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1

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More...

3

Radiative Processes Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.3 Stratocumulus (0.12) -13.2 7.3 Stratus (0.02) -2.6 1.2 Cloud Optical Thickness Passive remote sensing : ISCCP Chen et al. 2000 Pressure 0 3.6 23 379 50 440 680 1000...

4

Surface Processing & Mechanics Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Directory Staff Ceramic Machining Composites Coatings Powder Metallurgy Thermodynamics Tribology Related Links HTML Comments Welcome to the Surface Processing &...

5

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physicist Sensor Science Division Ultraviolet Radiation Group. ... Ph.D. Optical Sciences and Engineering ... Orlando, FL MS Electrical Engineering, The ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

6

Computer Integrated Building Processes Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Laboratory effective in October 2011, the Computer Integrated Building Processes Group ... Chris Brown) are now in the Systems Integration Division. ...

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

7

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uwe Arp. Dr. Uwe Arp is a physicist in the Ultraviolet Radiation Group of the Sensor Science Division in the Physical Measurement Laboratory. ...

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

9

Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Reactivity and Capacity of Oxygen Carriers for the Chemical Looping Combustion Process Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov February 2013 This...

10

Thin Film and Nanostructure Processing Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Thin Film and Nanostructure Processing Group is one of seven ... Deposition of thin films Electrodeposition of metals and alloys Evaporation of ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

12

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Protection Group Radiation Protection Group Under the direction of Radiological Control Manager (RCM) David Kestell, the Radiation Protection Group (RPG) provides radiation safety-related technical assistance to the lab community to ensure that all work is performed safely, efficiently and in compliance with applicable regulations and guidelines. BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA facility BELLA NDCX NDCX Gretina Gamma particle device PET Scanner APEX APEX APEX LASER LASER Rifle, CO Rifle, CO The group: Authorizes work with radioactive material and radiation-producing machines Manages the site inventory of radioactive and nuclear material Provides coverage for: Radiological operations Radiological engineering and shielding design Internal / external dosimetry services Radiation Safety and Transportation training

13

Computer Networking Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Networking Group Networking Group Do you need help? For assistance please submit a CNG Help Request ticket. CNG Logo Chris Ramirez SSRL Computer and Networking Group Manager (650) 926-2901 | email Jerry Camuso SSRL Computer and Networking (650) 926-2994 | email Networking Support The Networking group provides connectivity and communications services for SSRL. The services provided by the Networking Support Group include: Local Area Network support for cable and wireless connectivity. Installation and maintenance of network printers and queues. Telephony installations and support. Printing Support The Networking group provides printer maintenance and support for SSRL Beamline Printers and plotters. The following models are supported: HP - Designjet large format plotters HP - Color and B/W Laserjet, Inkjet, Deskjet, Officejet

14

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSGNE)...

15

The Scaling Group of the Radiative Transfer Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the equation of radiative transfer is invariant under a group of simultaneous transformations of the scale (i.e., the optical thickness) and the phase function. In this way, we provide a unified explanation of various empirical ...

Bruce H. J. McKellar; Michael A. Box

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Utilities Group Aids in Restructuring Process Researchers at the Energy Analysis Program's (EAP) Utility Planning and Policy (UPP) Group are helping ensure that energy efficiency, renewable energy, and a host of other important issues are not overlooked as California and the nation restructure the electric power industry. The UPP staff is analyzing the potential impact of restructuring on efficiency and renewables, modeling a variety of potential restructuring policies, and assisting federal customers seeking to better understand emerging electricity markets. UPP Group Leader Chuck Goldman is participating in discussions on how to distribute surcharge funds set aside for energy efficiency in California, and Acting EAP Head Stephen Wiel is assisting state lawmakers and regulators by overseeing the National Council on

17

Radiative processes: Potentials or Fields?  

SciTech Connect

In this work we prove that the transition amplitudes of processes involving the emission of one or more real photons is gauge invariant through terms that are always proportional to the electromagnetic field tensor.

Moreno, Matias [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Lopez Castro, Gabriel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

18

Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O'Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA for RTOG clinical trials is feasible and effective. The magnitude of registration discrepancy between institution and reviewer was presented, and the major issues were investigated to further improve this remote evaluation process.

Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada)] [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Inferring Group Processes from Computer-Mediated Affective Text Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Political communications in the form of unstructured text convey rich connotative meaning that can reveal underlying group social processes. Previous research has focused on sentiment analysis at the document level, but we extend this analysis to sub-document levels through a detailed analysis of affective relationships between entities extracted from a document. Instead of pure sentiment analysis, which is just positive or negative, we explore nuances of affective meaning in 22 affect categories. Our affect propagation algorithm automatically calculates and displays extracted affective relationships among entities in graphical form in our prototype (TEAMSTER), starting with seed lists of affect terms. Several useful metrics are defined to infer underlying group processes by aggregating affective relationships discovered in a text. Our approach has been validated with annotated documents from the MPQA corpus, achieving a performance gain of 74% over comparable random guessers.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Begoli, Edmon [ORNL; Jose, Ajith [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Griffin, Christopher [Pennsylvania State University

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term...

22

Magnetic fields and radiative feedback in the star formation process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star formation is a complex process involving the interplay of many physical effects, including gravity, turbulent gas dynamics, magnetic fields and radiation. Our understanding of the process has improved substantially in recent years, primarily as a result of our increased ability to incorporate the relevant physics in numerical calculations of the star formation process. In this contribution we present an overview of our recent studies of star cluster formation in turbulent, magnetised clouds using self-gravitating radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations (Price and Bate 2008, 2009). Our incorporation of magnetic fields and radiative transfer into the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method are discussed. We highlight how magnetic fields and radiative heating of the gas around newborn stars can solve several of the key puzzles in star formation, including an explanation for why star formation is such a slow and inefficient process. However, the presence of magnetic fields at observed strengths in collaps...

Price, Daniel J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Radiative Transfer through Arbitrarily Shaped Optical Media. Part II. Group Theory and Simple Closures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a formulation of the radiative transfer equation which allows for the distinction between various groups of spatial scales of variation that comprise the radiance field. Such a formulation provides a convenient means for ...

Graeme L. Stephens

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, Carol S. (14316 Bauer Rd., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Reed, Scott (10308 Leymon Court, N.W., Albuquerque, NM 87114); Walko, Robert J. (3215 Blume, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

Kaska, William C. (Goleta, CA); Jensen, Craig M. (Kailua, HI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DOE TEC Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call 10_11_07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group Conference Call Thursday, October 11, 2007, 3:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m. EDT Conference Call Minutes Participants: Chair: Cort Richardson (CSG/NE) Members: Mel Massaro (DOT/FRA), Ed Wilds (State of Connecticut), Vernon Jensen (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska), Sean Kice (SSEB), Ralph Hail (Norfolk Southern), Pat Edwards (CSG/NE), Kevin Blackwell (DOT/FRA), Larry Stern (CVSA), Sarah Wochos (CSG/MW), Tim Runyon (CSG/MW), Christina Nelson (NCSL), Tony Dimond (BLET), Matt Dennis & Doug Osborn (SNL), Jim Williams (WIEB), Ralph Best & Steve Schmid (BSC) Contractor Support: John Smegal (Legin) Summary: Cort Richardson welcomed the participants to the inaugural Radiation Monitoring Subtopic Group conference call and thanked them for their interest. He indicated that his

28

International Federation for Information Process Working Group 9.4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to promote development. Groups as diverse as the United Nations, the G8 at Okinawa, Foundations, national

Keniston, Kenneth

29

Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells. 4 figs.

Birkmire, R.W.; Schultz, J.M.; Marudachalam, M.; Hichri, H.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

30

Process for preparing group Ib-IIIa-VIa semiconducting films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are provided for the production of supported monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor films. In the subject methods, a substrate is coated with group I and III elements and then contacted with a reactive group VI element containing atmosphere under conditions sufficient to produce a substrate coated with a composite of at least two different group I-III-IV alloys. The resultant composite coated substrate is then annealed in an inert atmosphere under conditions sufficient to convert the composite coating to a monophasic group I-III-VI semiconductor film. The resultant supported semiconductor films find use in photovoltaic applications, particularly as absorber layers in solar cells.

Birkmire, Robert W. (Churchville, MD); Schultz, Jerold M. (Newark, DE); Marudachalam, Matheswaran (Newark, DE); Hichri, Habib (Newark, DE)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

32

Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

Ratner, Buddy D. (Seattle, WA); Hoffman, Allan S. (Seattle, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Intraoperative radiation therapy using mobile electron linear accelerators: Report of AAPM Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group No. 72  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) has been customarily performed either in a shielded operating suite located in the operating room (OR) or in a shielded treatment room located within the Department of Radiation Oncology. In both cases, this cancer treatment modality uses stationary linear accelerators. With the development of new technology, mobile linear accelerators have recently become available for IORT. Mobility offers flexibility in treatment location and is leading to a renewed interest in IORT. These mobile accelerator units, which can be transported any day of use to almost any location within a hospital setting, are assembled in a nondedicated environment and used to deliver IORT. Numerous aspects of the design of these new units differ from that of conventional linear accelerators. The scope of this Task Group (TG-72) will focus on items that particularly apply to mobile IORT electron systems. More specifically, the charges to this Task Group are to (i) identify the key differences between stationary and mobile electron linear accelerators used for IORT (ii) describe and recommend the implementation of an IORT program within the OR environment, (iii) present and discuss radiation protection issues and consequences of working within a nondedicated radiotherapy environment, (iv) describe and recommend the acceptance and machine commissioning of items that are specific to mobile electron linear accelerators, and (v) design and recommend an efficient quality assurance program for mobile systems.

Sam Beddar, A.; Biggs, Peter J.; Chang Sha; Ezzell, Gary A.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hensley, Frank W.; Mills, Michael D. [Department of Radiation Physics, Division of Radiation Oncology, Unit 94, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic Scottsdale, Scottsdale, Arizona 85259 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book...

35

Process for forming shaped group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the formation of shaped Group II-VI semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Peng, Xiaogang (Fayetteville, AR); Manna, Liberato (Palo del Colle, IT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Process for forming shaped group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals, and product formed using process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the formation of shaped Group III-V semiconductor nanocrystals comprises contacting the semiconductor nanocrystal precursors with a liquid media comprising a binary mixture of phosphorus-containing organic surfactants capable of promoting the growth of either spherical semiconductor nanocrystals or rod-like semiconductor nanocrystals, whereby the shape of the semiconductor nanocrystals formed in said binary mixture of surfactants is controlled by adjusting the ratio of the surfactants in the binary mixture.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Oakland, CA); Peng, Xiaogang (Fayetteville, AR); Manna, Liberato (Palo del Colle, IT)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Fundamental study on new dissolution process for platinum group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The method currently used for the dissolution of PGMs requires a long processing time because PGMs are chemically stable, and the dissolution rate of PGMs is...

38

KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group KL Energy Corp Formerly KL Process Design Group Jump to: navigation, search Name KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group) Place Rapid City, South Dakota Zip 57702 Product US-based bioethanol developer, owner, and provider of engineering, procurement, and contracting. Operates both greenfield and brownfield projects. References KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group) is a company located in Rapid City, South Dakota . References ↑ "KL Energy Corp. (Formerly KL Process Design Group)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=KL_Energy_Corp_Formerly_KL_Process_Design_Group&oldid=348118

39

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

groups/all/feed en Buildings groups/all/feed en Buildings http://en.openei.org/community/group/buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings.group/buildings" target="_blank">read more architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc

40

Distributed Multimodal Information Processing GroupINTERNET OF THINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small and lightweight components become more and more powerful, and at the same time cheaper. This enables the augmentation of physical objects with digital technology (e.g., information processing, communication). The interconnection of such intelligent devices leads away from the classical internet of computers towards the Internet of Things. This development has a wide range of implications in the dimensions of technology, applications and society. A significant area of application areas will be influenced by the Internet of Things, from private households over mobility to research and industry. In this seminar, various aspects of the Internet of Things were investigated. In the technological domain, the underlying communication technologies and hardware was discussed and an overview of interaction techniques with intelligent objects was gained. Furthermore, an overview of application domains was given and, based on selected examples, deeper investigated, such as the Internet of Vehicles. Last but not least, also economical implications and potential business models were investigated. Each of the single chapters addresses a specific topic and presents fundamental research trends and developments. This

Eckehard Steinbach; Matthias Kranz; Anas Al-nuaimi; Stefan Diewald; Andreas Mller; Luis Roalter; Florian Schweiger (editors; Technische Universitt Mnchen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer 5: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability U-115: Novell GroupWise Client Address Book Processing Buffer Overflow Vulnerability March 2, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: A vulnerability has been reported in in Novell GroupWise Client. PLATFORM: versions 8.0 through 8.02 HP3. ABSTRACT: The vulnerability is caused due to an error when processing Novell Address Book (".nab") files and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow via an overly long email address. reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory Secunia Advisory 48199 CVE-2011-4189 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The GroupWise 8 Client for Windows is vulnerable to an exploit where a malformed address book could cause heap memory corruption, which could lead to remote code execution under the privilege of the user that opened the

43

Influence of Microwave Radiation on Phosphorus-removal Process ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave radiation on the ore fines was carried out using MW-HS ... A Pilot- plant Scale Test on DRI Preparation from High-alumina Limonite Ore by...

