenomenon ...

Anzenberg, Vered

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates gamma radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Astrophysics Research Group Collection: Physics 60 MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts Summary: to gamma rays is likely to complement synchrotron radiation and produce...

329

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

330

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pacific Northwest Solar Radiation Data UO SOLAR MONITORING LAB Physics Department -- Solar Energy Center 1274 University of Oregon Eugene, Oregon 97403-1274 April 1, 1999 #12;Hourly solar radiation data

Oregon, University of

332

Long-distance colonization and radiation in gekkonid lizards, Tarentola (Reptilia: Gekkonidae), revealed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-distance colonization and radiation in gekkonid lizards, Tarentola (Reptilia: Gekkonidae-volant animal groups have undergone extensive transmarine dispersal with subsequent radiation in new, often many of the warmer islands in the North Atlantic Ocean. There were four main invasions of archipelagos

Carranza, Salvador

333

Correlation properties of loose groups  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-point spatial correlation function for loose groups of galaxies is computed, using the recently compiled catalog of groups in the southern hemisphere. It is found that the correlation function for groups has a similar slope to that of galaxies but with a smaller amplitude, confirming an earlier result obtained from a similar analysis of the CfA group catalog. This implies that groups of galaxies are more randomly distributed than galaxies, which may be consistent with the predictions of Kashlinsky (1987) for a gravitational clustering scenario for the formation of large-scale structures. 21 refs.

Maia, M.A.G.; Da Costa, L.N. (Observatorio Nacional do Brasil, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Measurement and analysis of near ultraviolet solar radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The photocatalytic detoxification of organic contaminants is currently being investigated by a number of laboratories, universities, and institutions throughout the world. The photocatalytic oxidation process requires that contaminants come in contact with a photocatalyst such as titanium dioxide, under illumination of ultraviolet (UV) radiation in order for the decomposition reaction to take place. Researches from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Sandia National Laboratories are currently investigating the use of solar energy as a means of driving this photocatalytic process. Measurements of direct-normal and global-horizontal ultraviolet (280--385 nm) and full-spectrum (280--4000 nm) solar radiation taken in Golden, Colorado over a one-year period are analyzed, and comparisons are made with data generated from a clear-sky solar radiation model (BRITE) currently in use for predicting the performance of solar detoxification processes. Analysis of the data indicates a ratio of global-horizontal ultraviolet to full-spectrum radiation of 4%--6% that is weakly dependent on air mass. Conversely, data for direct-normal ultraviolet radiation indicate a much large dependence on air mass, with a ratio of approximately 5% at low air mass to 1% at higher at masses. Results show excellent agreement between the measured data and clear-sky predictions for both the ultraviolet and the full-spectrum global-horizontal radiation. For the direct-normal components, however, the tendency is for the clear-sky model to underpredict the measured that. Averaged monthly ultraviolet radiation available for the detoxification process indicates that the global-horizontal component of the radiation exceeds the direct-normal component throughout the year. 9 refs., 7 figs.

Mehos, M.S.; Pacheco, K.A.; Link, H.F.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

336

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode. 4 figs.

Thacker, L.H.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Gamma radiation field intensity meter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gamma radiation intensity meter measures dose rate of a radiation field. The gamma radiation intensity meter includes a tritium battery emitting beta rays generating a current which is essentially constant. Dose rate is correlated to an amount of movement of an electroscope element charged by the tritium battery. Ionizing radiation decreases the voltage at the element and causes movement. A bleed resistor is coupled between the electroscope support element or electrode and the ionization chamber wall electrode.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Proceedings: Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Providence, RI, November 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Health physics (HP) professionals within the nuclear industry are continually upgrading their respective programs with new methods and technologies. The move to shorter outages combined with a diminishing group of contract HP technicians and demanding emergent work makes such changes even more important. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference focused on a number of key health physics issues and developments.

None

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proceedings: 2002 Radiation Protection Technology Conference: Baltimore, MD, October 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to program pressures resulting from shorter outages, combined with a diminishing group of contract health physics (HP) technicians, HP professionals must continuously upgrade their programs. Demanding emergent work also requires HP technicians in the nuclear industry to use new methods and technologies. The EPRI Radiation Protection Technology Conference was directed at highlighting a number of key health physics issues and developments.

None

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation ResponseMultiscale Modeling of Radiation Response Effects of Radiation Quality and HypoxiaEffects of Radiation Quality and Hypoxia Robert D. Stewart, Ph.D.Robert D. Stewart, Ph

Stewart, Robert D.

343

Radiation Protection Guidance Hospital Staff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 Radiation Protection Guidance For Hospital Staff Prepared for Stanford The privilege to use ionizing radiation at Stanford University, Stanford Hospital and Clinics, Lucile Packard with radioactive materials or radiation devices are responsible for knowing and adhering to applicable requirements

Kay, Mark A.

344

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia by more than 50 percent. #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212 ________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________ #12;COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program Medical Center - T: 212-305-0303 F: 212-305-0318 rso-clinical@columbia

Jia, Songtao

345

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

September 11, 1998 Meeting June 22, 1998 Meeting May 27, 1998 Meeting November 3, 1997 Meeting September 18, 1997 Meeting More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group...

347

Fluorination process using catalysts  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

1983-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

348

Fluorination process using catalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

Hochel, Robert C. (Aiken, SC); Saturday, Kathy A. (Aiken, SC)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Terahertz radiation mixer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A terahertz radiation mixer comprises a heterodyned field-effect transistor (FET) having a high electron mobility heterostructure that provides a gatable two-dimensional electron gas in the channel region of the FET. The mixer can operate in either a broadband pinch-off mode or a narrowband resonant plasmon mode by changing a grating gate bias of the FET. The mixer can beat an RF signal frequency against a local oscillator frequency to generate an intermediate frequency difference signal in the microwave region. The mixer can have a low local oscillator power requirement and a large intermediate frequency bandwidth. The terahertz radiation mixer is particularly useful for terahertz applications requiring high resolution.

Wanke, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Allen, S. James (Santa Barbara, CA); Lee, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

350

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

Quapp, William J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Radiation shielding composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

353

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

354

National Ambient Radiation Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Handheld CZT radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A handheld CZT radiation detector having a CZT gamma-ray sensor, a multichannel analyzer, a fuzzy-logic component, and a display component is disclosed. The CZT gamma-ray sensor may be a coplanar grid CZT gamma-ray sensor, which provides high-quality gamma-ray analysis at a wide range of operating temperatures. The multichannel analyzer categorizes pulses produce by the CZT gamma-ray sensor into channels (discrete energy levels), resulting in pulse height data. The fuzzy-logic component analyzes the pulse height data and produces a ranked listing of radioisotopes. The fuzzy-logic component is flexible and well-suited to in-field analysis of radioisotopes. The display component may be a personal data assistant, which provides a user-friendly method of interacting with the detector. In addition, the radiation detector may be equipped with a neutron sensor to provide an enhanced mechanism of sensing radioactive materials.

Murray, William S.; Butterfield, Kenneth B.; Baird, William

2004-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Purely radiative perfect fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study `purely radiative' (div E = div H = 0) and geodesic perfect fluids with non-constant pressure and show that the Bianchi class A perfect fluids can be uniquely characterized --modulo the class of purely electric and (pseudo-)spherically symmetric universes-- as those models for which the magnetic and electric part of the Weyl tensor and the shear are simultaneously diagonalizable. For the case of constant pressure the same conclusion holds provided one also assumes that the fluid is irrotational.

B. Bastiaensen; H. R. Karimian; N. Van den Bergh; L. Wylleman

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Open Group Base Specifications Issue 6 IEEE Std 1003.1, 2004 Edition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2004 The IEEE and The Open Group, All Rights reserved. NAME open - open a file SYNOPSIS [OH] #include stat be created; the user ID of the file shall be set to the effective user ID of the process; the group ID of the file shall be set to the group ID of the file's parent directory or to the effective group ID

359

Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

Aleksey Ilyin

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide Training For Radiation Emergencies, First Responder Operations - Instructors Guide COURSE...

362

POLARIZATION OF THE COSMIC BACKGROUND RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a 45 angle. Radiation whose electric field (polarization)radiation field, it can be uniquely characterized by its electric

Lubin, Philip Lubin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Proposal Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

364

Ann. For. Sci. 64 (2007) 899909; DOI: 10.1051/forest:2007072 Multiscale computation of solar radiation for predictive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Solar radiation is a fundamental component of ecological processes, but is poorly used at this scale due to the lack of available data. Here we present a GIS program allowing to calculate solar radiation as well and cloudiness data. Solar radiation measured from 88 meteorological stations used for validation indicated a R

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Global aspects of radiation memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational radiation has a memory effect represented by a net change in the relative positions of test particles. Both the linear and nonlinear sources proposed for this radiation memory are of the "electric" type, or E mode, as characterized by the even parity of the polarization pattern. Although "magnetic" type, or B mode, radiation memory is mathematically possible, no physically realistic source has been identified. There is an electromagnetic counterpart to radiation memory in which the velocity of charged particles obtain a net "kick". Again, the physically realistic sources of electromagnetic radiation memory that have been identified are of the electric type. In this paper, a global null cone description of the electromagnetic field is applied to establish the non-existence of B mode radiation memory and the non-existence of E mode radiation memory due to a bound charge distribution.

