Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Thermodynamics of Radiative Emission Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A basic assumption implicit in the application of thermodynamics to the electromagnetic field is that the laws of thermodynamics are locally valid for radiative emission and absorption processes. This means that a certain minimum amount of entropy must be created by the radiative process itself. It is shown, by considering the extreme case in which the spontaneous emission of a natural spectral line is the only process taking place, that this assumption is correct, and that its validity is essentially a consequence of the uncertainty principle as expressed by the reciprocal relationship between natural line breadth and lifetime.

M. A. Weinstein

1960-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

2

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

3

Radiation Protection Group Annual Report 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The RP Annual Report summarises the activities carried out by CERN’s Radiation Protection Group in the year 2003. It includes contribution from the EN section of the TIS/IE Group on environmental monitoring. Chapter 1 reports on the measurements and estimations of the impact on the environment and public exposure due to the Organisation’s activities. Chapter 2 provides the results of the monitoring of CERN’s staff, users and contractors to occupational exposure. Chapter 3 deals with operational radiation protection around the accelerators and in the experimental areas. Chapter 4 reports on RP design studies for the LHC and CNGS projects. Chapter 5 addresses the various services provided by the RP Group to other Groups and Divisions at CERN, which include managing radioactive waste, high-level dosimetry, lending radioactive test sources and shipping radioactive materials. Chapter 6 describes activities other than the routine and service tasks, i.e. development work in the field of instrumentation and res...

Silari, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing ...

H. F. Kraybill; D. C. Brunton

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

7

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Group Radiation Protection Group Under the direction of Radiological Control Manager (RCM) David Kestell, the Radiation Protection Group (RPG) provides radiation safety-related technical assistance to the lab community to ensure that all work is performed safely, efficiently and in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines. BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA NDCX NDCX Gretina Gamma particle device PET Scanner APEX APEX APEX LASER LASER Rifle, CO Rifle, CO The group: Authorizes work with radioactive material and radiation-producing machines Manages the site inventory of radioactive and nuclear material Provides coverage for: Radiological operations Radiological engineering and shielding design Internal / external dosimetry services Radiation Safety and Transportation training

8

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Networking Group Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group Manager (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and maintenance of network printers and queues. Telephony installations and support. Printing Support The Networking group provides printer maintenance and support for SSRL Beamline Printers and plotters. The following models are supported: HP - Designjet large format plotters HP - Color and B/W Laserjet, Inkjet, Deskjet, Officejet

9

Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process Researchers at the Energy Analysis Program's (EAP) Utility Planning and Policy (UPP) Group are helping ensure that energy efficiency, renewable energy, and a host of other important issues are not overlooked as California and the nation restructure the electric power industry. The UPP staff is analyzing the potential impact of restructuring on efficiency and renewables, modeling a variety of potential restructuring policies, and assisting federal customers seeking to better understand emerging electricity markets. UPP Group Leader Chuck Goldman is participating in discussions on how to distribute surcharge funds set aside for energy efficiency in California, and Acting EAP Head Stephen Wiel is assisting state lawmakers and regulators by overseeing the National Council on

10

Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a ...

Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

consider the issue of radiation monitoring exclusively within the context of dedicated trains. Pat Edwards asked how many states currently had FRA Hazmat inspectors. Kevin...

12

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

Group-invariant solutions of hydrodynamics and radiation hydrodynamics  

SciTech Connect

Using the property of invariance under Lie groups of transformations, the equations of hydrodynamics are transformed from partial differential equations to ordinary differential equations, for which special analytic solutions can be found. These particular solutions can be used for (1) numerical benchmarks, (2) the basis for analytic models, and (3) insight into more general solutions. Additionally, group transformations can be used to construct new solutions from existing ones. A space-time projective group is used to generate complicated solutions from simpler solutions. Discussion of these procedures is presented along with examples of analytic of 1,2 and 3-D hydrodynamics.

Coggeshall, S.V.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP ON MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Interagency Working Group for the practice of diagnostic radiology by Federal agencies. Since the body . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Quality Assurance Equipment Operator Performance Patient Exposure Considerations DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Prescription of Dental X rays

15

Doppler effect in the oscillator radiation process in the medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the radiation process of the charged particle passing through an external periodic field in a dispersive medium. In the optical range of spectrum we will consider two cases: first, the source has not eigenfrequency, and second, the source has eigenfrequency. In the first case, when the Cherenkov radiation occurs, the non-zero eigenfrequency produces a paradox for Doppler effect. It is shown that the absence of the eigenfrequency solves the paradox known in the literature. The question whether the process is normal (i.e. hard photons are being radiated under the small angles) or anomalous depends on the law of the medium dispersion. When the source has an eigenfrequency the Doppler effects can be either normal or anomalous. In the X-ray range of the oscillator radiation spectrum we have two photons radiated under the same angle- soft and hard. In this case the radiation obeys to so-called complicated Doppler effect, i.e. in the soft photon region we have anomalous Doppler effect and in the hard photon region we have normal Doppler effect.

Lekdar Gevorgian; Valeri Vardanyan

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

16

Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A software environment has been developed for processing and reconstructing online the large amount of data generated at TOMCAT, a synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. It has been designed to minimize user interaction and maximize the reconstruction speed and therefore optimize beam time usage.

Hintermüller, C.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Paul Sellin, Radiation Imaging Group The role of defects on CdTe detector performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul Sellin, Radiation Imaging Group The role of defects on CdTe detector performance P.J. Sellin1-destructive material characterisation techniques have been applied to CdTe wafers grown by the Travelling Heater Method Imaging Group PL mapping of whole CdTe wafers PL ( =819 nm) scan for two CdTe wafers, (left: wafer L700

Sellin, Paul

19

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10_11_07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSG/NE) Members: Mel Massaro (DOT/FRA), Ed Wilds (State of Connecticut), Vernon Jensen (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska), Sean Kice (SSEB), Ralph Hail (Norfolk Southern), Pat Edwards (CSG/NE), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Larry Stern (CVSA), Sarah Wochos (CSG/MW), Tim Runyon (CSG/MW), Christina Nelson (NCSL), Tony Dimond (BLET), Matt Dennis & Doug Osborn (SNL), Jim Williams (WIEB), Ralph Best & Steve Schmid (BSC) Contractor Support: John Smegal (Legin) Summary: Cort Richardson welcomed the participants to the inaugural Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group conference call and thanked them for their interest. He indicated that his

20

Focus groups: impact of quality and process capability factors on the silicon wafer slicing process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silicon wafer slicing is a highly complex manufacturing process, complicating efforts to monitor individual product type process stability and quality control effectively. Specifically, silicon wafer slicing involves multiple quality characteristics that occur synchronously. However, quantitative methods, such as process capability indices (PCIs) and statistical process control (SPC) charts, for monitoring slicing problems are limited. Therefore, this study presents a focus group procedure that explores engineering knowledge and expertise. Organisations can use focus groups to create knowledge of stable processes, optimal settings and quality control. Interactive discussions indicate that focus groups can improve productivity and decision making effectiveness either by accelerating the decision making or by increasing decision quality. Moreover, the proposed procedure enables an engineer to rapidly adjust a manufacturing system to eliminate problems related to slicing process instability phenomena and improve slicing quality and process capability. Finally, the SPC chart and the exponential weighted moving average (EWMA) control chart are presented to demonstrate and verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed methods.

Chin-Tsai Lin; Che-Wei Chang; Chie-Bein Chen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

Kaska, W.C.; Jensen, C.M.

1998-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

22

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

23

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Validation and Simplification of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Recursive Partitioning Analysis Classification for Glioblastoma  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Previous recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) of patients with malignant glioma (glioblastoma multiforme [GBM] and anaplastic astrocytoma [AA]) produced six prognostic groups (I-VI) classified by six factors. We sought here to determine whether the classification for GBM could be improved by using an updated Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) GBM database excluding AA and by considering additional baseline variables. Methods and Materials: The new analysis considered 42 baseline variables and 1,672 GBM patients from the expanded RTOG glioma database. Patients receiving radiation only were excluded such that all patients received radiation+carmustine. 'Radiation dose received' was replaced with 'radiation dose assigned.' The new RPA models were compared with the original model by applying them to a test dataset comprising 488 patients from six other RTOG trials. Fitness of the original and new models was evaluated using explained variation. Results: The original RPA model explained more variations in survival in the test dataset than did the new models (20% vs. 15%) and was therefore chosen for further analysis. It was reduced by combining Classes V and VI to produce three prognostic classes (Classes III, IV, and V+VI), as Classes V and VI had indistinguishable survival in the test dataset. The simplified model did not further improve performance (explained variation 18% vs. 20%) but is easier to apply because it involves only four variables: age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. Applying this simplified model to the updated GBM database resulted in three distinct classes with median survival times of 17.1, 11.2, and 7.5 months for Classes III, IV, and V+VI, respectively. Conclusions: The final model, the simplified original RPA model combining Classes V and VI, resulted in three distinct prognostic groups defined by age, performance status, extent of resection, and neurologic function. This classification will be used in future RTOG GBM trials.

Li Jing [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Wang Meihua; Won, Minhee [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Coughlin, Christopher [Federal Bureau of Prisons, Butner, NC (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Emory Clinic, Atlanta, GA (United States); Mehta, Minesh P., E-mail: mehta@humonc.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group Jump to: navigation, search Name KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group) Place Rapid City, South Dakota Zip 57702 Product US-based bioethanol developer, owner, and provider of engineering, procurement, and contracting. Operates both greenfield and brownfield projects. References KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group) is a company located in Rapid City, South Dakota . References ↑ "KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=KL_Energy_Corp_Formerly_KL_Process_Design_Group&oldid=348118

26

Ionizing Radiation Effects on CMOS Imagers Manufactured in Deep Submicron Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ionizing radiation, total dose, dark current, STI, hardening by design, RHDB 1. INTRODUCTION IonizingIonizing Radiation Effects on CMOS Imagers Manufactured in Deep Submicron Process Vincent Goiffona a large dynamic range. This can significantly impact the radiation hardness of "in-pixel" devices which

Mailhes, Corinne

27

Minority Group Interests and Political Representation: Gay Elected Officials in the Policy Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of key importance to groups in a democracy is the political representation of their interests in the policy process. The most obvious strategy of groups to achieve representation is to elect officials that identify with ...

Haider-Markel, Donald P.; Joslyn, Mark R.; Kniss, Chad J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

29

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

groups/all/feed en Buildings groups/all/feed en Buildings http://en.openei.org/community/group/buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings.group/buildings" target="_blank">read more architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc

30

U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer 5: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability March 2, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in in Novell GroupWise Client. PLATFORM: versions 8.0 through 8.02 HP3. ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is caused due to an error when processing Novell Address Book (".nab") files and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via an overly long email address. reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory Secunia Advisory 48199 CVE-2011-4189 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The GroupWise 8 Client for Windows is vulnerable to an exploit where a malformed address book could cause heap memory corruption, which could lead to remote code execution under the privilege of the user that opened the

31

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012) Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012)

32

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Remedial Design/ Remedial Action PassAPPENDIX F THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL PROCESS, AND THE RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESS This appendix presents a discussion

33

End group characterization in DNA of thymocytes after low doses of ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations into the configuration of the radiation induced strand breaks in the low dose range are presented. DNA sections containing the radiation induced strand breaks were separated from the undamaged s...

Th. Coquerelle; C. Sexauer

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups Minjung, and then we use the model to analyze terrorism data. We see that the richer Dirichlet process random effects, empirical studies of terrorism, logistic regression, gen- eralized linear mixed models, hierarchical models

Gill, Jeff

35

TH?D?AUD A?09: An Error Reporting and Tracking Database Tool for Process Improvement in Radiation Oncology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patient and employee safety is a critical concern in radiation therapy (RT). Current QA practices and operation processes in RT are typically developed based on rather prescriptive task group reports and regulatory agency requirements. Typically these programs are not developed with the goal of process optimization and safety but are brute?force efforts to prevent catastrophic errors. Other industries have been developing processes to improve quality and safety of their operations and products since the 1940s. These processes have become quite sophisticated and the result is that numerous industries have much better performance records than healthcare and RT. Recently the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine recommended the systematic application of systems engineering approaches for reforming our health care delivery system. The AAPM subsequently formed a task group charged with developing a structured systematic QA program approach for RT based on industrial principles and practices. Optimization of RT processes and implementation of industrial techniques requires the acquisition of data regarding performance statistics and failure or error rates of individual departments. Most facilities do not have the infrastructure to effectively collect and analyze such data. We have developed an efficient and effective process for collecting storing and analyzing the failure rate data in individual RT facilities that will support process improvement in patient care and safety. The process is based on a web?based tool for reporting events. The tool is designed so individual events can be reported in as little as two minutes. Events are categorized based on function area type and severity of failure. All events are systematically processed using web?based tools and stored for future analysis and evaluation of failure methods and process improvement and prioritization of efforts in an individual RT facility.

S Mutic; P Parikh; E Klein; R Drzymala; J Michalski; D Low

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation  

SciTech Connect

A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

Autrique, D. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany) [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Gornushkin, I. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Alexiades, V. [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States); Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Rethfeld, B. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)] [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

37

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups Minjung such a model can best be implemented, and then we use the model to analyze terrorism data. We seeG99. Keywords and phrases: terrorists, empirical studies of terrorism, logistic regression, gen

Casella, George

38

Political science is the study of governments, political processes, public policies and political behavior by groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Political science is the study of governments, political processes, public policies and political behavior by groups or individuals. Coursework is divided into four areas of study: American Politics. U.S. political institutions at the national level (e.g., Congress, Presidency, Judiciary), state and local

Saldin, Dilano

39

SSRL ETS Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint...

40

PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A-1 PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau on several projects: near-surface atmospheric temperature profiles, radiosonde performance at low images, and improvement of calibration procedures for interferometers. In the proposed work, analyses

Walden, Von P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiation processes of impurities in detached divertor plasmas of JT-60U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation processes of impurities in detached divertor plasmas of JT-60U T. Nakano, H. Kubo, N. Asakura, K. Shimizu, S. Konoshima, K. Fujimoto, H. Kawashima and S. Higashijima Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan. 21/5/2007 1st NIFS-CRC International Symposium 1st Korea-Japan Workshop @NIFS #12;Roles

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

42

On the link between Hadley circulation changes and radiative feedback processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the link between Hadley circulation changes and radiative feedback processes Masakazu Yoshimori1 and changes in the Hadley circulation accompany interhemispherically asymmetric surface temperature changes transport and Hadley circulation change. On the other hand, cloud feedback plays a relatively minor role

Broccoli, Anthony J.

43

Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chisholm, Matthew F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); McManus, James V. (Danbury, CT); Luxon, Bruce A. (Stamford, CT)

1991-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Theoretical Study on the Spontaneous Radiation of Inertia-gravity Waves Using the Renormalization Group Method. Part II: Verification of the Theoretical Equations by Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The renormalization group equations (RGEs) describing spontaneous inertia-gravity wave (GW) radiation from part of a balanced flow through a quasi-resonance that were derived in a companion paper by Yasuda et al. are validated through numerical ...

Yuki Yasuda; Kaoru Sato; Norihiko Sugimoto

46

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressures at the shock, to examine particular effects on the stability properties and frequencies of oscillation modes.

Curtis J. Saxton; Kinwah Wu

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan)] [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an atmospheric-pressure arc plasma are described from the viewpoint of continuorts radiation tlieory of the atmospheric arc plasma column is very sensitive to the electron density in the near infrared frequency rangeB ) Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc

Eagar, Thomas W.

49

Patterns of Care Study of radiation therapy for uterine cervix cancer in Japan: The influence of age on the process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background. To improve the quality of radiation oncology in Japan, a Patterns of Care Study (PCS) ... in the United States, was introduced to Japan. In this study, the process, including...

T. Teshima; Hiroshi Ikeda; Mitsuyuki Abe…

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Phase II study of radiation therapy combined with weekly nedaplatin in locally advanced uterine cervical carcinoma: Kitasato Gynecologic Radiation Oncology Group (KGROG 0501) - an initial analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of Medicine, Chiba, Japan, The University of...induced by ionizing radiation (IR) and can be repaired...of the character and radiation survival ratio of cancer...Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan envelope vector (HVJ-E...clonogenic assay to evaluate radiation sensitivity. Furthermore...

Yuzuru Niibe; Shimpei Tsunoda; Toshiko Jobo; Yukihiro Hamada; and Kazushige Hayakawa

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Relative Effectiveness of Positive Interdependence and Group Processing on Student Achievement, Interaction, and Attitude in Online Cooperative Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of positive interdependence and group processing on student achievement, interaction, and attitude in online cooperative learning. All of the participants, 144 college students...

Nam, Chang Woo

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

52

A STATIONARY STATE APPROACH TO RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON EXCITATION PROCESSES IN POLYATOMIC MOLECULES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bandwidth of the incident radiation. The conditions of...sufficiently narrow radiation bandwidths, it is demonstrated...should be regarded as occuring to molecular stationary...RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON...usual approach, are naturally taken into account...

William Rhodes; Bryan R. Henry; Michael Kasha

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kimura, Shigeru [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro [R and D Division, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Yamada, Noboru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu [Advanced Optical Storage Development Department, Advanced Device Technology Platform, Sony Corporation, 4-14-1 Asahi-cho, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan); Takata, Masaki [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36–88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Kazuhiko Ogawa; Yoshinori Ito; Katsuyuki Karasawa; Yoshihiro Ogawa; Hiroshi Onishi; Tomoko Kazumoto; Keiko Shibuya; Hitoshi Shibuya; Yoshishige Okuno; Shigeo Nishino; Etsuyo Ogo; Nobue Uchida; Kumiko Karasawa; Kenji Nemoto; Yasumasa Nishimura

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EVOLUTION IN THE H I GAS CONTENT OF GALAXY GROUPS: PRE-PROCESSING AND MASS ASSEMBLY IN THE CURRENT EPOCH  

SciTech Connect

We present an analysis of the neutral hydrogen (H I) content and distribution of galaxies in groups as a function of their parent dark matter halo mass. The Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey ?.40 data release allows us, for the first time, to study the H I properties of over 740 galaxy groups in the volume of sky common to the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and ALFALFA surveys. We assigned ALFALFA H I detections a group membership based on an existing magnitude/volume-limited SDSS Data Release 7 group/cluster catalog. Additionally, we assigned group ''proximity' membership to H I detected objects whose optical counterpart falls below the limiting optical magnitude—thereby not contributing substantially to the estimate of the group stellar mass, but significantly to the total group H I mass. We find that only 25% of the H I detected galaxies reside in groups or clusters, in contrast to approximately half of all optically detected galaxies. Further, we plot the relative positions of optical and H I detections in groups as a function of parent dark matter halo mass to reveal strong evidence that H I is being processed in galaxies as a result of the group environment: as optical membership increases, groups become increasingly deficient of H I rich galaxies at their center and the H I distribution of galaxies in the most massive groups starts to resemble the distribution observed in comparatively more extreme cluster environments. We find that the lowest H I mass objects lose their gas first as they are processed in the group environment, and it is evident that the infall of gas rich objects is important to the continuing growth of large scale structure at the present epoch, replenishing the neutral gas supply of groups. Finally, we compare our results to those of cosmological simulations and find that current models cannot simultaneously predict the H I selected halo occupation distribution for both low and high mass halos.

Hess, Kelley M. [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Centre (ACGC), Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch 7701 (South Africa); Wilcots, Eric M., E-mail: hess@ast.uct.ac.za, E-mail: ewilcots@astro.wisc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Radiation from a uniformly accelerated particle detector: Energy, particles, and the quantum measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We comment on the controversy whether a uniformly accelerated particle detector radiates. We stress the particular importance of the built-up correlations and of the quantum measurement process in this connection. We give the question the following form: We assume that the initial state of the quantum field is the Minkowski vacuum and that there is a uniformly accelerated two-level system which is initially in its ground state. What will in this case be found in the different regions of asymptotic future null infinity for the mean value of the field energy density on one hand and of the Minkowski particle number on the other if in the out region (a) no measurement is made on the two-level system, (b) the measurement finds the two-level system in its upper state, or (c) in its lower state? To obtain localized statements, we base the calculations on wave packet states. The different cases show essential differences.

Jürgen Audretsch and Rainer Müller

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Localized aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the nasal cavity: a survey by the Japan Lymphoma Radiation Therapy Group  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To clarify the role of radiotherapy and chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas (NHL) originating in the nasal cavity. Methods and Materials: The survey, administered at 25 Japanese institutes in 1998, enabled us to collect the clinical data for 787 patients with localized aggressive NHL who were treated between 1988 and 1992. Results: There were 42 patients (5%) with nasal lymphomas. Twelve of these patients received radiotherapy alone, and 30 were treated with a combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The median radiation dose was 47 Gy (22–66). Twelve patients were reviewed histopathologically according to REAL (Revised European-American Classification of Lymphoid neoplasms) classification. T-cell or natural killer (NK) cell lymphomas were detected in 9 patients (75%), and diffuse large B-cell lymphomas in 3 (25%). The 5-year overall and disease-free survival (DFS) rates of all patients were 57% and 59%, respectively. The 5-year DFS rate for the 30 patients treated with the combined therapy was 64% and that for the 12 patients treated with radiotherapy alone was 46% (p = 0.021). For the 34 patients with stage-modified International Prognostic Index (m-IPI) 0–1, the 5-year DFS rates of those treated with the combined therapy and radiotherapy alone were 68% and 45%, respectively (p = 0.020), but there was no difference in DFS rate among the two groups of patients with m-IPI 2–3. The 5-year local control rates of the patients who received >46 Gy (n = 22) and ?46 Gy (n = 20) were 95% and 76% (p = 0.087), respectively. There was no significant difference among the 5-year DFS rates (62% vs. 67%) and local control rates (87% vs. 100%) of the patients with T-cell or NK-cell lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Conclusions: Patients with nasal lymphomas (m-IPI 0–1) should be treated with combined therapy. For the patients with high risk (m-IPI 2–3), the effectiveness of combined therapy was not clarified because of the small number of the patients. A high radiation dose >46 Gy may need to be used to achieve good local control.

Naoto Shikama; Hiroshi Ikeda; Shigeo Nakamura; Masahiko Oguchi; Kouichi Isobe; Saeko Hirota; Masatoshi Hasegawa; Katsumasa Nakamura; Keisuke Sasai; Naofumi Hayabuchi

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

QED radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons with the next-to-leading accuracy  

SciTech Connect

Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated with the next-to-leading (NLO) accuracy. The contributions of loops and two photon emission were presented in analytical form. The covariant approach of Bardin and Shumeiko was used to extract the infrared divergence. All contributions to the radiative correction were presented in the form of the correction to the leptonic tensor thus allowing for further applications in other experiments, e.g., deep inelastic scattering. The radiative corrections (RC) to the cross sections and polarization asymmetries were analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of the current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Specific attention was paid on analyzing kinematical conditions for the process with large radiative effect when momenta of two photons in the final state are collinear to momenta of initial and final electrons, respectively.