44

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012) Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012)

46

Implementing initial state radiation for lepton induced processes in AMEGIC++.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm 15 B. Program Parameters 17 1. Introduction Initial State Radiation (ISR) is the most important QED correction to the Born cross section. For instance, in the case of electron positron annihilations at energies beyond the Zthreshold it leads... . In this way, the correction term becomes several times as large as the Born term at the initial center of mass energy. Evidently, the effect of ISR is of great significance for the interpretation of experimental results. However, since initial state photons...

Schalicke, A; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Soff, G

47

The Response of a Spectral General Circulation Model to Refinements in Radiative Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here results and analyses of a series of numerical experiments performed with a spectral general circulation model (GCM). The purpose of the GCM experiments is to examine the role of radiation/cloud processes in the general circulation ...

V. Ramanathan; Eric J. Pitcher; Robert C. Malone; Maurice L. Blackmon

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Uniform bulk Material Processing using Multimode Microwave Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE{sub 10}-mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE{sub 11}-, TE{sub 01}- and TM{sub 01}-cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

Varma, Ravi; Vaughan, Worth E.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

49

Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

Varma, Ravi (Los Alamos, NM); Vaughn, Worth E. (Madison, WI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Generic process for preparing a crystalline oxide upon a group IV semiconductor substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for growing a crystalline oxide epitaxially upon the surface of a Group IV semiconductor, as well as a structure constructed by the process, is described. The semiconductor can be germanium or silicon, and the crystalline oxide can generally be represented by the formula (AO).sub.n (A'BO.sub.3).sub.m in which "n" and "m" are non-negative integer repeats of planes of the alkaline earth oxides or the alkaline earth-containing perovskite oxides. With atomic level control of interfacial thermodynamics in a multicomponent semiconductor/oxide system, a highly perfect interface between a semiconductor and a crystalline oxide can be obtained.

McKee, Rodney A. (Kingston, TN); Walker, Frederick J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Chisholm, Matthew F. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

The Relative Effectiveness of Positive Interdependence and Group Processing on Student Achievement, Interaction, and Attitude in Online Cooperative Learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative effectiveness of positive interdependence and group processing on student achievement, interaction, and attitude in online cooperative learning. All of the participants, 144 college students enrolled in one of three different courses, received initial general instruction about teamwork skills and cooperative learning at the start of the study. Participants were then randomly assigned to one of three treatment groups: positive interdependence, group processing, and no structure. The ?positive interdependence? groups received subsequent positive interdependence skills training which were then utilized in their instructional activities. The ?group processing? groups received subsequent group processing skills training for use in their instructional activities. The ?no structure? groups received no additional instructional treatment beyond the initial basic teamwork and cooperative learning training. Results indicated that there were significant differences among students in the ?positive interdependence,? ?group processing,? and ?no structure? groups with respect to their achievement scores and interactions. Participants in the ?positive interdependence? groups had significantly higher achievement than participants in either the ?group processing? groups or the ?no structure? groups. In addition, participants in the ?positive interdependence? groups and the ?group processing? groups interacted with each other to a greater extent than those in the ?no structure? groups. This study also examined the relative effectiveness of positive interdependence and group processing on types of student interaction. The results indicated that ?positive interdependence? strategies were relatively more effective than ?group processing? strategies on ?sharing and comparing of information? interactions, whereas ?group processing? strategies were relatively more effective than ?positive interdependence? strategies on ?negotiation of meaning and co-construction of knowledge? interactions. Regarding student attitude towards the experiences of cooperative learning: participation, communication resources, and online activities, there was no significant difference among any of the three groups. The overall results of this study suggest that instructors would be advised to incorporate positive interdependence strategies in their online courses to help students perceive that they should actively contribute to their online group activities. In addition, instructors are recommended to inform groups of the individual progress of each member?s activities periodically by employing group processing strategies.

Nam, Chang Woo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

DISSERTATION THE EFFECTS OF RADIATIVE AND MICROPHYSICAL PROCESSES ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model is coupled in a consistent fashion to the bulk microphysical parameterization of Walko et al. (1995), an explicit liquid bin microphysical model (e.g. Feingold et al. 1996a) and a mixed­phase that boundary layer stability is strongly dependent upon ice processes, illustrating that the rapid reduction

Harrington, Jerry Y.

53

Recent Chemical Decontamination Experience: 2012 Radiation Management and Source Term Technical Strategy Group Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical decontamination remains a viable option for nuclear power plants to reduce radiation levels during maintenance and operating activities. This report presents the results of recent system chemical decontamination experiences from EPRI-member utilities in the United States and Europe, collected through an industry survey and as part of participation in the EPRI BWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment Program.BackgroundSome plants have performed ...

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

54

Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Simulating acceleration and radiation processes in X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high energy emission of microquasars is thought to originate from high energy particles. Depending on the spectral state, the distribution of these particles can be thermal with a high temperature (typically 100 keV) or non-thermal and extending to even higher energy. The properties of high energy plasmas are governed by a rich microphysics involving particle-particle collisions and particles-photons interactions. We present a new code developed to address the evolution of relativistic plasmas. This one-zone code focuses on the microphysics and solves the coupled kinetic equations for particles and photons, including Compton scattering, synchrotron emission and absorption, pair production and annihilation, bremsstrahlung emission and absorption, Coulomb interactions, and prescriptions for additional particle acceleration and heating. It can in particular describe mechanisms such a thermalisation by synchrotron self-absorption and Coulomb collisions. Using the code, we investigate whether various acceleration processes, namely thermal heating, non-thermal acceleration and stochastic acceleration, can reproduce the different spectral states of microquasars. Premilinary results are presented.

R. Belmont; J. Malzac; A. Marcowith

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Radiation reaction and renormalization via conservation laws of the Poincare group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the self-action problem in classical electrodynamics of a point-like charge arbitrarily moving in flat space-time of four or six dimensions. A consistent regularization procedure is proposed which exploits the symmetry properties of the theory. The energy-momentum and angular momentum balance equations allow us to derive the radiation reaction forces in both 4D and 6D. It is shown that a point-like source in 6D possesses an internal angular momentum with magnitude which is proportional to the square of acceleration. 6D action functional contains, apart from usual "bare" mass, an additional renormalization constant which corresponds to the curvature of the world line (i.e. to the magnitude of internal angular momentum of "bare" particle). It is demonstrated that the {\\it Poincar\\'e-invariant} six-dimensional electrodynamics is renormalizable theory.

Yurij Yaremko

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

57

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup October 11, 2007 More...

58

Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to the typical size of a single GCM grid cell) and temporally over a three day analysis period, total rainfall in the sensitivity simulation increased by 31% over that in the baseline simulation. Fewer optically thin clouds, arbitrarily defined as a cloud exhibiting an optical depth less than 1, formed in the sensitivity simulation. Domain-averaged AODs dropped from 0.46 in the baseline simulation to 0.38 in the sensitivity simulation. The overall net effect of additional aerosols attributable to primary particulates and aerosol precursors from point source emissions above the surface was a domain-averaged reduction of 5 W m-2 in mean daytime downwelling shortwave radiation.

Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan)] [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan)] [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan)] [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan)] [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan)] [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening  

SciTech Connect

Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Significance of joint features derived from the modified group delay function in speech processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure ...

Rajesh M. Hegde; Hema A. Murthy; V. R. R. Gadde

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Patterns of Radiotherapy Practice for Pancreatic Cancer in Japan: Results of the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG) Survey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the patterns of radiotherapy practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Methods and Materials: A questionnaire-based national survey of radiotherapy for pancreatic cancer treated between 2000 and 2006 was conducted by the Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG). Detailed information on 870 patients from 34 radiation oncology institutions was accumulated. Results: The median age of all patients was 64 years (range, 36-88), and 80.2% of the patients had good performance status. More than 85% of patients had clinical Stage T3-T4 disease, and 68.9% of patients had unresectable disease at diagnosis. Concerning radiotherapy (RT), 49.8% of patients were treated with radical external beam RT (EBRT) (median dose, 50.4 Gy), 44.4% of patients were treated with intraoperative RT (median dose, 25 Gy) with or without EBRT (median dose, 45 Gy), and 5.9% of patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy (median dose, 50 Gy). The treatment field consisted of the primary tumor (bed) only in 55.6% of the patients. Computed tomography-based treatment planning and conformal RT was used in 93.1% and 83.1% of the patients treated with EBRT, respectively. Chemotherapy was used for 691 patients (79.4%; before RT for 66 patients; during RT for 531; and after RT for 364). Gemcitabine was the most frequently used drug, followed by 5-fluorouracil. Conclusion: This study describes the general patterns of RT practice for pancreatic cancer in Japan. Most patients had advanced unresectable disease, and radical EBRT, as well as intraoperative RT with or without EBRT, was frequently used. Chemotherapy with gemcitabine was commonly used in conjunction with RT during the survey period.

Ogawa, Kazuhiko, E-mail: kogawa@med.u-ryukyu.ac.j [Department of Radiology, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Ito, Yoshinori [Department of Radiation Oncology, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Ogawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Hitoshi [Department of Radiology, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo (Japan); Okuno, Yoshishige [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kobe City Medical Center General Hospital, Kobe (Japan); Nishino, Shigeo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sapporo Kosei General Hospital, Sapporo (Japan); Ogo, Etsuyo [Department of Radiology, Kurume University, Kurume (Japan); Uchida, Nobue [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shimane Medical University, Shimane (Japan); Karasawa, Kumiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University, Yamagata (Japan); Nishimura, Yasumasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kinki University School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan)

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Ultraviolet Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The key external stakeholders include: NASA; NOAA, DARPA, members of the semiconductor industry, and academic and industrial researchers ...

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

66

Estimation of Radiative Corrections to the Process of Muon-Electron Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In detection of electrons from $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process the monochromatic electron spectrum is transformed due to a photon emission and fluctuations of energy loss in a target. The selection criterion of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion events is an electron momentum above the threshold momentum of 103.5 MeV/c, which corresponds to the maximum energy loss of 1.5 MeV. Radiative corrections including a virtual photon correction and soft photon emission below 1.5 MeV lead to a reduction by about 10% in the probability of $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process calculated without radiative corrections. The soft photons emission below 1.5 MeV contributes to a change of electron spectrum from monoenergetic one at 105 MeV to a spectrum with a low energy tail for the process of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion. However the effect of smearing of the initial momentum distribution due to the soft photon emission is small in comparison with a smearing due to energy loss fluctuations in a target. The average energy of soft photons emitted below 1.5 MeV is found to be 40 keV. The soft photon approximation is a good description for $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion process with photons emitted below 1.5 MeV.

Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

67

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressure...

Saxton, C J; Saxton, Curtis J.; Wu, Kinwah

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressures at the shock, to examine particular effects on the stability properties and frequencies of oscillation modes.

Curtis J. Saxton; Kinwah Wu

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

71

Group Process for Peoples Participation in Rural Nepal: Reflections from a Micro Level Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in local affairs. Thcir role in mobilizing the common people through some kinds ofmcmbershipand adherence has been vilal. Groups have been a perennial fcatureofhuman society. We havc social traditions which indicate that people havc always been engaged...

Luintel, Youba Raj

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Application of an Apple-II Computer in Real-Time Data Processing of Microwave Radiation Attenuation by Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an Apple-II microcomputer, real-time data acquisition, processing, staring and display of 12 GHz microwave radiation attenuation by rain have been implemented. The computer-radiometer interface consists of an address decoder, two three-...