J. Winicour

2014-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

367

On The Harmonic Oscillator Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the maximum kinematical invariance group of the quantum harmonic oscillator from a view point of the Ermakov-type system. A six parameter family of the square integrable oscillator wave functions, which seems cannot be obtained by the standard separation of variables, is presented as an example. The invariance group of generalized driven harmonic oscillator is shown to be isomorphic to the corresponding Schroedinger group of the free particle.

Raquel M. Lopez; Sergei K. Suslov; Jose M. Vega-Guzman

2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Neil 65 Group Picture Neil 65 Group Picture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neil 65 Group Picture Neil 65 Group Picture December 14, 2003 Row 1: Tom Dowling, Nolan Mc-Marie Belcastro, Chris Stephens, Rajneesh Hegde Row 2: Paul Wollan, Bruce Richter, Mike Plummer, Xiaoya Zha, Dan Bannai, Mike Albertson, Joan Hutchinson, Matt Devos, Tom Zaslovsky, Mark Ellingham, Sandra Kingan, James

Mohar, Bojan

369

Safarevic's Theorem on Solvable Groups as Galois Groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extension Kjk with Galois group G(Kjk) ¸ = G. Ÿ SafareviŸc proved this result in 1954. The intricate proof ) are embedable into G. Then there exists a Galois extension Kjk with Galois group isomorphic to G, which

370

Method and apparatus for measuring spatial uniformity of radiation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for measuring the spatial uniformity of the intensity of a radiation beam from a radiation source based on a single sampling time and/or a single pulse of radiation. The measuring apparatus includes a plurality of radiation detectors positioned on planar mounting plate to form a radiation receiving area that has a shape and size approximating the size and shape of the cross section of the radiation beam. The detectors concurrently receive portions of the radiation beam and transmit electrical signals representative of the intensity of impinging radiation to a signal processor circuit connected to each of the detectors and adapted to concurrently receive the electrical signals from the detectors and process with a central processing unit (CPU) the signals to determine intensities of the radiation impinging at each detector location. The CPU displays the determined intensities and relative intensity values corresponding to each detector location to an operator of the measuring apparatus on an included data display device. Concurrent sampling of each detector is achieved by connecting to each detector a sample and hold circuit that is configured to track the signal and store it upon receipt of a "capture" signal. A switching device then selectively retrieves the signals and transmits the signals to the CPU through a single analog to digital (A/D) converter. The "capture" signal. is then removed from the sample-and-hold circuits. Alternatively, concurrent sampling is achieved by providing an A/D converter for each detector, each of which transmits a corresponding digital signal to the CPU. The sampling or reading of the detector signals can be controlled by the CPU or level-detection and timing circuit.

Field, Halden (Boulder, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Interagency Sustainability Working Group Members  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chaired by the Federal Energy Management Program, the Interagency Sustainability Working Group is composed of representatives from every major Federal agency.

372

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Infrared Thermography (IRT) Working Group Sco McWilliams U.S. Photovoltaic Manufacturing Consor;um (PVMC) Infrared Thermography Infrared Thermography (IRT) has been demonstrated...

373

Lorentz Group in Ray Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been almost one hundred years since Einstein formulated his special theory of relativity in 1905. He showed that the basic space-time symmetry is dictated by the Lorentz group. It is shown that this group of Lorentz transformations is not only applicable to special relativity, but also constitutes the scientific language for optical sciences. It is noted that coherent and squeezed states of light are representations of the Lorentz group. The Lorentz group is also the basic underlying language for classical ray optics, including polarization optics, interferometers, the Poincare\\'e sphere, one-lens optics, multi-lens optics, laser cavities, as well multilayer optics.

S. Baskal; E. Georgieva; Y. S. Kim; M. E. Noz

2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

374

Anisotropic radiation elds: causality and quantum statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

radiation transport 5 2.1 Radiation transport equation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Closures The transport of radiation through a medium is described by the radiation transport equation for the radiative is used to describe anisotropic radiation. Because the two moment equations do not form a closed set

Honingh, Aline

375

Influence of Extraterrestrial Radiation on Radiation Portal Monitors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cosmic radiation and solar flares can be a major source of background radiation at the Earths surface. This paper examines the relationship between extraterrestrial radiation and the detectable background in radiation portal monitors used for homeland security applications. Background radiation data from 13 radiation portal monitor facilities are examined and compared against external sources of data related to extraterrestrial radiation, including measurements at neutron monitors located at 53 cosmic-ray observatories around the Earth, four polar orbiting satellites, three geostationary satellites, ground-based geomagnetic field data from observatories around the Earth, a solar magnetic index, solar radio flux data, and sunspot activity data. Four-years (January 2003 through December 2006) of data are used in this study, which include the latter part of Solar Cycle 23 as solar activity was on the decline. The analysis shows a significant relationship between some extraterrestrial radiation and the background detected in the radiation portal monitors. A demonstrable decline is shown in the average gamma ray and neutron background at the radiation portal monitors as solar activity declined over the period of the study.

Keller, Paul E.; Kouzes, Richard T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are also used in other air pollution abatement processes to remove organic vapors, odors, or carbon platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more than 400,000 metric tons and biomedical devices. Salient Statistics--United States: 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999e Mine production:1 Platinum 1

377

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 430,000 metric tons--United States: 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998e Mine production: Platinum 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,610 3,5001 Palladium 6

378

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of catalysts. Oxidation catalysts are also used in other air-pollution-abatement processes to remove organic in kilograms, unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: The Stillwater Mine is the only primary platinum-group metals (PGM) producer in the United States. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed more

379

PLATINUM-GROUP METALS (Platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, iridium, osmium)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

automobile exhaust emissions. Oxidation catalysts are also used in many air pollution abatement processes platinum-group metals (PGM) mine. The mine, located near Nye, MT, processed about 350,000 metric tons--United States: 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997e Mine production: Platinum 2,050 1,960 1,590 1,840 2,5002 Palladium 6

380

Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer- APPENDICES Appendices-Volume 1A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report consists of all the appendices for the report described below: In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values as appendices. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less. Detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, for other contaminants studied in the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction are presented in several other technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. Be sure to place the asterisk after the base number so your search can list the complete series of reports related to Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction.

Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Density matrix of black hole radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawking's model of black hole evaporation is not unitary and leads to a mixed density matrix for the emitted radiation, while the Page model describes a unitary evaporation process in which the density matrix evolves from an almost thermal state to a pure state. We compare a recently proposed model of semiclassical black hole evaporation to the two established models. In particular, we study the density matrix of the outgoing radiation and determine how the magnitude of the off-diagonal corrections differs for the three frameworks. For Hawking's model, we find power-law corrections to the two-point functions that induce exponentially suppressed corrections to the off-diagonal elements of the full density matrix. This verifies that the Hawking result is correct to all orders in perturbation theory and also allows one to express the full density matrix in terms of the single-particle density matrix. We then consider the semiclassical theory for which the corrections, being non-perturbative from an effective field-theory perspective, are much less suppressed and grow monotonically in time. In this case, the R\\'enyi entropy for the outgoing radiation is shown to grow linearly at early times; but this growth slows down and the entropy eventually starts to decrease at the Page time. In addition to comparing models, we emphasize the distinction between the state of the radiation emitted from a black hole, which is highly quantum, and that of the radiation emitted from a typical classical black body at the same temperature.

Lasma Alberte; Ram Brustein; Andrei Khmelnitsky; A. J. M. Medved

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

383

The History of Galaxy Formation in Groups: An Observational Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a pedagogical review on the formation and evolution of galaxies in groups, utilizing observational information from the Local Group to galaxies at z~6. The majority of galaxies in the nearby universe are found in groups, and galaxies at all redshifts up to z~6 tend to cluster on the scale of nearby groups (~1 Mpc). This suggests that the group environment may play a role in the formation of most galaxies. The Local Group, and other nearby groups, display a diversity in star formation and morphological properties that puts limits on how, and when, galaxies in groups formed. Effects that depend on an intragroup medium, such as ram-pressure and strangulation, are likely not major mechanisms driving group galaxy evolution. Simple dynamical friction arguments however show that galaxy mergers should be common, and a dominant process for driving evolution. While mergers between L_* galaxies are observed to be rare at z < 1, they are much more common at earlier times. This is due to the increased density of the universe, and to the fact that high mass galaxies are highly clustered on the scale of groups. We furthermore discus why the local number density environment of galaxies strongly correlates with galaxy properties, and why the group environment may be the preferred method for establishing the relationship between properties of galaxies and their local density.

Christopher J. Conselice

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Research documentation per participating group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research documentation per participating group #12;2. RESEARCH DOCUMENTATION OF THE GROUP SYSTEM Management Hybrid trucks StDy Steen, R. v.d. (PhD 3) FEM Tyre Modelling StDy 5.4 Mechanical Design Bedem, Ir

Franssen, Michael

385

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites.

386

Radiation (North Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is the designated agency to receive registration applications and issue certificates necessary for the production, storage, processing, and disposal of radioactive wastes....