Akushevich, Igor V. [Duke University, JLAB; Ilyichev, Alexander [Byelorussian State University; Shumeiko, Nikolai M [Byelorussian State University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Theoretical Study on the Spontaneous Radiation of Inertia-gravity Waves Using the Renormalization Group Method. Part I: Derivation of the Renormalization Group Equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By using the renormalization group (RG) method, the interaction between balanced flows and Doppler-shifted inertia-gravity waves (GWs) is formulated for the hydrostatic Boussinesq equations on the f-plane. The derived time-evolution equations (RG ...

Yuki Yasuda; Kaoru Sato; Norihiko Sugimoto

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Aid to Education: House Group Cites Need for More Technicians, Research on Learning Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...technical training facilities and basic research into the learning process...least until very recently, basic research in the learning process...Universitetets Institut for Teore-tisk Fysik, Blegdamsvej 17, Copen-hagen...program in steroid biochemistry theory and tech-niques, offered...

D. S. G.

1962-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

62

A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

Doehrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Roth, Stephan V. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bommel, Sebastian [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter [Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (?100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

A Multicenter Phase II Study of Local Radiation Therapy for Stage IEA Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphomas: A Preliminary Report From the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of moderate dose radiation therapy (RT) for mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma in a prospective multicenter phase II trial. Methods and Materials The subjects in this study were 37 patients with MALT lymphoma between April 2002 and November 2004. There were 16 male and 21 female patients, ranging in age from 24 to 82 years, with a median of 56 years. The primary tumor originated in the orbit in 24 patients, in the thyroid and salivary gland in 4 patients each, and 5 in the others. The median tumor dose was 30.6 Gy (range, 30.6–39.6 Gy), depending on the primary site and maximal tumor diameter. The median follow-up was 37.3 months. Results Complete remission (CR) or CR/unconfirmed was achieved in 34 patients (92%). The 3-year overall survival, progression-free survival, and local control probability were 100%, 91.9%, and 97.3%, respectively. Thirteen patients experienced Grade 1 acute toxicities including dermatitis, mucositis, and conjunctivitis. One patient developed Grade 2 taste loss. Regarding late toxicities, Grade 2 reactions including hypothyroidism, and radiation pneumonitis were observed in three patients, and Grade 3 cataract was seen in three patients. Conclusions This prospective phase II study demonstrated that moderate dose RT was highly effective in achieving local control with acceptable morbidity in 37 patients with MALT lymphoma.

Koichi Isobe; Yoshikazu Kagami; Keiko Higuchi; Takeshi Kodaira; Masatoshi Hasegawa; Naoto Shikama; Masanori Nakazawa; Ichiro Fukuda; Keiji Nihei; Kana Ito; Teruki Teshima; Yoshihiro Matsuno; Masahiko Oguchi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development  

SciTech Connect

Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation of cloud radiative properties. An examination of the CCM2 simulation characteristics indicated that many surface temperature and warm land precipitation problems were linked to deficiencies in the specification of cloud optical properties, which allowed too much shortwave radiation to reach the surface. In-cloud liquid water path was statically specified in the CCM2 using a "prescribed, meridionally and height varying, but time independent, cloud liquid water density profile, which was analytically determined from a meridionally specified liquid water scale height. Single-column model integrations were conducted to explore alternative formulations for the cloud liquid water path diagnostic, converging on an approach that employs a similar, but state-dependent technique for determining in-cloud liquid water concentration. The new formulation, results in significant improvements to both the top-of- atmosphere and surface energy budgets. In particular, when this scheme is incorporated in the three-dimensional GCM, simulated July surface temperature biases are substantially reduced, where summer precipitation over the northern hemisphere continents, as well as precipitation rates over most all warm land areas, is more consistent with observations". This improved parameterization has been incorporated in the CCM3.

Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Tumor bulk as a prognostic factor for the management of localized aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: a survey of the Japan lymphoma radiation therapy group  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors that specifically predict survival rates of patients with localized aggressive non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL). Methods and Materials: The survey was carried out at 25 radiation oncology institutions in Japan in 1998. The 5-year event-free (EFS) and overall survival rates (OAS) were calculated, and univariate and multivariate analyses were done to identify which of the following factors, namely, gender, age, performance status (PS), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level, Stage (I vs. II), tumor bulk (maximum diameter), and treatment, were significant from the viewpoint of prognosis. Results: A total of 1141 patients with Stage I and II NHL were treated by the Japanese Lymphoma Radiation Therapy Group between 1988 and 1992. Of them, 787 patients, who were treated using definitive radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy for intermediate- and high-grade lymphomas in working formulation, constituted the core of this study. Primary tumors arose mainly from extranodal organs (71%) in the head and neck (Waldeyer’s ring: 36% and sinonasal cavities: 9%). The factors associated with poorer prognosis were age over 60 years old (p radiation therapy alone (p Japan than in Western countries. Tumor bulk is an important prognostic factor in patients with localized aggressive extranodal NHL. Short course chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy was associated with prolonged survival in patients with localized aggressive \\{NHLs\\} of extranodal origin and 0–1 risk factor.

Masahiko Oguchi; Hiroshi Ikeda; Kouichi Isobe; Saeko Hirota; Masatoshi Hasegawa; Katsumasa Nakamura; Keisuke Sasai; Naofumi Hayabuchi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

Shanmugam and Moiola (1994a, b, 1995) have generated substantial controversy and reexamination of what was originally thought to be a well-understood stratigraphic interval of deep-water origin in the Carboniferous Jackfork Group of Arkansas and Oklahoma. This reexamination of interpretation is good in that it forces sedimentologists, sequence stratigraphers, and reservoir geologists to reconsider their understanding of deep-water processes and products, usage of scientific terms to communicate interpretations, and the economic consequences of being nearly right or certainly wrong. Examination of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) prompts brief comments on three issues: (1) the classification of a sedimentary deposit based on the sedimentary process during the final moments of deposition, (2) the use of apparently irrelevant analogs to interpret depositional and postdepositional processes and products, and (3) the regional interpretation of overall depositional environment from very specific and very local observations of sedimentary products.

Coleman, J.L. Jr. [Amoco Worldwide Exploration Business Group, Houston, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Kinetic simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes: Ethane hydrogenolysis over supported group VIII metals  

SciTech Connect

A kinetic model for ethane hydrogenolysis over Pt, Pd, Ir, and Co was formulated in terms of essentially two chemical parameters: the strength of bonding between atomic hydrogen and the metal surface and the strength of carbon-metal bonding between hydrocarbon fragments and the surface. These two surface bond strengths were estimated by calorimetric measurements of the heats of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption, combined with bond order conservation calculations. The results of the kinetic simulations suggest that ethane hydrogenolysis over Pt, Pd, Ir and Co takes place through irreversible C-C rupture of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 3} surface species. Hydrogenation of monocarbon CH{sub y} fragments is kinetically insignificant. Dissociative adsorption of hydrogen is an equilibrated process, while dissociative adsorption of ethane is slow and reversible. Finally, the role of kinetic modeling in the formulation, interpretation, and generalization of experimental research in heterogeneous catalysis is discussed.

Goddard, S.A.; Amiridis, M.D.; Rekoske, J.E.; Cardona-Martinez, N.; Dumesic, J.A. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Hard synchroton radiation and gas desorption processes at a copper absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments with high energy synchrotron radiation machines such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) under construction at Grenoble present the particular problem of the absorption of radiation at localities in the region of bending magnets where the power density can attain levels of around 400 W/mm2 at a critical energy of about 20 keV. In the present article we describe an investigation of the gas desorption and of photocurrent generation in a test facility at the Wiggler beam line at LURE Orsay which was designed to simulate and explore the conditions of operation at the local absorber sites in the ESRF. The experiment allowed in particular for varying angles of incidence of the radiation on an absorber and for surveys of photocurrents both from the absorber and over the surface of the vacuum enclosure. The observations of gas desorption are shown to follow most closely a model of photon induced desorption in which a significant role is assigned to fluorescenceradiation from the absorber.

B. A. Trickett; D. Schmied; E. M. Williams

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: â?¢ Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. â?¢ Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. â?¢ Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The contribution by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) on the depositional processes of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group (Formation) in Arkansas and Oklahoma highlights a few important processes that are often overlooked. Their work on the fabric of some high-density flow deposits is interesting in light of the debate over the nature of these types of deposits (Lowe, 1982; Hiscott, 1994). However, we disagree with some of the observations and interpretations they use in making their argument for a new depositional model, and submit that (1) turbidity current deposits (turbidites) are a major lithofacies component in the DeGray Spillway cut is not difficult, and (4) because it is not necessary to preserve conventional dogma, a change in nomenclature is more appropriate than a change in depositional models. Finally, their call for application of their debris-flow model to the North Sea, Gulf of Mexico, offshore Nigeria, and elsewhere is disturbing because they would have the petroleum industry relinquish the idea of predictability in deep-water reservoirs.

Bouma, A.H. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); DeVries, M.B. [Exxon Company, Houston, TX (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Lazanu, S; Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect

We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using ?-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

Caylar, Beno?-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) put forth a new interpretation of sandstone depositional processes in the Jackfork Group exposed in the spillway at DeGray Lake, near Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Their novel interpretation of deposition dominated by sandy, matrix-supported debris flows is at odds with nearly every other investigation of the Jackfork to date. One key to their interpretation is their contention that the Jackfork sandstones have a high matrix content (as high as 25%). The high matrix content is critical to their arguments about the textural characteristics and flow properties of debris flows vs. turbidites. In our guidebook, we presented a large volume of petrographic data collected from samples taken from the Jackfork exposed on the east and west sides of the Spillway at DeGray Lake (and other locations as well). D`Agostino performed nearly al of the petrographic analyses presented in that guidebook. We disagree strongly with the reinterpretations of Shanmugam and Moiola and believe we can confidently address issues of petrography and matrix content. Specifically, we wish to address four points: (1) the amount of petrographic sampling done by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995); i.e., sampling density in a 327-m- (1072-ft) thick section, (2) overall matrix content of Jackfork sandstones, and Shanmugam and Moiola`s misrepresentation of our data, plus their apparent unfamiliarity with pertinent published data on the petrography of the Jackfork, (3) the distinction among authigenic clay, density in a 327-m- (1072-ft-) thick section, (2) overall matrix content of Jackfork sandstones, and Shanmugam and Moiola`s misrepresentation of our data, plus their apparent unfamiliarity with pertinent published data on the petrography of the Jackfork, (3) the distinction among authigenic clay, detrital clay, and other matrix materials, which Shanmugam and Moiola do not adequately discuss, and (4) the relationship of matrix content to their own facies classification scheme.

D`Agostino, A.E.; Jordan, D.W. [TD Geoscience, Midland, TX (United States); Jordan, D.W. [ARCO International Oil & Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Rail TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail The Rail Topic Group has the responsibility to identify and discuss current issues and concerns regarding rail transportation of radioactive materials by the Department of Energy (DOE). The group's current task is to examine different aspects of rail transportation including inspections, tracking and radiation monitoring, planning and process, and review of lessons learned. Ultimately, the main goal for members will be to assist in the identification of potential rail routes for shipments to Yucca Mountain, in a manner that will contribute to a safe, dynamic, and flexible transportation system. The identification of potential routes from reactor sites and DOE facilities will serve as an important first step in transportation planning, examining alternative routes, and getting feedback

79

Cultural Determinants of Information Processing Shortcuts in Computer Supported Groups: A Review, Research Agenda and Instrument Validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organizations are constantly engaged in actions. If an organization does not take actions, it cannot remain solvent, and if the organization consistently exercises poor judgment in the actions that it takes, it is destined to fail. Organizations do not ... Keywords: Culture, Decision Support Systems, Group Support Systems, Information Overload, Teams

Christopher P. Furner

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Novel Method for the Determination of Carbonyl Groups in Cellulosics by Fluorescence Labeling. 3. Monitoring Oxidative Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work, as the third and last part of this series, gives four illustrative examples, which are not only scientifically interesting but also industrially relevant:? solutions of cellulose in N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO) as used in the Lyocell process; alkalization and aging of pulp in 18% NaOH as the initial step in the viscose rayon production; electron beaming of pulp as a means of activation for further processing to derivatives; cellulose changes as occurring upon prolonged drying and storage of pulp under thermal stress. ... It was evident that both processes, carbonyl generation and chain shortening, were closely interrelated and proceeded simultaneously. ...

Antje Potthast; Jürgen Röhrling; Thomas Rosenau; Andrea Borgards; Herbert Sixta; Paul Kosma

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) presented a novel reinterpretation of the Jackfork Group in the DeGray Spillway and Kiamichi Mountain sections, Arkansas and Oklahoma, suggesting that thick-bedded sandstones in these sections, previously interpreted as turbidites, are debris-flow deposits. Careful assessment of this reinterpretation is critical because the Jackfork serves as a classic North American sediment-gravity flow sequence and because the techniques of Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), if applied widely, would lead to reinterpretation, and in my view, misinterpretation, of virtually every sediment-gravity flow sequence in the geologic record. In this discussion, I focus on only three of the many issues raised by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995): (1) their rejection of the concept of high density turbidity currents; (2) their description of the Jackfork Group in DeGray Spillway; and (3) their criteria for distinguishing between turbidites and debris-flow deposits.

Lowe, D.R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvania Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Reply  

SciTech Connect

Progress in science is often made when we make new observations, question old paradigms that do not work, and introduce new concepts. We attempted to do all this in our paper on the Jackfork Group (Shanmugam and Moiola, 1995). To allow Bulletin readers to appreciate the sequence of events leading to our controversial paper that provoked the preceding critiques, we need to place our contributions in a historical perspective. Our involvement with the Ouachitas began in the late 1960s when Moiola initiated a study of the Upper Carboniferous deep-water succession. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, we perpetuated the {open_quotes}turbidite{close_quotes} paradigm by continuing to interpret the Jackfork Group and associated strata according to conventional wisdom. However, we were always troubled by the virtual absence of normal grading in these classic turbidite deposits.

Shanmugam, G.; Moiola, R.J. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS’ high sampling resolution to study the “twilight zone” around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM’s 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM’s operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

Simon Phillpot; James Tulenko

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Reinterpretation of depositional processes in a classic flysch sequence (Pennsylvanian Jackfork Group), Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma: Discussion  

SciTech Connect

The {open_quotes}classic{close_quotes} deep-water outcrops of the Pennsylvanian upper Jackfork Group in the Ouachita Mountains of west-central Arkansas, recently discussed by Shanmugam and Moiola (1995), are especially significant to the petroleum industry because they have long been used as an analog to fine-grained, deep-water clastic reservoirs throughout the world. Numerous industry, academic, and government geoscientists have studied these outcrops for many years. As Shanmugam and Moiola (1995) point out, several interpretations of these outcrops have been made through the years. These changing interpretations coincide with the evolution of knowledge about deep-marine sedimentation and reservoirs. These outcrops have been constantly reexamined as petroleum geoscientists have brought their global exploration and production experience to the field.

Slatt, R.M. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Weimer, P. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Stone, C.G. [Arkansas Geological Commission, Little Rock, AR (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

87

Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children's Oncology Group Phase 2 Study  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the effects on 1-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining motexafin and gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiation therapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5- to 10-min intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2 to 5 h prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated 1-year EFS was 18% {+-} 5%, and the estimated 1-year OS was 53% {+-} 6.5%. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusions: Compared to historical controls, the addition of MGd to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas.

Bradley, Kristin A., E-mail: bradley@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Zhou Tianni [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); McNall-Knapp, Rene Y. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States)] [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Jakacki, Regina I. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Levy, Adam S. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)] [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Vezina, Gilbert [Department of Radiology, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Children's National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations September 1, 2011 - 4:07pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Washington Group International, Inc. (WGI) for a September 2010 incident that violated the Department's radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations, and has proposed a $412,500 civil penalty. The violations are associated with a radiological contamination incident that occurred on September 29, 2010, during open air demolition of Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) nuclear facilities

89

Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations September 1, 2011 - 4:07pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Washington Group International, Inc. (WGI) for a September 2010 incident that violated the Department's radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations, and has proposed a $412,500 civil penalty. The violations are associated with a radiological contamination incident that occurred on September 29, 2010, during open air demolition of Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) nuclear facilities

90

Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through the largest gift in kind in the history of Penn State's College of Information Sciences and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Armstrong Process Group makes $9 million donation to IST Center for Enterprise Architecture Through, Armstrong Process Group (APG), a leading enterprise architecture service provider, is contributing software, research collaboration and organizational guidance to the Center. "We are very happy to have the Armstrong

Petrick, Irene J.

91

Enhancing the heat transfer in a heat treatment furnace through improving the combustion process in the radiation tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......energy efficiency in the heating processes. The heat...chamber and lead to shorter heating time to achieve the objective...chamber as a part of oil quenching heat treatment...energy efficiency in the heating processes. The heat...The rising of fuel prices and the increasing requirements......

E. M. Elmabrouk; Y. Wu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Intensification of biodiesel production from waste goat tallow using infrared radiation: Process evaluation through response surface methodology and artificial neural network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the first time, an efficient simultaneous trans/esterification process for biodiesel synthesis from waste goat tallow with considerable free fatty acids (FFAs) content has been explored employing an infrared radiation assisted reactor (IRAR). The impacts of methanol to tallow molar ratio, IRAR temperature and H2SO4 concentration on goat tallow conversion were evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, 96.7% FFA conversion was achieved within 2.5 h at 59.93 wt.% H2SO4, 69.97 °C IRAR temperature and 31.88:1 methanol to tallow molar ratio. The experimental results were also modeled using artificial neural network (ANN) and marginal improvement in modeling efficiency was observed in comparison with RSM. The infrared radiation strategy could significantly accelerate the conversion process as demonstrated through a substantial reduction in reaction time compared to conventionally heated reactor while providing appreciably high biodiesel yield. Moreover, the in situ water removal using silica-gel adsorbent could also facilitate achieving higher FFA conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Owing to the occurrence of simultaneous transesterification of triglycerides present in goat tallow, overall 98.5 wt.% FAME content was determined at optimal conditions in the product biodiesel which conformed to ASTM and EN biodiesel specifications.

R. Chakraborty; H. Sahu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group to introduce themselves and their role in the Focus Group to Jeff. III. The Action Tracking matrix was discussed. The following updates were provided: a. The process for...

94

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

95

Photoelectrochemical Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Photoelectrochemical Working Group meets regularly to review technical progress, develop synergies, and collaboratively develop common tools and processes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water...

96

A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating short- and long-term processes. Part II: second cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation dose calculations. An important goal of our model development is second cancer risk estimation

Shuryak, Igor; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Enhancing the heat transfer in a heat treatment furnace through improving the combustion process in the radiation tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......predicted and measured data. The CFD simulations...methods to improve the heat transfer rate and provide quantitative data which can be used...important in the combustion and the heat transfer processes...models on hydrogen-hydrocarbon combustion modelling......

E. M. Elmabrouk; Y. Wu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS  

SciTech Connect

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

O'Neil, Peter

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Can We Predict Plan Quality for External Beam Partial Breast Irradiation: Results of a Multicenter Feasibility Study (Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group Study 06.02)  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Partial breast irradiation (PBI) after lumpectomy may be an option for selected patients with early breast cancer. A feasibility study of accelerated PBI delivered using external beam 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (RT) was undertaken at 8 Australasian centers. The present study evaluated the impact of patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors on the quality of RT plans as determined by the dose–volume parameters of organs at risk. Methods and Materials: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the study. All RT plans were centrally reviewed using predefined dosimetric criteria before commencement and after completion of protocol therapy. The RT plans of 47 patients met the dose–volume constraints, and all 47 patients received PBI to a prescribed dose of 38.5 Gy in 10 fractions. The RT plan quality was determined by volumes of the ipsilateral whole breast, lung, and heart that received 50% and 95%; 30%; and 5% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Patient, tumor, and RT technique-related factors were investigated for association with the parameters of RT plan quality. Results: The ratio of the planning target volume to the ipsilateral whole-breast volume was significantly associated with the ipsilateral breast doses on multiple variable analyses. The distance of the postlumpectomy surgical cavity from the heart and lung were predictive for heart and lung doses, respectively. A distance between surgical cavity and heart of >4 cm typically resulted in <1% of the heart volume receiving 5 Gy or less. It was more difficult to meet the heart dose constraint for left-sided and medially located tumors. Conclusions: Partial breast irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal RT was feasible within the study constraints. The ratio of planning target volume to ipsilateral whole-breast volume and the distance of surgical cavity from the heart were significant predictors of the quality of treatment plan for external beam PBI.

Kron, Tomas, E-mail: Tomas.Kron@petermac.org [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); School of Science, Engineering and Technology, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Willis, David; Link, Emma [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Lehman, Margot [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Campbell, Gillian [Auckland City Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland (New Zealand); O'Brien, Peter [Newcastle Calvary Mater Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Newcastle, NSW (Australia); Chua, Boon [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Departments of Radiation Oncology, Physical Sciences and Radiation Therapy, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the �¢����solar-background�¢��� mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM�¢����s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS�¢���� 1 Hz sampling to study the �¢����twilight zone�¢��� around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM�¢����s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM�¢����s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Interagency Committees and Working Groups  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE is actively involved with other Federal agencies that have responsibilities for the radiation protection of the public and the environment. This site provides the different committees and working groups that DOE is involved with.

102

SI Group Scheduling Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personnel On-Call Page Beamline Validation Schedule Group Organizational Chart Reviews Presentations Group Scheduling Page Project Scheduling Information Ops Scheduling Info Project / Scheduling Info APS fy2005 Annual Schedule ( html ) PSS Validation Schedule APS fy2006 Annual Schedule (html) PSS Validation Teams Latest Machine Studies Schedule (pdf) (html) New Builds Schedule (For SI GROUP Reference Only) Parasitic Beam Operations Schedule Ops Scheduling Page Shutdown Information Work Schedules August/September Shutdown Shutdown Work List Validation Schedule Safety Info Work Request Links ISM Core Functions Enter / Search Work Requests APS Safety Page Modify / Approve Work Requests Radiation Safety Policy APS TMS Training Profiles MSDS Search This page maintained by Joe Budz

103

Group Doppler effect in anisotropic plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In anisotropic plasmas, the radiative power emitted and the power observed per unit solid angle should be calculated along the direction of the group velocityv g ...