Song Qian

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Older Age Predicts Decreased Metastasis and Prostate Cancer-Specific Death for Men Treated With Radiation Therapy: Meta-Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The impact of age on prostate cancer (PCa) outcome has been controversial; therefore, we analyzed the effect of age on overall survival (OS), distant metastasis, prostate cancer-specific death (PCSD), and nonprostate cancer death (NPCD) on patients with locally advanced PCa. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in four Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) phase III trials, 8531, 8610, 9202, and 9413, were studied. Cox proportional hazards regression was used for OS analysis, and cumulative events analysis with Fine and Gray's regression was used for analyses of metastasis, PCSD, and NPCD. Results: Median follow-up of 4,128 patients with median age of 70 (range, 43-88 years) was 7.3 years. Most patients had high-risk disease: cT3 to cT4 (54%) and Gleason scores (GS) of 7 (45%) and 8 to 10 (27%). Older age ({<=}70 vs. >70 years) predicted for decreased OS (10-year rate, 55% vs. 41%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and increased NPCD (10-year rate, 28% vs. 46%, respectively; p < 0.0001) but decreased metastasis (10-year rate, 27% vs. 20%, respectively; p < 0.0001) and PCSD (10-year rate, 18% vs. 14%, respectively; p < 0.0001). To account for competing risks, outcomes were analyzed in 2-year intervals, and age-dependent differences in metastasis and PCSD persisted, even in the earliest time periods. When adjusted for other covariates, an age of >70 years remained associated with decreased OS (hazard ratio [HR], 1.56 [95% confidence interval [CI], 1.43-1.70] p < 0.0001) but with decreased metastasis (HR, 0.72 [95% CI, 0.63-0.83] p < 0.0001) and PCSD (HR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.66-0.92] p < 0.0001). Finally, the impact of the duration of androgen deprivation therapy as a function of age was evaluated. Conclusions: These data support less aggressive PCa in older men, independent of other clinical features. While the biological underpinning of this finding remains unknown, stratification by age in future trials appears to be warranted.

Hamstra, Daniel A., E-mail: dhamm@umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pilepich, Miljenko V. [UCLA Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Hanks, Gerald E. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David J. [Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); McGowan, David G. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Roach, Mack [UCSF, San Francisco, California (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Off-label use of medical products in radiation therapy: Summary of the Report of AAPM Task Group No. 121  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Medical products (devices, drugs, or biologics) contain information in their labeling regarding the manner in which the manufacturer has determined that the products can be used in a safe and effective manner. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves medical products for use for these specific indications which are part of the medical product's labeling. When medical products are used in a manner not specified in the labeling, it is commonly referred to as off-label use. The practice of medicine allows for this off-label use to treat individual patients, but the ethical and legal implications for such unapproved use can be confusing. Although the responsibility and, ultimately, the liability for off-label use often rests with the prescribing physician, medical physicists and others are also responsible for the safe and proper use of the medical products. When these products are used for purposes other than which they were approved, it is important for medical physicists to understand their responsibilities. In the United States, medical products can only be marketed if officially cleared, approved, or licensed by the FDA; they can be used if they are not subject to or specifically exempt from FDA regulations, or if they are being used in research with the appropriate regulatory safeguards. Medical devices are either cleared or approved by FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health. Drugs are approved by FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and biological products such as vaccines or blood are licensed under a biologics license agreement by FDA's Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research. For the purpose of this report, the process by which the FDA eventually clears, approves, or licenses such products for marketing in the United States will be referred to as approval. This report summarizes the various ways medical products, primarily medical devices, can legally be brought to market in the United States, and includes a discussion of the approval process, along with manufacturers' responsibilities, labeling, marketing and promotion, and off-label use. This is an educational and descriptive report and does not contain prescriptive recommendations. This report addresses the role of the medical physicist in clinical situations involving off-label use. Case studies in radiation therapy are presented. Any mention of commercial products is for identification only; it does not imply recommendations or endorsements of any of the authors or the AAPM. The full report, containing extensive background on off-label use with several appendices, is available on the AAPM website (http://www.aapm.org/pubs/reports/).

Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Thompson, Heaton H. II; Jani, Shirish K. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Hagerstown, Maryland 21740 (United States); and others

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Introduction of bifunctional group onto MWNT by radiation-induced graft polymerization and its use as biosensor-supporting materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A biosensor comprising tyrosinase immobilized on bifunctionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) supports was prepared for the detection of phenolic compounds in drinks such as red wine and juices. The MWNT supports were prepared by radiation-induced ...

Yu-Jin Lee; Da-Jung Chung; Sang-Hyub Oh; Seong-Ho Choi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

NIST Optical Radiation Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Staff Directory. Staff. Name, Position, Office Phone. ... Contact. Optical Radiation Group Eric Shirley, Group Leader. ...

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Limited Chemotherapy and Shrinking Field Radiotherapy for Osteolymphoma (Primary Bone Lymphoma): Results From the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 99.04 and Australasian Leukaemia and Lymphoma Group LY02 Prospective Trial;Bone; Lymphoma; Radiotherapy; Chemotherapy; Clinical trial  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To establish benchmark outcomes for combined modality treatment to be used in future prospective studies of osteolymphoma (primary bone lymphoma). Methods and Materials: In 1999, the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) invited the Australasian Leukemia and Lymphoma Group (ALLG) to collaborate on a prospective study of limited chemotherapy and radiotherapy for osteolymphoma. The treatment was designed to maintain efficacy but limit the risk of subsequent pathological fractures. Patient assessment included both functional imaging and isotope bone scanning. Treatment included three cycles of CHOP chemotherapy and radiation to a dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions using a shrinking field technique. Results: The trial closed because of slow accrual after 33 patients had been entered. Accrual was noted to slow down after Rituximab became readily available in Australia. After a median follow-up of 4.3 years, the five-year overall survival and local control rates are estimated at 90% and 72% respectively. Three patients had fractures at presentation that persisted after treatment, one with recurrent lymphoma. Conclusions: Relatively high rates of survival were achieved but the number of local failures suggests that the dose of radiotherapy should remain higher than it is for other types of lymphoma. Disability after treatment due to pathological fracture was not seen.

Christie, David, E-mail: david.christie@premion.com.au [Premion and Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland (Australia); Dear, Keith [Department of Epidemiology and Population Studies, Australian National University, Canberra, New South Wales (Australia); Le, Thai [BHB, Premion, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Barton, Michael [Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes and Research (CCORE) and University of NSW, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Wirth, Andrew [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Porter, David [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Roos, Daniel [Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Pratt, Gary [Royal Brisbane Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation shielding material consisting of 95 to 97% by weight SiO/sub 2/ and 5 to 3% by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, H.L.

1981-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, Hugh L. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

TH?E?500?01: Formal Radiation Therapy Safety Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern radiation therapy has become increasingly complex. In order to maintain a high level of safety medical physicists are shifting their approach to safety from historical to formal. Quality assurance (QA) is not a unique challenge to radiation therapy let alone medicine. Every industry has an approach to measuring

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Effects of Moist Convection and Water Vapor Radiative Processes on Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary interest of the present study is to examine the sensitivity of climate to radiative perturbations such as increases in CO2 and solar insolation for surface temperatures warmer than present day global averaged values (Ts> 290 K). The ...

M. Lal; V. Ramanathan

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Study of Radiative and Turbulent Processes in the Stable Boundary Layer under Weak Wind Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of radiation and turbulence was studied in a weak wind nocturnal inversion layer using a one-dimensional model. In contrast to a strong wind stable boundary layer where cooling within the surface inversion layer is dominated by ...

S. G. Gopalakrishnan; Maithili Sharan; R. T. McNider; M. P. Singh

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing  

SciTech Connect

Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

Laderman, S. (Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Pianetta, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION AND RADIOISOTOPES ON THE LIFE PROCESSES. An Annotated Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Issued in two books and an Index. A total of 11,944 annotated references is presented to report and published literature concerning the effects of radiation on biological systems. Abstracts are included for many references. Author and subject indexes are included. (C.H.)

Pierce, C.M. comp.

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Radiation tolerant acquisition system and signal processing for LVDT sensors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis work aims at designing a new electronic board which wants to be a generic acquisition card with numerical processor capabilities for reading LVDT or other position sensors. The board is based on commercial parts and is designed to be radiation tolerant . That means that the electronics works properly up a given limit of radiation levels. A flash based FPGA, known to be latch-up free, is selected to perform the Sine Fit algorithm in fixed point precision to retrieve the sensor position. The Sine Fit algorithm is deeply analyzed and 3 different implementations in fixed point representation are investigated in order to achieve a numerical precision that can assure the target requirements. The third algorithm makes use of the CORDIC functions. The tests are done on a proof demonstrator board with ADC and FPGA.

Danzeca, Salvatore

88

DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Process for depositing thin film layers onto surfaces modified with organic functional groups and products formed thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for producing a thin film product, comprising a first step in which an underlying substrate of a first material is provided. The underlying substrate includes a plurality of unmodified sites. The underlying substrate is then chemically modified wherein a plurality of organic functional groups are attached to a plurality of the unmodified sites. The arrangement and type of the functional group used can be selected for the purpose of controlling particular properties of the second material deposited. A thin film layer of at least one second material is then deposited onto the chemically modified underlying substrate. This can be accomplished by connecting the thin film to the underlying substrate by binding the thin film to the functional groups.

Tarasevich, Barbara J. (Richland, WA); Rieke, Peter C. (Pasco, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

THE RADIATION PROCESSING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

A review of various ways in which nuclear energy can be used in the chemical process industry is presented. Data are included on aspects of radioinduced polymerization of ethylene. Flowsheets are included for radiochemonuclear, thermochemonuclear, electrochemonuclear, and photochemonuclear reactors. Other information is included on irradiation loops. (J.R.D.)

Steinberg, M.; Manowitz, B.

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the radiative and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LLNL 2-D zonally averaged chemical-radiative transport model of the global atmosphere was used to study the effects of the June 15, 1991 eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano on stratospheric processes. SAGE-11 time-dependent aerosol surface area density and optical extinction data were used as input into the model. By the winter solstice, 1991, a maximum change in column ozone was observed in the equatorial region of {minus}2% (with heterogeneous chemical reactions on sulfuric acid aerosols) and {minus}5.5% (including heterogeneous reactions plus radiative feedbacks). Maximum local ozone decreases of 12% were derived in the equatorial region, at 25 km, for winter solstice 1991. Column NO{sub 2} peaked ({minus}14%) at 30 S in October 1991. Local concentrations of NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, and HO{sub x}, in the lower stratosphere, were calculated to have changed between 30 S and 30 N by {minus}40%, +80%, and +60% respectively.

Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

93

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Rail TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail The Rail Topic Group has the responsibility to identify and discuss current issues and concerns regarding rail transportation of radioactive materials by the Department of Energy (DOE). The group's current task is to examine different aspects of rail transportation including inspections, tracking and radiation monitoring, planning and process, and review of lessons learned. Ultimately, the main goal for members will be to assist in the identification of potential rail routes for shipments to Yucca Mountain, in a manner that will contribute to a safe, dynamic, and flexible transportation system. The identification of potential routes from reactor sites and DOE facilities will serve as an important first step in transportation planning, examining alternative routes, and getting feedback

94

Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection...

96

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

97

Early Salvage Hormonal Therapy for Biochemical Failure Improved Survival in Prostate Cancer Patients After Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Plus Radiation Therapy-A Secondary Analysis of Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To assess the survival benefit of early vs late salvage hormonal therapy (HT), we performed a secondary analysis on patients who developed recurrence from Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01, a randomized trial comparing 4 vs 8 months neoadjuvant HT plus radiation therapy (RT) in intermediate- and high-risk prostate adenocarcinoma. Methods and Materials: A total of 102 patients from the trial who recurred were analyzed at a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The patients were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of salvage HT: 57 patients had prostate-specific antigen (PSA) {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 1, early), 21 patients had PSA >10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases (group 2, late), and 24 patients had distant metastases (group 3, late). The endpoint analyzed was overall survival (OS) calculated from 2 different time points: date of enrolment in the trial (OS1) and date of initiation of salvage HT (OS2). Survival was estimated using Kaplan-Meier curves and a Cox regression model. Results: The OS1 differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS1 at 10 years was 78% in group 1, 42% in group 2, and 29% in group 3. The OS2 also differed significantly between groups (P<.0005): OS2 at 6 years was 70% in group 1, 47% in group 2, and 22% in group 3. Group 1 had the longest median time from end of RT to biochemical failure compared with groups 2 and 3 (3.3, 0.9, and 1.7 years, respectively; P<.0005). Group 1 also had the longest median PSA doubling time compared with groups 2 and 3 (9.9, 3.6, and 2.4 months, respectively; P<.0005). On multivariate analysis, timing of salvage HT, time from end of RT to biochemical failure, and PSA nadir on salvage HT were significant predictors of survival. Conclusion: Early salvage HT based on PSA {<=}10 ng/mL and absent distant metastases improved survival in patients with prostate cancer after failure of initial treatment with neoadjuvant HT plus RT.

Mydin, Aminudin R., E-mail: aminudinrahman@googlemail.com [Department of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Kuala Lumpur Hospital, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Dunne, Mary T.; Finn, Marie A. [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Clinical Trials Resource Unit, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Armstrong, John G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke's Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chemical Process Measurements Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in the gas and liquid phases and ... inventory of atmospheric greenhouse gases, most notably ... Gas and Particulate Concentration Measurements and ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Digital Single Event Transients in a 180-nm Fully Depleted SOI Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of ionizing radiation on single event transients are reported for Fully Depleted SOI (FDSOI) technology using experiments and simulations. Logic circuits, i.e. CMOS inverter chains, were irradiated with cobalt-60 ...