387

Time dependence of Hawking radiation entropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If a black hole starts in a pure quantum state and evaporates completely by a unitary process, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation initially increases and then decreases back to zero when the black hole has disappeared. Here numerical results are given for an approximation to the time dependence of the radiation entropy under an assumption of fast scrambling, for large nonrotating black holes that emit essentially only photons and gravitons. The maximum of the von Neumann entropy then occurs after about 53.81% of the evaporation time, when the black hole has lost about 40.25% of its original Bekenstein-Hawking (BH) entropy (an upper bound for its von Neumann entropy) and then has a BH entropy that equals the entropy in the radiation, which is about 59.75% of the original BH entropy 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2}, or about 7.509M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 6.268 10{sup 76}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, using my 1976 calculations that the photon and graviton emission process into empty space gives about 1.4847 times the BH entropy loss of the black hole. Results are also given for black holes in initially impure states. If the black hole starts in a maximally mixed state, the von Neumann entropy of the Hawking radiation increases from zero up to a maximum of about 119.51% of the original BH entropy, or about 15.018M{sub 0}{sup 2} ? 1.254 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}, and then decreases back down to 4?M{sub 0}{sup 2} = 1.049 10{sup 77}(M{sub 0}/M{sub s}un){sup 2}.

Page, Don N., E-mail: profdonpage@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 4-181 CCIS, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Modeling and simulation of film blowing process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, their work does not include crystallization kinetics, hence, restricted to amorphous polymers. Cao and Campbell?s predictions of bubble radius, temperature, and velocity profiles are in reasonably good agreement with Gupta?s (1980) experimental measurements.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 V Process conditions used for the analysis of Exxon data. . . . . . . . . 99 VI The influence of radiation heat transfer on the process. . . . . . . . . 171 x LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page 1 Schematic of a typical film blowing process...

Mayavaram, Ravisankar S.

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

389

Radiative ?(1S) decays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wW~ ii~ ~ + v~ 1''&WV'' V 0.20 0.45 0.70 ~y ~ EBFA~ 0.95 l.20 FIG. 4. Energy spectrum (normalized to beam energy) for Y~y2(h+h ) event candidates, with continuum data and ex- pected background from Y~m 2(h +h ) overplotted. 40 30 ~ 20 LLI IO hl...PHYSICAL REVIEW 0 VOLUME 41, NUMBER 5 Radiative T(lS) decays 1 MARCH 1990 R. Fulton, M. Hempstead, T. Jensen, D. R. Johnson, H. Kagan, R. Kass, F. Morrow, and J. Whitmore Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 W.-Y. Chen, J. Dominick, R. L. Mc...

Baringer, Philip S.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Radiation Field on Superspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

391

Radiation.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115,Performance QualityRadiation August

392

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3. |ID#:Synchrotron Radiation The following is

393

Virtual Gamma Ray Radiation Sources through Neutron Radiative Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The countrate response of a gamma spectrometry system from a neutron radiation source behind a plane of moderating material doped with a nuclide of a large radiative neutron capture cross-section exhibits a countrate response analogous to a gamma radiation source at the same position from the detector. Using a planar, surface area of the neutron moderating material exposed to the neutron radiation produces a larger area under the prompt gamma ray peak in the detector than a smaller area of dimensions relative to the active volume of the gamma detection system.

Scott Wilde, Raymond Keegan

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Measurement of Radiation Damage on Silica Aerogel \\v Cerenkov Radiator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We measured the radiation damage on silica aerogel \\v Cerenkov radiators originally developed for the $B$-factory experiment at KEK. Refractive index of the aerogel samples ranged from 1.012 to 1.028. The samples were irradiated up to 9.8~MRad of equivalent dose. Measurements of transmittance and refractive index were carried out and these samples were found to be radiation hard. Deteriorations in transparency and changes of refractive index were observed to be less than 1.3\\% and 0.001 at 90\\% confidence level, respectively. Prospects of using aerogels under high-radiation environment are discussed.

S. K. Sahu et al

1996-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Radiation Control Program and Radiation Control Act (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute authorizes the state to implement a regulatory program for sources of radiation, and contains rules for the Department, licensing and registration, and taxation of radioactive materials.

396

Self-Reported Cognitive Outcomes in Patients With Brain Metastases Before and After Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Patients with brain metastases may experience treatment-related cognitive deficits. In this study, we prospectively assessed the self-reported cognitive abilities of patients with brain metastases from any solid primary cancer before and after irradiation of the brain. Methods and Materials: The treatment group (TG) consisted of adult patients (n=50) with brain metastases who received whole or partial irradiation of the brain without having received prior radiation therapy (RT). The control group (CG) consisted of breast cancer patients (n=27) without cranial involvement who were treated with adjuvant RT. Patients were recruited between May 2008 and December 2010. Self-reported cognitive abilities were acquired before RT and 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after irradiation. The information regarding the neurocognitive status was collected by use of the German questionnaires for self-perceived deficits in attention (FEDA) and subjectively experienced everyday memory performance (FEAG). Results: The baseline data showed a high proportion of self-perceived neurocognitive deficits in both groups. A comparison between the TG and the CG regarding the course of self-reported outcomes after RT showed significant between-group differences for the FEDA scales 2 and 3: fatigue and retardation of daily living activities (P=.002) and decrease in motivation (P=.032) with an increase of attention deficits in the TG, but not in the CG. There was a trend towards significance in FEDA scale 1: distractibility and retardation of mental processes (P=.059) between the TG and the CG. The FEAG assessment presented no significant differences. An additional subgroup analysis within the TG was carried out. FEDA scale 3 showed significant differences in the time-related progress between patients with whole-brain RT and those receiving hypofractionated stereotactic RT (P=.025), with less decrease in motivation in the latter group. Conclusion: Self-reported attention declined in patients with brain metastases after RT to the brain, whereas it remained relatively stable in breast cancer patients.

Cole, Ansa Maer [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Scherwath, Angela [Department of Medical Psychology, University Medical Centre Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ernst, Gundula [Department of Medical Psychology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Lanfermann, Heinrich [Institute for Neuroradiology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany); Steinmann, Diana, E-mail: steinmann.diana@mh-hannover.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover, Hannover (Germany)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Comparison of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties and Dynamical Processes at Two Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Si...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity Involvement and MakingYersiniae.Shewanellaby

398

The Radiation Reaction Effects in the BMT Model of Spinning Charge and the Radiation Polarization Phenomenon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effect of radiation polarization attended with the motion of spinning charge in the magnetic field could be viewed through the classical theory of self-interaction. The quantum expression for the polarization time follows from the semiclassical relation $T_{QED}\\sim \\hbar c^{3}/\\mu_{B}^2\\omega_{c}^3$, and needs quantum explanation neither for the orbit nor for the spin motion. In our approach the polarization emerges as a result of natural selection in the ensenmble of elastically scattered electrons among which the group of particles that bear their spins in the 'right' directions has the smaller probability of radiation. The evidence of non-complete polarization degree is also obtained.

S. L. Lebedev

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

399

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t ? [0,1). We prove several results ...

Borodin, Alexei

400

Radiation transport in inhomogeneous media  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Calculations of radiation transport in heated materials are greatly complicated by the presence of regions in which two or more materials are inhomogeneously mixed. This phenomenon is important in many systems, such as astrophysical systems where density clumps can be found in star-forming regions and molecular clouds. Laboratory experiments have been designed to test the modeling of radiation transport through inhomogeneous plasmas. A laser-heated hohlraum is used as a thermal source to drive radiation through polymer foam containing randomly distributed gold particles. Experimental measurements of radiation transport in foams with gold particle sizes ranging from 5-9 {mu}m to submicrometer diameters as well as the homogeneous foam case are presented. The simulation results of the radiation transport are compared to the experiment and show that an inhomogeneous transport model must be applied to explain radiation transport in foams loaded with 5 {mu}m diameter gold particles.

Keiter, Paul; Gunderson, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Foster, John; Rosen, Paula; Comley, Andrew; Taylor, Mark [AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Perry, Ted [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

RADIATIVE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We perform analytic linear stability analyses of an interface separating two stratified media threaded by a radiation flux, a configuration relevant in several astrophysical contexts. We develop a general framework for analyzing such systems and obtain exact stability conditions in several limiting cases. In the optically thin, isothermal regime, where the discontinuity is chemical in nature (e.g., at the boundary of a radiation pressure-driven H II region), radiation acts as part of an effective gravitational field, and instability arises if the effective gravity per unit volume toward the interface overcomes that away from it. In the optically thick 'adiabatic' regime where the total (gas plus radiation) specific entropy of a Lagrangian fluid element is conserved, for example at the edge of radiation pressure-driven bubble around a young massive star, we show that radiation acts like a modified equation of state and derive a generalized version of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor stability condition.

Jacquet, Emmanuel [Laboratoire de Mineralogie et Cosmochimie de Museum (LMCM), CNRS and Museum National d'Histoire Naturelle, UMR 7202, 57 rue Cuvier, 75005 Paris (France); Krumholz, Mark R., E-mail: ejacquet@mnhn.fr, E-mail: krumholz@ucolick.org [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radiation of inertial scalar particles in the de Sitter universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the radiation from an inertial scalar particle evolving in a de Sitter expanding Universe. In the context of scalar QED the process is generated by the first order term in the perturbation theory expansion of the S-matrix. The partial transition probability is obtained and analysed, and soft-photon emission is found to dominate overall. It has been argued that an inertial particle evolving in dS spacetime loses physical momentum just as a decelerated particle in Minkowski space does. It is thus expected that an inertial charge will radiate in a similar way. We investigate the radiated energy and make a qualitative comparison of the angular distribution of the energy with the radiation pattern in the latter case.