P. L. Leung; P. C. W. Fung

104

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

105

Magnetism Group  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of the Institute of Physics and the Physical Society has announced the establishment of a Magnetism Group. The aim of the new Group is to further interest in ... Group. The aim of the new Group is to further interest in magnetism by holding regular discussion meetings and in other ways. It is intended that these ...

1965-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Paired, Double-Blind, Randomized Comparison of a Moisturizing Durable Barrier Cream to 10% Glycerine Cream in the Prophylactic Management of Postmastectomy Irradiation Skin Care: Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 04.01  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: A previous, unblinded study demonstrated that an alcohol-free barrier film containing an acrylate terpolymer (ATP) was effective in reducing skin reactions compared with a 10% glycerine cream (sorbolene). The different appearances of these products precluded a blinded comparison. To test the acrylate terpolymer principle in a double-blinded manner required the use of an alternative cream formulation, a moisturizing durable barrier cream (MDBC); the study was conducted by the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) as protocol 04.01. Methods and Materials: A total of 333 patients were randomized; 1 patient was ineligible and 14 patients withdrew or had less than 7 weeks' observations, leaving 318 for analysis. The chest wall was divided into medial and lateral compartments, and patients were randomized to have MDBC applied daily to the medial or lateral compartment and sorbolene to the other compartment. Weekly observations, photographs, and symptom scores (pain and pruritus) were collected to week 12 or resolution of skin reactions if earlier. Skin dose was confirmed by centrally calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeters. Results: Rates of medial and lateral compartment Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC), version 3, greater than or equal to grade 3 skin reactions were 23% and 41%, but rates by skin care product were identical at 32%. There was no significant difference between MDBC and sorbolene in the primary endpoint of peak skin reactions or secondary endpoints of area-under-the-curve skin reaction scores. Conclusions: The MDBC did not reduce the peak skin reaction compared to sorbolene. It is possible that this is related to the difference in the formulation of the cream compared with the film formulation. Skin dosimetry verification and double blinding are essential for radiation skin care comparative studies.

Graham, Peter H., E-mail: peter.graham@sesiahs.health.nsw.gov.au [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales (Australia); Plant, Natalie; Graham, Jennifer L.; Browne, Lois [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales (Australia)] [Cancer Care Centre, St. George Hospital, Kogarah, New South Wales (Australia); Borg, Martin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia); Capp, Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mater Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mater Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Delaney, Geoff P. [Cancer Care Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia)] [Cancer Care Centre, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Harvey, Jennifer [Mater Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)] [Mater Hospital, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Kenny, Lisbeth [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, Queensland (Australia)] [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Francis, Michael [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong (Australia)] [Andrew Love Cancer Centre, Geelong (Australia); Zissiadis, Yvonne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth (Australia)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

108

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

109

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

none,

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Radiation Sterilization of Prototype Military Foods. III. Pork Loin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Spearman-KMirber estimation of an LD5o...independent of the dose-response...with- 610 RADIATION STERILIZATION...values with radiation dose, and the fluctuating...commercial radiation process for...Werkowski. 1968. Estimation of radiation...

Abe Anellis; D. Berkowitz; C. Jarboe; H. M. El-Bisi

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Group X  

SciTech Connect

This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

Fields, Susannah

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

113

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation

114

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a wider range with full resolution. The incoming beam is focused using a capillary condenser, forming hollow cone illumination. It is capable of Zernike phase contrast at both...

115

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and Cloud Processes in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and long-range levels. The author here offers a systematic discussion of the transfer of solar and thermal important topics in atmospheric radiation, cloud physics, and thermal equilibrium. Aspects

Liou, K. N.

116

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste...

118

QEP WORKING GROUP CHARGES Assessment Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. (Standard 2.12) During Phase I of the planning process, members of the Assessment Working Group with the institution's strategic plan, a review of the literature, definition of student learning appropriate related to goals. (Handbook for Review Committees, Standards 2.12 and 3.3.2) During Phase I

Liu, Paul

119

Research Highlights Sorted by Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Working Group Aerosol Life Cycle | Cloud Life Cycle | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Aerosol | Cloud Modeling | Cloud Properties | Radiative Processes Aerosol Life Cycle 2013 Bhattacharya, A. Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports ASR Fast, J. . Development and Validation of a Black Carbon Mixing State Resolved Three-Dimensional Model ARM ASR Gilles, M., Moffet, R. Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California ARM ASR Kafle, D. N., Coulter, R. L. Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide ARM Keppel-Aleks, G. Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model ARM Li, Z. A Mixed Bag of Aerosols over Northeastern China ARM

120

Application of a Least Square Non-parametric Discovery Process Model to Colorado Group Mixed Conventional and Unconventional Oil Plays, Western Canada Sedimentary Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A least squares non-parametric discovery process model has been developed recently for assessing petroleum resources in mature plays with complex size distribution characteristics. Applications of this model to o...

Zhuoheng Chen; Kirk G. Osadetz; Gemai Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Meeting Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation Meeting Attendees

124

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1999 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program................................................................. 1 INFORMATION PROCESSING ............................................. 2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ........................ 2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS) ............ 3

Toronto, University of

125

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2000 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program PROCESSING ...................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs'.................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS).....................3 Complex Data Requests

Toronto, University of

126

Effects of ionizing radiation on modern ion exchange materials  

SciTech Connect

We review published studies of the effects of ionizing radiation on ion exchange materials, emphasizing those published in recent years. A brief overview is followed by a more detailed examination of recent developments. Our review includes styrene/divinylbenzene copolymers with cation-exchange or anion-exchange functional groups, polyvinylpyridine anion exchangers, chelating resins, multifunctional resins, and inorganic exchangers. In general, strong-acid cation exchange resins are more resistant to radiation than are strong-base anion exchange resins, and polyvinylpyridine resins are more resistant than polystyrene resins. Cross-linkage, salt form, moisture content, and the surrounding medium all affect the radiation stability of a specific exchanger. Inorganic exchangers usually, but not always, exhibit high radiation resistance. Liquid ion exchangers, which have been used so extensively in nuclear processing applications, also are included.

Marsh, S.F.; Pillay, K.K.S.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Automata groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-presentation. We also find the L-presentation for several other groups generated by three-state automata, and we describe the defining relations in the Grigorchuk groups G_w. In case when the sequence w is almost periodic these relations provide an L...

Muntyan, Yevgen

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

128

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

129

Start | Grid View | Browse by Day OR Group/Topical | Author Index | Keyword Index | Personal Scheduler Controlled Variables Selection for a Gas-to-Liquids Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) production of synthesis gas (syngas), (ii) Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactor and (iii) upgrading units. Various production [1]. In our work, we study in a detail; design, optimization and controlled variables selection for a GTL process based on ATR for synthesis gas production and a FT reactor with Cobalt catalyst

Skogestad, Sigurd

130

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

at the DTIC Research groups (I/II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/im_proc_a.htm #12;Image Processing Group (GPI) #12;Music Technology Group (MTG) · Head of the group: Xavier SerraResearch at the DTIC #12;Research groups (I/II) · Image Processing Group (GPI) · Music Technology Group (MTG) · Distributed Multimedia Applications Group (DMAG) · Interactive Technologies Group (GTI

Verschure, Paul

132

Solar-radiation-maintained glacier recession on Kilimanjaro drawn from combined ice-radiation geometry modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar-radiation-maintained glacier recession on Kilimanjaro drawn from combined ice of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts, USA Georg Kaser Tropical Glaciology Group, Department of Geography retreat during the twentieth century. To evaluate the role of solar radiation in maintaining glacier

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

133

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

College of Health Sciences RAS Radiation Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; excitation and ionization processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RM 546.) RAS 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

135

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

136

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lamp filaments, the electrodes of an electric arc, and molten metals of high melting point. The emission of an incandescent object is due to its temperature and depends little upon the chemical nature of the radiator. The Stefan- 13 Boltzmann law... is automatically fed by the welding machine into the weld puddle. Metal is transferred through the arc plasma to the base material being welded. The wire is of the same metallic composition as the base metal, and generally the same diameter is used for most...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

at the DTIC Research groups (I/II)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research at the DTIC #12;Research groups (I/II) · Image Processing Group (GPI) · Music Technology Group (MTG) · Interactive Technologies Group (GTI) · Computational Imaging and Simulation Technologies groups (II/II) · Natural Language Processing Research Group (NLP) · Artificial Intelligence Group (AI

138

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

139

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Abelian groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s a 1-1 mapping. Also (na + ma)c' [(n + m)a]c ge (n + m)b ra nb + mb gt (na)c + (ma)o. Thus a is a homomorphism, and th1s together with the above tells us that a is an isomorphism. Hence (2) is proved, and thus the theorem, Definition 2 e6 If a...t o e. d ix elexext x oi s dross G is ~dvdsdt s by' n if there exists y such that ny rx x, As sn example of divisibility we note that the element 0 is divisible by every integer. Also, in the additive group of' xational numbers, we note every...

Bolen, James Cordell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

SciTech Connect

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

# Energy Measuremenfs Group  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ri EECE ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of Energy, was used during November 1976 to conduct an exploratory aerial radiological survey in-the greater Niagara Fails area. The purpose of that survey was to identify locations having concentrations of terrestrial radioactivity not typical of the radiation

145

Working Group Report: Sensors  

SciTech Connect

Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

Artuso, M.; et al.,

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes  

SciTech Connect

In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

148

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

149

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

151

A group of processes related to the Poisson process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...particles of one type, for example Lithium-6, being bombarded by a...the same whether there is an excess of persons or chairs because...2. Had there been a large excess of persons ( large), something...contrast, had there been only an excess of one person ( little more...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploration coordination tool to enhance the implementation of the coordination process At the 1st ISECG1 INTERNATIONAL SPACE EXPLORATION COORDINATION GROUP WORKPLAN Update following 3rd ISECG Meeting broader future participation in the planning and coordination process; - assessment of the requirements

153

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system, which significantly increases the efficiency of radiator heating while improving occupant comfort. Learn More Navillum Nanotechnologies University of Utah Navillum Nanotechnologies developed a process to fabricate quantum dots and other types of semiconducting nanocrystals. When used in liquid crystal displays (LCD), quantum dots improve energy efficiency by up to 35 percent and in solar panels can increase efficiency up to 45 percent. Learn More Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products that

155

Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group 1 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Annual Report ­ 2008 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group 1 About

Pulfrey, David L.

156

Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group Microsystems and Nanotechnology Group 1 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group The University of British Columbia Annual Report ­ 2007 Microsystems and Nanotechnology Research Group 1 About

Pulfrey, David L.

157

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

158

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

159

Enforcement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Technology Group, Inc. related to a form wood timber fire caused by nearby propane heaters during construction of the Salt Waste Processing Facility at DOE's Savannah...

160

Biosphere Process Model Report  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Radiation and Health Thormod Henriksen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of radioactivity from reactor accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions in the atmosphere. These subjects were interest is the effect of small radiation doses, given at a low dose rate. These studies are of importance for environmental problems as well as within cancer treatment. The group have close cooperations with professor

Johansen, Tom Henning

162

Radiation protection: Natural radiation risks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... radiation to which humans are exposed consists of four components - cosmic, gamma, internal, radon. The relative contribution that each makes to the sum is shown in the chart. ... but exposure of the whole body to terrestrial gamma rays and of the lungs to radon daughters are influenced by the nature and location of housing. Gamma rays are emitted ...

M. C. O'Riordan

1983-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) cites violations associated with radiation safety and quality improvement deficiencies identified during a DOE Idaho Operations Office May 2006 assessment of radioactive waste processing activities at the Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP). The

165

Compton Sources of Electromagnetic Radiation  

SciTech Connect

When a relativistic electron beam interacts with a high-field laser beam, intense and highly collimated electromagnetic radiation will be generated through Compton scattering. Through relativistic upshifting and the relativistic Doppler effect, highly energetic polarized photons are radiated along the electron beam motion when the electrons interact with the laser light. For example, X-ray radiation can be obtained when optical lasers are scattered from electrons of tens-of-MeV beam energy. Because of the desirable properties of the radiation produced, many groups around the world have been designing, building, and utilizing Compton sources for a wide variety of purposes. In this review article, we discuss the generation and properties of the scattered radiation, the types of Compton source devices that have been constructed to date, and the prospects of radiation sources of this general type. Due to the possibilities of producing hard electromagnetic radiation in a device that is small compared to the alternative storage ring sources, it is foreseen that large numbers of such sources may be constructed in the future.

Geoffrey Krafft,Gerd Priebe

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Process oil manufacturing process  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for producing a naphthenic process oil having reduced sulfur, nitrogen and polynuclear aromatics contents from a naphthenic feed containing same and having an atmospheric boiling range of about 650/sup 0/ to about 1200/sup 0/F. comprising: A. passing the feed into a first hydrotreating stage having a hydrotreating catalyst therein, the stage maintained at a temperature of about 600/sup 0/ to about 750/sup 0/F. and at a hydrogen partial pressure of about 400 to about 1500 psig, to convert at least a portion of the sulfur to hydrogen sulfide and the nitrogen to ammonia; B. passing the hydrotreated feed from the first hydrotreating stage in an intermediate stripping stage wherein hydrogen sulfide, ammonia, or both is removed; C. passing the hydrotreated feed from the intermediate stage into a second hydrotreating stage having therein a hydrotreating catalyst selected from the group consisting of nickel-molybdenum, cobalt-molybdenum, nickel-tungsten and mixtures thereof, the second hydrotreating stage maintained at a temperature lower than that of the first hydrotreating stage and at a hydrogen partial pressure ranging between about 400 and about 1,500 psig; D. monitoring the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both of the product exiting the second hydrotreating stage; and, E. adjusting the temperature in the second hydrotreating stage to keep the polynuclear aromatics content, the degree of saturation, or both below a limit suitable for process oil.

Corman, B.G.; Korbach, P.F.; Webber, K.M.

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Grant Topic Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments. The group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the development of a consolidated funding vehicle for transportation activities, should DOE implement such a program. Some of the major issues under consideration by the Consolidated Grant

168

SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION...DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO SOLAR ORIGIN OF CHANGES IN THE PRIMARY COSMIC RADIATION...that any relationship of these variations to solar phenomena arose through in- direct processes...

J. A. Simpson

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Calicivirus Inactivation by Nonionizing (253.7-Nanometer-Wavelength [UV]) and Ionizing (Gamma) Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...7-nm-wavelength [UV]) radiation, inactivation by ionizing (gamma) radiation was studied as a process...constituents on inactivation by radiation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Viruses...Shoji Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) was propagated in MDCK...

Ana Maria de Roda Husman; Paul Bijkerk; Willemijn Lodder; Harold van den Berg; Walter Pribil; Alexander Cabaj; Peter Gehringer; Regina Sommer; Erwin Duizer

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplishments and Future Accomplishments and Future Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting Phoenix, AZ Judith A. Holm, Office of National Transportation Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management April 4, 2005 TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) American Nuclear Society (ANS) Association of American Railroads (AAR) Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET) Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. (CRCPD) Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) Council of State Governments-Eastern Regional Conference (CSG-ERC) Council of State Governments-Midwestern Office (CSG-MW) Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals (CORAR) Dangerous Goods Advisory Council (DGAC)

171

Phase I/II trial of initial treatment with chemo-radiation in patients with highly advanced gastric adenocarcinoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CA Phase II study of radiation therapy combined with...Kitasato Gynecologic Radiation Oncology Group (KGROG...Medicine, Sagamihara, Japan, Kitasato University...chemoradiotherapy with lesser radiation dose for LAUCC using...Pharmaceutical Co., Japan. If this phase II trial...

Kohshi Kumagai; Yoshiro Saikawa; Ryo Ito; Takahiro Igarashi; Tsuyoshi Kiyota; Rieko Nakamura; Masaki Ohashi; Norihito Wada; Masashi Yoshida; Tetsuro Kubota; Koichiro Kumai; and Masaki Kitajima

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Radiating gravastars  

SciTech Connect

Considering a Vaidya exterior spacetime, we study dynamical models of prototype gravastars, made of an infinitely thin spherical shell of a perfect fluid with the equation of state p = ?, enclosing an interior de Sitter spacetime. We show explicitly that the final output can be a black hole, an unstable gravastar, a stable gravastar or a 'bounded excursion' gravastar, depending on how the mass of the shell evolves in time, the cosmological constant and the initial position of the dynamical shell. This work presents, for the first time in the literature, a gravastar that emits radiation.

Chan, R. [Coordenação de Astronomia e Astrofísica, Observatório Nacional, Rua General José Cristino, 77, São Cristóvão 20921-400, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, M.F.A. da [Departamento de Física Teórica, Instituto de Física, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua São Francisco Xavier 524, Maracanã 20550-900, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Rocha, Jaime F. Villas da [Instituto de Biociências, Departamento de Ciências Naturais, Universidade Federal do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Av. Pasteur 458, Urca, CEP 22290-240, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Wang, Anzhong, E-mail: chan@on.br, E-mail: mfasnic@gmail.com, E-mail: jfvroch@pq.cnpq.br, E-mail: anzhong_wang@baylor.edu [GCAP-CASPER, Department of Physics, Baylor University, Waco, TX 76798 (United States)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

6 - Industrial Applications of Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chapter summarizes the industrial applications of ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation finds use in a variety of industrial applications such as wire and cable insulation, tire manufacturing, production of polymeric foams, heat-shrinkable films and tubings, curing of coatings, adhesives and composites, printing, and other technological development. It provides extensive information on EB process in wire and cable and tire technology. The chapter also provides discussion on EB process in the manufacture of polyolefin foams and heat-shrinkable materials. Detailed discussion on cross-linked PE pipes (PEX) including methods for production, irradiation, and its advantages, is presented. Other applications for ionizing radiation include sterilization of medical devices, hydrogels, radiation curing of polymeric composites, production of fluoroadditives, radiation-cured flexography, coatings, adhesives, paints, and printing inks. Keywords Ionizing radiation; tire manufacturing; wire and cable insulations; printing inks; polyolefin foams; heat-shrinkable materials; cross-linked PE pipes (PEX); hydrogels; flexography

Jiri George Drobny

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Natural and Radiation Carcinogenesis in Man. III. Radiation Carcinogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mice. NATURAL AND RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN MAN. 3. RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS. | Journal Article | Japan Neoplasms etiology Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced Radiation Genetics | JAPAN NEOPLASM ETIOLOGY NEOPLASMS, RADIATION-INDUCED RADIATION...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956)- An Assessment of Quantities released, Off-Site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1990s, concern about the Oak Ridge Reservation's past releases of contaminants to the environment prompted Tennessee's public health officials to pursue an in-depth study of potential off-site health effects at Oak Ridge. This study, the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction, was supported by an agreement between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the State of Tennessee, and was overseen by a 12-member panel appointed by Tennessee's Commissioner of Health. One of the major contaminants studied in the dose reconstruction was radioactive iodine, which was released to the air by X-10 (now called Oak Ridge National Laboratory) as it processed spent nuclear reactor fuel from 1944 through 1956. The process recovered radioactive lanthanum for use in weapons development. Iodine concentrates in the thyroid gland so health concerns include various diseases of the thyroid, such as thyroid cancer. The large report, ''Iodine-131 Releases from Radioactive Lanthanum Processing at the X-10 Site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (1944-1956) - An Assessment of Quantities Released, Off-site Radiation Doses, and Potential Excess Risks of Thyroid Cancer,'' is in two volumes. Volume 1 is the main body of the report, and Volume 1A, which has the same title, consists of 22 supporting appendices. Together, these reports serve the following purposes: (1) describe the methodologies used to estimate the amount of iodine-131 (I-131) released; (2) evaluate I-131's pathway from air to vegetation to food to humans; (3) estimate doses received by human thyroids; (4) estimate excess risk of acquiring a thyroid cancer during ones lifetime; and (5) provide equations, examples of historical documents used, and tables of calculated values. Results indicate that females born in 1952 who consumed milk from a goat pastured a few miles east of X-10 received the highest doses from I-131 and would have had the highest risks of contracting thyroid cancer. Doses from cow's milk are considerably less . Detailed dose and risk estimates, and associated uncertainties, for other contaminants studied for the Oak Ridge dose reconstruction are presented in several other technical reports. One way to easily locate them in OSTI's Information Bridge is by searching the ''report number field'' for the number DOE/OR/21981*. Be sure to place the asterisk after the base number so your search can list the complete series of reports related to Oak Ridge Dose Reconstruction.

Apostoaei, A.I.; Burns, R.E.; Hoffman, F.O.; Ijaz, T.; Lewis, C.J.; Nair, S.K.; Widner, T.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Group Focus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom September 8, 2011 Call-In: 301-903-0620 PROPOSED AGENDA Work Group Framework 3:00 - 4:00 pm EST Introductory Remarks...................................................Glenn Podonsky Meeting Purpose/Process..........................................Mari-Jo Campagnone Group Discussion Facilitation...............................................Pete Stafford Discussion...................................................................................All (1) Proposed Work Group Guidance (2) Proposed Charter Template (3) Work Group Matrix Next Steps..........................................Mari-Jo Campagnone/Pete Stafford Training Work Group 4:00 - 5:00 pm EST Introductory Remarks.....................................................Karen Boardman

177

JLF User Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

or a radiative shocks in a supernova remnants. She has lead experiments at the Omega Laser Facility and National Ignition Facility and participated in experiments at the...

178

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally. 15 figs.

Anger, H.O.; Martin, D.C.; Lampton, M.L.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Radiation imaging apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation imaging system using a charge multiplier and a position sensitive anode in the form of periodically arranged sets of interconnected anode regions for detecting the position of the centroid of a charge cloud arriving thereat from the charge multiplier. Various forms of improved position sensitive anodes having single plane electrode connections are disclosed. Various analog and digital signal processing systems are disclosed, including systems which use the fast response of microchannel plates, anodes and preamps to perform scintillation pulse height analysis digitally.

Anger, Hal O. (Berkeley, CA); Martin, Donn C. (Berkeley, CA); Lampton, Michael L. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

College of Medicine RM Radiation Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry. Prereq: PHY 213 or 232; MA, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RAS 546.) RM 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

182

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

183

GRAYSTONE GROUP ADVERTISING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and GRAYSTONE GROUP ADVERTISING Partnership The University Central Florida has partnered with the Graystone Group for the purposes of facilitating recruitment advertising services. Benefits of partnering evaluations. Placing Recruitment Advertising: · Graystone Group is available to support all your recruitment

Wu, Shin-Tson

184

Program Building Committee's Central Planning Group.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tooe ZTA245.7 8873 Y)O./3~ The Texas A&M (stem r ultural ~ion ~ervrce Damet C Plannstlel. Director College Stallon Program Building Committee's CENTRAL PLANNING GROUP 8-1344 Authors: Burl B. Richardson , Extension Program Specialist... and Mary G. Marshall, Extension Program Specialist Program -Building Committee's CENTRAL PLANNING GROUP This leaflet describes the role of the central planning group in the program development process_ The central planning group is the highest...