Keast, Craig L.

100

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Controls Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Schedule Safety and Training Divisions APS Engineering Support Division AES Groups Accelerator Systems Division ASD Groups X-ray Science Division XSD Groups...

102

Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations September 1, 2011 - 4:07pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Washington Group International, Inc. (WGI) for a September 2010 incident that violated the Department's radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations, and has proposed a $412,500 civil penalty. The violations are associated with a radiological contamination incident that occurred on September 29, 2010, during open air demolition of Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) nuclear facilities

103

Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations Department of Energy Cites Washington Group International, Inc. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Violations September 1, 2011 - 4:07pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Washington Group International, Inc. (WGI) for a September 2010 incident that violated the Department's radiation protection and nuclear safety regulations, and has proposed a $412,500 civil penalty. The violations are associated with a radiological contamination incident that occurred on September 29, 2010, during open air demolition of Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) nuclear facilities

104

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III - Calculate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Far Ultraviolet Physics Group / Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III The Far Ultraviolet Physics Group maintains and improves the ...

105

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

106

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

108

High-Temperature Processing of Solids Through Solar Nebular Bow Shocks: 3D Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations with Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental, unsolved problem in Solar System formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks has been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H$_2$ is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulati...

Boley, A C; Desch, S J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quantum groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of Quantum groups, although rather young, since the expression Quantum ... introduction of a suitable form of the quantum group, the algebra A...

111

The impact of detailed urban-scale processing on the composition, distribution, and radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed urban-scale processing has not been included in global 3D chemical transport models due to its large computational demands. Here we present a metamodel for including this processing, and compare it with the use ...

Cohen, Jason Blake

112

IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu [University of Maryland (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume 2, Appendix A: Process and protocol  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains documentation prepared by the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Working Group for conducting the Plutonium ES and H Vulnerability Assessment and training the assessment teams. It has the following five parts. (1) The Project Plan describes the genesis of the project, sets forth the goals, objectives and scope, provides definitions, the projected schedule, and elements of protocol. (2) The Assessment Plan provides a detailed methodology necessary to guide the many professionals who have been recruited to conduct the DOE-wide assessment. It provides guidance on which types and forms of plutonium are to be considered within the scope of the assessment, and lays out the assessment methodology to be used. (3) The memorandum from the Project to Operations Office Managers provides the protocol and direction for participation in the assessment by external stakeholders and members of the public; and the guidance for the physical inspection of plutonium materials in storage. (4) The memorandum from the Project to the assessment teams provides guidance for vulnerability screening criteria, vulnerability evaluation and prioritization process, and vulnerability quantification for prioritization. (5) The Team Training manual was used at the training session held in Colorado Springs on April 19--21, 1994 for all members of the Working Group Assessment Teams and for the leaders of the Site Assessment Teams. The goal was to provide the same training to all of the individuals who would be conducting the assessments, and thereby provide consistency in the conduct of the assessments and uniformity in reporting of the results. The training manual in Section A.5 includes supplemental material provided to the attendees after the meeting.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SI Group Scheduling Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Personnel On-Call Page Beamline Validation Schedule Group Organizational Chart Reviews Presentations Group Scheduling Page Project Scheduling Information Ops Scheduling Info Project / Scheduling Info APS fy2005 Annual Schedule ( html ) PSS Validation Schedule APS fy2006 Annual Schedule (html) PSS Validation Teams Latest Machine Studies Schedule (pdf) (html) New Builds Schedule (For SI GROUP Reference Only) Parasitic Beam Operations Schedule Ops Scheduling Page Shutdown Information Work Schedules August/September Shutdown Shutdown Work List Validation Schedule Safety Info Work Request Links ISM Core Functions Enter / Search Work Requests APS Safety Page Modify / Approve Work Requests Radiation Safety Policy APS TMS Training Profiles MSDS Search This page maintained by Joe Budz

115

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

116

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

117

Full-System Decontamination of a BWR Using the LOMI Process Volume 5: Shielding and Radiation Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LOMI (low-oxidation-state metal-ion) dilute-chemical-decontamination process has been qualified for use on the complete reactor system of BWRs. Full-system decontamination offers several economic and operational advantages over current partsystem applications. This study provides the technical basis for a safety evaluation.

1991-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radioactivity and Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

119

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation

120

New Directing Groups for Metal-Catalyzed Asymmetric CarbonCarbon Bond-Forming Processes: Stereoconvergent AlkylAlkyl Suzuki Cross-Couplings of Unactivated Electrophiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability of two common protected forms of amines (carbamates and sulfonamides) to serve as directing groups in Ni-catalyzed Suzuki reactions has been exploited in the development of catalytic asymmetric methods for ...

Wilsily, Ashraf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... optical trap (MOT) for chromium with a fluorescence-detection efficiency sufficient to ... that first demonstrated a novel source of low-energy ions with a ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... occurs near liquid-liquid and liquid-vapor critical ... measurements of helium and other gases with uncertainties ... ab initio calculations of gas viscosity. ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... He earned high honors in physics for his thesis, "A new predictive scheme for rotating superconductors." He received his Ph.D. in physics from the ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

124

SSRL Imaging Group | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

resolution. These activities include efforts supported by DOE BES, NIH NIBIB, and the SSRL SMB Program supported by NIH NCRR and DOE BER. Beam Line 2-3 Hard-x-ray microprobe...

125

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... meet industrial needs. Research Interests: Atomic structure and orientation of nano-clusters and ultrathin films on surfaces; ...

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

NIST, Sensor Science Division, Ultraviolet Radiation Group ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... helps maintain and improve the storage ring as the national primary UV irradiance ... of about 1 part in 10000 at the standard operating energy of 380 ...

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes  

SciTech Connect

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model (MM4), RegCM2 includes improved formulations of boundary layer, radiative transfer, surface physics, cumulus convection, and time integration technique, which make it more physically comprehensive and more computationally efficient than the previous regional climate model version. This paper discusses a number of month-long simulations over the European region that were conducted to test the new RegCM2 boundary-layer parameterization (the scheme developed by Holtsag et al.) and radiative transfer formulation [the package developed for the NCAR Community Climate Model 2 (CCM2)]. Both schemes significantly affect the model precipitation, temperature, moisture, and cloudiness climatology, leading to overall more realistic results, while they do not substantially modify the model performance in simulating the aggregated characteristics of synoptic patterns. Description of the convective processes and procedures of boundary condition assimilation included in RegCM2 is presented in companion paper by Giorgi et al. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Marinucci, M.R.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Phase II Comparative Study of Gross Tumor Volume Definition With or Without PET/CT Fusion in Dosimetric Planning for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC): Primary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515  

SciTech Connect

Background: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0515 is a Phase II prospective trial designed to quantify the impact of positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) compared with CT alone on radiation treatment plans (RTPs) and to determine the rate of elective nodal failure for PET/CT-derived volumes. Methods: Each enrolled patient underwent definitive radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer ({>=}60 Gy) and had two RTP datasets generated: gross tumor volume (GTV) derived with CT alone and with PET/CT. Patients received treatment using the PET/CT-derived plan. The primary end point, the impact of PET/CT fusion on treatment plans was measured by differences of the following variables for each patient: GTV, number of involved nodes, nodal station, mean lung dose (MLD), volume of lung exceeding 20 Gy (V20), and mean esophageal dose (MED). Regional failure rate was a secondary end point. The nonparametric Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed-ranks test was used with Bonferroni adjustment for an overall significance level of 0.05. Results: RTOG 0515 accrued 52 patients, 47 of whom are evaluable. The follow-up time for all patients is 12.9 months (2.7-22.2). Tumor staging was as follows: II = 6%; IIIA = 40%; and IIIB = 54%. The GTV was statistically significantly smaller for PET/CT-derived volumes (98.7 vs. 86.2 mL; p < 0.0001). MLDs for PET/CT plans were slightly lower (19 vs. 17.8 Gy; p = 0.06). There was no significant difference in the number of involved nodes (2.1 vs. 2.4), V20 (32% vs. 30.8%), or MED (28.7 vs. 27.1 Gy). Nodal contours were altered by PET/CT for 51% of patients. One patient (2%) has developed an elective nodal failure. Conclusions: PET/CT-derived tumor volumes were smaller than those derived by CT alone. PET/CT changed nodal GTV contours in 51% of patients. The elective nodal failure rate for GTVs derived by PET/CT is quite low, supporting the RTOG standard of limiting the target volume to the primary tumor and involved nodes.

Bradley, Jeffrey, E-mail: jbradley@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa [Department of Statistics, RTOG, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Choi, Noah [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Forster, Ken [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Siegel, Barry A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Brunetti, Jacqueline [Holy Name Medical Center, Teaneck, NJ (United States); Purdy, James [University of California at Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Faria, Sergio [McGill University, Montreal (Canada); Vu, Toni [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Montreal, Hospital Notre Dame, Montreal (Canada); Thorstad, Wade [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, TX (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Full-Time, Eye-Safe Cloud and Aerosol Lidar Observation at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Sites: Instruments and Data Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric radiative forcing, surface radiation budget, and top-of-the-atmosphere radiance interpretation involve knowledge of the vertical height structure of overlying cloud and aerosol layers. During the last decade, the U.S. Department of ...

James R. Campbell; Dennis L. Hlavka; Ellsworth J. Welton; Connor J. Flynn; David D. Turner; James D. Spinhirne; V. Stanley Scott III; I. H. Hwang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Oteri, F.; Sinclair, K.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Byers Auto Group: A Case Study Into The Economics, Zoning, and Overall Process of Installing Small Wind Turbines at Two Automotive Dealerships in Ohio (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides the talking points about a case study on the installation of a $600,000 small wind project, the installation process, estimated annual energy production and percentage of energy needs met by the turbines.

Sinclair, K.; Oteri, F.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

NIST Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Staff Directory. Browse Staff by Group. Dosimetry. Neutron Physics. Radioactivity. Search for Staff Member. ...

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

133

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the ?¢????solar-background?¢??? mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM?¢????s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS?¢???? 1 Hz sampling to study the ?¢????twilight zone?¢??? around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM?¢????s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM?¢????s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

134

THE CHEMICAL AND RADIATION RESISTANCE OF POLYPHENYLENE SULFIIDE AS ENCOUNTERED IN THE MODULAR CAUSTIC SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is a semicrystalline polymer with excellent engineering plastic properties and suitable processing temperatures. PPS can also be made containing branches (using a trifunctional monomer) and with crosslinked microstructure (when curing the monomer at high temperature in the presence of oxygen). PPS is made from the condensation reaction between para-dichlorobenzene and sodium sulfide with the assistance of a catalyst (to lower the activation barrier). The synthesis conditions for making PPS has evolved since its invention in the 1960's to the optimal conditions developed by the Philips Corporation in the 1970's. The resulting polymer consists of chemically stable molecular moieties such as benzene rings and ether like sulfur linkages between the aromatic rings. Polyphenylene sulfide (PPS) is extremely resistant to gamma irradiation, caustic solution, and dilute nitric acid. PPS is the material of construction for the coalescers used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). After applying the equivalent of 3.3 E8 rad (330 Mrad), or the equivalent of 11 years of gamma irradiation (assuming a stripping solution concentration of 7.5 Ci/gal), and several months of exposures to 3M caustic solution and caustic salt simulant, no dimensional changes nor chemical changes were detected in PPS whether the PPS was in fiber form or in a composite with E-glass fibers. However, PPS acts as a media for heterogeneous nucleation. In particular, PPS appears to favor aluminosilicate formation in saturated solutions of aluminum and silicon in caustic environments. Parallel testing, in progress, is examining the stability of PPS when exposed to the new solvent formulation under development for MCU. Preliminary data, after two months of exposure, demonstrates PPS is stable to the new solvent.

Fondeur, F.; Herman, D.; Poirier, M.; Fink, S.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

135

Adaptive multigroup radiation diffusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the development and implementation of an algorithm for dramatically increasing the accuracy and reliability of multigroup radiation diffusion simulations at low group counts. This is achieved by ...

Williams, Richard B., Sc. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

FAQ 4-What is radioactivity and radiation?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and radiation? What is radioactivity and radiation? Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both...