Robert Blaga

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

403

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: Energy ResourcesNewsInformation

404

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Request for Travel Funds for Systems Radiation Biology Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 3rd International Systems Radiation Biology Workshop brought together the major European, US and Japanese research programs on radiation risk as well as selected experts representing systems biological approaches to discuss how the new methodologies could be best exploited for low dose research. A significant part of the workshop was devoted to discussions organised as breakout group sessions. To facilitate discussions number of participants was limited to 60 persons. To achieve the goals of this symposium in this international conference, support from DOE is vital. Hence, this proposal requested support in the amount of $15,000 to cover the travel expenses of international experts and radiation biology scientists from the United States. This supporting mechanism was clearly identified to the selected US participants as a conference support award from the DOE (See attached PDF). The workshop was an outstanding opportunity to strengthen interactions between leading experts in the emerging areas of radiation sciences, and will also provide opportunities for younger scientists to meet with experts and discuss their results. This workshop was designed to endorse active engagement in international collaboration. A major objective of this conference was to effectively communicate research results, in order to ensure that current thinking reflects sound science of radiation biology. Further, this international event addressed the use and success of scientific initiatives in radiation biology for policymakers, standard-setters, and the general public.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen [NYU School of Medicine

2014-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE HIGGS WORKING GROUP: SUMMARY REPORT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This working group has investigated Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron and the LHC. Once Higgs bosons are found their properties have to be determined. The prospects of Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC and a high-energy linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider are discussed in detail within the Standard Model and its minimal supersymmetric extension (MSSM). Recent improvements in the theoretical knowledge of the signal and background processes are presented and taken into account. The residual uncertainties are analyzed in detail. Theoretical progress is discussed in particular for the gluon-fusion processes gg {yields} H(+j), Higgs-bremsstrahlung off bottom quarks and the weak vector-boson-fusion (VBF) processes. Following the list of open questions of the last Les Houches workshop in 2001 several background processes have been calculated at next-to-leading order, resulting in a significant reduction of the theoretical uncertainties. Further improvements have been achieved for the Higgs sectors of the MSSM and NMSSM. This report summarizes our work performed before and after the workshop in Les Houches. Part A describes the theoretical developments for signal and background processes. Part B presents recent progress in Higgs boson searches at the Tevatron collider. Part C addresses the determination of Higgs boson couplings, part D the measurement of tan {beta} and part E Higgs boson searches in the VBF processes at the LHC. Part F summarizes Higgs searches in supersymmetric Higgs decays, part G photonic Higgs decays in Higgs-strahlung processes at the LHC, while part H concentrates on MSSM Higgs bosons in the intense-coupling regime at the LHC. Part I presents progress in charged Higgs studies and part J the Higgs discovery potential in the NMSSM at the LHC. The last part K describes Higgs coupling measurements at a 1 TeV linear e{sup +}e{sup -} collider.

DAWSON, S.; ET AL.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Time dependent annealing of radiation - induced leakage currents in MOS devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented showing the radiation response of several unhardened commercial 1.25-{mu}m bulk CMOS processes using LOCOS isolation technology. In all cases studied radiation-induced failure is caused by effects in the field oxide, and the radiation-induced {delta}V{sub T} in the channel region is usually small at the failure dose. Time dependent leakage current data for the field oxides are presented and discussed.

Terrell, J.M. (Booz Allen and Hamilton, Inc. Bethesda, MD (US)); Olkham, T.R.; Lelis, A.J.; Benedetto, J.M. (Harry Diamond Labs., Adelphi, MD (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Radiation Safety Work Control Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiation Safety Work Control Form (see instructions on pg-3) Rev. May 2014 Area: Form : Date: Preliminary Applicability Screen: (a) Will closing the beam line injection stoppers...

409

Electromagnetic radiation by gravitating bodies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitating bodies in motion, regardless of their constitution, always produce electromagnetic radiation in the form of photon pairs. This phenomenon is an analog of the radiation caused by the motion of dielectric (or magnetic) bodies. It is a member of a wide class of phenomena named dynamical Casimir effects, and it may be viewed as the squeezing of the electromagnetic vacuum. Production of photon pairs is a purely quantum-mechanical effect. Unfortunately, as we show, the emitted radiation is extremely weak as compared to radiation produced by other mechanisms.

Iwo Bialynicki-Birula; Zofia Bialynicka-Birula

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat...

411

Quality Services: Radiation (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations establish standards for protection against ionizing radiation resulting from the disposal and discharge of radioactive material to the environment. The regulations apply to any...

412

Implementation of an Integrated Quality Assurance Program for a CT-TPS Process.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Systematic constancy and accuracy of a treatment planning system (TPS) are crucial for the entire radiation treatment planning process (TPP). The Quality Assurance (QA) of (more)

Wu, Junqing

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Parametric analysis of radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow using the finite volume radiation solution method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the outside vapor deposition (OVD) process, silica particles are deposited by thermophoretic force on the surface of a cylinder. This process is associated with complex physical phenomena such as heat transfer between a torch and a cylinder, chemical reaction for silica particle formation, and particle deposition. Since the OVD process is carried out in a very high temperature environment, radiative heat transfer should be taken into consideration. Here, the radiative-convective heat transfer around a circular cylinder in a cross flow of a radiating gas has been numerically analyzed using the finite volume radiation solution method in a nonorthogonal coordinate system. The cross-flow Reynolds number based on the cylinder diameter is 40, and the fluid Prandtl number is assumed to be 0.7. The radiative heat transfer coupled with convection is reasonably predicted by the finite volume radiation solution method. Distributions of the local Nusselt number are investigated according to the variation of radiation parameters such as conduction-to-radiation parameter, optical thickness, scattering albedo, and cylinder wall emissivity.

Lee, K.H.; Lee, J.S.; Choi, M. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY COMMITTEE Functions The Radiation Safety Committee shall advise the Provost on all policy matters relating to radiation safety; formulate campus radiation safety policies in compliance the Risk Manager) monitor the performance of the Radiation Safety Officer as it relates to implementation

Sze, Lawrence

415

Sustainability Community Special Interest Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Community Special Interest Group Meeting, CHI 2012 Eli Blevis, Yue Pan, & David: Weather Effects #12;Discussion Catalyst: Social Sustainability #12;Discussion Catalyst: Barriers & Brick Catalyst: Education #12;Discussion Catalyst: Cultural Factors #12;Discussion Catalyst: Finding Our Way #12

Blevis, Eli

416

Ayrshire Red Squirrel Group Squirrelpox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ayrshire Red Squirrel Group SSG Report 1st March 2012 Squirrelpox Sero-positive grey squirrels. Concerns are also rising that there may be outbreaks of pox in red squirrel populations which have gone

417

Midwest Hydro Users Group Meeting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Midwest Hydro Users Group will be holding their annual Fall meeting on November 12th and 13th in Wausau, Wisconsin. An Owners-only meeting on the afternoon of the 12th followed by a full...

418

Macdonald processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macdonald processes are probability measures on sequences of partitions defined in terms of nonnegative specializations of the Macdonald symmetric functions and two Macdonald parameters q,t in [0,1). We prove several results about these processes, which include the following. (1) We explicitly evaluate expectations of a rich family of observables for these processes. (2) In the case t=0, we find a Fredholm determinant formula for a q-Laplace transform of the distribution of the last part of the Macdonald-random partition. (3) We introduce Markov dynamics that preserve the class of Macdonald processes and lead to new "integrable" 2d and 1d interacting particle systems. (4) In a large time limit transition, and as q goes to 1, the particles of these systems crystallize on a lattice, and fluctuations around the lattice converge to O'Connell's Whittaker process that describe semi-discrete Brownian directed polymers. (5) This yields a Fredholm determinant for the Laplace transform of the polymer partition function, and taking its asymptotics we prove KPZ universality for the polymer (free energy fluctuation exponent 1/3 and Tracy-Widom GUE limit law). (6) Under intermediate disorder scaling, we recover the Laplace transform of the solution of the KPZ equation with narrow wedge initial data. (7) We provide contour integral formulas for a wide array of polymer moments. (8) This results in a new ansatz for solving quantum many body systems such as the delta Bose gas.

Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin

2013-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Galois Groups of Schubert Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GALOIS GROUPS OF SCHUBERT PROBLEMS A Dissertation by ABRAHAM MARTIN DEL CAMPO SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY... August 2012 Major Subject: Mathematics GALOIS GROUPS OF SCHUBERT PROBLEMS A Dissertation by ABRAHAM MARTIN DEL CAMPO SANCHEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Martin Del Campo Sanchez, Abraham

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

420

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Hawking radiation on a falling lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scalar field theory on a lattice falling freely into a 1+1 dimensional black hole is studied using both WKB and numerical approaches. The outgoing modes are shown to arise from incoming modes by a process analogous to a Bloch oscillation, with an admixture of negative frequency modes corresponding to the Hawking radiation. Numerical calculations show that the Hawking effect is reproduced to within 0.5% on a lattice whose proper spacing where the wavepacket turns around at the horizon is $\\sim0.08$ in units where the surface gravity is 1.