Richardson, Burl B.; Marshall, Mary G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NIF User Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

users NIF User Group The National Ignition Facility User Group provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who use NIF for...

186

Page 91 (corrected) Table 4.3.1. Working Group on Data Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/CAS WORKING GROUP ON RADIATION FLUXES E. Raschke Germany/GKSS N/A EX­OFFICIO MEMBERS R. Schiffer USA

187

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student Groups Student Group Description Short Description AHR Scholar-Architecture Scholar ART Honors - Architecture Honors H04 Honors - Allied Medical Prof Honors H05 Honors - Arts & Sciences Honors H14 Honors - Envir&Natural Resources Honors H15 Honors - Food, Agr, & Envir Sci Honors H16 Honors

188

ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, EGsG , EGsG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT DECEMBER 1979 EGG-R-003 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SHPACK PROPERTY Norton, Massachusetts DATE OF SURVEY: AUGUST 1979 C. M . BLUITT Project Scientist APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION ?4@ t!lz- T. P. Stuart, Manager Remote Sensing Sciences Department THE REMOTE SENSING. lA!ORATORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ____--- I(-__ ABSTRACT An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the Shpack property in Norton, Massachusetts. In past years this property was used as a dump site for certain types of radioactive waste materials. Gamma ray data were collected over a 2.2 km* area centered on the site by flying northwest-southeast lines spaced 60 m apart. Processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray

189

Radiation effects on polypropylene/polybutylene blends  

SciTech Connect

Polymer blends of polypropylene and polybutylene have been found to exhibit substantial maintenance of structural integrity after exposure to ionizing radiation. This radiation resistance has been found to be related to processing conditions and the resulting morphology of the blend. This article discusses (a) the processing conditions and the resulting mechanical properties after irradiation and (b) the role of morphology in this unexpected blend property.

Rolando, R.J. (3M Engineering Systems and Technology, St. Paul, MN (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Nuclear radiation electronic gear  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear ... Examines the line of nuclear radiation instrumentation offered by Nuclear-Chicago Corporation and Victoreen Instrument Company. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

192

National group honors Sandia radiation effects expert | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

contributions, importance of technical contributions made by teams the individual led, quality and significance of publications and patents, years of technical distinction...

193

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency radiation detector is disclosed for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data. 4 figures.

Sigg, R.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

194

Pre-Clinical Radiation Biology and Medical Physics Divisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the uncertainties". Consider the uncertainties in delivering and measuring a dose of radiation to a certain tissue; There are uncertainties inherent in the dose measurement and calculation process Estimates of these uncertainties (forPre-Clinical Radiation Biology and Medical Physics Divisions Department of Radiation Oncology Tom

195

Estimation of Radiation Resistance Values of Microorganisms in Food Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Weibull 12D equivalent of a radiation process, or the minimal radiation dose (MRD), for cured ham...experimental sterilizing dose (ESD) and the Schmidt-Nank...9 Printed in U.S.A Estimation of Radiation Resistance Values of Microorganisms...

Abe Anellis; Stanley Werkowski

1968-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

197

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

198

Training Work Group Charter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charter Charter Training Work Group Charter The Training Work Group fosters improvements in the quality, efficacy, and delivery of DOE safety training, and realizes significant efficiencies by minimizing redundancies across the DOE Complex. The Work Group provides a collaborative opportunity for DOE to gain insights from operating contractors, the contractor work force and their representatives, and to combine the best wisdom to assure that the most efficient and effective worker health and safety program expectations, approaches and processes are in place and are well communicated. Training Work Group Charter More Documents & Publications HSS Briefing to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) on Union Activities 10 CFR 851 Implementation Work Group Charter

199

GEA Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Place Bochum, Germany Zip 44809 Sector Biofuels, Solar Product Bochum-based, engineering group specialising in process engineering and components for the food, pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries. GEA through its subsidiaries is involved in the solar and biofuels sector. Coordinates 51.485955°, 7.210866° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.485955,"lon":7.210866,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

200

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pending Jobs by Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

202

Long Term by Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

203

Interagency Advanced Power Group, Solar Working Group: Meeting minutes  

SciTech Connect

This report is the minutes of the Solar Working group. The meeting was prompted by the Steering Group`s desire to resolve issues the Solar Working Group.

Not Available

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system,...

205

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

SciTech Connect

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Interagency Sustainability Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

207

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

208

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

209

Vision System for Group of Mobile Robots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A vision system for group of small mobile robots playing soccer is presented. The whole process ... shape of color markers on top of each robot, is presented. Then, the color classifier...

Artur Babiarz; Robert Bieda; Krzysztof Jaskot

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Working Group 7 Summary  

SciTech Connect

The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

211

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

213

Impurity radiation from a tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

In tokamak operating modes, energy balance is often governed by impurity radiation. This is the case near the divertor plates, during impurity pellet injection, during controlled discharge disruptions, etc. The calculation of impurity radiation is a fairly involved task (it is sometimes the most difficult part of the general problem) because the radiation power is determined by the distribution of ions over the excited states and by the rate constants of elementary processes of radiation and absorption. The objective of this paper is to summarize in one place all the approximate formulas that would help investigators to describe radiation from the most often encountered impurities in a fairly simple way in their calculations accounting for plasma radiation, without reference to special literature. Simple approximating formulas describing ionization, recombination, and charge-exchange processes, as well as radiative losses from ions with a given charge, are presented for five impurity species: beryllium, carbon, oxygen, neon, and argon. Estimating formulas that allow one to take into account plasma opacity for resonant photons in line impurity radiation are also presented.

Morozov, D. Kh.; Baronova, E. O. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Nuclear Fusion Institute (Russian Federation); Senichenkov, I. Yu. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Grouped exposed metal heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

September 2012, Training Work Group Status Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Status Overview Training Work Group Status Overview Accomplishments: 1. May 7-8. Attended NIEHS Trainer's Exchange in Oak Ridge. 2. May 8-9. Joined HAMMER in visiting Oak Ridge entities to build support for the Radworker pilot. Entities visited included ORISE, Y-12, DOE TRU Project, and local labor entities. 3. June 19-20. Participated with Char Wells, Sandia National Laboratory Training Manager, (NTC, NIEHS and HAMMER in attendance) at a DOE M&O contractor led Learning/Training Workshop. - Obtained EFCOG commitment to create a Human Capital Training Subgroup under the Business Management Working Group. - Serving this group as data repository and communications hub for efforts to standardize General Employee Radiation Training (GERT) within DOE. - Briefed the complex wide Radworker reciprocity concept finding interest and

216

Radiation Protection and Safety Training | Environmental Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The objective of this course is to provide students with an introduction to the fundamentals of ionizing radiation protection and safety. The course curriculum combines...

217

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Radiative Atmospheric Divergence...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation emitted by the earth. This instrument is onboard a European Union geostationary weather satellite launched in December 2005; it is collecting data over Niamey and the...

218

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

219

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

220

Verifying a nuclear weapon`s response to radiation environments  

SciTech Connect

The process described in the paper is being applied as part of the design verification of a replacement component designed for a nuclear weapon currently in the active stockpile. This process is an adaptation of the process successfully used in nuclear weapon development programs. The verification process concentrates on evaluating system response to radiation environments, verifying system performance during and after exposure to radiation environments, and assessing system survivability.

Dean, F.F.; Barrett, W.H.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

The Ashlawn Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashlawn Group LLC Ashlawn Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name The Ashlawn Group LLC Place Alexandria, Virginia Zip 22304 Sector Services Product Provides management and technical consulting services, sales representations, product development, design and manufacturing process engineering solutions for industrial applications for the Department of Defense and energy-related industries. References The Ashlawn Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Ashlawn Group LLC is a company located in Alexandria, Virginia . References ↑ "The Ashlawn Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Ashlawn_Group_LLC&oldid=352164"

222

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

223

HYDROLOGICAL PROCESSES Hydrol. Process. (2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation (e.g. via snow reflection/insulation and soil moisture/ice control on turbulent fluxes) and timing

Haak, Hein

224

Trails Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet and non-motorized alternatives between the Townsite and LANL or between technical areas. The Trails Working Group, established in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA Los

225

A Second Poincare' Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solutions of the sourceless Einstein's equation with weak and strong cosmological constants are discussed by using In\\"on\\"u-Wigner contractions of the de Sitter groups and spaces. The more usual case corresponds to a weak cosmological-constant limit, in which the de Sitter groups are contracted to the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to the Minkowski space. In the strong cosmological-constant limit, however, the de Sitter groups are contracted to another group which has the same abstract Lie algebra of the Poincar\\'e group, and the de Sitter spaces are reduced to a 4-dimensional cone-space of infinite scalar curvature, but vanishing Riemann and Ricci curvature tensors. In such space, the special conformal transformations act transitively, and the equivalence between inertial frames is that of special relativity.

R. Aldrovandi; J. G. Pereira

1998-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

226

Atmospheres and radiating surfaces of neutron stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The beginning of the 21st century was marked by a breakthrough in the studies of thermal radiation of neutron stars. Observations with modern space telescopes have provided a wealth of valuable information. Being correctly interpreted, this information can elucidate physics of superdense matter in the interiors of these stars. The theory of formation of thermal spectra of neutron stars is based on the physics of plasmas and radiative processes in stellar photospheres. It provides the framework for interpretation of observational data and for extracting neutron-star parameters from these data. This paper presents a review of the current state of the theory of surface layers of neutron stars and radiative processes in these layers, with the main focus on the neutron stars that possess strong magnetic fields. In addition to the conventional deep (semi-infinite) atmospheres, radiative condensed surfaces of neutron stars and "thin" (finite) atmospheres are also considered.

Potekhin, A Y

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Yennello Group Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Science Texas A&M University The Group Activities Publications Articles Talks and Posters Detectors Links Pictures Women in Nuclear Science Internal Documents Contacts run...

229

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Caucus created a mission statement and resolution: - All Tribes with cultural ties to Yucca Mountain should be invited to join TEC - Ongoing funds to support Tribal Topic Group...

230

Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group of research and industry experts focuses on issues related to the cost, safety, and reliability of hydrogen pipelines. Participants represent organizations...

231

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

failure occurs." for ICPMS analysis and "One per analytical batch" for ICPAES and flame atomic absorption analysis. This was more frequent than the Focus Group members recalled...

232

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

expectations for incorporating Focus Group interpretations of HASQARD requirements in the document without a new letter from DOE contracting officers (COs) going out to the...

233

Radiation Safety Program Annual Review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................................................10 AREA RADIATION SURVEYS AND CONTAMINATION CONTROL...........................................11.....................................................................................................13 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT meetings of the Radiation Safety Committee where new users and uses of radioactive materials, radiation

Lyubomirsky, Ilya

234

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of steam buildings. Radiator Labs developed a mechanism that allows heating systems to control heat transfer at each radiator. The Radiator Labs design utilizes an...

235

The universal radiative transport equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSAL RADIATIVE TRANSPORT EQUATION Rudolph W.The Universal Radiative Transport Equation Rudolph W.The various radiative transport equations used in general

Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

University of Amsterdam Programming Research Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering Environment Bob Diertens Programming Research Group, Faculty of Science, University of Amsterdam­ToolBus software engineering environment. We generalize the refine step in this environment towards a process an environment. Keywords: process algebra, software engineering, software architecture, workbench, environment 1

Amsterdam, Universiteit van

237

University of Amsterdam Programming Research Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@science.uva.nl Programming Research Group Electronic Report Series #12;A Process Algebra Software Engineering Environment Bob engineering workbench of which several instances can be combined to form an environment. Keywords: process algebra, software engineering, software architecture, workbench, environment 1. Introduction In [10

Amsterdam, Universiteit van

238

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photoelectrochemical Working Group Photoelectrochemical Working Group Promising PEC Materials The PEC Working Group invites the international research community to assist in the development of PEC Materials White Papers to track the research status of the most promising materials classes for solar water splitting. The Photoelectrochemical Working Group meets regularly to review technical progress, develop synergies, and collaboratively develop common tools and processes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. Its members include principal investigators and supporting personnel from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded photoelectrochemical projects. More information on planned DOE photoelectrochemical activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan.

239

Notes: Role of the Nfo and ExoA Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Endonucleases in Radiation Resistance and Radiation-Induced Mutagenesis of Bacillus subtilis Spores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aerospace Medicine, Radiation Biology Department...Group, Chiba-shi, Japan 5 University of Florida...to different types of radiation have been studied...of spore samples for radiation exposure has been described...NIRS) in Chiba, Japan, under the aegis of...

Ralf Moeller; Peter Setlow; Mario Pedraza-Reyes; Ryuichi Okayasu; Günther Reitz; Wayne L. Nicholson

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radiation Dose Estimates from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Radiation Dose Estimates from Hanford Radioactive Material Releases to the Air- tantly, what radiation dose people may have received. An independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP, additionalProjectworkcouldresultin revisions of these dose estimates. April 21, 1994 Companion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

242

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

243

Radiation (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation (North Dakota) Radiation (North Dakota) Radiation (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations The Department of Health is the designated agency to receive registration applications and issue certificates necessary for the production, storage, processing, and disposal of radioactive wastes. The Industrial Commission of North Dakota is tasked with monitoring and enforcing provisions related

244

Galaxies that Shine: radiation-hydrodynamical simulations of disk galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation feedback is typically implemented using subgrid recipes in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxies. Very little work has so far been performed using radiation-hydrodynamics (RHD), and there is no consensus on the importance of radiation feedback in galaxy evolution. We present RHD simulations of isolated galaxy disks of different masses with a resolution of 18 pc. Besides accounting for supernova feedback, our simulations are the first galaxy-scale simulations to include RHD treatments of photo-ionisation heating and radiation pressure, from both direct optical/UV radiation and multi-scattered, re-processed infrared (IR) radiation. Photo-heating smooths and thickens the disks and suppresses star formation about as much as the inclusion of ("thermal dump") supernova feedback does. These effects decrease with galaxy mass and are mainly due to the prevention of the formation of dense clouds, as opposed to their destruction. Radiation pressure, whether from direct or IR radiation, has little effect, but ...

Rosdahl, Joakim; Teyssier, Romain; Agertz, Oscar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Quantitative Analysis of Group Decision Making for Complex Engineered Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding group decision-making processes is crucial for design or operation of a complex system. Unfortunately, there are few experimental tools that might contribute to the development of a theory of group decision-making ...

Broniatowski, David Andre

246

Project Documentation Group Members  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

agencies to track client services and outcomes, thus providing sound documentation that justifies stateCSC 4330 Project Documentation 11/30/2009 Group Members: Andy Bursavich Justin Farr Will Folse Chris Miceli Michael Miceli #12;Group Answers I. The Title ­ UREC Client Tracking System II. The project

Kundu, Sukhamay

247

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

248

Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.  

SciTech Connect

The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

249

RADIONUCLIDE RADIATION PROTECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COPYRIGHT 2002 Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;3 #12;4 #12;5 Radiation Protection Dosimetry Vol. 98, No'Energie Atomique, CEA/Saclay, France ISBN 1 870965 87 6 RADIATION PROTECTION DOSIMETRY Vol. 98 No 1, 2002 Published by Nuclear Technology Publishing #12;RADIONUCLIDE AND RADIATION PROTECTION DATA HANDBOOK 2nd Edition (2002

Healy, Kevin Edward

250

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

251

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) are the primary USGCRP vehicles for implementing and coordinating research activities within and across agencies. These groups are critical to Program integration and in assessing the Program's progress. The working groups span a wide range of interconnected issues of climate and global change, and address major components of the Earth's environmental and human systems, as well as cross-disciplinary approaches for addressing these issues. IWGs correspond to program functions and are designed to bring agencies together to plan and develop coordinated activities, implement joint activities, and identify and fill gaps in the Program's plans. They allow public officials to communicate with each other on emerging directions within their agencies, on their stakeholder needs, and on best practices learned from agency activities. Together, these functions allow the agencies to work in a more coordinated and effective manner.

252

Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Steering Group Report Fermilab Director Pier Oddone convened the Fermilab Steering Group in March 2007. Members comprised particle and accelerator scientists from Fermilab and the national community. Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim served as chair. The Steering Group subsequently formed subgroups to provide advice on the best physics opportunities that new facilities could offer. These subgroups drew upon university and laboratory scientists largely from outside Fermilab. The Steering Group took a number of steps to obtain as much input as possible from a broad spectrum of the U.S. particle- and accelerator-physics community. The Steering Group chair gave presentations and conducted town-hall-style sessions at meetings of all the major collaborations at Fermilab (CDF, DZero, MINOS, MINERνA,

253

Topic Group Participants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Group Report Topic Group Report Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group April 5, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona Recent 180(c) Topic Group Activities Issue Papers 1. Funding Distribution Method 2. Allowable Activities 3. Definitions 4. Pass-Through Requirements 5. Contingency Plans 6. 180(c) Policy or Rulemaking 7. Timing and Eligibility* 8. Funding for Related Activities* 9. State Fees* 10. Funding Allocation Approach* 180(c) Policy & Procedures * Executive Summary * Draft Policy & Procedures * Draft Grant Application Pckg * Appendix *Papers 7-10 still under discussion Today's Discussion Items * Reviewed Topic Group member comments on a variety of issues * Key issues included: - Funding allocation and timing of grants - Planning grants - State fees/matching requirements - Related non-training activities

254

THE GROUP D STREPTOCOCCI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...observed a similar frequency. In adult subjects...faecalis was found in larger numbers, although...soils and adjacent areas, Mundt (127...or undergo some thermal processing prior...recontamination after thermal processing and...of survival of thermal processing or...plants and grow in areas far removed from...

R. H. Deibel

1964-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radiation therapy for esophageal cancer: results of the patterns of Care Study in Japan 1995–1997  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To report the characteristics and treatment process of esophageal cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) in Japan.

Masahiro Kenjo; Masahiko Oguchi; Kotaro Gomi; Takashi Yamashita; Takashi Uno…

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Coordination External Coordination Working Group: Background and Process Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 TEC History * DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) formed TEC in 1992 * EM & RW developed MOU and TEC charter in 1992 - Other DOE program offices joined in 1993-94 * Other agencies (DOT, FRA, NRC, EPA) have been active participants Meeting Locations 1992-present Some Founding Principles * TEC concept centered on unique stakeholder accountability principles - Participation by key responsible parties in technical/policy issue discussion and resolution results in increased confidence and more efficient business decisions * Ultimate goal: develop multi-year set of

257

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Group Steering Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania Joel Butler Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sally Dawson Brookhaven National Laboratory Helen Edwards Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Himel Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stephen Holmes Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Young-Kee Kim, Chair Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory/ University of Chicago Andrew Lankford University of California, Irvine David McGinnis Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sergei Nagaitsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Vladimir Shiltsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Maury Tigner Cornell University Hendrik Weerts Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Neutrino Physics Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania

259

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

260

Americans' Average Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

We live with radiation every day. We receive radiation exposures from cosmic rays, from outer space, from radon gas, and from other naturally radioactive elements in the earth. This is called natural background radiation. It includes the radiation we get from plants, animals, and from our own bodies. We also are exposed to man-made sources of radiation, including medical and dental treatments, television sets and emission from coal-fired power plants. Generally, radiation exposures from man-made sources are only a fraction of those received from natural sources. One exception is high exposures used by doctors to treat cancer patients. Each year in the United States, the average dose to people from natural and man-made radiation sources is about 360 millirem. A millirem is an extremely tiny amount of energy absorbed by tissues in the body.

NA

2000-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hydrogen Storage Systems Analysis Working Group Meeting: Summary Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of these biannual Working Group meetings is to bring together the DOE research community involved in systems analysis of hydrogen storage materials and processes.

262

Radiation: Facts, Risks and Realities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Radiation 3 Understanding Radiation Risks 6 Naturally Occurring (Background) Radiation 7 Man-Made Radiation, beta particles and gamma rays. Other types, such as x-rays, can occur naturally or be machine-produced. Scientists have also learned that radiation sources are naturally all around us. Radiation can come from

263

Focus Group I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF ATTITUDES IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA Sheila K. Hanson, Energy & Environmental Research Center Daniel J. Daly, Energy & Environmental Research Center Edward N. Steadman, Energy & Environmental Research Center John A. Harju, Energy & Environmental Research Center June 2005 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In April 2005, representatives of the Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, held two focus groups in Williston, North Dakota. A total of sixteen people participated; seven on April 20 and nine on April 21. The purpose of the focus group research was to gain insight into the public perception of carbon sequestration from

264

Electric Vehicle Research Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................................................9 From diesel to electric: a new era in personnel transport for underground coal minesElectric Vehicle Research Group Annual Report 2012 #12;Table of Contents Executive Summary................................................................................8 C2-25 Electric Vehicle Drivetrain

Liley, David

265

Usage Statistics By Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Usage Statistics Usage Statistics Genepool Cluster Statistics Period: daily weekly monthly quarter yearly 2year Utilization By Group Jobs Pending Last edited: 2013-09-26 18:21:13...

266

Strategic Initiatives Work Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Work Group, comprised of members representing DOE, contractor and worker representatives, provides a forum for information sharing; data collection and analysis; as well as, identifying best practices and initiatives to enhance safety performance and safety culture across the Complex.

267

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

268

Independents' group posts loss  

SciTech Connect

Low oil gas prices and special charges caused the group of 50 U.S. independent producers Oil and Gas Journal tracks to post a combined loss in first half 1992. The group logged a net loss of $53 million in the first half compared with net earnings of $354 million in first half 1991, when higher oil prices during the Persian Gulf crisis buoyed earnings in spite of crude oil and natural gas production declines. The combined loss in the first half follows a 45% drop in the group's earnings in 1991 and compares with the OGJ group of integrated oil companies whose first half 1992 income fell 47% from the prior year. Special charges, generally related to asset writedowns, accounted for most of the almost $560 million in losses posted by about the third of the group. Nerco Oil and Gas Inc., Vancouver, Wash., alone accounted for almost half that total with charges related to an asset writedown of $238 million in the first quarter. Despite the poor first half performance, the outlook is bright for sharply improved group earnings in the second half, assuming reasonably healthy oil and gas prices and increased production resulting from acquisitions and in response to those prices.

Sanders, V.; Price, R.B.

1992-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

269

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNL’s ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical ionizing radiation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perturbations and level splittings 8-3 Ionization and the Saha equation 2. Textbook Radiative processes... the following chapters: Chapter 1 Basic concepts 1-1 Radiative flux and...