137

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

138

HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Meeting Training Work Group Meeting HSS Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting Meeting Dates: July 10 - 11 The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman (HSS/NTC),Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Meeting Agenda Meeting Summary Draft RAD Worker Training Reciprocity Program for Work Group v.1 Draft Radiation Worker Portability Validation Meeting Attendees

139

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1999 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program................................................................. 1 INFORMATION PROCESSING ............................................. 2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ........................ 2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS) ............ 3

Toronto, University of

140

Research Highlights Sorted by Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Working Group Aerosol Life Cycle | Cloud Life Cycle | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Aerosol | Cloud Modeling | Cloud Properties | Radiative Processes Aerosol Life Cycle 2013 Bhattacharya, A. Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports ASR Fast, J. . Development and Validation of a Black Carbon Mixing State Resolved Three-Dimensional Model ARM ASR Gilles, M., Moffet, R. Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California ARM ASR Kafle, D. N., Coulter, R. L. Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide ARM Keppel-Aleks, G. Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model ARM Li, Z. A Mixed Bag of Aerosols over Northeastern China ARM

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141

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

142

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

143

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

144

AEC GROUP SHELTER  

SciTech Connect

As a result of atomic shelter tests and field experiments condueted over the past nine years, it has been conclusively shown that shelters provide the only promising means of civilian protection in the event of a nuclear war. Design details are presented for a group shelter to accommodate 100 persons of all age groups and both sexes. The shelter structure is a multiplate corrugated- steel arch set on a concrete slab with end walls of bridge plate sheathing. The entire structure is covered with a minimum of 3 feet of earth. The shelter combines outstanding protection against radioactive fall-out with good protection against blast and thermal radiation. Drawings are included. General operating procedures are outlined. (C.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Radiation detection system  

SciTech Connect

A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

Franks, Larry A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lutz, Stephen S. (Santa Barbara, CA); Lyons, Peter B. (Los Alamos, NM)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

148

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Carbon Materials Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Breakout Group Process Materials Breakout Group Process * Day 2, Thursday - Review results of Day 1 and modify if needed - Identify critical R&D needs - Outline R&D plan with key milestones - Report results to plenary Carbon Materials Breakout Group * Key Results - Target: get the science right to engineer carbon materials for hydrogen storage * Integrate theory, experiment, engineering * Understand mechanisms, effects, and interactions ranging from physisorption to chemisorption - Theory * Provide "directional" guidance for experiments (and vice- versa) * Provide baseline theory to elucidate parameters affecting the number and type of binding sites and the heat of their interaction with H2 (∆H ) for a broad range of (highly) modified carbon materials

150

Immobilization technology down-selection radiation barrier approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six immobilization technology projects variants, previously selected for evaluation during the PEIS/ROD process, have been evaluated with respect to the nine basic criteria for fissile materials disposition. Metrics for the criteria were developed to facilitate a comparative analysis of the technology variants. The six technology variants are grouped according to their radiation barrier approach. Information and data for the technology options were provided by limited experimental studies, definitions of process flowsheets, and preliminary evaluations of facility concepts and costs.

Gray, L.W.; Gould, T.H.

1997-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Radiation Stress Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiation stresses Sij associated with the propagation of wind-generated waves are principal driving forces for several important surf-zone processes. The accurate estimation of the onshore flux of longshore-directed mean momentum Syx, using ...

S. S. Pawka; D. L. Inman; R. T. Guza

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

RADIATION DOSIMETER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improvement was made in the determination of amounts of ionizing radiation, particularly low-energy beta particles of less than 1000 rad total dose by means of fluid-phase dosimeter employing a stabilized-- sensitized ferrous-ferric colorimetric system in a sulphuric acid medium. The improvement in the dosimeter consists of adding to the ferrous-ferric system in concentrations of 10/sub -2/ to 10/sup -4/M an organic compound having one or more carboxylic or equivalent groups, such compounds being capable of chelating or complexing the iron ions in the solution. Suitable sensitizing and stabilizing agents are benzoic, phthalic, salicylic, malonic, lactic, maleic, oxalic, citric, succinic, phenolic tartaric, acetic, and adipic acid, as well as other compounds which are added to the solution alone or in certain combinations. As in conventional fluid-phase dosimeters, the absorbed dosage is correlated with a corresponding change in optical density at particular wavelengths of the solution.

Balkwell, W.R. Jr.; Adams, G.D. Jr.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Roles of Dry Convection, Cloud-Radiation Feedback Processes and the Influence of Recent Improvements in the Parameterization of Convection in the GLA GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of the simulated July circulation to modifications in the parameterization of dry and moist convection, evaporation from failing raindrops, and cloud-radiation interaction is examined with the GLA (Goddard Laboratory for ...

Y. Sud; A. Molod

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Group communication specifications: a comprehensive study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

View-oriented group communication is an important and widely used building block for many distributed applications. Much current research has been dedicated to specifying the semantics and services of view-oriented group communication systems (GCSs). However, ... Keywords: Group communication systems, partitionable group membership, process group membership, specifications of group communication systems, view synchrony, virtual synchrony

Gregory V. Chockler; Idit Keidar; Roman Vitenberg

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

157

Upgraded Coal Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

Evan Hughes

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

New Roles for Electric and Magnetic Fields in Processing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electromagnetic and Acoustic Radiation Effects as Healing Vectors in Medicine Energy Savings in Materials Processing Using Electromagnetic Radiation.

159

# Energy Measuremenfs Group  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ri EECE ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of Energy, was used during November 1976 to conduct an exploratory aerial radiological survey in-the greater Niagara Fails area. The purpose of that survey was to identify locations having concentrations of terrestrial radioactivity not typical of the radiation

160

Quantum Processes and Metrology Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... understanding needed to create nanooptics and quantum dot structures that ... We are developing quantum dots as reliable sources of single photons ...

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Illinois Wind Workers Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

David G. Loomis

2012-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

163

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group Kelvin Building, University mrad. The upstream detector, RICH1, uses aerogel and C 4 F 10 radiators to identify particles

Glasgow, University of

165

Radiation control standards and procedures  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

1956-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

167

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links:

168

Security Technologies Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Technologies Group. Welcome. Our group develops measurement science in support of performance-based standards ...

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

169

Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Preferences, Information, and Group Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study will examine how the structure of preferences of group members in a decision-making group, as well as the information they have, affects the collection and the processing of information by individual members of a decision making group. Structure of preferences in this study will represent each individual group members preference towards a particular course of action. Using an experimental method of analysis, this study will examine how the preference structure of a group affects what and how much information a group member will analyze before making a decision. I hypothesize that the structure of the group members preferences should affect the subjects search and process of information. This study aims to answer the following questions; do group preferences affect the search and processing of information? Do group members thoroughly survey the objectives and alternatives in the decision making process?

Espinoza, Alejandro

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs Columbia University Radiator Labs developed a low-cost, easily installed radiator retrofit that converts radiator heating systems into a controlled-zoned system, which significantly increases the efficiency of radiator heating while improving occupant comfort. Learn More Navillum Nanotechnologies University of Utah Navillum Nanotechnologies developed a process to fabricate quantum dots and other types of semiconducting nanocrystals. When used in liquid crystal displays (LCD), quantum dots improve energy efficiency by up to 35 percent and in solar panels can increase efficiency up to 45 percent. Learn More Mesdi Systems University of Central Florida Mesdi Systems developed revolutionary equipment for manufacturing lithium-ion batteries, solar cells, and other high precision products that

173

Climate Forcing by Changing Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By how much does changing radiation from the sun influence the earths climate, presently and in the recent past, compared with other natural and anthropogenic processes? Current knowledge of the amplitudes and timescales of solar radiative ...

Judith Lean; David Rind

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consolidated Grant Topic Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes affected by DOE nuclear material shipments. The group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the development of a consolidated funding vehicle for transportation activities, should DOE implement such a program. Some of the major issues under consideration by the Consolidated Grant

175

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

176

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on...

177

Engineered Fire Safety Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered Fire Safety Group. Welcome. ... Employment/Research Opportunities. Contact. Jason Averill, Leader. Engineered Fire Safety Group. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

178

Energy Research Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group. Welcome. The newest Group in the CNST develops instruments designed to reveal the nanoscale ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

180

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

182

SCM Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement How Do the Variational Analysis and SCMsCRMs Respond to a Reduced ARM SGP Network? Shaocheng Xie Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory...

183

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accomplishments and Future Accomplishments and Future Transportation External Coordination Working Group Meeting Phoenix, AZ Judith A. Holm, Office of National Transportation Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management April 4, 2005 TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) American Nuclear Society (ANS) Association of American Railroads (AAR) Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers and Trainmen (BLET) Commercial Vehicle Safety Alliance (CVSA) Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors, Inc. (CRCPD) Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) Council of State Governments-Eastern Regional Conference (CSG-ERC) Council of State Governments-Midwestern Office (CSG-MW) Council on Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals (CORAR) Dangerous Goods Advisory Council (DGAC)

184

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter experts concerned with secure transport of spent nuclear...

185

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

188

Lighting Group: What's New  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New in the Lighting Group For more information on what's new in the Lighting Group, please contact: Francis Rubinstein Lighting Group Leader (510) 486-4096...

189

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE The Stanford Synchrotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Cells A new process that simultaneously combines the light and heat of solar radiation to generate electricity could offer more than double the efficiency of existing...

190

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 2001 - Program Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... seen a tremendous increase in the use of low-energy photon ... for the high levels of absorbed dose used in the industrial radiation processing of ...

191

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division 1998 - Current Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Cs gamma-ray ranges, and the low-energy photon ... beam, and a high-dose- rate Gammacell used in our radiation-processing dosimetry ...

192

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sustainable Energy Systems Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Energy Systems Group The Sustainable Energy Systems Group studies the impacts of energy generation and use, manufacturing, and other activities on the environment, the...

194

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

synchrotron research in a particular area. View monthly meetings on calendar Groups Catalysis Randall Winans, APS The Catalysis group meets at noon on the second Tuesday of each...

195

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Groups defined by automata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is Chapter 24 in the "AutoMathA" handbook. Finite automata have been used effectively in recent years to define infinite groups. The two main lines of research have as their most representative objects the class of automatic groups (including word-hyperbolic groups as a particular case) and automata groups (singled out among the more general self-similar groups). The first approach implements in the language of automata some tight constraints on the geometry of the group's Cayley graph, building strange, beautiful bridges between far-off domains. Automata are used to define a normal form for group elements, and to monitor the fundamental group operations. The second approach features groups acting in a finitely constrained manner on a regular rooted tree. Automata define sequential permutations of the tree, and represent the group elements themselves. The choice of particular classes of automata has often provided groups with exotic behaviour which have revolutioned our perception of infinite finitely ge...

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

198

Solar Thermal Group Australian National University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Concentrated Solar Power Parabolic Troughs (Concentration Ratio ~ 80) #12;Solar Thermal Group AustralianC 500o C Solar Concentrator (Dish or Trough) Rebecca Dunn & Dr Keith Lovegrove rebecca Concentrating Solar Power ­ The Basics 1. Parabolic mirror. 2. Receiver at focus. 3. Solar Radiation heats fluid

199

Bioanalytical Science Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bioanalytical Science Group. Welcome. We provide the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required ...

2013-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Lighting Research Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lighting Research Group overview what's new publications software facilities people contact us links...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Scientific Working Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... TWGDAM 1988). SWGDOG, Scientific Working Group on Dogs and Orthogonal Detection Guidelines, 2004. SWGTOX, Scientific ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

QUANTUM GROUPS JOHAN KUSTERMANS Syllabus: #15; The de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group: motivational ex- amples and special cases. The classical case, compact and discrete quantum groups. #15 for weights. #15; The general de#12;nition of a locally compact quantum group and its basic consequences

Schürmann, Michael

203

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group | Focus Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

204

Energy Research Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy Research Group Staff. ... Nikolai Zhitenev, Group Leader Nikolai Zhitenev is the Group Leader of the CNST Energy Research Group. ...

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site. The Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) cites violations associated with radiation safety and quality improvement deficiencies identified during a DOE Idaho Operations Office May 2006 assessment of radioactive waste processing activities at the Accelerated Retrieval Project (ARP). The

207

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan LEcuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Properties of Intra-group Stars and Galaxies in Galaxy Groups: "Normal" versus "Fossil" Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosmological LCDM simulations of 12 M_vir~10^14 Msun galaxy groups have been performed, invoking star formation, chemical evolution with non-instantaneous recycling, metallicity dependent radiative cooling, strong star-burst driven galactic super-winds and effects of a meta-galactic UV field. At z=0, intra-group light (IGL) fractions are found to be 12-45%. Low values refer to groups with only a small difference between the R-band magnitudes of the first and second ranked group galaxy, large are typical of "fossil" groups (FGs). The IG stars in the 4 FGs are 0.3-0.5 Gyr older than in the 8 nonFGs. For the IGL, B-R=~1.4, in good agreement with observations. For FGs/nonFGs the iron abundance of the IG stars is slightly sub-solar in the central parts (r~100 kpc) decreasing to about 40% solar at about 0.5 r_vir The IG stars are alpha-element enhanced with [O/Fe] increasing with r, and an overall [O/Fe]~0.45, indicating predominant SNII enrichment. The velocity distributions of the IG stars and group galaxies are, at r>~30 kpc, significantly more radially anisotropic for FGs than for nonFGs. So a characteristic of FG formation, apart from formation time (D'Onghia et al.), may be the "initial" velocity distribution of the group galaxies. For FGs one can dynamically infer the (dark matter dominated) mass distribution of the groups all the way to r_vir, from the kinematics of the IG stars or group galaxies. For the nonFGs this method overestimates the group mass at r>~200 kpc, by up to a factor of two at r_vir. This is interpreted as FGs being, in general, more relaxed than nonFGs. Finally, FGs of the above M_vir should host ~500 planetary nebulae at projected distances between 100 and 1000 kpc from the first ranked galaxy. All results appear consistent with the FG formation scenario of D'Onghia et al.