Ted Jacobson; David Mattingly

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

422

Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

423

2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

William Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Networks Spanish project COPABIB Group Murcia Group Polit. Valencia Group La Laguna Computation in heterogeneous-hierarchical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks Spanish project COPABIB Group Murcia Group Polit. Valencia Group La Laguna Computation in heterogeneous-hierarchical environments Project COPABIB: Univ. Alicante, Castell´on, La Laguna, Murcia COPABIB Group Murcia Group Polit. Valencia Group La Laguna Contents 1 Networks 2 Spanish project COPABIB 3

Giménez, Domingo

425

Particle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to connect the energy re- lease process with the acceleration of electrons in solar flares, using a CA modelParticle acceleration and radiation by direct electric fields in flaring complex solar active-Meudon, 92195 Meudon Cedex, FRANCE Abstract The acceleration and radiation of solar energetic particles

Anastasiadis, Anastasios

426

On the approximation of local and linear radiative damping in the middle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

atmosphere. In general, this damping is a nonlocal process in which heat is transferred to and from remote form 13 November 2009) ABSTRACT The validity of approximating radiative heating rates in the middle'') is investigated. Using radiative heating rate and temperature output from a chemistry­climate model with realistic

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

427

Second international conference on computer simulation of radiation effects in solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 102 abstracts are included, arranged under the following headings: interatomic potentials and theoretical methods, displacement cascades and radiation effects in metals, radiation effects in semiconductors, sputtering and surface processes, cluster-solid interactions, highly charged ions and inelastic effects, and posters (A and B).

de la Rubia, T.D.; Gilmer, G.H. [comps.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Appendix F. Radiation Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis

Pennycook, Steve

429

Introduction Abstract reflection groups and abstract buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Abstract reflection groups and abstract buildings Their geometric realizations Compactly supported cohomology L2 -cohomology Cohomology of Coxeter groups and buildings Mike Davis (work groups and buildings #12;Introduction Abstract reflection groups and abstract buildings Their geometric

Vogtmann, Karen

430

Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review Article RADIATION SHIELDING TECHNOLOGY J. Kenneth Shultis and Richard E. Faw* Abstract Physics Society INTRODUCTION THIS IS a review of the technology of shielding against the effects to the review. The first treats the evolution of radiation-shielding technology from the beginning of the 20th

Shultis, J. Kenneth

431

Radiation damping, noncommutativity and duality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, our main objective is to construct a N=2 supersymmetric extension of the nonrelativistic $(2+1)$-dimensional model describing the radiation damping on the noncommutative plane with scalar (electric) and vector (magnetic) interactions by the N=2 superfield technique. We also introduce a dual equivalent action to the radiation damping one using the Noether procedure.

E. M. C. Abreu; A. C. R. Mendes; C. Neves; W. Oliveira

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Hawking radiation and Quasinormal modes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectrum of Hawking radiation by quantum fields in the curved spacetime is continuous, so the explanation of Hawking radiation using quasinormal modes can be suspected to be impossible. We find that quasinormal modes do not explain the relation between the state observed in a region far away from a black hole and the short distance behavior of the state on the horizon.

SangChul Yoon

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

4, 699707, 2007 Radiation importance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inactive convection. 1 Introduction Given that for much of the world ocean, the radiation termsOSD 4, 699­707, 2007 Radiation importance D. Nof and L. Yu Title Page Abstract Introduction Discussion EGU Ocean Sci. Discuss., 4, 699­707, 2007 www.ocean-sci-discuss.net/4/699/2007/ © Author(s) 2007

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

434

RADIATION AND CLOUD MONITORING STATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

how they affect the energy balance between incoming solar radiation and heat re-radiated from Earth, and moisture content; area cloud coverage; solar and terrestrial radia- tion; and standard meteorological region and the North Slope of Alaska. ARCS sites are a component of the Department of Energy

Reeves, Geoffrey D.

435

Integrating fiber optic radiation dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research effort was to determine the feasibility of forming a radiation sensor coupled to an optical fiber capable of measuring gamma photon, x-ray, and beta particle dose rates and integrated dose, and to construct a prototype dosimeter read-out system utilizing the fiber optic sensor. The key component of the prototype dosimeter system is a newly developed radiation sensitive storage phosphor. When this phosphor is excited by energetic radiation, a proportionate population of electron-hole pairs are created which become trapped at specific impurities within the phosphor. Trapped electrons can subsequently be stimulated optically with near-infrared at approximately 1 micrometer wavelength; the electrons can recombine with holes at luminescent centers to produce a luminescence which is directly proportional to the trapped electron population, and thus to the radiation exposure. By attaching the phosphor to the end of an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit both the IR optical stimulation and the characteristic phosphor luminescence through the fiber to and from the read-out instrument, which can be located far (e.g., kilometers) from the radiation field. This document reports on the specific design of the prototype system and its operating characteristics, including its sensitivity to various radiation dose rates and energies, its dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio at various radiation intensities, and other system characteristics. Additionally, the radiation hardness of the phosphor and fiber are evaluated. 17 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs.

Soltani, P.K.; Wrigley, C.Y.; Storti, G.M.; Creager, R.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Induced Instability Patrick Hagerty #3; Department of Mathematics University of Michigan of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 abloch@math.lsa.umich.edu Michael I. Weinstein z Fundamental Mathematics a central rigid body which can radiate energy through exible components such as solar panels and antennae

Bloch, Anthony

437

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which have undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed.

Briggs, Gifford G. (Cincinnatti, OH); Kato, Takeo R. (Cincinnatti, OH); Schonegg, Edward (Cleves, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Process for reducing beta activity in uranium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a method for lowering the beta radiation hazards associated with the casting of uranium. The method reduces the beta radiation emitted from the as-cast surfaces of uranium ingots. The method also reduces the amount of beta radiation emitters retained on the interiors of the crucibles that have been used to melt the uranium charges and which undergone cleaning in a remote handling facility. The lowering of the radioactivity is done by scavenging the beta emitters from the molten uranium with a molten mixture containing the fluorides of magnesium and calcium. The method provides a means of collection and disposal of the beta emitters in a manner that reduces radiation exposure to operating personnel in the work area where the ingots are cast and processed. 5 tabs.

Briggs, G.G.; Kato, T.R.; Schonegg, E.

1985-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

439

Mapping incident photosynthetically active radiation from MODIS data over China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of incident photosynthetically active radiation from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer data. Journal, nitrogen and energy in different natural systems. Since photosynthesis is the core process for energy as an input for modeling photosynthesis from single plant leaves to complex plant communities. For example

Liang, Shunlin

440

A Radiation Hardened Reconfigurable FPGA Shankarnarayanan Ramaswamy1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Size Isolation Device Options S/D Engineering Supply Voltages Gate Electrodes Metal Levels Poly & Diffusion Silicide 150nm Shallow Trench Isolation 26 ? / 70 ? Halo with S/D Extensions 1.5V / 3.3V N+ Poly and manufactured utilizing this 150 nm radiation hardened CMOS process employing seven levels of metal. The chip

Manohar, Rajit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Stimulated Emission of Radiation in a Nuclear Fusion Reaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This letter claims that process of stimulated emission of radiation can be used to induce a fusion reaction in a HD molecule to produce Helium-3. An experimental set-up for this reaction is presented. It is proposed to study the technical potential of this reaction as an energy amplifier.

Michael Duren

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Transition Radiation in QCD matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In ultrarelativistic heavy ion collisions a finite size QCD medium is created. In this paper we compute radiative energy loss to zeroth order in opacity by taking into account finite size effects. Transition radiation occurs on the boundary between the finite size medium and the vacuum, and we show that it lowers the difference between medium and vacuum zeroth order radiative energy loss relative to the infinite size medium case. Further, in all previous computations of light parton radiation to zeroth order in opacity, there was a divergence caused by the fact that the energy loss is infinite in the vacuum and finite in the QCD medium. We show that this infinite discontinuity is naturally regulated by including the transition radiation.

Magdalena Djordjevic

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

443

LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING Wenwu Zhang, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4-1 Chapter 34 LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING Wenwu Zhang, Ph.D. General Electric Global Research)34.1 OVERVIEW LASER is the acronym of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Although regarded as one of the nontraditional processes, laser material processing (LMP) is not in its infancy anymore

Yao, Y. Lawrence

444

Fischer-Tropsch process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A Fischer-Tropsch process utilizing a product selective and stable catalyst by which synthesis gas, particularly carbon-monoxide rich synthesis gas is selectively converted to higher hydrocarbons of relatively narrow carbon number range is disclosed. In general, the selective and notably stable catalyst, consist of an inert carrier first treated with a Group IV B metal compound (such as zirconium or titanium), preferably an alkoxide compound, and subsequently treated with an organic compound of a Fischer-Tropsch metal catalyst, such as cobalt, iron or ruthenium carbonyl. Reactions with air and water and calcination are specifically avoided in the catalyst preparation procedure.

Dyer, Paul N. (Allentown, PA); Pierantozzi, Ronald (Orefield, PA); Withers, Howard P. (Douglassville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Quality Assurance of Radiation Therapy Planning Systems: Current Status and Remaining Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computerized radiation therapy planning systems (RTPSs) are pivotal for treatment planning. The acceptance, commissioning, and quality control of RTPSs are uniquely complex and are described in the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group Report 53 (1998) and International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Report Series No. 430 (2004). The International Atomic Energy Agency also developed a document and data package for use by vendors and purchasers to aid with acceptance testing of RTPSs. This document is based on International Electrotechnical Commission standard 62083 (2000) and describes both 'type' tests to be performed in the factory and 'site' tests to be performed in the clinic. The American Association of Physicists Task Group Report 67 described benchmark tests for the validation of dose calculation algorithms. Test data are being produced with the backing of the U.S. National Cancer Institute. However, significant challenges remain. Technology keeps evolving rapidly, thus requiring new quality assurance (QA) procedures. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy with its use of inverse optimization has added a new dimension to QA, because the results are not intuitively obvious. New technologies such as real-time ultrasound guidance for brachytherapy, TomoTherapy, and Cyberknife, require their own specialized RTPSs with unique QA requirements. On-line imaging allows for the generation of dose reconstructions using image warping techniques to determine the daily dose delivered to the patient. With increasing computer speeds, real-time reoptimization of treatment plans will become a reality. Gating technologies will require four-dimensional dose calculations to determine the actual dose delivered to tissue voxels. With these rapidly changing technologies, it is essential that a strong QA culture is invoked in every institution implementing these procedures and that new protocols are developed as a part of the clinical implementation process.