271

Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications for Dose per Unit Intake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Radiation Protection Dosimetry Article Report of the Nuclear Energy Agency Expert Group on Gut Transfer Factors: Implications...transfer factors recommended by an Expert Group of the Nuclear Energy Agency for intakes of certain important elements in......

G.M. Kendall; J.D. Harrison; T.P. Fell

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

A FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studying the numerical solutions to the radiative transport equation (RTE) or the within-group neutron transport equation [4, 13] in the field of neutron transport [4], atmospheric radiative transfer [1], heatA FAST FORWARD SOLVER OF RADIATIVE TRANSFER EQUATION HAO GAO AND HONGKAI ZHAO Abstract

Soatto, Stefano

273

Chapter 5 - Gasification Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary There is a broad range of reactor types that are used in the practical realization of the gasification process. For most purposes, these reactor types can be grouped into one of three categories: moving-bed gasifiers, fluid-bed gasifiers, and entrained-flow gasifiers. Moving-bed processes are the oldest processes, and two processes in particular, the producer gas process and the water gas process, have played an important role in the production of synthesis gas from coal and coke. In moving bed processes, there are the sasol-lurgi dry bottom process, British Gas/Lurgi (BGL) slagging gasifier, that are detailed in the chapter along with their applications. Following this, fluid-bed processes are discussed in which the blast has two functions: that of blast as a reactant and that of the fluidizing medium for the bed. The best known fluid-bed gasifiers that have no tar problem are regenerators of catalytic cracking units that often operate under reducing, that is, gasification conditions that can be found in many refineries. HRL process, BHEL gasifier, circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) processes, the KBR transport gasifier, agglomerating fluid-bed processes, the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) gasifier, the GEE gasification process, the Shell Gasification Process (SGP), Lurgi’ s Multi-Purpose Gasification process (MPG), etc. are the various processes discussed in the chapter.

Christopher Higman; Maarten van der Burgt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

275

The structural characteristics of radiation oncology in Japan in 2003  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Purpose: To ascertain the basic structural characteristics of radiation oncology facilities in Japan, we conducted a national survey on their status in 2003. The aims of the survey included the following: present status of radiation treatment facilities, equipment, personnel, patient loads, and other factors. Methods and Materials: A mail survey verified each potential facility delivering megavoltage radiation therapy and collected data on treatment devices, other equipment, personnel, new patients, and so on. Responses were obtained from 100% of potential facilities. Results: A total of 726 facilities delivered radiation therapy, with 859 megavoltage devices, 203 RALS (remote after-loading system) and other radioactive sources, with 941 FTE (full-time employee) radiation oncologists including 369 FTE Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology-certified radiation oncologists, 1555 FTE radiation therapists, and 70 FTE physicists in 2003. Megavoltage devices included two heavy ion units and four proton units. In total, there were 149,793 new patients and 146,351 (98%) by external irradiation; 4379 (3%) were treated by brachytherapy with or without external irradiation. Eighty-six percent of the facilities had treatment-planning computers, but 4% had no treatment-planning capability. Six percent (44 facilities) of all facilities used hyperthermia, 12% (85 facilities) intraoperative radiation therapy, and 2% (12 facilities) intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Conclusion: Facilities surveys continue to provide a source of census data on radiation oncology in Japan, allowing comparisons among facility groups and over time.

Hitoshi Shibuya; Hirohiko Tsujii

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

The structural characteristics of radiation oncology in Japan in 2003  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To ascertain the basic structural characteristics of radiation oncology facilities in Japan, we conducted a national survey on their status in 2003. The aims of the survey included the following: present status of radiation treatment facilities, equipment, personnel, patient loads, and other factors. Methods and Materials: A mail survey verified each potential facility delivering megavoltage radiation therapy and collected data on treatment devices, other equipment, personnel, new patients, and so on. Responses were obtained from 100% of potential facilities. Results: A total of 726 facilities delivered radiation therapy, with 859 megavoltage devices, 203 RALS (remote after-loading system) and other radioactive sources, with 941 FTE (full-time employee) radiation oncologists including 369 FTE Japanese Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology-certified radiation oncologists, 1555 FTE radiation therapists, and 70 FTE physicists in 2003. Megavoltage devices included two heavy ion units and four proton units. In total, there were 149,793 new patients and 146,351 (98%) by external irradiation; 4379 (3%) were treated by brachytherapy with or without external irradiation. Eighty-six percent of the facilities had treatment-planning computers, but 4% had no treatment-planning capability. Six percent (44 facilities) of all facilities used hyperthermia, 12% (85 facilities) intraoperative radiation therapy, and 2% (12 facilities) intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Conclusion: Facilities surveys continue to provide a source of census data on radiation oncology in Japan, allowing comparisons among facility groups and over time.

Shibuya, Hitoshi [JASTRO Database Committee, Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo (Japan)]. E-mail: shibuya.mrad@tmd.ac.jp; Tsujii, Hirohiko [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba-shi, Chiba (Japan)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and hearing no objections to the minutes as presented they were approved. II. The Action Tracking matrix was discussed. The following updates were provided: a. The process for...

278

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hearing no objections to the minutes as presented, they were approved. II. The Action Tracking matrix was discussed. The following updates were provided: a. The process for...

279

HASQARD Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on HASQARD were identified by anyone present during the presentation. III. The Action Tracking matrix was discussed. The following updates were provided: a. The process for...

280

Interactive visual intervention planning in particle accelerator environments with ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation is omnipresent. It has many interesting applications: in medicine, where it allows curing and diagnosing patients; in communication, where modern communication systems make use of electromagnetic radiation; and in science, where it is used to discover the structure of materials; to name a few. Physically, radiation is a process in which particles or waves travel through any kind of material, usually air. Radiation can be very energetic, in which case it can break the atoms of ordinary matter (ionization). If this is the case, radiation is called ionizing. It is known that ionizing radiation can be far more harmful to living beings than non-ionizing radiation. In this dissertation, we are concerned with ionizing radiation. Naturally occurring ionizing radiation in the form of radioactivity is a most natural phenomenon. Almost everything is radioactive: there is radiation emerging from the soil, it is in the air, and the whole planet is constantly undergoing streams of energetic cosmic radiation. Sinc...

Fabry, Thomas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Magnetic reconnection with radiative cooling. I. Optically thin regime  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic reconnection processes in many high-energy-density astrophysical and laboratory plasma systems are significantly affected by radiation; hence traditional, nonradiative reconnection models are not applicable to these systems. Motivated by this observation, the present paper develops a Sweet-Parker-like theory of resistive magnetic reconnection with strong radiative cooling. It is found that, in the case with zero guide field, intense radiative cooling leads to a strong plasma compression, resulting in a higher reconnection rate. The compression ratio and the reconnection layer temperature are determined by the balance between ohmic heating and radiative cooling. The lower temperature in a radiatively cooled layer leads to a higher Spitzer resistivity and, hence, a higher reconnection rate. Several specific radiative processes (bremsstrahlung, cyclotron, and inverse Compton) in the optically thin regime are considered for both the zero- and strong-guide-field cases, and concrete expressions for the reconnection parameters are derived, along with the applicability conditions.

Uzdensky, Dmitri A. [Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Physics Department, UCB-390, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); McKinney, Jonathan C. [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-4060 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Calibration & Test Group The LASP Calibration & Test Group (Cal Group) is involved  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and rejection efficiency modeling · Strong (0.08 T) inner field, reduced (Radiation dose models and analysis · Full 3-D radiation shielding and dose analysis using SolidWorks models of instruments · Material-dependent models (high-Z, low-Z) · Radiation signal and noise contribution estimates

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

284

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

285

Cloud Formation and Acceleration in a Radiative Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a radiatively heated and cooled medium, the thermal instability is a plausible mechanism for forming clouds, while the radiation force provides a natural acceleration, especially when ions recombine and opacity increases. Here we extend Field's theory to self-consistently account for a radiation force resulting from bound-free and bound-bound transitions in the optically thin limit. We present physical arguments for clouds to be significantly accelerated by a radiation force due to lines during a nonlinear phase of the instability. To qualitatively illustrate our main points, we perform both one and two-dimensional (1-D/2-D) hydrodynamical simulations that allow us to study the nonlinear outcome of the evolution of thermally unstable gas subjected to this radiation force. Our 1-D simulations demonstrate that the thermal instability can produce long-lived clouds that reach a thermal equilibrium between radiative processes and thermal conduction, while the radiation force can indeed accelerate the clouds to ...

Proga, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

288

Specific Group Hardware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores with hyperthreading). The total local disk space is 1.9 TB. It is running Scientific Linux SL release 5.5 (Boron) and is disk booted. It is in rack 17. palicevo2 The Virtual Organization (VO) server testbed. It's a Dell PowerEdge R410 with 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors, each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores

289

The China Energy Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The China Energy Group A city-owned cogeneration plant, built in 1989 in Weihai, Shandong, received an award from the Chinese government as an advanced energy-efficient enterprise. The Energy Analysis Program's China Energy Group-a core team of four Mandarin-speaking U.S. and Chinese researchers, plus leader Mark Levine and a dozen other staff members-has worked closely with energy policymakers in China for nearly a decade. Their goal is to better understand the dynamics of energy use in China and to develop and enhance the capabilities of institutions that promote energy efficiency in that country. This unique collaboration began as a joint effort with the Energy Research Institute of China's State Planning Commission, but the Group's network has expanded to

290

DOE STGWG Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STGWG Group STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas. The tribal membership is composed of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Navajo Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Santa Clara Pueblo, Pueblo de San Ildefonso, Seneca Nation of Indians, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the

291

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizing Framework Organizing Framework CAG Organizing Framework The Community Advisory Group Organizing Framework is composed of three primary components: CAG Purpose and Charge CAG Member Responsibilities Operating Principles CAG Membership and Participation Download a pdf of the CAG Organizing Framework. Purpose and Charge The purpose of the LBNL Community Advisory Group (CAG) is to provide input into the Lab's physical plans and development projects. The specific charge to this group is to: Advise LBNL staff on issues related to the environmental impacts of proposed planning and development projects; Articulate key community planning and design principles to be considered in the review of individual projects as well as to guide the physical development of LBNL overall; Identify recommended strategies and actions for addressing community

292

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

293

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

294

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

295

Radiation.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An average American's exposure is about 620 millirems per year from naturally occurring and other sources. Other Factors Background radiation varies with location....

296

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

297

Radiation Safety September 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................... 8 2.6 RUA Holder........................................................................................................ 11 3.3 Radiation Use Authorization (RUA).......................................................................................... 11 3.4 Review of RUA Applications

California at Irvine, University of

298

Radiative polarization of electrons  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a new method of calculating the radiative polarization of electrons in homogeneous magnetic fields, using the modified electron propagation function.

Julian Schwinger and Wu-yang Tsai

1974-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for understanding

Pennycook, Steve

300

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Appendix F: Radiation Appendix F: Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon in air; potassium in food on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sources. People are exposedAppendix F: Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F: Radiation F-3 Fig. F.1. The hydrogen atom and its

Pennycook, Steve

302

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation G-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation G-3 Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

303

Appendix F. Radiation Appendix F. Radiation F-3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from natural and human-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantlyAppendix F. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix F. Radiation F-3 Appendix F. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about radiation. The information is intended to be a basis for un- derstanding

Pennycook, Steve

304

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on the order of 1.5 W/m 2 AERI - (Pre-ARM Model) AERI - (Model in 2003) 1 RU = 1 mW / (m 2 sr cm -1 ) Excellent Agreement in Clear Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer Between Obs and Calcs Shortwave Flux Bias (Solid) Shortwave Flux RMS (Hatched) W m -2 * Comparison of shortwave radiative flux at the surface

305

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.  

SciTech Connect

Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

SIMOS,N.

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Meeting Summaries Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington DC TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 15, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Minneapolis TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 21, 2004 Albuquerque TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 22, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Jacksonville TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 20, 1999 Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1998

308

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH J.H . Park et al. #12;'s of FeinCsm e tal The chargeandorbitalordering geom etryin YB a C o 2 O 5 S. K. Kwon etal .Magnetism Theory

Min, Byung Il

309

Radiation-tolerant imaging device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A barrier at a uniform depth for an entire wafer is used to produce imaging devices less susceptible to noise pulses produced by the passage of ionizing radiation. The barrier prevents charge created in the bulk silicon of a CCD detector or a semiconductor logic or memory device from entering the collection volume of each pixel in the imaging device. The charge barrier is a physical barrier, a potential barrier, or a combination of both. The physical barrier is formed by an SiO{sub 2} insulator. The potential barrier is formed by increasing the concentration of majority carriers (holes) to combine with the electron`s generated by the ionizing radiation. A manufacturer of CCD imaging devices can produce radiation-tolerant devices by merely changing the wafer type fed into his process stream from a standard wafer to one possessing a barrier beneath its surface, thus introducing a very small added cost to his production cost. An effective barrier type is an SiO{sub 2} layer. 7 figs.

Colella, N.J.; Kimbrough, J.R.

1996-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Two-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiative transfer equation has been derived with full mathematical rigor [13,14]. In the case the wave nature of the process and is not just about energy transport. Hence the governing equation cannotTwo-frequency radiative transfer and asymptotic solution Albert C. Fannjiang* Department

Fannjiang, Albert

311

Radiation effects in Si-Ge quantum size structure (Review)  

SciTech Connect

The article is dedicated to the review and analysis of the effects and processes occurring in Si-Ge quantum size semiconductor structures upon particle irradiation including ion implantation. Comparisons to bulk materials are drawn. The reasons of the enhanced radiation hardness of superlattices and quantum dots are elucidated. Some technological applications of the radiation treatment are reviewed.

Sobolev, N. A., E-mail: sobolev@ua.pt [Universidade de Aveiro, Departamento de Fisica and I3N (Portugal)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DDE ESTIMATED DOSE FROM CONCEPTION TO DECLARATION: DDE Radiation Safety Officer Signature for increased protection from ionizing radiation for declared pregnant radiation workers. The radiation dose of the occupational dose limit of 50 mSv (5.0 rem). The CPMC Radiation Safety Office will provide education

Jia, Songtao

313

RADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. · Radiation therapist - a health professional who designs, calculates (plans) and provides the radiation dose and monitors the delivery of radiation therapy, taking into account the protection and safety of patientsRADIATION ONCOLOGY TARGET YOUR FUTURE #12;A Career in Radiation Oncology YOUR CHOICE SAVE LIVES

Tobar, Michael

314

A New Appraisal of Radiation Genetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... forty years of its existence, radiation genetics has developed into a vast field with many interrelated, specialist areas devoted to physical, chemical, genetical and cytological analysis of the action ... culminates in the conclusion that "the discovery of the purely material nature of the complex processes of life" is ''one of the major landmarks in the history of dialectical ...

CHARLOTTE AUERBACH

1965-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

315

Interaction of Excimer Laser Radiation with Solids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We review the nature of the interactions that occur when excimer laser radiation impacts on different materials. The physical processes that occur during such interactions can be traced by subsequent physical and chemical analysis of the interface following the irradiation. We illustrate this approach with data obtained for a variety of materials including Cu Al polyimide and foamed polystyrene. We also discuss the processes that initiate material removal in transparent (wide bandgap) materials.

Walter W. Duley; Kevin Dunphy; Grant Kinsman; Stephen Mihailov

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......occupational illness to personnel, major damage...acceptable levels. Selection of control measures...or equipment operating correctly in...99 103 to 104 Personnel life safety...and abnormal operating conditions under...radiation risk to personnel, public and...worker radiation training) reduces the......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Radiation safety system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......disable this safety function and...circuits and software. Other required...source in case of radiation monitors. Feedback...from other non-safety systems to prevent...write and check software. The expected...logic systems for safety functions can...levels of prompt radiation hazard. ACS......

Vaclav Vylet; James C. Liu; Lawrence S. Walker

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Risks from ionizing radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... RADON indoors now accounts for nearly half of the average UK population exposure to ionizing radiation ... exposure to ionizing radiation. We believe that the extent of the variation in exposure to radon in the United Kingdom and else-where and its magnitude in relation to exposures from ...

R. H. Clarke; T. R. E. Southwood

1989-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Control Group Variation in the Janus Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Variation in the Janus Studies Group Variation in the Janus Studies Benjamin Haley 1 , William Liu 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 Data from historical radiobiological mega-studies is being migrated online to enable open access to the results of these studies. The availability of these large data sets offers the possibility of merging the results of multiple studies for meta-analysis. However, researchers must overcome several hurdles in order to analyze data from disparate radiobiology studies. Variations in animal treatment, autopsy methods, and nomenclature must be accounted for before developing

320

Instrumentation @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation The Catalysis Group at BNL is leading research initiatives into the development of new tools and techniques that focus on the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and catalysts using imaging, spectroscopy and scattering techniques and integrated combinations of them under reaction conditions to unravel the morphology, chemical and structural properties, of catalysts, respectively. These efforts revolve around the use of synchrotron radiation (NSLS), electrons (CFN) and quantum tunneling tools with particular thrusts into imaging, spectroscopy and scattering. Groups Instrumentation(BNL) Three UHV chambers with diverse instrumentation for surface characterization: LEED, UPS, XPS, AES, TPD, ISS, PM-AP-IRRAS, Reactivity Cell. All the systems include ancillary instrumentation such as sputtering guns and metal evaporators. The IRRAS system was retrofitted with an ambient pressure (AP) cell on top of the UHV system. The sample can be prepared and characterized in UHV and then transfer in vacuum to the AP cell.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Electromagnetics, 26:335, 2006 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electromagnetics, 26:3­35, 2006 Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC ISSN: 0272-6343 print/1532 the statistical properties of the impedance (Z) and scattering (S) matrices of open electromagnetic cavities. Introduction The problem of the coupling of electromagnetic radiation in and out of structures is a general one

Anlage, Steven

322

SCM Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud microphysical parameterizations cloud microphysical parameterizations with SCM, CAPT and M-PACE observations X. Liu (PNNL) S. Xie, J. Boyle, S. Klein (LLNL) S. J. Ghan (PNNL) H. Morrison, A. Gettelman (NCAR) Goal: Improve Climate Model Parameterizations Tools: single column models (SCM) and DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT) (LLNL CAPT team) ARM measurements provide unique data for model evaluation and guidance for parameterization improvement Motivations Cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds has a significant impact on cloud radiative forcing, precipitation formation, etc. The treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is often oversimplified Liquid/ice partitioning according to a temperature dependent function; Neglect ice nucleation and Bergeron-Findeisen

323

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Albuquerque TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Presentation - April 21, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Portland TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - February 6, 2001 Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1999

324

Nuclear radiation actuated valve  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear radiation actuated valve for a nuclear reactor. The valve has a valve first part (such as a valve rod with piston) and a valve second part (such as a valve tube surrounding the valve rod, with the valve tube having side slots surrounding the piston). Both valve parts have known nuclear radiation swelling characteristics. The valve's first part is positioned to receive nuclear radiation from the nuclear reactor's fuel region. The valve's second part is positioned so that its nuclear radiation induced swelling is different from that of the valve's first part. The valve's second part also is positioned so that the valve's first and second parts create a valve orifice which changes in size due to the different nuclear radiation caused swelling of the valve's first part compared to the valve's second part. The valve may be used in a nuclear reactor's core coolant system.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Schively, Dixon P. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Radiation Weighting Factors and High Energy Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......generally inadequate for high energy radiation. In order to determine...appropriate wR values in the high energy region, several criteria are...are proposed for neutrons of energy above 100 MeV and for protons above 10 MeV. The wR value for muons is confirmed to be practically......

M. Pelliccioni

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Manhattan Project: Processes  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Processes Processes Uranium Mining, Milling, and Refining Uranium Isotope Separation Plutonium Production Bomb Design, Development, and Production Bomb Testing and Weapon Effects Processes PLEASE NOTE: The Processes pages are not yet available. Links to the pages listed below and to the left will be activated as content is developed. Select topics relating to the industrial processes of the Manhattan Project have been grouped into the categories listed to the left. A quick overview of processes involved in the mission of the Manhattan Project can be obtained by reading the summary pages for each of the categories, located in the left navigation bar. Each summary page also has a listing of all the subtopics included within that category. For a complete menu of all process pages, see the comprehensive list of topics below.

327

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

328

NERSC User Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC User Group Meeting NERSC User Group Meeting Oct 18, 2010 Outline * About OpenMP * Parallel Regions * Worksharing Constructs * Synchronization * Data Scope * Tasks * Using OpenMP at NERSC 2 3 Common Architectures * Shared Memory Architecture - Multiple CPUs share global memory, could have local cache - Uniform Memory Access (UMA) - Typical Shared Memory Programming Model: OpenMP, Pthreads, ... * Distributed Memory Architecture - Each CPU has own memory - Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) - Typical Message Passing Programming Model: MPI, ... * Hybrid Architecture - UMA within one SMP node - NUMA across nodes - Typical Hybrid Programming Model: mixed MPI/OpenMP, ... What is OpenMP * OpenMP is an industry standard API of C/C++ and Fortran for shared memory parallel programming.

329

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS ON NON-PGM CATALYSTS * INK FORMULATION * CCM VS. GDE * DELAMINATION PERFORMANCE * BACKUP POWER APPLICATION - STATUS: 60C, 0.5V, 0.2W/CM2 (DEGRADATION ISSUES) - TARGETS: SHOULD BE SET CONSISTENT WITH DOE STATIONARY TARGETS (2015) * AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATION - INCREASE POWER DENSITY TO >0.5W/CM2

330

Group Vision Care Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision Vision Care Policy Group Name: LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC. RETIREES Group Number: 12284390 Divisions 0005 & 0006 Effective Date: JANUARY 1, 2011 EVIDENCE OF COVERAGE Provided by: VISION SERVICE PLAN INSURANCE COMPANY 3333 Quality Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 (916) 851-5000 (800) 877-7195 EOC NM 03/02 11/25/08 CLD In addition to the information contained in this Benefit Program Summary, the LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees Summary Plan Description contains important information about your LANS health and welfare benefits. For additional information: For Retirees: Customer Care Center (866) 934-1200 www.ybr.com/benefits/lanl LANL Benefits Website for Retirees: http://www.lanl.gov/worklife/benefits/retirees/

331

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Icon Fermilab Icon Photo Home About About the Steering Group Members & Contributors Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Acknowledgement Contents Contents Chapter 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Chapter 2 Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Chapter 3 Fermilab and the ILC Chapter 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier Chapter 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier Chapter 6 Beyond the ILC and the LHC Chapter 7 A Fermilab Plan for Discovery Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix A Steering Group charge Appendix B Fermilab and the ILC Appendix C The international neutrino program Appendix D Neutrino science with 8 GeV and 800 GeV protons Appendix E Muon-to-electron conversion in nuclei Appendix F Precision physics experiments with kaon beams Appendix G Facilities considered Appendix H Steps toward a muon collider

332

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summary April...