Jesper Sommer-Larsen

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Rational subsets of groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This text, Chapter 23 in the "AutoMathA" handbook, is devoted to the study of rational subsets of groups, with particular emphasis on the automata-theoretic approach to finitely generated subgroups of free groups. Indeed, Stallings' construction, associating a finite inverse automaton with every such subgroup, inaugurated a complete rewriting of free group algorithmics, with connections to other fields such as topology or dynamics. Another important vector in the chapter is the fundamental Benois' Theorem, characterizing rational subsets of free groups. The theorem and its consequences really explain why language theory can be successfully applied to the study of free groups. Rational subsets of (free) groups can play a major role in proving statements (a priori unrelated to the notion of rationality) by induction. The chapter also includes related results for more general classes of groups, such as virtually free groups or graph groups.

Bartholdi, Laurent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

211

Radiation receiver  

SciTech Connect

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

RADIATION SOURCES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel long-lived source of gamma radiation especially suitable for calibration purposes is described. The source of gamma radiation is denoted mock iodine131, which comprises a naixture of barium-133 and cesium-137. The barium and cesium are present in a barium-cesium ratio of approximately 5.7/1 to 14/1, uniformly dispersed in an ion exchange resin and a filter surrounding the resin comprised of a material of atomic number below approximately 51, and substantially 0.7 to 0.9 millimeter thick.

Brucer, M.H.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Consensus of Information in Distributed Control of a Diffusion Process using Centroidal Voronoi Tessellations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes like chemical/radiation leaks, oil spills etc. can have a large impact on human health and natural] and extended to a diffusing and spaying scenario [6]. Actually, the monitoring and control of a diffusion tracking, task assignment, and traffic control [10] [11] [12]. Although a group of mobile actuators

Ren, Wei

214

September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Agenda  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Focus Group Focus Group HSS/Union Work Group Telecom September 8, 2011 Call-In: 301-903-0620 PROPOSED AGENDA Work Group Framework 3:00 - 4:00 pm EST Introductory Remarks...................................................Glenn Podonsky Meeting Purpose/Process..........................................Mari-Jo Campagnone Group Discussion Facilitation...............................................Pete Stafford Discussion...................................................................................All (1) Proposed Work Group Guidance (2) Proposed Charter Template (3) Work Group Matrix Next Steps..........................................Mari-Jo Campagnone/Pete Stafford Training Work Group 4:00 - 5:00 pm EST Introductory Remarks.....................................................Karen Boardman

215

Advanced Polymer Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Student Common Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Students interested in the oils and fats industry make valuable networking connections by joining the AOCS Student Common Interest Group. Student Common Interest Group Student Membership achievement aocs application award awards distinguished divi

217

Quantum Chevalley groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this paper is to construct quantum analogues of Chevalley groups inside completions of quantum groups or, more precisely, inside completions of Hall algebras of finitary categories.

Berenstein, Arkady

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group Kelvin Building, University detector (RICH1), fig. 2, has a combined gas and aerogel radiator and is situated in front of the dipole magnet. The aerogel radiator is placed against the entrance window of the second gaseous (C 4 F 10

Glasgow, University of

219

Microanalysis Research Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Microanalysis Research Group Staff. ... Joseph M. Conny, Research Chemist. Jeff M. Davis, Materials Research Engineer. ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hydrogen Analysis Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL factsheet that describes the general activites of the Hydrogen Analysis Group within NREL's Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Retrieval Group Digital Video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This site is no longer in use and will soon disappear entirely. The Retrieval Group Information Access Division Last updated ...

222

Working Group 7 Summary  

SciTech Connect

The primary subject of working group 7 at the 2012 Advanced Accelerator Concepts Workshop was muon accelerators for a muon collider or neutrino factory. Additionally, this working group included topics that did not fit well into other working groups. Two subjects were discussed by more than one speaker: lattices to create a perfectly integrable nonlinear lattice, and a Penning trap to create antihydrogen.

Nagaitsev S.; Berg J.

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

224

Radiation Tolerant Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strategies that can alleviate radiation damage may assist the design of radiation tolerant materials. We will summarize our recent studies on radiation damage in...

225

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R : R : . . . RADIATION LABORATO DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

228

Biosphere Process Model Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the postclosure performance of a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, a Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) will be conducted. Nine Process Model Reports (PMRs), including this document, are being developed to summarize the technical basis for each of the process models supporting the TSPA model. These reports cover the following areas: (1) Integrated Site Model; (2) Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport; (3) Near Field Environment; (4) Engineered Barrier System Degradation, Flow, and Transport; (5) Waste Package Degradation; (6) Waste Form Degradation; (7) Saturated Zone Flow and Transport; (8) Biosphere; and (9) Disruptive Events. Analysis/Model Reports (AMRs) contain the more detailed technical information used to support TSPA and the PMRs. The AMRs consists of data, analyses, models, software, and supporting documentation that will be used to defend the applicability of each process model for evaluating the postclosure performance of the potential Yucca Mountain repository system. This documentation will ensure the traceability of information from its source through its ultimate use in the TSPA-Site Recommendation (SR) and in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) analysis processes. The objective of the Biosphere PMR is to summarize (1) the development of the biosphere model, and (2) the Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) developed for use in TSPA. The Biosphere PMR does not present or summarize estimates of potential radiation doses to human receptors. Dose calculations are performed as part of TSPA and will be presented in the TSPA documentation. The biosphere model is a component of the process to evaluate postclosure repository performance and regulatory compliance for a potential monitored geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The biosphere model describes those exposure pathways in the biosphere by which radionuclides released from a potential repository could reach a human receptor. Collectively, the potential human receptor and exposure pathways form the biosphere model. More detailed technical information and data about potential human receptor groups and the characteristics of exposure pathways have been developed in a series of AMRs and Calculation Reports.

J. Schmitt

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

229

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dosimeter Information Sheet Dose Lookup Dosimeter image Dosimetry This laboratory provides a comprehensive range of dosimetry services. Personnel dose monitoring (OSL) Area...

230

Radiation properties of cavity Cerenkov radiation  

SciTech Connect

Cerenkov radiation from cavities has been analyzed by quantum electrodynamic theory. Analytical expressions of basic radiation properties such as the Einstein's A and B coefficients are derived and shown to be directly modified by the cavities. The analysis leads to the conclusion that the coherent radiation from the Cerenkov radiation devices is due to super radiance of spontaneous emission instead of stimulated emission. Coherent and incoherent radiations are analyzed in the THz radiation range.

Gao Ju; Shen Fang [Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

, EGsG , EGsG ENERGY MEASUREMENTS GROUP ECT FOLLOW-UP REPORT DECEMBER 1979 EGG-R-003 AN AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE SHPACK PROPERTY Norton, Massachusetts DATE OF SURVEY: AUGUST 1979 C. M . BLUITT Project Scientist APPROVED FOR PUBLICATION ?4@ t!lz- T. P. Stuart, Manager Remote Sensing Sciences Department THE REMOTE SENSING. lA!ORATORY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ____--- I(-__ ABSTRACT An aerial radiological survey to measure terrestrial gamma radiation was carried out over the Shpack property in Norton, Massachusetts. In past years this property was used as a dump site for certain types of radioactive waste materials. Gamma ray data were collected over a 2.2 km* area centered on the site by flying northwest-southeast lines spaced 60 m apart. Processed data indicated that detected radioisotopes and their associated gamma ray

232

GEA Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Place Bochum, Germany Zip 44809 Sector Biofuels, Solar Product Bochum-based, engineering group specialising in process engineering and components for the food, pharmaceutical and petrochemical industries. GEA through its subsidiaries is involved in the solar and biofuels sector. Coordinates 51.485955°, 7.210866° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.485955,"lon":7.210866,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Interagency Advanced Power Group, Solar Working Group: Meeting minutes  

SciTech Connect

This report is the minutes of the Solar Working group. The meeting was prompted by the Steering Group`s desire to resolve issues the Solar Working Group.

Not Available

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Survivable pulse power space radiator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiator system is described for use on an outer space vehicle, which must survive a long period of nonuse and then radiate large amounts of heat for a limited period of time. The radiator includes groups of radiator panels that are pivotally connected in tandem, so that they can be moved to deployed configuration wherein the panels lie largely coplanar, and to a stowed configuration wherein the panels lie in a stack to resist micrometerorite damage. The panels are mounted on a boom which separates a hot power source from a payload. While the panels are stowed, warm fluid passes through their arteries to keep them warm enough to maintain the coolant in a liquid state and avoid embrittlement of material. The panels can be stored in a largely cylindrical shell, with panels progressively further from the boom being of progressively shorter length. 5 figs.

Mims, J.; Buden, D.; Williams, K.

1988-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

THERMAL RADIATION FROM AN ACCRETION DISK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An effect of stimulated radiation processes on thermal radiation from an accretion disk is considered. The radial density waves triggering flare emission and producing quasiperiodic oscillations in radiation from an accretion disk are discussed. It is argued that the observational data suggest the existence of the weak laser sources in a twotemperature plasma of an accretion disk. It was shown earlier that thermal radio emission has a stimulated character and that this statement is probably valid for thermal blackbody radiation in others spectral ranges (Prigara 2003). According to this conception thermal radiation from non-uniform gas is produced by an ensemble of individual emitters.

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH GROUP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;5:567­571. 9. Wien F, Wallace BA. Calcium fluoride micro cells for synchrotron radiation circular dichroism modeling and drug design pro- gram. J Mol Graphics 1990;8:52­56. 7. Guideline Q6B, International Conference

Krivobokova, Tatyana

237

Trails Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some serve as quiet and non-motorized alternatives between the Townsite and LANL or between technical areas. The Trails Working Group, established in December 2003, includes representatives from local citizen hiking groups, Los Alamos County, Forest Service, Park Service, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the NNSA Los

238

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

239

Radiation Effects In Ceramics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RADIATION MATERIALS SCIENCE IN TECHNOLOGY APPLICATIONS II: Radiation Effects in Ceramics. Sponsored by: Jt. SMD/MSD Nuclear Materials...

240

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry. ... OH. US Air Force Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory, Wright-Patterson - Base, OH [100548- 0] PA. ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Radiation Physics Division, part of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ... the measurement standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

242

1451 Group 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... It defines a set of implementaition-independent application programming interface (API) as needed. Website: http://grouper.ieee.org/groups/1451/0/.

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

243

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR FEEDBACK HOME About the Community Advisory...

244

Image Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Group works to support the needs for Homeland Security Presidential Directive (HSPD)-12 and the Personal Identity Verification (PIV) card for ...

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Grid Integration Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grid Integration Group The Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducts research that advances the near-term adoption of demand response (DR) technologies, policies, programs,...

246

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

247

Electron Physics Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Group conducts wide ranging, cross-disciplinary research ... phenomenon known as spin transfer torque, a ... energy and generates heat, creating two ...

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

248

Hydrogen Technologies Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

NERSC Users Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policies Data Analytics & Visualization Science Gateways User Surveys NERSC Users Group Teleconferences Annual Meetings NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Operations...

250

Scientific Interest Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis High Pressure LiquidSoft-Matter Surface Scattering Powder Diffraction SAXS Surface & Interface Scattering XAS X-ray Micros.Imaging Scientific Interest Groups...

251

Tribal Topic Group Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

* Email information on Indian 101 course to Tribal Topic Group * Government panel at future TEC on impacts of broader hazmat transportation spectrum * Set up next conference...

252

MEMS Test Working Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... p2. Top view of cantilevers in in-plane length group. p1. Unconventional anchor design. Same anchor design as in thickness test structures. ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Particle Data Group - Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group HOME: pdgLive Summary Tables Reviews, Tables, Plots Particle Listings Europe, Africa, Middle East, India, Pakistan, Russia and all other countries For copies of: ...

254

Standards Working Groups - Logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... group is to define practices and test methods related to the overall deployment procedures and constraints in place for emergency response. ...

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

255

TMS Group Savings Plus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A money-saving group discount on auto and homeowners policies; Convenient payment plans Including automatic checking account deduction or direct home...