Van Dyk, Jacob [Department of Physics and Engineering, London Regional Cancer Program/London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON (Canada); Departments of Oncology, Medical Biophysics, Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, and Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)], E-mail: jake.vandyk@lhsc.on.ca

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Joint Research Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research works on advanced solid state spectroscopy. In 2005, the operation of the PF ring was quitted from Laboratory (SRL) was estab- lished in 1975 as a research group dedicating to study solid state physics using of the accelerator physics group and the solid state spectroscopy group. The members of the accelerator group have

Katsumoto, Shingo

447

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

CFCC working group meeting: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the vugraphs presented at this meeting. Presentations covered are: CFCC Working Group; Overview of study on applications for advanced ceramics in industries for the future; Design codes and data bases: The CFCC program and its involvement in ASTM, ISO, ASME, and military handbook 17 activities; CFCC Working Group meeting (McDermott Technology); CFCC Working Group meeting (Textron); CFCC program for DMO materials; Developments in PIP-derived CFCCs; Toughened Silcomp (SiC-Si) composites for gas turbine engine applications; CFCC program for CVI materials; Self-lubricating CFCCs for diesel engine applications; Overview of the CFCC program`s supporting technologies task; Life prediction methodologies for CFCC components; Environmental testing of CFCCs in combustion gas environments; High-temperature particle filtration ORNL/DCC CRADA; HSCT CMC combustor; and Case study -- CFCC shroud for industrial gas turbines.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Radiation Safety Committee Laser Use Registration Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Committee Laser Use Registration Form Pulsed Duration (sec) Average Power: Pulse operating procedures and specific approval conditions required by the Radiation Safety Committee now of Radiation Safety Committee Chair Date #12;

de Lijser, Peter

450

Radiative and climate impacts of absorbing aerosols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

incident radiation are distinguished, and albedos for oceanOceans using multiple satellite datasets in conjunction with MACR (Monte Carlo Aerosol-Cloud-Radiation)ocean temperature is coupled with the rest of the climate system, the dimming of surface radiation

Zhu, Aihua

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

THE RADIATION CHEMISTRY OP AMINO ACIDS, PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS IN RELATION TO THE RADIATION STERILIZATION OF HIGH-PROTEIN FOODS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Various Ionizing Radiations. Radiat. Res. , 22, 694 (1968). W. M. Garrison, Radiation Induced Reactions of AminoFrozen Aqueous Solutions, in Radiation Chemistry of Aqueous

Garrison, W.M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Purification process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process for the removal of hydrogen sulphide from gases or liquid hydrocarbons, comprises contacting the gas or liquid hydrocarbon with an aqueous alkaline solution, preferably having a pH value of 8 to 10, comprising (A) an anthraquinone disulphonic acid or a water-soluble sulphonamide thereof (B) a compound of a metal which can exist in at least two valency states and (C) a sequestering agent.

Marshall, A.

1981-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

453

Hydropyrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved process for producing a methane-enriched gas wherein a hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material is treated with a hydrogen-containing pyrolysis gas at an elevated temperature and pressure to produce a product gas mixture including methane, carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The improvement comprises passing the product gas mixture sequentially through a water-gas shift reaction zone and a gas separation zone to provide separate gas streams of methane and of a recycle gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane for recycle to the process. A controlled amount of steam also is provided which when combined with the recycle gas provides a pyrolysis gas for treatment of additional hydrogen-deficient carbonaceous material. The amount of steam used and the conditions within the water-gas shift reaction zone and gas separation zone are controlled to obtain a steady-state composition of pyrolysis gas which will comprise hydrogen as the principal constituent and a minor amount of carbon monoxide, steam and methane so that no external source of hydrogen is needed to supply the hydrogen requirements of the process. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment, conditions are controlled such that there also is produced a significant quantity of benzene as a valuable coproduct.

Ullman, Alan Z. (Northridge, CA); Silverman, Jacob (Woodland Hills, CA); Friedman, Joseph (Huntington Beach, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiation-damaged polystyrene (given the identification name of 'polycube') was fabricated by mixing high-density polystyrene material ("Dylene Fines # 100") with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used in the 1960s for criticality studies during processing of spent nuclear fuel. The polycubes have since been stored for almost 40 years at the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) after failure of two processes to reclaim the plutonium and uranium oxides from the polystyrene matrix. Thermal decomposition products from this highly cross-linked polystyrene matrix were characterized using Gas Chromatograph/Mass Spectroscopy (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal furnace. The decomposition studies were performed in air and helium atmospheres at about 773 K. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different compared to virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the number of organic species generated and their concentrations. In the inert (i.e., helium) atmosphere, the major volatile organic products identified (in order of decreasing concentrations) were styrene, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene, nathphalene, propane, .alpha.-methylbenzene, indene and 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene. But in air, the major volatile organic species identified changed slightly. Concentrations of the organic species in the inert atmosphere were significantly higher than those for the air atmosphere processing. Overall, 38 volatile organic species were identified in the inert atmosphere compared to 49 species in air. Twenty of the 38 species in the inert conditions were also products in the air atmosphere. Twenty-two oxidized organic products were identified during thermal processing in air.

Abrefah, John; Klinger, George S.

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation-induced lung injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of radiation therapy is limited by the occurrence of the potentially fatal clinical syndromes of radiation pneumonitis and fibrosis. Radiation pneumonitis usually becomes clinically apparent from 2 to 6 months after completion of radiation therapy. It is characterized by fever, cough, dyspnea, and alveolar infiltrates on chest roentgenogram and may be difficult to differentiate from infection or recurrent malignancy. The pathogenesis is uncertain, but appears to involve both direct lung tissue toxicity and an inflammatory response. The syndrome may resolve spontaneously or may progress to respiratory failure. Corticosteroids may be effective therapy if started early in the course of the disease. The time course for the development of radiation fibrosis is later than that for radiation pneumonitis. It is usually present by 1 year following irradiation, but may not become clinically apparent until 2 years after radiation therapy. It is characterized by the insidious onset of dyspnea on exertion. It most often is mild, but can progress to chronic respiratory failure. There is no known successful treatment for this condition. 51 references.

Rosiello, R.A.; Merrill, W.W. (Yale Univ. Medical Center, New Haven, CT (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

12.815 Atmospheric Radiation, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to the physics of atmospheric radiation and remote sensing including use of computer codes. Radiative transfer equation including emission and scattering, spectroscopy, Mie theory, and numerical solutions. ...

Prinn, Ronald G.

457

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

458

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

459

Standards for Protection Against Radiation (Michigan)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule establishes standards for protection against radiation hazards. In addition to complying with requirements set forth, every reasonable effort should be made to maintain radiation levels...

460

ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Accident Registries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accident Registries The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) maintains a number of radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Current Status of the Synchrotron Radiation Center  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) operates the Aladdin electron storage ring at energies of 800 MeV or 1 GeV in support of a broad range of national and international research programs. A low emittance configuration is in routine operation during 800-MeV shifts and offers improved photon flux density with about the same beam lifetime. An improved undulator compensation algorithm and new optical beam position monitors have been implemented improving beam stability and maintaining vertical beam size variations to < 2% peak-to-peak during undulator scanning. Instrumentation initiatives include construction of a modified Wadsworth beamline (7.8 - 50 eV) and a variable-line-spacing plane-grating monochromator (VLS-PGM, 75 - 2000 eV) to utilize radiation from a permanent magnet undulator. The Wadsworth beamline is being commissioned for photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments using high-resolution Scienta analyzers. The VLS-PGM is being constructed for experiments that require higher photon energies and high flux density such as x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) and x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). It is scheduled to be available in early 2004. Recent research at the SRC has produced exciting results in a variety of fields, culminating in eight articles published in Physical Review Letters and three in Nature since October 2002, in addition to articles in many other publications. An outreach program offers research experiences for undergraduates and provides the general public with an awareness of synchrotron radiation. Hands-on workshops and activities on FTIR microscopy and X-PEEM are offered for graduate students and scientists. SRC sponsors a summer Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program and offers opportunities to non-research universities and high schools. Tours and educational events are coordinated with local civic groups and schools. Open houses are offered that include tours, demonstrations, and family activities.

Kinraide, R.; Moore, C.J.; Jacobs, K.D.; Severson, M.; Bissen, M.J.; Frazer, B.; Bisognano, J.J.; Bosch, R.A.; Eisert, D.; Fisher, M.; Green, M.A.; Gundelach, C.T.; Hansen, R.W.C.; Hochst, H.; Julian, R.L.; Keil, R.; Kleman, K.; Kubala, T.; Legg, R.A.; Pedley, B. [Synchrotron Radiation Center (United States)] [and others

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

462

Task Group 9 Update (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation is a brief update of IEC TC82 QA Task Force, Group 9. Presented is an outline of the recently submitted New Work Item Proposal (NWIP) for a Comparative Thermal Cycling Test for CPV Modules to Differentiate Thermal Fatigue Durability.