333

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES January 31, 2008 December 6, 2007 October 4, 2007...

334

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Security Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries August 17, 2006 (Draft) July 18, 2006 (Draft) June...

335

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Conference...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries May 13, 1999 April 8, 1999 March 1, 1999 More...

336

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Green Bay STG Meeting Summary- September 14, 2006 Washington STG Meeting Summary - March 14,...

337

-THERMODYNAMICS AND PROCESS MODELLING GROUP --NPL MATERIALS CENTRE -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

_DATA/RESULTS SYSTEM SOURCE STOP DEFINE WHAT ? system ENTER : 'Fe,Ni,Al,Mo,Nb,C' ! SEARCHING by Dr H K D H Bhadeshia at University of Cambridge under the terms and conditions of NPL 79 IN OPENING DATAFILE DEFINE WHAT ? system ENTER : Fe,Ni,Al,Mo,Nb,C^[[D^[[D^[[D FE KEYWORD

Cambridge, University of

338

Integrating grouped and ungrouped data: the point process case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be located in the Black Hills National Forest. The causes ofin the Black Hills National Forest. It could be explored forthat is the Black Hills National Forest. It is interesting

Hernandez Magallanes, Irma del Consuelo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dr. sc. Christoph Studer Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. July 2009: Ph.D. in Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Doctoral dissertation: "Iterative MIMO Decoding: Algorithm Zurich) and Prof. H. B¨olcskei (Communication Technology Laboratory, ETH Zurich). Jan. 2006 ­ July 2009

340

Dr. sc. Christoph Studer Digital Signal Processing (DSP) Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology and Electrical Engineer- ing, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. July 2009: Ph.D. in Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. Doctoral dissertation: "Iterative (Integrated Systems Laboratory, ETH Zurich) and Prof. H. B¨olcskei (Communication Technology Laboratory, ETH

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Going Green to Be Seen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-statured automobile coveted across demographic categories. Why is the Prius is so successful? One possibility is that the Prius is a hybrid gas­electric vehicle, meaning that it costs less to fuel. Yet it costs many thousands

Sorenson, Michael

342

Fireball during combustion of hydrocarbon fueld releases II. Thermal radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The processes of radiative heat transfer in a fireball which develops upon ignition of a cloud of hydrocarbon fuel near the Earth’s surface are simulated numerically. The emissive characteristics of combustion pr...

G. M. Makhviladze; J. P. Roberts; S. E. Yakush

343

Operational radiation protection in high-energy physics accelerators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......transportation, movement, storage, handling, processing...radioactive materials and wastes are properly controlled...measurements for radioactive waste characterisation, on-site storage of radioactive materials...short-term active or long-term passive, high-radiation-level......

S. H. Rokni; A. Fassò; J. C. Liu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrology Group - UNSAT-H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H Recharge Estimation UNSAT-H is a FORTRAN computer code used to simulate the one-dimensional flow of water, vapor, and heat in soils. The code addresses the processes of precipitation, evaporation, plant transpiration, storage, and deep drainage. The UNSAT-H computer code is used to understand the movement of water, heat, and vapor in soils so better decisions can be made about land use, waste disposal, and climate change. Example Tests and Typical Applications include studies of the water balance behavior of surface covers over shallow land burial waste sites and studies of land disturbance effects on recharge rates. The UNSAT-H computer code is managed by the Hydrology Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy

345

Service Improvement Group Operational Plan 2014 -2015  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Service Improvement Group Operational Plan 2014 - 2015 Version 1.0 #12;2 Introduction Universities are facing a number of challenges including financial constraints, increasing regulatory demands is accessible from the website · Review procedures and processes every six months · Assist in the development

Botea, Adi

346

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Candidate Radiation Drugs Inch Forward 10.1126/science.331.6024...radiation, workers at the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant wear protective gear...Candidate radiation drugs inch forward. | News | 0 (E)-4-carboxystyryl-4-chlorobenzylsulfone...

Yudhijit Bhattacharjee

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

348

ULTRA SECURE HIGH RELIABILITY WIRELESS RADIATION MONITOR  

SciTech Connect

Radiation monitoring in nuclear facilities is essential to safe operation of the equipment as well as protecting personnel. In specific, typical air monitoring of radioactive gases or particulate involves complex systems of valves, pumps, piping and electronics. The challenge is to measure a representative sample in areas that are radioactively contaminated. Running cables and piping to these locations is very expensive due to the containment requirements. Penetration into and out of an airborne or containment area is complex and costly. The process rooms are built with thick rebar-enforced concrete walls with glove box containment chambers inside. Figure 1 shows high temperature radiation resistance cabling entering the top of a typical glove box. In some case, the entire processing area must be contained in a 'hot cell' where the only access into the chamber is via manipulators. An example is shown in Figure 2. A short range wireless network provides an ideal communication link for transmitting the data from the radiation sensor to a 'clean area', or area absent of any radiation fields or radioactive contamination. Radiation monitoring systems that protect personnel and equipment must meet stringent codes and standards due to the consequences of failure. At first glance a wired system would seem more desirable. Concerns with wireless communication include latency, jamming, spoofing, man in the middle attacks, and hacking. The Department of Energy's Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed a prototype wireless radiation air monitoring system that address many of the concerns with wireless and allows quick deployment in radiation and contamination areas. It is stand alone and only requires a standard 120 VAC, 60 Hz power source. It is designed to be mounted or portable. The wireless link uses a National Security Agency (NSA) Suite B compliant wireless network from Fortress Technologies that is considered robust enough to be used for classified data transmission in place of NSA Type 1 devices.

Cordaro, J.; Shull, D.; Farrar, M.; Reeves, G.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

350

Strong radiative heating due to the mixing state of black carbon in atmospheric aerosols  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The global model that I used was GATOR-GCMM, which treated gas, aerosol, radiative, meteorological and transport processes (see Supplementary ...

Mark Z. Jacobson

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

351

RADIATIVE TRANSFER IN ULTRARELATIVISTIC OUTFLOWS  

SciTech Connect

Analytical and numerical solutions are obtained for the equation of radiative transfer in ultrarelativistic opaque jets. The solution describes the initial trapping of radiation, its adiabatic cooling, and the transition to transparency. Two opposite regimes are examined. (1) Matter-dominated outflow. Surprisingly, radiation develops enormous anisotropy in the fluid frame before decoupling from the fluid. The radiation is strongly polarized. (2) Radiation-dominated outflow. The transfer occurs as if radiation propagated in vacuum, preserving the angular distribution and the blackbody shape of the spectrum. The escaping radiation has a blackbody spectrum if (and only if) the outflow energy is dominated by radiation up to the photospheric radius.

Beloborodov, Andrei M., E-mail: amb@phys.columbia.edu [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2011-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

352

Florida Radiation Protection Act (Florida)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Public Health is responsible for administering a statewide radiation protection program. The program is designed to permit development and utilization of sources of radiation for...

353

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Westly Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search Name: Westly Group Place: Menlo Park, California Zip: 94025 Product: Clean technology-oriented venture capital firm. References: Westly Group1 This article...

355

Enovos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enovos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enovos Group Place: Germany Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based utility. The utility has interests in solar energy. References:...

356

Schaeffler Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Schaeffler Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schaeffler Group Place: Germany Product: A manufacturer of rolling bearings and linear products worldwide as well as a renowned...

357

Zeppini Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zeppini Group Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian firm that sells PV applications for homes, industry and business. References: Zeppini Group1 This article is a stub. You can...

358

Focus Group | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Focus Group Meeting (Activities Status) Meeting agenda, summary and 2011 Directives Reform Status Meeting Date: May 19, 2011 January 20, 2011 Focus Group Meeting (Activities...

359

GROUPED'ANALYSEETDETHORIECONOMIQUELYONSTTIENNE CSRfirmprofilesandinnovation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for innovation. Key words: Corporate Social Responsibility, Innovation, Organizational, Practices, Product, Process Résumé Cet article étudie les relations entre la responsabilité sociale des entreprises (RSE) et l'innovation. Mots clefs:Responsabilité sociale des entreprises, Innovation, Organisation, Pratiques, Produit

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

360

Radiation prevents much cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence reviewed here supports the concept that chronic exposure to ionising radiation can dramatically decrease cancer incidence and mortality. This evidence includes an inverse relationship between radiation levels and cancer induction and/or mortality in: over 200 million people in the USA; 200 million people in India; 10,000 residents of Taipei who live in cobalt-60 contaminated homes; high radiation areas of Ramsar, Iran; 12 million person-years of exposed and carefully selected control nuclear workers; almost 300,000 homes with radon in the USA; non-smokers in high radon areas of Saxony, Germany.

T.D. Luckey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Biophysics and synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book, contains contributions to the conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation held in July 1986 at Frascati. It is devoted to advances in the resolution of biological molecule structure obtainable through synchroton radiation studies. The use of synchroton radiation has firmly established x-ray spectroscopy of biological molecules. More detailed knowledge on the local structure of active sites of metalloproteins, as well as a number of studies on the interaction of metal ions with other important biological macromolecular systems are presented. This new method for protein structure analysis is a major improvement for the rapidly expanding field of protein engineering.

Bianconi, A.; Castellano, C.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The Intense Radiation Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new dispersion relation for photons that are nonlinearly interacting with a radiation gas of arbitrary intensity due to photon-photon scattering. It is found that the photon phase velocity decreases with increasing radiation intensity, it and attains a minimum value in the limit of super-intense fields. By using Hamilton's ray equations, a self-consistent kinetic theory for interacting photons is formulated. The interaction between an electromagnetic pulse and the radiation gas is shown to produce pulse self-compression and nonlinear saturation. Implications of our new results are discussed.

M. Marklund; P. K. Shukla; B. Eliasson

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

365

Quantum vacuum radiation in optical glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recent experimental claim of the detection of analogue Hawking radiation in an optical system [PRL 105 (2010) 203901] has led to some controversy [PRL 107 (2011) 149401, 149402]. While this experiment strongly suggests some form of particle creation from the quantum vacuum (and hence it is per se very interesting), it is also true that it seems difficult to completely explain all features of the observations by adopting the perspective of a Hawking-like mechanism for the radiation. For instance, the observed photons are emitted parallel to the optical horizon, and the relevant optical horizon is itself defined in an unusual manner by combining group and phase velocities. This raises the question: Is this really Hawking radiation, or some other form of quantum vacuum radiation? Naive estimates of the amount of quantum vacuum radiation generated due to the rapidly changing refractive index --- sometimes called the dynamical Casimir effect --- are not encouraging. However we feel that naive estimates could be misleading depending on the quantitative magnitude of two specific physical effects: "pulse steepening" and "pulse cresting". Plausible bounds on the maximum size of these two effects results in estimates much closer to the experimental observations, and we argue that the dynamical Casimir effect is now worth additional investigation.

Stefano Liberati; Angus Prain; Matt Visser

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

367

Personality and group interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that "prize Chips will be awarded equally to each person in the group based on the total number of blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds". b) In the contrient condition, subjects were told that "Prize Chips will be awarded only... to the individual with the most blocks still standing in the tower at the end of the 15 seconds. If there are any ties in terms of the number blocks on the tower and there is no clear winner, then no prize chips will be distributed". 6. Only one tower may...

Hair, Elizabeth Catherine

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

SPPR Group Proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal June 23, 2010 Agenda Purpose of Meeting Presenters Background Information  Three Terminal Plan & Market Access  Business Case  Transmission Infrastructure Program ED5-Palo Verde Project Potential Rate Impacts Discussion / Comments 2 Purpose of Meeting Provide background information Share the SPPR Group's current proposal and how it might affect Parker-Davis Project (P-DP) customers Obtain your feedback on the proposal 3 Presenters Background Information - Todd Rhoades ED5-PV Project Description - Todd Rhoades Project Marketability - John Steward Project Cost & Financing - Jack Murray Potential Rate Impacts - Jack Murray Next Steps - Todd Rhoades 4 Three Terminal Plan November 2009 5 Business Case

369

CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 December 7, 2009 Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-36, Rev. 0) Rvisions to the Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry for internal use and also we are making them available for use by DOE line and contractor assessment personnel in developing and implementing effective DOE oversight and contractor self-assessment and corrective action processes. CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

370

Kinetic equilibration from a radiative transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision is studied using a radiative transport model. Thermalization is found to dominate over expansion with medium regulated cross sections. Pressure anisotropy shows an approximate alpha_s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. Energy density is also found to approach an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that viscosity is important during the early longitudinal expansion phase of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

Bin Zhang

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

371

Memory effects in radiative jet energy loss  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In heavy-ion collisions the created quark-gluon plasma forms a quickly evolving background, leading to a time dependent radiative behavior of high momentum partons traversing the medium. We use the Schwinger Keldysh formalism to describe the jet evolution as a non-equilibrium process including the Landau-Pomeranschuk-Migdal effect. Concentrating on photon emission, a comparison of our results to a quasistatic calculation shows good agreement, leading to the conclusion that the radiative behavior follows the changes in the medium almost instantaneously.

Frank Michler; Björn Schenke; Carsten Greiner

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

372

TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Groups Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually by phone and email between TEC's semiannual general meetings, participate in conference calls and report back to the Department and TEC members. The Topic Groups are intended to work on significant issues, produce a relevant product and sunset the group when the work is

373

Quantum Mechanics associated with a Finite Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I describe, in the simplified context of finite groups and their representations, a mathematical model for a physical system that contains both its quantum and classical aspects. The physically observable system is associated with the space containing elements fxf for f an element in the regular representation of a given finite group G. The Hermitian portion of fxf is the Wigner distribution of f whose convolution with a test function leads to a mathematical description of the quantum measurement process. Starting with the Jacobi group that is formed from the semidirect product of the Heisenberg group with its automorphism group SL(2,F{N}) for N an odd prime number I show that the classical phase space is the first order term in a series of subspaces of the Hermitian portion of fxf that are stable under SL(2,F{N}). I define a derivative that is analogous to a pseudodifferential operator to enable a treatment that parallels the continuum case. I give a new derivation of the Schrodinger-Weil representation of the Jacobi group. Keywords: quantum mechanics, finite group, metaplectic. PACS: 03.65.Fd; 02.10.De; 03.65.Ta.

Robert W. Johnson

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 0 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process Deviation Document Number: P-010 Rev 11-0304 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): F-013 Process Deviation Form, P-008 Corrective/Preventive Action, F-014 Process Deviation Log, ADMP-001 Procurement Process P-010 Process Deviation 11_0304 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 08_0822 Process assigned to new owner. Process and flowchart modified to require completion of all items on F-013. 09_0122 Process and flowchart modified to reflect process modifications.

375

Radiation Detector R&D | Global and Regional Solutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Detector and Nonproliferation R&D Group Radiation Detector and Nonproliferation R&D Group A major element in nonproliferation, arms control verification, nuclear materials safeguards and homeland security is the ability to detect, identify and measure nuclear, radioactive and chemical materials. BNL has a significant and world-class capability in radiation detection including the design and fabrication of advanced detector systems for scientific R&D and nonproliferation applications that has evolved over more than six decades. To support nonproliferation, arms control, safeguards and homeland security, BNL has focused on advanced radiation detector systems that offer room temperature operation with high energy resolution for gamma-ray detectors, imaging and direction indicating capabilities for both gamma-ray

376

Lighting Group: People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Lighting Group Staff Phone Mailstop Email Group Leader [area code 510] Rubinstein, Francis 486-4096 90R3111 FMRubinstein@lbl.gov Staff Scientists Berman, Sam 5682 90R3111 Clear, Robert 486-4286 90R3111 RDClear@lbl.gov Research Associates Enscoe, Abby (510) 486 6077 90R3111 AIEnscoe@lbl.gov Fritz, Randolph M. (510) 495 2532 90R3111 RFritz@lbl.gov Ghatikar, Girish 486-6768 90R3111 GGhatikar@lbl.gov Granderson, Jessica 486-7692 90R3111 JGranderson@lbl.gov Howells, Jack 4096 46R0125 MRHowells@lbl.gov Kiliccote, Sila 495-2615 90R3111 SKiliccote@lbl.gov Liu, Gao 7207 70R0108B GLiu@lbl.gov Wen, Yao-Jung 4702 90R3111 YJWen@lbl.gov Yazdanian, Mehry 486-4701 90R3111 MYazdanian@lbl.gov Research Technicians Galvin, James 486-4661 47R0112 JEGalvin@lbl.gov Technical Support DiBartolomeo, Dennis 486-4702 90R3111

377

ARM - Measurement - Backscattered radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation govMeasurementsBackscattered radiation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Backscattered radiation The scattering of radiant energy into the hemisphere of space bounded by a plane normal to the direction of the incident radiation and lying on the same side as the incident ray. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System IAP : In-situ Aerosol Profiles (Cessna Aerosol Flights)

378

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

379

Radiation from accelerated branes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The radiation emitted by accelerated fundamental strings and D-branes is studied within the linear approximation to the supergravity limit of string theory. We show that scalar, gauge field and gravitational radiation is generically emitted by such branes. In the case where an external scalar field accelerates the branes, we derive a Larmor-type formula for the emitted scalar radiation and study the angular distribution of the outgoing energy flux. The classical radii of the branes are calculated by means of the corresponding Thompson scattering cross sections. Within the linear approximation, the interaction of the external scalar field with the velocity fields of the branes gives a contribution to the observed gauge field and gravitational radiation.

Mohab Abou-Zeid and Miguel S. Costa

2000-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

380

Radiation Induced Mammary Cancer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Induced Mammary Cancer R.L. Ullrich * R.J. Preston # * Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77550 # Biology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831, U.S.A Over the last......

R.L. Ullrich; R.J. Preston

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ionizing radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ionizing radiation detector is provided which is based on the principle of analog electronic integration of radiation sensor currents in the sub-pico to nano ampere range between fixed voltage switching thresholds with automatic voltage reversal each time the appropriate threshold is reached. The thresholds are provided by a first NAND gate Schmitt trigger which is coupled with a second NAND gate Schmitt trigger operating in an alternate switching state from the first gate to turn either a visible or audible indicating device on and off in response to the gate switching rate which is indicative of the level of radiation being sensed. The detector can be configured as a small, personal radiation dosimeter which is simple to operate and responsive over a dynamic range of at least 0.01 to 1000 R/hr.

Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

383

Processing Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Processing Science Related to the Electron Beam Melting Additive Manufacturing Process October 14 th , 2014 Ryan Dehoff Metal Additive Manufacturing Thrust Lead Manufacturing...

384

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

385

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

386

September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Focus Group [Name of Work Group] Work Group Charter (Date) I. PURPOSE The HSS Focus Group [Name of Work Group] is one of several HSS Work Groups, established to address worker health, safety and security programs improvements across the U.S. Department of Energy Complex. The [Name of Work Group] has been established to (state specific purpose). II. OBJECTIVES (State the desired impact(s) and major outcome(s) for, the Work Group) 1. Establish specific improvement goals, intended outputs and supporting activities that respond to identified worker health and safety improvement needs. 2. Establish measurable indicators when possible to support findings, recommendations and accomplishments.

387

Radiative Muon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of radiative muon capture is developed. The discussion includes both parity conserving and nonconserving effects. The Gell-Mann weak magnetic term and the induced pseudoscalar are included, along with comparable relativistic effects in the nucleons. The theory is applied to light nuclei and especially to the radiative Godfrey reaction ?-+C126??+?+B125. An experiment to detect the induced pseudoscalar directly is proposed.

Jeremy Bernstein

1959-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

389

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2002 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program......................................................................................... 9 2001 EMME/2 Road Network Inclusion of Links to CCDRS .................. 9 Road and Transit Management Group 2002 Annual Report i SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG), in cooperation

Toronto, University of

390

High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

391

Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Digital Technology Group 1/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory William R Carson Building on the presentation by Francisco Monteiro Matlab #12;Digital Technology Group 2/20 Computer Laboratory Digital Technology Group Computer Laboratory The product: MATLAB® - The Language

Cambridge, University of

392

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

393

Radiative muon capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by relating the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture to that of radiative pion capture, that the transition amplitude of radiative muon capture proposed recently by Hwang and Primakoff differs from the others mainly by Low's counter terms. Despite the fact that the "original" transition amplitude does not violate seriously the conservation of the hadronic electromagnetic current, Low's counter terms, as introduced via Low's prescription to secure the presence of small conservation-of-hadronic-electromagnetic-current-breaking terms, are confirmed to be of numerical importance. Further, it is found in the "elementary-particle" treatment of radiative muon capture that the uncertainty arising from the nuclear structure can be reduced to become negligible. Therefore, an exclusive radiative muon capture experiment can in principle differentiate the Hwang-Primakoff theory from the others and yet provide a comprehensive test of partial conservation of axial-vector current.RADIOACTIVITY Theories of radiative muon capture, linearity hypothesis versus Low's prescription; nuclear structure and PCAC.

W -Y. P. Hwang

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

An Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Instrumentation Complex for Atmospheric Radiation Measurements in Siberia S. M. Sakerin, F. V. Dorofeev, D. M. Kabanov, V. S. Kozlov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, V. V. Polkin, V. P. Shmargunov, S. A. Terpugova, S. A. Turchinovich, and V. N. Uzhegov Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction The instrumentation complex is described, which has been prepared for radiative experiments in the region of Tomsk (West Siberia). The complex consists of three groups of devices to measure (a) the characteristics of the total downward radiation; (b) the most variable components of the atmospheric transparency directly affecting the income of radiation (aerosol optical depth [AOD], total content of water vapor, ozone, etc.); and (c) aerosol and meteorological parameters of the near-ground layer of the

395

ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Radiation Medicine Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online March 24-28, 2014 August 18-22, 2014 Fee: $250 Maximum enrollment: 28 30 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 4½-day course includes more advanced information for medical practitioners. This program is academically more rigorous than the Radiation Emergency Medicine course and is primarily for Physicians, Clinical Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants desiring an advanced level of information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing radiation injuries and illnesses. Advanced topics in the diagnosis and management of radiation-induced injuries and illnesses includes the use of cytokines, stem cell transplants, antimicrobials, wound care and other advanced techniques. Group problem-solving is used to thoroughly orient attendees to the

396

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Facilities for the Intensity Frontier SuperNuMI (SNuMI) Project X Existing rings Project X and the ILC Project X and longer term facilities Summary Facilities for the Intensity Frontier The Steering Group considered a variety of accelerator facilities and programs using the following criteria: Support for physics research goals, effective use of accelerator assets freed up at the end of Tevatron operations, Alignment with the ILC R&D program, Potential for achievement over the next decade. Twelve facilities received consideration using some or all of these criteria. Appendix G sorts those facilities not described in this chapter based on relevance to proton- or electron-based programs. This chapter describes the facilities that would support neutrino science and precision physics at the intensity frontier. The facilities include an intense proton source and its injection to the existing rings at Fermilab for a variety of programs.