256

Electron Physics Group Staff Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Electron Physics Group Staff. ... Jabez McClelland, Group Leader Jabez McClelland is the Group Leader of the CNST Electron Physics Group. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

257

RADIOISOTOPE AND RADIATION APPLICATIONS. Quarterly Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was given of the possible hazards to consumers from radioisotope residues in consumer products. A laboratory demonstration was given of the use of Mn/sup 54/ to facilitate removal of manganese from process feed water. lt was found in the hazards evaluation that the "worst case" of radiation exposure from residual radioisotopes in steel gives a radiation exposure somewhat less than the maximum allowable dose levels for occupational exposure. Initial study indicates that for actual cases, the radiation exposures to be expected from radioisotope residues in steel products would ordinarily be small compared to natural background. An exception to this generalization might be found when a longer lived isotope like Mn/sup 54/ was present. Preliminary results of the laboratory demonstnation of using Mn/sup 54/ to monitor the removal of manganese from feed water indicated that the method may allow a considerable improvement in accuracy of process control. The study of the mechanism of formation of free radicals in polymeric materials was continued. Emphasis was placed on examination of the effect of structural factors on the efficiency of free-radical site formation in acrylate polymers. The investigation was extended to include an examination of the effect on free-radical formation of the constituents on the carbon atom located alpha to the ester group. Polymethylacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate, and polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate were used in this study. Measurement of the volatile products from the irradiation of the polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate was completed. The data substantiated earlier findings which indicated that the point of attack in free-radical formation occurs on the ester side chain. (auth)

Sunderman, D.N., ed.

1961-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Training Work Group Charter | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Charter Charter Training Work Group Charter The Training Work Group fosters improvements in the quality, efficacy, and delivery of DOE safety training, and realizes significant efficiencies by minimizing redundancies across the DOE Complex. The Work Group provides a collaborative opportunity for DOE to gain insights from operating contractors, the contractor work force and their representatives, and to combine the best wisdom to assure that the most efficient and effective worker health and safety program expectations, approaches and processes are in place and are well communicated. Training Work Group Charter More Documents & Publications HSS Briefing to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) on Union Activities 10 CFR 851 Implementation Work Group Charter

259

On A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups. Using homotopy invariance of group homology in one variable, we identify the sections of A^1-fundamental group sheaves of an isotropic reductive group G over an infinite field k with the second homology group of the group G(k). This provides explicit loops representing elements in the A^1-fundamental groups.

Konrad Voelkel; Matthias Wendt

260

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) Print E-mail Interagency Working Groups (IWGs) are the primary USGCRP vehicles for implementing and coordinating research activities within and across agencies. These groups are critical to Program integration and in assessing the Program's progress. The working groups span a wide range of interconnected issues of climate and global change, and address major components of the Earth's environmental and human systems, as well as cross-disciplinary approaches for addressing these issues. IWGs correspond to program functions and are designed to bring agencies together to plan and develop coordinated activities, implement joint activities, and identify and fill gaps in the Program's plans. They allow public officials to communicate with each other on emerging directions within their agencies, on their stakeholder needs, and on best practices learned from agency activities. Together, these functions allow the agencies to work in a more coordinated and effective manner.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Steering Group Report Fermilab Director Pier Oddone convened the Fermilab Steering Group in March 2007. Members comprised particle and accelerator scientists from Fermilab and the national community. Fermilab Deputy Director Young-Kee Kim served as chair. The Steering Group subsequently formed subgroups to provide advice on the best physics opportunities that new facilities could offer. These subgroups drew upon university and laboratory scientists largely from outside Fermilab. The Steering Group took a number of steps to obtain as much input as possible from a broad spectrum of the U.S. particle- and accelerator-physics community. The Steering Group chair gave presentations and conducted town-hall-style sessions at meetings of all the major collaborations at Fermilab (CDF, DZero, MINOS, MINERνA,

262

Topic Group Participants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Group Report Topic Group Report Presented to: Transportation External Coordination Working Group April 5, 2005 Phoenix, Arizona Recent 180(c) Topic Group Activities Issue Papers 1. Funding Distribution Method 2. Allowable Activities 3. Definitions 4. Pass-Through Requirements 5. Contingency Plans 6. 180(c) Policy or Rulemaking 7. Timing and Eligibility* 8. Funding for Related Activities* 9. State Fees* 10. Funding Allocation Approach* 180(c) Policy & Procedures * Executive Summary * Draft Policy & Procedures * Draft Grant Application Pckg * Appendix *Papers 7-10 still under discussion Today's Discussion Items * Reviewed Topic Group member comments on a variety of issues * Key issues included: - Funding allocation and timing of grants - Planning grants - State fees/matching requirements - Related non-training activities

263

Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation Facility SURF III ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Synchrotron Radiation. What is Synchrotron Radiation? Synchrotron radiation ... known. Properties of Synchrotron Radiation. Schwinger ...

264

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group May 17, 2007 January 16, 2007 August 31,...

265

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

266

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

267

PASSION FOR WOOD THE DLH GROUP 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are generated outside Denmark · Sales and procurement offices, warehouses and processing facilities in 33 ............................................................................... 21 THE DLH GROUP 2006 This publication outlines the essential aspects of the develop- ment in the DLH

268

September 2012, Training Work Group Status Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training Work Group Status Overview Training Work Group Status Overview Accomplishments: 1. May 7-8. Attended NIEHS Trainer's Exchange in Oak Ridge. 2. May 8-9. Joined HAMMER in visiting Oak Ridge entities to build support for the Radworker pilot. Entities visited included ORISE, Y-12, DOE TRU Project, and local labor entities. 3. June 19-20. Participated with Char Wells, Sandia National Laboratory Training Manager, (NTC, NIEHS and HAMMER in attendance) at a DOE M&O contractor led Learning/Training Workshop. - Obtained EFCOG commitment to create a Human Capital Training Subgroup under the Business Management Working Group. - Serving this group as data repository and communications hub for efforts to standardize General Employee Radiation Training (GERT) within DOE. - Briefed the complex wide Radworker reciprocity concept finding interest and

269

The HERMES RICH group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construction and use of a dual radiator Ring Imaging ?erenkov (RICH) detector is described. This instrument was developed for the HERMES experiment at DESY which emphasises measurements of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. It provides particle identification for pions, kaons, and protons in the momentum range from 2 to 15 GeV, which is essential to these studies. The instrument uses two radiators, C4F10, a heavy fluorocarbon gas, and a wall of silica aerogel tiles. The use of aerogel in a RICH detector has only recently become possible with the development of clear, large, homogeneous and hydrophobic aerogel. A lightweight mirror was constructed using a newly perfected technique to make resin-coated carbon-fiber surfaces of optical quality. The photon detector consists of 1934 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) for each detector half, held in a soft steel matrix to provide

N. Akopov; E. C. Aschenauer; K. Bailey; S. Bernreuther; N. Bianchi; G. P. Capitani; P. Carter; E. Cisbani; R. De Leo; E. De Sanctis; V. Djordjadze; S. Frullani; F. Garibaldi; J. -o. Hansen; B. Hommez; M. Iodice; H. E. Jackson; P. Jung; R. Kaiser; J. Kanesaka; R. Kowalczyk; L. Lagamba; A. Maas; V. Muccifora; K. Negodaeva; W. -d. Nowak; T. G. Oneill; D. H. Potterveld; D. Ryckbosch; Y. Sakemi; F. Sato; A. Schwind; T. -a. Shibata; K. Suetsugu; E. Thomas; M. Tytgat; G. M. Urciuoli; K. Van De Kerckhove; R. Van De Vyver; S. Yoneyama; H. Zohrabian; L. F. Zhang

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

System and method for secure group transactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a secure system, processing on one or more computers, provides a way to control a group transaction. The invention uses group consensus access control and multiple distributed secure agents in a network environment. Each secure agent can organize with the other secure agents to form a secure distributed agent collective.

Goldsmith, Steven Y. (Rochester, MN)

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Indoor Environment Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Environment Group Indoor Environment Group The Indoor Environment Group performs research that aims to maintain healthy and productive indoor environments while buildings are made more energy efficient. We study the links between indoor environmental quality, building ventilation, building energy efficiency and occupants' health, performance and comfort. We undertake experiments in laboratory and field settings and employ modeling to characterize indoor environmental conditions and evaluate the fate, transport and chemical transformations of indoor pollutants. We elucidate pathways of pollutant exposure, evaluate and develop energy efficient means of controlling indoor environmental quality, and provide input for related guidelines and standards. Contacts William Fisk WJFisk@lbl.gov (510) 486-5910

272

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steering Group Steering Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania Joel Butler Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sally Dawson Brookhaven National Laboratory Helen Edwards Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Thomas Himel Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stephen Holmes Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Young-Kee Kim, Chair Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory/ University of Chicago Andrew Lankford University of California, Irvine David McGinnis Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Sergei Nagaitsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Vladimir Shiltsev Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Maury Tigner Cornell University Hendrik Weerts Argonne National Laboratory Contributors Neutrino Physics Group Eugene Beier University of Pennsylvania

273

Group key management  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an architecture and implementation for doing group key management over a data communications network. The architecture describes a protocol for establishing a shared encryption key among an authenticated and authorized collection of network entities. Group access requires one or more authorization certificates. The implementation includes a simple public key and certificate infrastructure. Multicast is used for some of the key management messages. An application programming interface multiplexes key management and user application messages. An implementation using the new IP security protocols is postulated. The architecture is compared with other group key management proposals, and the performance and the limitations of the implementation are described.

Dunigan, T.; Cao, C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chemical Reference Data Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Reference Data Group. Welcome. The Chemical Reference Data Group compiles, evaluates, correlates and measures ...

2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

275

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Welcome. The Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group conducts research in ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

276

Cyber Infrastructure Group Home Page  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyber Infrastructure Group. Welcome. The Cyber Infrastructure Group (775.04) addresses the integration and interoperability ...

2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

NIST Laser Applications Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Applications Group. Welcome. The Laser Applications Group advances laser technology for applications in optical ...

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Multiplexed Biomolecular Science Group. Dr. Marc Salit (Group Leader). Autumn ...

2012-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

279

Process for reducing radioactive contamination in phosphogypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process of two crystallization stages for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum is disclosed. In the process anhydrite crystals are obtained through dehydration of the radiation containing phosphogypsum in strong sulfuric acid; a portion of the anhydrite crystals containing the radioactive contamination is converted to substantially radiation free gypsum by crystallizing out on a large solids concentration of radiation free gypsum seed crystals; and coarse radiation free gypsum crystals are separated from small anhydrite crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination.

Gaynor, J.C.; Palmer, J.W.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

280

Focus Group I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION - A COMMUNITY FOCUS GROUP STUDY OF ATTITUDES IN WILLISTON, NORTH DAKOTA Sheila K. Hanson, Energy & Environmental Research Center Daniel J. Daly, Energy & Environmental Research Center Edward N. Steadman, Energy & Environmental Research Center John A. Harju, Energy & Environmental Research Center June 2005 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY In April 2005, representatives of the Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) at the University of North Dakota, held two focus groups in Williston, North Dakota. A total of sixteen people participated; seven on April 20 and nine on April 21. The purpose of the focus group research was to gain insight into the public perception of carbon sequestration from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fermilab | Employee Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phone Book Fermilab at Work Search Search Go Skip over navigation to main content EAG Home About the EAG EAG Members Questions and Answers Suggestions and Questions Focus Group...

282

File Groups at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another user "jimi", but does not want other members of bigsci to be able to see the data, the PI for Big Science could create a new group (for example, "ejdata", for elvis...

283

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

page 1 - Go to home page 2 - Go to search page 7 - Privacy policy 8 - Terms of use 9 - Go to contactcomment page LBNL Community Advisory Group: HOME CALENDAR...

284

The Ren Group - Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ren Group Home Research Members Publications ContactsLinks NEWS Dec 15, 2012 Host an Electron Tomography Workshop with Peter Ercius at NCEM from Jan. 16-18th, 2013. Nov 20, 2012...

285

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL, UK Top B. Krusche Institute of Physics University of Basel CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland Top Yu. Kuyanov COMPAS Group IHEP Protvino, RU-142284...