Bosco, N.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Civil Engineering, Uni- versity of Toronto Data Management Groups Web Site http Susanna Choy, B.A.Sc. (Industrial Engineering), M.Eng. (Civil Engineering) Uni- versity of Toronto, P.Eng. Reuben Briggs, B.A.Sc. (Civil Engineering), M.A.Sc. (Civil Engineering) Univer- sity of Toronto, P

Toronto, University of

464

Systems Biology Group Decision Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entities (e.g., molecular, cellular, organism, ecological) #12;OHIO STATE T . H . E UNIVERSITY Systems/analysis of perception, attention, choice, learning, optimality,... #12;OHIO STATE T . H . E UNIVERSITY Group decision making, evolution and ecology Current work: Modeling/analysis of coordinated motion, foraging, choice

465

Geodesic spaces : momentum Groups : symmetry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geodesic spaces : momentum :: Groups : symmetry Vaughan Pratt Stanford University BLAST 2010 a · b denoting b rotated 90 degrees about a. End of reprise. 3. This talk; Geodesic spaces At FMCS. as points evenly spaced along a geodesic , right distributivity expresses a symmetry of about an arbitrary

Pratt, Vaughan

466

Policy Groups Winfried E. Kuhnhauser  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Policy Groups Winfried E. Kuhnhauser GMD National Research Center For Information Technology D: Systems that support a multitude of independent security domains in which an individual security policy domains consti- tutes a major problem. While security policies are capable of controlling the applications

Kühnhauser, Winfried

467

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Sommerfeld radiation condition at threshold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We prove Besov space bounds of the resolvent at low energies in any dimension for a class of potentials that are negative and obey a virial condition with these conditions imposed at infinity only. We do not require spherical symmetry. The class of potentials includes in dimension $\\geq3$ the attractive Coulomb potential. There are two boundary values of the resolvent at zero energy which we characterize by radiation conditions. These radiation conditions are zero energy versions of the well-known Sommerfeld radiation condition.

Erik Skibsted

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

469

Parameterization and Analysis of 3-D Solar Radiative Transfer in Clouds: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports on the research that we have done over the course of our two-year project. The report also covers the research done on this project during a 1 year no-cost extension of the grant. Our work has had two main, inter-related thrusts: The first thrust was to characterize the response of stratocumulus cloud structure and dynamics to systematic changes in cloud infrared radiative cooling and solar heating using one-dimensional radiative transfer models. The second was to couple a three-dimensional (3-D) solar radiative transfer model to the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) model that we use to simulate stratocumulus. The purpose of the studies with 3-D radiative transfer was to examine the possible influences of 3-D photon transport on the structure, evolution, and radiative properties of stratocumulus. While 3-D radiative transport has been examined in static cloud environments, few studies have attempted to examine whether the 3-D nature of radiative absorption and emission influence the structure and evolution of stratocumulus. We undertook this dual approach because only a small number of LES simulations with the 3-D radiative transfer model are possible due to the high computational costs. Consequently, LES simulations with a 1-D radiative transfer solver were used in order to examine the portions of stratocumulus parameter space that may be most sensitive to perturbations in the radiative fields. The goal was then to explore these sensitive regions with LES using full 3-D radiative transfer. Our overall goal was to discover whether 3-D radiative processes alter cloud structure and evolution, and whether this may have any indirect implications for cloud radiative properties. In addition, we collaborated with Dr. Tamas Varni, providing model output fields for his attempt at parameterizing 3-D radiative effects for cloud models.

Jerry Y. Harrington

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University] [Columbia University

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

LBNL Totally Depleted CCD Group Internal Note Last revised 8 November 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL Totally Depleted CCD Group Internal Note Last revised 8 November 2002 Conceptual design for shielding the 200 µm-thick LBNL CCD at the Lick 3-m Coud´e Spectrograph from environmental gamma radiation This note was drafted by Don Groom (LBNL; deg@lbl.gov), but it is based on considerable work by Steve

472

LBNL Totally Depleted CCD Group Internal Note Last revised 8 November 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL Totally Depleted CCD Group Internal Note Last revised 8 November 2002 Conceptual design for shielding the 200 µm­thick LBNL CCD at the Lick 3­m Coud??e Spectrograph from environmental gamma radiation This note was drafted by Don Groom (LBNL; deg@lbl.gov), but it is based on considerable work by Steve

473

IEC Quality Assurance Task Group 5: UV, Temperature, and Humidity (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Taskgroup 5 (TG5) is concerned with a comparative aging standard incorporating factors including ultraviolet radiation and temperature. Separate experiments are being conducted in support of a test standard via the regional sub-groups in Asia, Europe, and the United States. The authors will describe the objectives and timeline for TG5 as well as providing an update on the experiments in progress.

Miller, D.; Bath, J.; K& ouml; hl, M.; Shioda, T.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Produce and fish sampling program of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Environmental Surveillance Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes produce and fish sampling procedures of the Environmental Surveillance Group at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program monitors foodstuffs and fish for possible radioactive contamination from Laboratory operations. Data gathered in this program on radionuclide concentrations help to estimate radiation doses to Laboratory personnel and the public. 3 references, 7 figures, 2 tables.

Salazar, J.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) -a PAGES/IMAGES working group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PALeo-constraints on SEA-level rise (PALSEA) - a PAGES/IMAGES working group Coordinators: Mark for the reduction in ice sheets and subsequent rise in sea level over the next century are highly uncertain rise. Interglacial sea levels constrain the global sensitivity of sea-level to radiative forcing. Well

Siddall, Mark

476

Optimal segmentation and packaging process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for improving packaging efficiency uses three dimensional, computer simulated models with various optimization algorithms to determine the optimal segmentation process and packaging configurations based on constraints including container limitations. The present invention is applied to a process for decontaminating, decommissioning (D&D), and remediating a nuclear facility involving the segmentation and packaging of contaminated items in waste containers in order to minimize the number of cuts, maximize packaging density, and reduce worker radiation exposure. A three-dimensional, computer simulated, facility model of the contaminated items are created. The contaminated items are differentiated. The optimal location, orientation and sequence of the segmentation and packaging of the contaminated items is determined using the simulated model, the algorithms, and various constraints including container limitations. The cut locations and orientations are transposed to the simulated model. The contaminated items are actually segmented and packaged. The segmentation and packaging may be simulated beforehand. In addition, the contaminated items may be cataloged and recorded.

Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Meservey, Richard H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Landon, Mark D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radiation Parameterization for Three-Dimensional Inhomogeneous Cirrus Clouds Applied to ARM Data and Climate Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 (a) We developed a 3D radiative transfer model to simulate the transfer of solar and thermal infrared radiation in inhomogeneous cirrus clouds. The model utilized a diffusion approximation approach (four-term expansion in the intensity) employing Cartesian coordinates. The required single-scattering parameters, including the extinction coefficient, single-scattering albedo, and asymmetry factor, for input to the model, were parameterized in terms of the ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size. The incorporation of gaseous absorption in multiple scattering atmospheres was accomplished by means of the correlated k-distribution approach. In addition, the strong forward diffraction nature in the phase function was accounted for in each predivided spatial grid based on a delta-function adjustment. The radiation parameterization developed herein is applied to potential cloud configurations generated from GCMs to investigate broken clouds and cloud-overlapping effects on the domain-averaged heating rate. Cloud inhomogeneity plays an important role in the determination of flux and heating rate distributions. Clouds with maximum overlap tend to produce less heating than those with random overlap. Broken clouds show more solar heating as well as more IR cooling as compared to a continuous cloud field (Gu and Liou, 2001). (b) We incorporated a contemporary radiation parameterization scheme in the UCLA atmospheric GCM in collaboration with the UCLA GCM group. In conjunction with the cloud/radiation process studies, we developed a physically-based cloud cover formation scheme in association with radiation calculations. The model clouds were first vertically grouped in terms of low, middle, and high types. Maximum overlap was then used for each cloud type, followed by random overlap among the three cloud types. Fu and Liou's 1D radiation code with modification was subsequently employed for pixel-by-pixel radiation calculations in the UCLA GCM. We showed that the simulated cloud cover and OLR fields without special tuning are comparable to those of ISCCP dataset and the results derived from radiation budget experiments. Use of the new radiation and cloud schemes enhances the radiative warming in the middle to upper tropical troposphere and alleviates the cold bias in the UCLA atmospheric GCM. We also illustrated that ice crystal size and cloud inhomogeneous are significant factors affecting the radiation budgets at the top of the atmosphere and the surface (Gu et al. 2003). (c) An innovative approach has been developed to construct a 3D field of inhomogeneous clouds in general and cirrus in particular in terms of liquid/ice water content and particle size on the basis of a unification of satellite and ground-based cloud radar data. Satellite remote sensing employing the current narrow-band spectro-radiometers has limitation and only the vertically integrated cloud parameters (optical depth and mean particle size) can be determined. However, by combining the horizontal cloud mapping inferred from satellites with the vertical structure derived from the profiling Doppler cloud radar, a 3D cloud field can be constructed. This represents a new conceptual approach to 3D remote sensing and imaging and offers a new perspective in observing the cloud structure. We applied this novel technique to AVHRR/NOAA satellite and mm-wave cloud radar data obtained from the ARM achieve and assessed the 3D cirrus cloud field with the ice crystal size distributions independently derived from optical probe measurements aboard the University of North Dakota Citation. The retrieved 3D ice water content and mean effective ice crystal size involving an impressive cirrus cloud occurring on April 18, 1997, are shown to be comparable to those derived from the analysis of collocated and coincident in situ aircraft measurements (Liou et al. 2002). (d) Detection of thin cirrus with optical depths less than 0.5, particularly those occurring i n the tropics remains a fundamental problem in remote sensing. We developed a new detection scheme for the