397

Particle Data Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About PDG About PDG About the PDG PDG authors Order PDG products PDG citation Encoder tools Job at LBNL Contact Us Downloads Resources Errata Archives Atomic Nuclear Properties Online HEP Info Non-PDG Databases Durham-RAL databases Current experiments Guide to Data Partial-wave analyses Contact Us News The "Reviews, Tables, Plots" section has been updated. The next book edition is due in early summer 2014, and the booklet in late summer 2014. Funded By: US DOE US NSF CERN MEXT (Japan) INFN (Italy) MEC (Spain) IHEP & RFBR (Russia) Mirrors: USA (LBNL) Brazil CERN Indonesia Italy Japan (KEK) Russia (Novosibirsk) Russia (Protvino) UK (Durham) The Review of Particle Physics J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 partial update for the 2014 edition.

398

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

399

Working Group Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K. Zorika G. Zhang Focus of Discussion The session convened on March 2, with brief introductions by Bill Clements. The purpose of the session was to discuss the scientific merits of retrofitting TOGA/TAO buoys with shortwave radiometers. Three questions were posed at the outset of the session to focus the discussion.

400

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 61 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.11.150 © 2012 Future Science Ltd In 1950 Reese et al. proposed a mechanism for cel- lulose hydrolysis, which involved two general com- ponents, C 1 and C x , acting in sequence [1]. According to the model, the C 1 component first disrupted and swelled the crystalline cellulose, possibly releasing soluble oligo saccharides into solution. The C x compo- nent, which was shown to have endoglucanase activity, was then able to effectively hydrolyze the previously inaccessible substrate along with the soluble oligo- saccharides. Furthermore, the activity of the mixture was found to be higher than the activity of each com- ponent acting alone, indicating that the components were acting synergistically. In the following years, a number of groups began to identify and characterize

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Lighting Group: Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software Software Lighting Software The Lighting Group has developed several computer programs in the course of conducting research on energy efficient lighting. Several of these programs have proven useful outside the research environment. One of the most popular programs for advanced lighting applications is Radiance. For more information on this program and its availability, click on the link below. RADIANCE Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. The primary advantage of Radiance over simpler lighting calculation and rendering tools is that there are no limitations on the geometry or the materials that may be simulated. Radiance is used by architects and engineers to predict illumination, visual quality and appearance of innovative design spaces, and by researchers to evaluate new

402

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

403

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab In This Section: Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Guidelines The Steering Group's proposed plan Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOνA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac.

404

Preservation of food by ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

This study is presented in three volumes. Vol. I: Presents a concise description of the philosophy of radiation, protection for people working with irradiation processes, including problems associated with the design and operation of a large facility and solutions to problems encountered. Radiation dosimetry and radiolytic effects in foods are also presented. Vol. II: Effects of radiation on bacteria and viruses are discussed as well as the lethal effect on microorganisms and insects. Also presented are the effects of irradiated food on packaging materials. Vol. III: The effects of radurization on meats, poultry, fish, shellfish, fruits, vegetables, and spices. Also included are the effects of irradiation for the use of shelf-life extension.

Josephson, E.S.; Peterson, M.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

REPORT NO. 8 radiation hazards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REPORT NO. 8 REVISED guidance for the control of radiation hazards in uranium mining SEPTEMBER 1967 OF RADIATION HAZARDS IN URANIUM MINING SEPTEMBER 1967 Staff Report of the FEDERAL RADIATION COUNCIL #12;FEDERAL...... .... .._ _.... Section I. Introduction. . . Section II. The Radiation Environment AssociatedWith Uranium Mining. Section

406

Appendix G: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix G: Radiation #12;#12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

407

Appendix A: Radiation HYDROGEN ATOM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation; radon effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and human-made sourcesAppendix A: Radiation #12;P P P E E E N NN HYDROGEN ATOM DEUTERIUM ATOM TRITIUM ATOM HYDROGEN

Pennycook, Steve

408

Groups & Services, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groups & Services Groups & Services Homepage | Contact Us Customer Support Cyber Security Enterprise Computing Services Network Services BCF Facility Services Web Services Unix Services Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Cyber Security Policy Development: Developing and communicating Cyber Security policy and processes. Network and Application Review: Reviewing and approving all external connections to and from the BNL Intranet. Incident Investigation: Investigating Cyber Security "incidents" that are referred to the Cyber Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT). CSIRT will assist local administrators with technical and forensic investigations. Intrusion Detection Management: Supporting the Intrusion Detection system at BNL, which includes tracking events, assessing risk, and

409

Proteasome Structures Affected by Ionizing Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Effect of ionizing radiation on 26S but...radiation doses, and immediately...the dose range 1 to 20 Gy...ionizing radiation induced a...38), ionizing radiation (39...over a wide range of radiation doses and further...

Milena Pervan; Keisuke S. Iwamoto; and William H. McBride

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Chemical Kinetics and Properties from the Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Radiation Chemistry Data Center (RCDC) is a focal point for the compilation and evaluation of kinetic, spectroscopic and thermodynamic data for processes in solution involving reactive intermediates, including free radicals and excited states. These data are primarily derived from the published literature on radiation chemistry and quantitative aspects of photochemistry. The compilations are presented as individual groups of pages corresponding to each published work. Each compilation consists of an introductory article, describing the scope of the compilation, with the considerations and criteria for data evaluation discussed. Nomenclature for the compilation is also described here. For several compilations the introduction is followed by one or more pages of links organized as an index or table of contents to the individual pages of the compilation. These links allow the browsing of the data by species name. Each page tabulates the reaction of a transient species with a particular reactant. RCDC was established at the Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory in 1965, as part of the National Standard Reference Data System.

411

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Physics at the Intensity Frontier Neutrino science Precision physics Summary Physics at the Intensity Frontier The Standard Model of Particle Physics succeeds brilliantly at explaining the nature of the physical universe, but it leaves many open questions. Despite the development of myriad intriguing theories to address these questions, ultimately only experiment can light the way to discovery. In our own time, experiments at the energy frontier can search directly for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Alongside the compelling physics of Terascale explorations at the LHC and the ILC, another window on discovery has opened with the remarkable recent developments in neutrino science and with the ability to detect new physics phenomena in ultrarare events or in the small perturbations they induce in other processes. This chapter focuses on accelerator-based opportunities at the intensity frontier. Experiments in symmetry-violating processes and rare decays can provide windows into new mass scales of many thousands of TeV. Neutrino experiments may tell us about physics at even higher energies near unification or about an entirely new source of CP violation that may help explain the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe

412

Radiation delivery system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation delivery system and method are described. The system includes a treatment configuration such as a stent, balloon catheter, wire, ribbon, or the like, a portion of which is covered with a gold layer. Chemisorbed to the gold layer is a radiation-emitting self-assembled monolayer or a radiation-emitting polymer. The radiation delivery system is compatible with medical catheter-based technologies to provide a therapeutic dose of radiation to a lesion following an angioplasty procedure.

Sorensen, Scott A. (Overland Park, KS); Robison, Thomas W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig M. V. (Jemez Springs, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

1. THE RADIATION BELTS The outer zone radiation belts consist of energetic elec-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a variety of time scales. There is a noted association between solar wind speed and relativistic elec- tron and external processes. This paper reviews what is currently understood of the interactions between energetic, A Review of ULF Interactions with Radiation Belt Electrons Scot R. Elkington Laboratory for Atmospheric

Elkington, Scot R.

414

Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2012 In conjunction with the HAMMER Steering Committee meeting the HSS Focus Group Training Working Group Meeting was conducted from 2:00 PM to 4:30 PM at the HAMMER Training...

415

Uzbekistan Radiation Portal Monnitoring System  

SciTech Connect

The work proposed in this presentation builds on the foundation set by the DTRA funded demonstration project begun in 2000 and completed in December of 2003. This previous work consisted of two phases whose overall objective was to install portal radiation monitors at four select ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan (Tashkent International Airport, Gisht-Kuprik (Kazakhstan border), Alat (Turkmenistan border), and Termez (Afghanistan border)) in order to demonstrate their effectiveness in preventing the illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. The objectives also included developing and demonstrating capabilities in the design, installation, operation, training, and maintenance of a radiation portal monitoring system. The system and demonstration project has proved successful in many ways. An effective working relationship among the Uzbekistan Customs Services, Uzbekistan Border Guards, and Uzbekistan Institute of Nuclear Physics has been developed. There has been unprecedented openness with the sharing of portal monitor data with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The system has proved to be effective, with detection of illicit trafficking, and, at Alat, an arrest of three persons illegally transporting radioactive materials into Turkmenistan. The demonstration project has made Uzbekistan a model nonproliferation state in Central Asia and, with an expanded program, places them in a position to seal a likely transit route for illicit nuclear materials. These results will be described. In addition, this work is currently being expanded to include additional ports-of-entry in Uzbekistan. The process for deciding on which additional ports-of-entry to equip will also be described.

Richardson, J; Knapp, R; Loshak, A; Yuldashev, B; Petrenko, V

2005-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

416

ANSI and IEC standards for, and evaluation of, radiation detection instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

During the last quarter of 2002, an effort was started to develop performance requirements for radiation instrumentation used for the detection of illicit trafficking of radioactive material. Coordinated by the US National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST), a team was formed to establish writing committees for the development of these requirements as American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standards. The core of the new area was developed as ANSI N42, Homeland Security Instruments. A series of standards were developed followed by testing and evaluation (T&E) protocols that would be used for specific testing. Four US National Laboratories provided T&E support and work commenced to test instruments provided by manufacturers at no cost. During this time, discussions began regarding the formation of a new work group within the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). This new work group would be located within technical committee (TC) 45 which addresses nuclear instrumentation. This new work group, 15B, also began developing international standards to address the same instrument types. Following development of ANSI standards, the testing and evaluation process began, running for two distinct rounds. The results of the work was consolidated by NIST and released back to individual companies as well as the user community in a controlled manner. This document will provide details regarding the standards and their basis and status, as well as some information regarding the T&E process used in the USA.

Chiaro Jr, Peter John [ORNL] [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order "The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with construction deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The investigation addressed specific areas of potential noncompliance with DOE nuclear safety requirements established in 10 C.F.R. Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management." Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. - NCO-2010-02 More Documents & Publications Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -

418

CFN | Thin Films Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Thin-Film Processing Facility Online Manager (FOM) website FOM manual ESR for lab 1L32 (High-Resolution SEM and x-ray microanalysis) CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) form for 1L32 (ESR #1) Technical article on LABE detector (Analytical SEM) Request form for off-hours access (.doc, First time only, renewals done via email) Lab Tool capabilities Primary contact Training schedule Backup contact Booking calendar Booking rules SOP 1L32 Analytical SEM Camino Thurs 10-12 PM Stein FOM yes yes Hitachi S-4800 SEM Stein Tues 1-3 PM Black FOM no yes booking calendar: yes = need to reserve tool time in calendar before using tool booking rules: yes = specific rules exist for reserving tool time SOP = standard operating procedure (basic instructions)

419

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

35 35 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.13.56 © 2013 Future Science Ltd While lignocellulosic feedstocks represent a promising renewable and sustainable alternative to petroleum- based fuels, high production costs associated with con- version processes currently prevent them from being economically viable for large-scale implementation [1]. The production of biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstocks requires the depolymerization of cell wall carbohydrates into simple sugars that can be utilized during fermentation. However, the desired cellulose microfibrils are surrounded by a matrix of lignin and hemicellulose, which greatly inhibits their accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes [1,2]. Lignin is a phenolic polymer that reinforces the secondary cell wall, confers struc-

420

ROTC: Education Groups' Reforms Stress Flexibility, Fuller Funding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...one nuclear fuel re-processing plant in operation at West Valley, New York (two are under con-struction elsewhere...AEC's Price said radiation exposures to persons near the West Valley plant boundary "might be" higher than exposures pos-sible...

D. Park Teter

1971-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Radiative muon capture in hydrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analyze the radiative capture of the negative muon in hydrogen using amplitudes derived within the chiral Lagrangian approach. Besides the leading and next to leading order terms, given by the well-known Rood-Tolhoek Hamiltonian, we extract from these amplitudes the corrections of the next order in 1/M (M is the nucleon mass). In addition, we estimate within the same formalism also the ?(1232) isobar excitation effects and processes described by an anomalous Lagrangian. The model we consider allows us to put the ? isobar off-shell. Our calculations show sensitivity of capture rates and photon spectra to Z, one of the off-shell parameters, related to the ?N? vertex. We have found that the model can provide the photon spectra, which are in the interval 60?MeV<~k<~kmax (k is the photon momentum) close to the experimental one.

E. Truhlík and F. C. Khanna

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Audible radiation monitor  

SciTech Connect

This invention consists of a method and apparatus for monitoring ionizing radiation comprising radiation detectors in electrical connection with an isotopic analyzer and a device for producing chords to which each isotope is mapped so that the device produces a unique chord for each isotope. Preferably the chords are pleasing to the ear, except for chords representing unexpected isotopes, and are louder or softer depending on the level of radioactivity produced by each isotope, and musical instrument voices may be simulated in producing the chords as an aid to distinguishing similar-sounding chords. Because of the representation by chords, information regarding the level and composition of the radiation in an area can be conveyed to workers in that area more effectively and yet without distracting them.

Odell, D.M.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

Composition for radiation shielding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

425

ACC115 High Volume Processing of Composites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

composite processing technologies Direct support of the Materials, Joining, and Carbon Fiber SMC Working Groups Direct collaboration Focal Project 4 via Material and...

426

American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2012 Workforce Study: The Radiation Oncologists' and Residents' Perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) conducted the 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce Survey to obtain an up-to-date picture of the workforce, assess its needs and concerns, and identify quality and safety improvement opportunities. The results pertaining to radiation oncologists (ROs) and residents (RORs) are presented here. Methods: The ASTRO Workforce Subcommittee, in collaboration with allied radiation oncology professional societies, conducted a survey study in early 2012. An online survey questionnaire was sent to all segments of the radiation oncology workforce. Respondents who were actively working were included in the analysis. This manuscript describes the data for ROs and RORs. Results: A total of 3618 ROs and 568 RORs were surveyed. The response rate for both groups was 29%, with 1047 RO and 165 ROR responses. Among ROs, the 2 most common racial groups were white (80%) and Asian (15%), and the male-to-female ratio was 2.85 (74% male). The median age of ROs was 51. ROs averaged 253.4 new patient consults in a year and 22.9 on-treatment patients. More than 86% of ROs reported being satisfied or very satisfied overall with their career. Close to half of ROs reported having burnout feelings. There was a trend toward more frequent burnout feelings with increasing numbers of new patient consults. ROs' top concerns were related to documentation, reimbursement, and patients' health insurance coverage. Ninety-five percent of ROs felt confident when implementing new technology. Fifty-one percent of ROs thought that the supply of ROs was balanced with demand, and 33% perceived an oversupply. Conclusions: This study provides a current snapshot of the 2012 radiation oncology physician workforce. There was a predominance of whites and men. Job satisfaction level was high. However a substantial fraction of ROs reported burnout feelings. Perceptions about supply and demand balance were mixed. ROs top concerns reflect areas of attention for the healthcare sector as a whole.

Pohar, Surjeet, E-mail: spohar@iuhealth.org [Indiana University Health East, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Fung, Claire Y. [Commonwealth Newburyport Cancer Center, Newburyport, Massachusetts (United States); Hopkins, Shane [William R. Bliss Cancer Center, Ames, Iowa (United States); Miller, Robert [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Azawi, Samar [VA Veteran Hospital/University of California Irvine, Newport Beach, California (United States); Arnone, Anna; Patton, Caroline [ASTRO, Fairfax, Virginia (United States); Olsen, Christine [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

FINAL Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) January 28-30, 2002 New Orleans, Louisiana Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 20 th semi-annual meeting January 28-30, 2002, in New Orleans, Louisiana. This was the tenth anniversary of TEC, and 102 attendees from national, State, Tribal, and local government organizations; industry and professional groups and other interested parties in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, met to address a variety of issues related to DOE's radioactive materials transportation activities. The TEC process includes the involvement of these key stakeholders in developing solutions to DOE transportation issues through their actual participation in the work product. These members provide continuing and improved

428

Oxford Catalysts Group plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxford Catalysts Group plc Oxford Catalysts Group plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Oxford Catalysts Group plc Place Oxford, United Kingdom Zip OX2 6UD Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Developer of catalysts for room-temperature hydrogen production, hot steam production and Fischer-Tropsch processes. Coordinates 43.781517°, -89.571699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.781517,"lon":-89.571699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

429

Lighting Science Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Science Group Science Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Lighting Science Group Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75201 Product LED design company, with multiple patents pending in power management, bulb design and manufacturing processes which it collectively refers to as ODL (Optimized Digital Lighting) technology. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

430

Chronic radiation enteritis: A community hospital experience  

SciTech Connect

A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the operative management of patients with chronic radiation enteropathy. Thirty-eight affected patients from 1974 to 1986 were reviewed. Patients with recurrent cancer responsible for symptoms were excluded. Seventy-one percent of patients presented with bowel obstruction. Twenty-one patients were treated with bowel resection, while 17 were treated with a bypass procedure or diverting ostomy alone. Overall morbidity was 45%, and postoperative mortality was 16%. Patients in the bypass group were significantly older than those in the resection group (70.3 vs. 55.5 years, P = .024), suggesting that age may have been a determinant of the procedure performed. In our study there was no difference in outcome based on preexisting vascular disease, tumor site, type of procedure performed, or radiation dose. We conclude that resection is the procedure of choice in cases of chronic radiation enteritis requiring surgery except in cases with dense adhesions when enteroenterostomal bypass is a viable alternative.

Fenner, M.N.; Sheehan, P.; Nanavati, P.J.; Ross, D.S. (Southern Illinois Univ. School of Medicine, Springfield (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Expanded Pending Jobs by Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:25...

432

Renormalization group aspects of graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Tsai Renormalization group aspects of graphene Maria A. H. Vozmediano * * vozmediano...Cantoblanco, , 28049 Madrid, Spain Graphene is a two-dimensional crystal of carbon...same lines. renormalization group|graphene|Coulomb interactions| 1. Introduction...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

MTorres Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTorres Group Place: Murcia, Spain Zip: 30320 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturer References: MTorres Group1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

434

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Data Management Group Annual Report 2003 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located ........................................................................................................ 3 Text-based Data Retrieval System `drs

Toronto, University of

435

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2001 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program..............................................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ..........................................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS)..............................................3 Complex Data

Toronto, University of

436

Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process Building Science "Power Words" Translator Vetting Process In February 2014, the U.S. Department of Energy convened a group...

437

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 10 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course/Analysis Initiation Process Document Number: ISDP- 010 Rev 11_0512 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Vickie Pleau Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-035 Analysis Feasibility Assessment, ISDP-010, Course Analysis Initiation Process, ISDP-015, WBT/ILT/Ex Design Process ISDP-010 Course/Analysis Initiation Process 11_0512 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0512 Modified verbiage for clarification and updated referenced documents.

438

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 4 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Course Evaluation and Close-out Process Document Number: ISDP-014 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Vickie Pleau Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-011, ISD History File Acceptance, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 5 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-014 Course Evaluation and Close-out Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 5 I. Purpose To effectively plan and control the process for evaluating and finalizing EOTA ILT, EX and WBT training products, assuring

439

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

440

Photolytic Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Tunable terahertz radiation source  

SciTech Connect

Terahertz radiation source and method of producing terahertz radiation, said source comprising a junction stack, said junction stack comprising a crystalline material comprising a plurality of self-synchronized intrinsic Josephson junctions; an electrically conductive material in contact with two opposing sides of said crystalline material; and a substrate layer disposed upon at least a portion of both the crystalline material and the electrically-conductive material, wherein the crystalline material has a c-axis which is parallel to the substrate layer, and wherein the source emits at least 1 mW of power.

Boulaevskii, Lev; Feldmann, David M; Jia, Quanxi; Koshelev, Alexei; Moody, Nathan A

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Introduction to MARSSIM The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) provides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ROADMAP Introduction to MARSSIM The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual, characterization, and any necessary remedial actions. The process of planning the survey, implementing the survey in the Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Process, combined with references to sections in MARSSIM where

443

Cascaded frequency doublers for broadband laser radiation  

SciTech Connect

A new scheme of a cascaded converter of the first harmonic of broadband cw laser radiation into the second harmonic (SH) with compensation for the group walk-off in cascades is proposed and investigated. The conditions under which high conversion coefficients of broadband ({approx}33 cm{sup -1}) single-mode fibre laser radiation with low peak power ({approx}300 W) into the SH are determined for frequency doublers based on the most promising LBO crystal. Conversion of cw radiation with an average power of 300 W and efficiency {eta} = 4.5 % into the SH is obtained in a single LBO crystal. Effect of coherent addition of SH radiation excited in different cascades is demonstrated for two- and three-stage schemes. The expected conversion efficiencies, calculated disregarding loss but taking into account real aberrations of elements, are 18 % and 38 %, respectively. The effect of pumping depletion begins to manifest itself in the third cascade of a three-stage converter; it may reduce the latter value to {approx}30 %. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

Andreev, N F; Vlasova, K V; Davydov, V S; Kulikov, S M; Makarov, A I; Sukharev, Stanislav A; Freidman, Gennadii I; Shubin, S V

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

445

LEDSGP/about/working-groups | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDSGP/about/working-groups LEDSGP/about/working-groups < LEDSGP‎ | about Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP Logo.png Advancing climate-resilient low emission development around the world Home About Tools Expert Assistance Events Publications Join Us About How We Work > Regional Platforms > Working Groups LEDS GP Members Steering Committee Guiding Structure Contacts Working Groups The working groups of the LEDS Global Partnership develop and deliver technical resources, training, expert assistance, and match-making. And, they engage with current topical networks and convene virtual forums. Work Stream-LEDS Planning Processes Facilitator and Process Training for Research Leads Subnational Integration of LEDS Climate Resilience Integration to LEDS Work Stream-Analysis and Tools Development Impacts Assessment Working Group

446

Fusion systems for profinite groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......April 2014 research-article Articles Fusion systems for profinite groups Radu Stancu...paper. We introduce the notion of a pro-fusion system on a pro- group, which generalizes the notion of a fusion system on a finite -group. We also prove......

Radu Stancu; Peter Symonds

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Water Resources Working Group Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Resources Working Group Report This report provided content for the Wisconsin Initiative in February 2011. #12;Water Resources Working Group Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts October 2010 #12;Water Resources Working Group Members ­ WICCI Tim Asplund (Co-Chair) - Wisconsin Department

Sheridan, Jennifer

448

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2004 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located of the funding partners: Ministry of Transportation, Ontario #12;SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG

Toronto, University of

449

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

Toronto, University of

450

Weak Boson Emission in Hadron Collider Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections to many hadron collider processes are known to become large and negative at high energies, due to the appearance of Sudakov-like logarithms. At the same order in perturbation theory, weak boson emission diagrams contribute. Since the W and Z bosons are massive, the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections and the contributions from weak boson emission are separately finite. Thus, unlike in QED or QCD calculations, there is no technical reason for including gauge boson emission diagrams in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In most calculations of the O(alpha) electroweak radiative corrections, weak boson emission diagrams are therefore not taken into account. Another reason for not including these diagrams is that they lead to final states which differ from that of the original process. However, in experiment, one usually considers partially inclusive final states. Weak boson emission diagrams thus should be included in calculations of electroweak radiative corrections. In this paper, I examine the role of weak boson emission in those processes at the Fermilab Tevatron and the CERN LHC for which the one-loop electroweak radiative corrections are known to become large at high energies (inclusive jet, isolated photon, Z+1 jet, Drell-Yan, di-boson, t-bar t, and single top production). In general, I find that the cross section for weak boson emission is substantial at high energies and that weak boson emission and the O(alpha) virtual weak radiative corrections partially cancel.

U. Baur

2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F: Precision physics experiments with kaon beams F: Precision physics experiments with kaon beams The charged kaon experiment enabled by the Tevatron Stretcher and Project X could deliver a precision measurement of the K+→π+νv branching fraction that matches the small theoretical uncertainty. In parallel, the charged kaon experiment can probe many other decay channels including a precision measurement of K+→e+ν and a search for K+→π+μe which are both uniquely incisive probes of Terascale physics and beyond. The neutral kaon experiment driven by the enormous 8 GeV beam power provided by Project X could discover and measure the ultrarare KL→π0νv process. As the sensitivity reaches down to the Standard Model branching ratio of 3×10-11, several extensions of the Standard Model would be excluded or, even better, new Terascale phenomena would be detected. Upon attaining the Standard Model sensitivity the neutral kaon experiment then becomes sensitive to very high mass scale (>1000 TeV/c2) through precision measurement of the KL→π0νv branching fraction.

452

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SolidEnergy Systems SolidEnergy Systems Massachusetts Institute of Technology SolidEnergy Systems developed cutting-edge battery technologies to meet the world's growing energy storage demand. The Polymer Ionic Liquid (PIL) rechargeable lithium battery has four times the energy density of a conventional lithium-ion battery. Learn More Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process, termed "CANDO", for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen. The CANDO technology improves the efficiency of nitrogen treatment by lowering energy inputs and enabling energy recovery from waste nitrogen. Learn More NuMat Technologies, Inc. Northwestern University NuMat Technologies, Inc is a cleantech spin-out that computationally

453

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgement Acknowledgement The Fermilab Steering Group is grateful to many members of the particle physics and accelerator community for their expert advice and contributions to the preparation of this report: Robert Abrams, Nikolai Andreev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Giorgio Apollinari, Jeff Appel, Rick Baartman, Jonathan Bagger, Wander Baldini, Barry Barish, Gerald Blazey, Dixon Bogert, Ed Bonnema, James Brau, Steven Brice, Stanley Brodsky, Daniel Broemmelsiek, Alan Bross, Charles Brown, Douglas Bryman, William Bugg, Alexey Burov, Phillip Burrows, Maksim Bychkov, Robert Cahn, Marcela Carena, Jean-Paul Carneiro, Harry Carter, Robert Carey, Brian Chase, David Christian, Michael Church, Willie Clark, Janet Conrad, John Corlett, Mary Anne Cummings, Dan Dale, Chris Damerell, Paul Debevec, André de Gouvea, Fritz DeJongh, Marcel Demarteau, Paul Derwent, Milind Diwan, Harold Lee Dodds, Gerald Dugan, Craig Dukes, Estia Eichten, Eckhard Elsen, Louis Emery, Peter Fisher, George Flanagan, Tony Favale, Gary Feldman, Buck Field, David Finley, Bonnie Fleming, Brian Foster, Emil Frlez, Kenneth Ganezer, Consolato Gattuso, Stephen Geer, Norman Gelfand, Terry Goldman, Keith Gollwitzer, Maury Goodman, Paul Grannis, Daniel Green, Terry Grimm, Alan Hahn, Reidar Hahn, Michael Harrison, Ayman Hawari, David Hertzog, Robert Hirosky, David Hitlin, Richard Holmes, Maxine Hronek, Patrick Hurh, Jim Hylen, Gerald Jackson, Andreas Jansson, David Johnson, Jeffrey Johnson, Rol Johnson, John Johnstone, Chang Kee Jung, Steven Kahn, Peter Kammel, Yuri Kamyshkov, David Kawall, Kara Keeter, Christina Keller, Robert Kephart, Harold Kirk, David Kirkby, Arkadiy Klebaner, Sergey Korenev, Ioanis Kourbanis, Andreas Kronfeld, Krishna Kumar, James Lackey, Kenneth Lande, Valeri Lebedev, Kevin Lesko, Tony Leveling, Mats Lindroos, Laurence Littenberg, Vladimir Lobashev, Kevin Lynch, William Marciano, Daniel Marlow, John Marriner, Michael Martens, Dongming Mei, Mark Messier, Peter Meyers, Phillip Miller, Shekhar Mishra, Hugh Montgomery, Kevin Munday, Homer Neal, David Neuffer, Andrew Norman, Kenneth Olsen, Peter Ostroumov, Satoshi Ozaki, Robert Palmer, Vaia Papadimitriou, Stephen Parke, Kent Paschke, Ralph Pasquinelli, Todd Pedlar, Stephen Peggs, Susan Pfiffner, Henryk Piekarz, Thomas Phillips, Dinko Pocanic, Milorad Popovic, James Popp, Eric Prebys, Chris Quigg, Regina Rameika, Ronald Ray, Lee Roberts, Tom Roberts, Natalie Roe, Jerome Rosen, Marc Ross, Howard Rubin, Randy Ruchti, Richard Sah, Niki Saoulidou, Kate Scholberg, Alan Schwartz, Yannis Semertzidis, Abraham Seiden, Melvyn Shochet, Marilyn Smith, Henry Sobel, Paul Souder, Giulio Stancari, Michelle Stancari, Raymond Stefanski, James Stone, Sheldon Stone, Michael Syphers, Alex Tarasiewicz, Eddie Tatar, Rex Tayloe, Alvin Tollestrup, Yagmur Torun, Todd Treado, Michael Turner, Fred Ullrich, John Urbin, Alexander Valishev, Leonid Vorobiev, Nick Walker, Robert Webber, Bernard Wehring, Steven Werkema, Christopher White, Herman White, James Whitmore, David Wildman, Kent Alan Williams, William Willis, Phil Winkle, William Snow, Stanley Wojcicki, Hitoshi Yamamoto, Peter Yamin, Katsuya Yonehara, Cary Yoshikawa, Albert Young, Michael Zeller, Michael Zisman, Alexander Zlobin, and Robert Zwaska

454

Report from the dosimetry working group to CEDR project management  

SciTech Connect

On August 2, 1989, Admiral Watkins, Secretary of the US Department of Energy (DOE), presented a four-point program designed to enhance the DOE epidemiology program. One part of this program was the establishment of a Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) to facilitate independent research to validate and supplement DOE research on human health effects. A Dosimetry Working Group was formed during May 1991 to evaluate radiation dose variables and associated documentation that would be most useful to researchers for retrospective and prospective studies. The Working Group consisted of thirteen individuals with expertise and experience in health physics, epidemiology, dosimetry, computing, and industrial hygiene. A final report was delivered to CEDR Project Management during February 1992. The report contains a number of major recommendations concerning collection, interpretation, and documentation of dosimetry data to maximize their usefulness to researchers using CEDR for examining possible health effects of occupational exposure to ionizing radiation.

Fix, J J

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Interagency Sustainability Working Group | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Interagency Sustainability Working Group Interagency Sustainability Working Group The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the...

456

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents &...

457

Effects of radiation on materials: twelfth international symposium  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides information on irradiation creep of structural metals; microstructural development, neutron-induced swelling and charged particle irradiation. The theory of swelling is discussed along with mechanical properties, pressure vessel steels and irradiation facilities. The influence of helium on radiation-induced microstructural development, and radiation-induced changes in fracture toughness of iron-based austenitic and ferrite alloys are presented. The final section on other radiation studies covers the following: a modified method of helium introduction into alloys via the tritium trick, radiation damage aspects of a novel method for providing safe storage of Krypton-85 from fuel re-processing, and radiation effects on resins and zeolites forming part of the waste stream from the clean-up effort at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant.

Garner, F.A. (ed.); Perrin, J.S. (ed)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A multigroup diffusion solver using pseudo transient continuation for a radiation-hydrodynamic code with patch-based AMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a scheme to solve the nonlinear multigroup radiation diffusion (MGD) equations. The method is incorporated into a massively parallel, multidimensional, Eulerian radiation-hydrodynamic code with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). The patch-based AMR algorithm refines in both space and time creating a hierarchy of levels, coarsest to finest. The physics modules are time-advanced using operator splitting. On each level, separate level-solve packages advance the modules. Our multigroup level-solve adapts an implicit procedure which leads to a two-step iterative scheme that alternates between elliptic solves for each group with intra-cell group coupling. For robustness, we introduce pseudo transient continuation (PTC). We analyze the magnitude of the PTC parameter to ensure positivity of the resulting linear system, diagonal dominance and convergence of the two-step scheme. For AMR, a level defines a subdomain for refinement. For diffusive processes such as MGD, the refined level uses Dirichet boundary data at the coarse-fine interface and the data is derived from the coarse level solution. After advancing on the fine level, an additional procedure, the sync-solve (SS), is required in order to enforce conservation. The MGD SS reduces to an elliptic solve on a combined grid for a system of G equations, where G is the number of groups. We adapt the partial temperature scheme for the SS; hence, we reuse the infrastructure developed for scalar equations. Results are presented. (Abridged)

A. I. Shestakov; S. S. R. Offner

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic Ecology Aquatic ecology group studies ecological interactions between biota and their environment in freshwater and marine ecosystems. The group focuses particularly on the ecological interactions and their underlying ecological processes necessary to sustain ecosystem structure and function in their natural state

460

Thermal Decomposition of Radiation-Damaged Polystyrene  

SciTech Connect

The radiation-damaged polystyrene material (''polycube'') used in this study was synthesized by mixing a high-density polystyrene (''Dylene Fines No. 100'') with plutonium and uranium oxides. The polycubes were used on the Hanford Site in the 1960s for criticality studies to determine the hydrogen-to-fissile atom ratios for neutron moderation during processing of spent nuclear fuel. Upon completion of the studies, two methods were developed to reclaim the transuranic (TRU) oxides from the polymer matrix: (1) burning the polycubes in air at 873 K; and (2) heating the polycubes in the absence of oxygen and scrubbing the released monomer and other volatile organics using carbon tetrachloride. Neither of these methods was satisfactory in separating the TRU oxides from the polystyrene. Consequently, the remaining polycubes were sent to the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) for storage. Over time, the high dose of alpha and gamma radiation has resulted in a polystyrene matrix that is highly cross-linked and hydrogen deficient and a stabilization process is being developed in support of Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board Recommendation 94-1. Baseline processes involve thermal treatment to pyrolyze the polycubes in a furnace to decompose the polystyrene and separate out the TRU oxides. Thermal decomposition products from this degraded polystyrene matrix were characterized by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to provide information for determining the environmental impact of the process and for optimizing the process parameters. A gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system coupled to a horizontal tube furnace was used for the characterization studies. The decomposition studies were performed both in air and helium atmospheres at 773 K, the planned processing temperature. The volatile and semi-volatile organic products identified for the radiation-damaged polystyrene were different from those observed for virgin polystyrene. The differences were in the n umber of organic species generated and their concentrations.

J Abrefah GS Klinger

2000-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 5 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process Document Number: ISDP-015 Rev. 10_0630 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Production Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-046 Training Design/Development Summary, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006A WBT Script Template, ISDF- 007 Lesson Plan Template, ISDF-012, ISD History File Checklist ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release ISDP-015 WBT/ILT/EX Course Design Process 10_0630 Page 3 of 6

462

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 7 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Exercise Development Process Document Number: ISDP-017 Revision 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ISDP-002, Training Product Process Notify of Changes: ISD, ITT, MGT Referenced Document(s): ISDF-001 Technical Direction, ISDF-004 Design Document, ISDF-006 WBT Script Template, ISDF-007 Lesson Plan Template, ITTP-016 WBT Programming ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 10_0630 Initial Release 11_0223 Made changes to accurately reflect TPP. 11_0414 Added Derivative Classifier to step 12.0 ISDP-017 Exercise Development Process 11_0414 Page 3 of 8

463

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 5 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Website Development-Maintenance Process Document Number: ITTP-015 Rev. 11_0419 Document Owner: Benjamin Aragon Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: ITT Referenced Document(s): ITTF-016 Website Development/Maintenance Log, ISDP-002 Training Production Process ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 2 of 6 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change A Initial Release 11_0419 Deleted decision point 2.1 and 2.2, incorporated Notifying Requester into step 2.0, modified verbiage for clarification. ITTP-015 Website Development-Maintenance Process 11_0419Page 3 of 6

464

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not contaminate the Inspector by touching it to radioactive surfaces or materials. If contamination is suspected Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17, and x-ray radiation. Its applications include: · Detecting and measuring surface contamination

Haller, Gary L.

465

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Solar energy: Radiation nation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Australia receives more solar radiation per square metre, on average, than any other continent. Although turning this ... to make use of its heat. We spoke to Australian proponents of two very different solar-thermal systems, both rather confusingly known as ...

Carina Dennis

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

467

Psoriasis and ultraviolet radiation  

SciTech Connect

Prevention and detection screening programs as a public health service in curtailing the ever-increasing incidence of all forms of skin cancer are reviewed. The effect of solar and artificial ultraviolet radiation on the general population and persons with psoriasis is examined. 54 refs.

Farber, E.M.; Nall, L. (Psoriasis Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Local microwave background radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An inquiry on a possible local origin for the Microwave Background Radiation is made. Thermal MBR photons are contained in a system called {\\it magnetic bottle} which is due to Earth magnetic field and solar wind particles, mostly electrons. Observational tests are anticipated.

Domingos Soares

2014-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

469

Infrared radiation: Herschel revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The year 2000 marks the 200th anniversary of Herschel’s discovery of infrared radiation. Using a car light in place of the Sun and a liquid crystal sheet instead of thermometers the experiment is an effective classroom demonstration of invisible light.

Erin E. Pursell; Richard Kozlowski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source nerates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith generates several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Crowell, John M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Radiation detector spectrum simulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A small battery operated nuclear spectrum simulator having a noise source generates pulses with a Gaussian distribution of amplitudes. A switched dc bias circuit cooperating therewith to generate several nominal amplitudes of such pulses and a spectral distribution of pulses that closely simulates the spectrum produced by a radiation source such as Americium 241.

Wolf, M.A.; Crowell, J.M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

472

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

International Best Practices for Pre- Processing and Co-Processing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Best Practices for Pre- Processing and Co-Processing International Best Practices for Pre- Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry Title International Best Practices for Pre- Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hasanbeigi, Ali, Hongyou Lu, Christopher J. Williams, and Lynn K. Price Date Published July 2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, co-processing, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies, pre-processing, sewage sludge, solid waste Abstract Co-processing municipal solid waste (MSW) and sewage sludge in cement kilns can both reduce the cementindustry's growing fossil fuel use and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and help address the increasing needfor safe and environmentally sensitive municipal waste treatment and disposal.

474

Workshop on electronic and ionic collision cross sections needed in the modeling of radiation interactions with matter: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The term modeling in the Workship title refers to the mathematical analysis of the consequences of many collision processes for characterizing the physical stage of radiation actions. It requires as input some knowledge of collision cross sections. Traditionally, work on cross sections and work on the modeling are conducted by separate groups of scientists. It was the purpose of the Workshop to bring these two groups together in a forum that would promote effective communication. Cross-section workers described the status of their work and told what data were available or trustworthy. Modeling workers told what kind of data were needed or were most important. Twenty-two items from the workshop were prepared separately for the data base.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

RHIC II Science Working Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshops Workshops The series of RHIC II Science Workshops began in November 2004, at which time seven Working Groups were initiated. These groups met in workshops through 2005, with the purpose of providing an organized forum for the community to address and describe quantitatively the most important science issues for the proposed RHIC II luminosity upgrade, and corresponding detector upgrades. Each Working Group was led by three convenors representing theory and experiment, and each has produced a detailed report (except for the "New Directions" group, which provided a sounding board and input to the other groups). The Working Group reports are linked below. The summary "white paper" document, "Future Science at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider" (PDF), is based on these reports, and was prepared by a Writing Committee that included at least one convenor from each of the Working Groups.

476

Radiative transfer with partial coherence in optically thick plasmas Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, F-13397 Marseille Cedex 20, France  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approach to address radiative transfer prob- lems involves a transport equation of Boltzmann-type, referred to as "radiative transfer equation", accounting for radiation-matter interaction processes such as spon- taneous the use of a transport theory for photons unavoidable. Opac- ity models for radiative transfer are widely

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

477

Radiation Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Charge Delocalization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Improved Radiation Stability of Cations in Ionic Liquids. 2. Improved Radiation Resistance Through Charge Delocalization in 1-Benzylpyridinium Ilya A. Shkrob, Timothy W. Marin, Jasmine L. Hatcher, Andrew R. Cook, Tomasz Szreder and James F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 117, Just Accepted (2013). [Find paper at ACS Publications]. Abstract: Hydrophobic room-temperature ionic liquids (ILs) hold promise as replacements for molecular diluents for processing of used nuclear fuel as well as for the development of alternative separations processes, provided that the solvent can be made resistant to ionizing radiation. We demonstrate that 1-benzylpyridinium cations are uniquely suited as radiation resistant cations due to the occurrence of charge delocalization both in their reduced and oxidized form in the ILs. It is suggested that

478

ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of external surfaces by naturally occurring atomic oxygen. CCD detectors are particularly vulnerable to damage damage. A comprehensive discussion of the types of radiation damage known to occur in CCDs is beyond1 ACS WFC CCD Radiation Test: The Radiation Environment Michael R. Jones Space Telescope Science

Sirianni, Marco

479

Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Nanoscale Engineering Of Radiation Tolerant Silicon Carbide. Abstract: Radiation tolerance is determined by how effectively the...

480

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports September 24, 2013 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Radiation Exposure Welcome The Occupational Radiation Exposure Information page on this web page is intended to provide the latest available information on radiation exposure to...

482

Acceleration and Classical Electromagnetic Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical radiation from an accelerated charge is reviewed along with the reciprocal topic of accelerated observers detecting radiation from a static charge. This review commemerates Bahram Mashhoon's 60th birthday.

E. N. Glass

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

483

Mathematical Problems of Radiative Equilibrium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... in turn with the cases of purely absorbing and grey material in local radiative equilibrium (Schwarzschild-Milne model) and that of monochromatic radiative equilibrium with scattering but zero emissivity (Schuster ...

1935-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

484

Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Health Physicist (Radiation Protection Specialist) senior subject matter expert for health physics/radiation safety at the sites. You will...

485

E-Print Network 3.0 - attenuates gamma radiation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Astrophysics Research Group Collection: Physics 60 MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts Summary: to gamma rays is likely to complement synchrotron radiation and produce...

486

Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling  

SciTech Connect

The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

Estimation of the committed radiation dose resulting from gamma radionuclides ingested with food  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to estimate the value of the radiation dose absorbed in consequence of consumption of popular food products for individual age groups. Potatoes, corn and sugar beet were selected...

Piotr Gody?; Agnieszka Do?ha?czuk-?ródka…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Radiation dose modeling using IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO  

SciTech Connect

The Radiological Environment Modeling System (REMS) quantifies dose to humans in radiation environments using the IGRIP (Interactive Graphical Robot Instruction Program) and Deneb/ERGO (Ergonomics) simulation software products. These commercially available products are augmented with custom C code to provide the radiation exposure information to and collect the radiation dose information from the workcell simulations. The emphasis of this paper is on the IGRIP and Deneb/ERGO parts of REMS, since that represents the extension to existing capabilities developed by the authors. Through the use of any radiation transport code or measured data, a radiation exposure input database may be formulated. User-specified IGRIP simulations utilize these database files to compute and accumulate dose to human devices (Deneb`s ERGO human) during simulated operations around radiation sources. Timing, distances, shielding, and human activity may be modeled accurately in the simulations. The accumulated dose is recorded in output files, and the user is able to process and view this output. REMS was developed because the proposed reduction in the yearly radiation exposure limit will preclude or require changes in many of the manual operations currently being utilized in the Weapons Complex. This is particularly relevant in the area of dismantlement activities at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, TX. Therefore, a capability was needed to be able to quantify the dose associated with certain manual processes so that the benefits of automation could be identified and understood.

Vickers, D.S.; Davis, K.R.; Breazeal, N.L.; Watson, R.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ford, M.S. [Battelle Pantex, Amarillo, TX (United States). Dept. of Radiation Safety

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

489

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

490

Unionaire Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1508) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unionaire Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1508) Unionaire Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1508) Unionaire Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1508) April 22, 2011 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Unionaire Group failed to certify room air conditioners as compliant with the energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Unionaire Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1508) More Documents & Publications Airwell Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1505) Crosley Group: Proposed Penalty (2011-CE-1506

491

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 5 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 1 of 8 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process Document Number: ISDP-005 Rev 11_0718 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001, Quality Manual Notify of Changes: PM2 Referenced Document(s): ISDF-XXX Vision User Guide (currently being developed ) ISDP-005 Functional/Job/Task Analysis Process 11_0718 Page 2 of 8 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0410 Initial Release 10_0630 Process modified to match steps within the TPP 11_0718 Minor editorial changes; changed step 8.0 from Task-to-Training Matrix to "Analysis"-to-Training Matrix.

492

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear radiation electronic gear (continued) ... Examines nuclear instrumentation available from several major U.S. manufacturers. ... Nuclear / Radiochemistry ...

S. Z. Lewin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z