Kuo-Nan Liou

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

478

Monitoring radiation use in cardiac fluoroscopy imaging procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Timely identification of systematic changes in radiation delivery of an imaging system can lead to a reduction in risk for the patients involved. However, existing quality assurance programs involving the routine testing of equipment performance using phantoms are limited in their ability to effectively carry out this task. To address this issue, the authors propose the implementation of an ongoing monitoring process that utilizes procedural data to identify unexpected large or small radiation exposures for individual patients, as well as to detect persistent changes in the radiation output of imaging platforms. Methods: Data used in this study were obtained from records routinely collected during procedures performed in the cardiac catheterization imaging facility at St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Australia, over the period January 2008-March 2010. A two stage monitoring process employing individual and exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) control charts was developed and used to identify unexpectedly high or low radiation exposure levels for individual patients, as well as detect persistent changes in the radiation output delivered by the imaging systems. To increase sensitivity of the charts, we account for variation in dose area product (DAP) values due to other measured factors (patient weight, fluoroscopy time, and digital acquisition frame count) using multiple linear regression. Control charts are then constructed using the residual values from this linear regression. The proposed monitoring process was evaluated using simulation to model the performance of the process under known conditions. Results: Retrospective application of this technique to actual clinical data identified a number of cases in which the DAP result could be considered unexpected. Most of these, upon review, were attributed to data entry errors. The charts monitoring the overall system radiation output trends demonstrated changes in equipment performance associated with relocation of the equipment to a new department. When tested under simulated conditions, the EWMA chart was capable of detecting a sustained 15% increase in average radiation output within 60 cases (<1 month of operation), while a 33% increase would be signaled within 20 cases. Conclusions: This technique offers a valuable enhancement to existing quality assurance programs in radiology that rely upon the testing of equipment radiation output at discrete time frames to ensure performance security.

Stevens, Nathaniel T.; Steiner, Stefan H.; Smith, Ian R.; MacKay, R. Jock [Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada); St. Andrew's Medical Institute, St. Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland 4000 (Australia); Department of Statistics and Actuarial Sciences, Business and Industrial Statistics Research Group, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models donâ??t consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns and found that local effects were often much larger than the overall values mentioned above, and were especially large for high sun and near convective clouds such as cumulus. The study also found that statistical methods such as neural networks appear promising for enabling cloud models to consider radiative interactions between nearby atmospheric columns. Finally, through collaboration with German scientists, the project found that new methods (especially one called â??stepwise krigingâ?) show great promise in filling gaps between cloud radar scans. If applied to data from the new DOE scanning cloud radars, these methods can yield large, continuous three-dimensional cloud structures for future radiative simulations.

Varnai, Tamas

2012-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

480

Avatars of Participants in Anticipatory Standardization Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avatars of Participants in Anticipatory Standardization Processes Karthikeyan Umapathy Sharoda A. Paul Sandeep Purao John W. Bagby Prasenjit Mitra Standards Interest Group, College of IST, Pennsylvania State University ABSTRACT: In the development of anticipatory ICT standards

Bagby, John

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Methodology to manage process technology innovation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research conducted for this thesis was performed at "Company X", a U.S.-based engineered goods manufacturer. This project focused on the company's Advanced Manufacturing group and its process technology development ...

Schweizer, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Georgia Radiation Control Act (Georgia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Georgia Radiation Control Act is designed to prevent any associated harmful effects upon the environment or the health and safety of the public through the institution and maintenance of a...

483

Ionizing Radiation Injury (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to employers that have more than one employee who engages in activities which involve the presence of ionizing radiation. Employers with less than three employees can...

484

Texas Radiation Control Act (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to institute and maintain a regulatory program for radiation sources that is compatible with federal standards and regulatory programs, and, to the degree possible,...

485

Radiation-Associated Liver Injury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The liver is a critically important organ that has numerous functions including the production of bile, metabolism of ingested nutrients, elimination of many waste products, glycogen storage, and plasma protein synthesis. The liver is often incidentally irradiated during radiation therapy (RT) for tumors in the upper- abdomen, right lower lung, distal esophagus, or during whole abdomen or whole body RT. This article describes the endpoints, time-course, and dose-volume effect of radiation on the liver.

Pan, Charlie C., E-mail: cpan@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Das, Shiva K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO (United States); Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Solar Radiation and Asteroidal Motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of solar wind and solar electromagnetic radiation on motion of asteroids are discussed. The results complete the statements presented in Vokrouhlick\\'{y} and Milani (2000). As for the effect of electromagnetic radiation, the complete equation of motion is presented to the first order in $v/c$ -- the shape of asteroid (spherical body is explicitly presented) and surface distribution of albedo should be taken into account. Optical quantities must be calculated in proper frame of reference.

Jozef Klacka

2000-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

487

Results of the 2012-2013 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) Job Search and Career Planning Survey of Graduating Residents in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose/Objective(s): To determine the timeline used by postgraduate year (PGY)-5 radiation oncology residents during the job application process and the factors most important to them when deciding on a first job. Methods and Materials: In 2012 and 2013, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology conducted a nationwide electronic survey of PGY-5 radiation oncology residents in the United States during the final 2 months of their training. Descriptive statistics are reported. In addition, subgroup analysis was performed. Results: Surveys were completed by 180 of 314 residents contacted. The median time to start networking for the purpose of employment was January PGY-4; to start contacting practices, complete and upload a curriculum vitae to a job search website, and use the American Society of Radiation Oncology Career Center was June PGY-4; to obtain letters of recommendation was July PGY-5; to start interviewing was August PGY-5; to finish interviewing was December PGY-5; and to accept a contract was January PGY-5. Those applying for a community position began interviewing at an earlier average time than did those applying for an academic position (P=.04). The most important factors to residents when they evaluated job offers included (in order from most to least important) a collegial environment, geographic location, emphasis on best patient care, quality of support staff and facility, and multidisciplinary approach to patient care. Factors that were rated significantly different between subgroups based on the type of position applied for included adequate mentoring, dedicated research time, access to clinical trials, amount of time it takes to become a partner, geographic location, size of group, starting salary, and amount of vacation and days off. Conclusions: The residents' perspective on the job application process over 2 years is documented to provide a resource for current and future residents and employers to use.

Mattes, Malcolm D., E-mail: mdm9007@nyp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Kharofa, Jordan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Zeidan, Youssef H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Tung, Kaity [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Gondi, Vinai [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); Golden, Daniel W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Energy Systems Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and attracted over 230 attendees. The chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission, Mack Wallace was the keynote speaker and Ralph Lewis, formerly Vice President of Gulf Oil Company, was the luncheon speaker. There were twenty-four technical papers, four tutorial...-eight papers, four tutorial seminars and three discussion groups. Dr. Arthur Rosenfield, program leader at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, was the first luncheon speaker and Dr. Albert Bartlett from the University of Colorado was the seond luncheon speaker...

Anand, N. K.; Caton, J.; Heffington, W. M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Somasundaram, S.; Turner, W. D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Ostwind Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont: EnergyThis articleOslo,Ostwind Group Jump

490

Copisa Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentratingRenewable Solutions LLC Jump to:Information New YorkGeothermalCoorsCopisa Group

491

Ralos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosource HistoryRaft River0422° LoadingRalos Group Jump

492

Anel Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORT Americium/Curium VitrificationAltensol Jump to:AmbientAWEAAnel Group

493

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRGWORKINGPAPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRGWORKINGPAPER Abstract Reforming Small Power Systems under Political Nepal and Tooraj Jamasb This paper assesses the electricity sector reforms across small power systems make power sector reform in Nepal and similar small systems a more complex process. As international

Aickelin, Uwe

494

Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

Not Available

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRGWORKINGPAPERNON-TECHNICALSUMMARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the nuclear element of the energy decision process is #12;www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk EPRGWORKINGPAPERNON, energy efficiency, distributed power generation and renewable energy sources. Opponents to nuclear power and Nuclear Power Generation EPRG Working Paper EPRG 0912 John Ash The issue of whether to include nuclear

Aickelin, Uwe

496

Oligomerization process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Etherification process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX); Jones, Jr., Edward M. (Friendswood, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PROGRAMME GROUP RESEARCH UPDATE: Biodiversity indicators & knowledge management programme group Introduction Duncan Ray The programme group Biodiversity Indicators and Knowledge Management (BIKM) was established by the merger of the Biodiversity Indicators & Evaluation Programme and the Decision Support

499

Ionizing Radiation Detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A CdZnTe (CZT) crystal provided with a native CdO dielectric coating to reduce surface leakage currents and thereby, improve the resolution of instruments incorporating detectors using CZT crystals is disclosed. A two step process is provided for forming the dielectric coating which includes etching the surface of a CZT crystal with a solution of the conventional bromine/methanol etch treatment, and passivating the CZT crystal surface with a solution of 10 w/o NH.sub.4 F and 10 w/o H.sub.2 O.sub.2 in water after attaching electrical contacts to the crystal surface.

Wright, Gomez W. (Nashville, TN); James, Ralph B. (Livermore, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Chinn, Douglas A. (Livermore, CA)