286

Security Topic Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Group Security and TEC * Tension exists between open forum concept of TEC and the ability of STG members to discuss security topics. - DOE will maintain the open forum - it will not form a subgroup of cleared members NAS Study * Some members want STG to formally recommend a fully independent review of security issues - DOE is reviewing the NAS study and has not formulated a position Security Topic Group (Continued) Classification Guide & Information Sharing Protocol * Guide is finished and undergoing internal concurrence - Slated for late September release * Protocol will be completed once the guide is issued Security-Related Lessons Learned * Lessons learned document was distributed and comments requested by the end of March Security Topic Group (Continued) SRG/CVSA Survey

287

Finite groups and quantum physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concepts of quantum theory are considered from the constructive 'finite' point of view. The introduction of a continuum or other actual infinities in physics destroys constructiveness without any need for them in describing empirical observations. It is shown that quantum behavior is a natural consequence of symmetries of dynamical systems. The underlying reason is that it is impossible in principle to trace the identity of indistinguishable objects in their evolution-only information about invariant statements and values concerning such objects is available. General mathematical arguments indicate that any quantum dynamics is reducible to a sequence of permutations. Quantum phenomena, such as interference, arise in invariant subspaces of permutation representations of the symmetry group of a dynamical system. Observable quantities can be expressed in terms of permutation invariants. It is shown that nonconstructive number systems, such as complex numbers, are not needed for describing quantum phenomena. It is sufficient to employ cyclotomic numbers-a minimal extension of natural numbers that is appropriate for quantum mechanics. The use of finite groups in physics, which underlies the present approach, has an additional motivation. Numerous experiments and observations in the particle physics suggest the importance of finite groups of relatively small orders in some fundamental processes. The origin of these groups is unclear within the currently accepted theories-in particular, within the Standard Model.

Kornyak, V. V., E-mail: kornyak@jinr.ru [Joint Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratory of Information Tecnnologies (Russian Federation)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Ashlawn Group LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ashlawn Group LLC Ashlawn Group LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name The Ashlawn Group LLC Place Alexandria, Virginia Zip 22304 Sector Services Product Provides management and technical consulting services, sales representations, product development, design and manufacturing process engineering solutions for industrial applications for the Department of Defense and energy-related industries. References The Ashlawn Group LLC[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Ashlawn Group LLC is a company located in Alexandria, Virginia . References ↑ "The Ashlawn Group LLC" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=The_Ashlawn_Group_LLC&oldid=352164"

289

Primary Radiation Damage Formation  

SciTech Connect

The physical processes that give rise to changes in the microstructure, and the physical and mechanical properties of materials exposed to energetic particles are initiated by essentially elastic collisions between atoms in what has been called an atomic displacement cascade. The formation and evolution of this primary radiation damage mechanism are described to provide an overview of how stable defects are formed by displacement cascades, as well as the nature and morphology of the defects themselves. The impact of the primary variables cascade energy and irradiation temperature are discussed, along with a range of secondary factors that can influence damage formation.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Radiation Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brotherhood of Locomotive Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers & Trainmen Scott Palmer BLET Radiation Safety Officer New Hire Training New Hire study topics * GCOR * ABTH * SSI * Employee Safety * HazMat * Railroad terminology * OJT * 15-week class * Final test Hazardous Materials * Initial new-hire training * Required by OSHA * No specified class length * Open book test * Triennial module Locomotive Engineer Training A little bit older...a little bit wiser... * Typically 2-4 years' seniority * Pass-or-get-fired promotion * Intensive program * Perpetually tested to a higher standard * 20 Weeks of training * 15 of that is OJT * General Code of Operating Rules * Air Brake & Train Handling * System Special Instructions * Safety Instructions * Federal Regulations * Locomotive Simulators * Test Ride * Pass test with 90% Engineer Recertification

291

RADIATION COUNTER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a radiation counter, and more particularly, to a scintillation counter having high uniform sensitivity over a wide area and capable of measuring alpha, beta, and gamma contamination over wide energy ranges, for use in quickly checking the contami-nation of personnel. Several photomultiplier tubes are disposed in parallel relationship with a light tight housing behind a wall of scintillation material. Mounted within the housing with the photomultipliers are circuit means for producing an audible sound for each pulse detected, and a range selector developing a voltage proportional to the repetition rate of the detected pulses and automatically altering its time constant when the voltage reaches a predetermined value, so that manual range adjustment of associated metering means is not required.

Goldsworthy, W.W.

1958-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Topic Group Summary - July 1999...

293

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup Tracking Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup...

294

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAGIS Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries TRAGIS Subgroup TRAGIS Subgroup April 11, 2006 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

295

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Draft Work Plan More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic...

296

CNST Group Seminars - 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Joshua Hihath Arizona State University. ... electrostatic potential in high spatial and energy resolutions, and ... MI is a four-wave-mixing (FWM) process ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

297

NIST Thermodynamic Metrology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... circuits are made in reaction chambers, or process "tools", each of ... such as the altitude of aircraft, barometric pressure for weather prediction, and ...

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Polymer Matrix Composites Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

breakthroughs in the development of materials for lightweight pressure vessels, flywheel energy storage systems, processing technology for thick-wall structures, rapid curing...

299

Transportation External Coordination Working Group:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

External Coordination External Coordination Working Group: Background and Process Judith Holm National Transportation Program Albuquerque, New Mexico April 21, 2004 TEC History * DOE's Office of Environmental Management (EM) and Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) formed TEC in 1992 * EM & RW developed MOU and TEC charter in 1992 - Other DOE program offices joined in 1993-94 * Other agencies (DOT, FRA, NRC, EPA) have been active participants Meeting Locations 1992-present Some Founding Principles * TEC concept centered on unique stakeholder accountability principles - Participation by key responsible parties in technical/policy issue discussion and resolution results in increased confidence and more efficient business decisions * Ultimate goal: develop multi-year set of

300

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photoelectrochemical Working Group Photoelectrochemical Working Group Promising PEC Materials The PEC Working Group invites the international research community to assist in the development of PEC Materials White Papers to track the research status of the most promising materials classes for solar water splitting. The Photoelectrochemical Working Group meets regularly to review technical progress, develop synergies, and collaboratively develop common tools and processes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting. Its members include principal investigators and supporting personnel from U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-funded photoelectrochemical projects. More information on planned DOE photoelectrochemical activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Gamma Radiation & X-Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays 1. Gamma radiation and X-rays are electromagnetic radiation like visible light, radio waves, and ultraviolet light. These electromagnetic radiations...

302

The China Energy Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The China Energy Group A city-owned cogeneration plant, built in 1989 in Weihai, Shandong, received an award from the Chinese government as an advanced energy-efficient enterprise. The Energy Analysis Program's China Energy Group-a core team of four Mandarin-speaking U.S. and Chinese researchers, plus leader Mark Levine and a dozen other staff members-has worked closely with energy policymakers in China for nearly a decade. Their goal is to better understand the dynamics of energy use in China and to develop and enhance the capabilities of institutions that promote energy efficiency in that country. This unique collaboration began as a joint effort with the Energy Research Institute of China's State Planning Commission, but the Group's network has expanded to

303

DOE STGWG Group  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STGWG Group STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Missouri, Nevada, Oregon, Tennessee and Texas. The tribal membership is composed of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Isleta Pueblo, Jemez Pueblo, Navajo Nation, Nez Perce Tribe, Santa Clara Pueblo, Pueblo de San Ildefonso, Seneca Nation of Indians, Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, and the

304

LBNL Community Advisory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organizing Framework Organizing Framework CAG Organizing Framework The Community Advisory Group Organizing Framework is composed of three primary components: CAG Purpose and Charge CAG Member Responsibilities Operating Principles CAG Membership and Participation Download a pdf of the CAG Organizing Framework. Purpose and Charge The purpose of the LBNL Community Advisory Group (CAG) is to provide input into the Lab's physical plans and development projects. The specific charge to this group is to: Advise LBNL staff on issues related to the environmental impacts of proposed planning and development projects; Articulate key community planning and design principles to be considered in the review of individual projects as well as to guide the physical development of LBNL overall; Identify recommended strategies and actions for addressing community

305

Lighting Group: Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview Overview of the Lighting Research Group The Lighting Research Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory performs research aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes, throughout the State of California and across the Nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research in the Lighting Group falls into three main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems and Controls and Communications. Click on a link below for more information about each of these research areas. Sources and Ballasts investigates next generation light sources, such as

306

Specific Group Hardware  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores with hyperthreading). The total local disk space is 1.9 TB. It is running Scientific Linux SL release 5.5 (Boron) and is disk booted. It is in rack 17. palicevo2 The Virtual Organization (VO) server testbed. It's a Dell PowerEdge R410 with 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors, each with 4 cores (16 virtual cores

307

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

308

Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinocome Group Place Beijing Municipality, China Sector Solar Product A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector References Sinocome Group1 LinkedIn Connections...

309

Bell, group and tangle  

SciTech Connect

The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

Solomon, A. I., E-mail: a.i.solomon@open.ac.u [Open University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2) W. J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , Newand R. J. Berry, "Manual on Radiation Dosimetry" (New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (New

Perez-Mendez, V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 2 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Process/Continual Improvement Document Number: P-012 Rev 11_0406 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: David Rocha Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: Q-001 Quality Manual Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): F-016 Process/Continual Improvement Form, P-001 Document Control Process, P-008 Corrective Action and Preventive Action, P-004 Business System Management Review P-012 Process/Continual Improvement Rev. 11_0406 Page 2 of 6 Revision History:

312

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

313

In Search of Rapid Processing Routes for CIGS Photovoltaic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effects of Sensitizer Length on Radiation Crosslinked Shape-Memory ... Microstructural Development during Thermo Mechanical Processing of Pipeline Steel.

314

Stimulated radiative laser cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building a refrigerator based on the conversion of heat into optical energy is an ongoing engineering challenge. Under well-defined conditions, spontaneous anti-Stokes fluorescence of a dopant material in a host matrix is capable of lowering the host temperature. The fluorescence is conveying away a part of the thermal energy stored in the vibrational oscillations of the host lattice. In particular, applying this principle to the cooling of (solid-state) lasers opens up many potential device applications, especially in the domain of high-power lasers. In this paper, an alternative optical cooling scheme is outlined, leading to radiative cooling of solid-state lasers. It is based on converting the thermal energy stored in the host, into optical energy by means of a stimulated nonlinear process, rather than a spontaneous process. This should lead to better cooling efficiencies and a higher potential of applying the principle for device applications.

Muys, Peter

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Group Nearest Neighbor Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given two sets of points P and Q, a group nearest neighbor(GNN) query retrieves the point(s) of P with the smallestsum of distances to all points in Q. Consider, for instance,three users at locations q1, q2 and q3 that want to find a meeting point (e.g., ...

Dimitris Papadias; Qiongmao Shen; Yufei Tao; Kyriakos Mouratidis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

BCDA Group Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dohn Arms 2-0272 - 401B1161 9:00AM - 5:30PM EPICS application development and support, CAT contact Marianne Binetti 2-5023 - 401C1239-C 8:30AM - 5:00PM Group Secretary Jeff...

317

Solar radiation resource assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bulletin discusses the following: introduction; Why is solar radiation resource assessment important Understanding the basics; the solar radiation resource assessment project; and future activities.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Courses on Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation The following is an incomplete list of courses on Synchrotron Radiation. For additional courses, check lightsources.org. XAFS School The APS XAFS School...

319

Radiation Physics Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Events. Radiation Physics Events. (showing 1 - 3 of 3). CIRMS 2012 Start Date: 10/22/2012 ...

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bayesian Radiation Source Localization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Measurements and General Instrumentation

Kenneth D. Jarman; Erin A. Miller; Richard S. Wittman; Christopher J. Gesh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

322

Chemical Hydrides Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Process Development Approach To Deliver Economic H 2 via NaBH 4 NaBH 4 Natural Gas Solar Energy Hydro Power H 2 Catalyst + H 2 Borate Return Geo- thermal Energy Source Borates...

323

SCM Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud microphysical parameterizations cloud microphysical parameterizations with SCM, CAPT and M-PACE observations X. Liu (PNNL) S. Xie, J. Boyle, S. Klein (LLNL) S. J. Ghan (PNNL) H. Morrison, A. Gettelman (NCAR) Goal: Improve Climate Model Parameterizations Tools: single column models (SCM) and DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT) (LLNL CAPT team) ARM measurements provide unique data for model evaluation and guidance for parameterization improvement Motivations Cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds has a significant impact on cloud radiative forcing, precipitation formation, etc. The treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is often oversimplified Liquid/ice partitioning according to a temperature dependent function; Neglect ice nucleation and Bergeron-Findeisen

324

Cell Systems Science Group Staff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Members of the Cell Systems Science Group. Dr. John T. Elliott (Group Leader). Dr. Donald H. Atha ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

NIST Ionizing Radiat. Div. - 2004: Strategic Focus 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of high levels of absorbed dose, as required in the industrial radiation processing of ... tremendous increase in the use of low-energy, photon ...

326

NIST Ionizing Radiat. Div. - 2002: Strategic Focus 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of high levels of absorbed dose, as required in the industrial radiation processing of ... tremendous increase in the use of low-energy, photon ...

327

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

328

Apparatus and method for detecting gamma radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high efficiency radiation detector for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation from small-volume, low-activity liquid samples with an overall uncertainty better than 0.7% (one sigma SD). The radiation detector includes a hyperpure germanium well detector, a collimator, and a reference source. The well detector monitors gamma radiation emitted by the reference source and a radioactive isotope or isotopes in a sample source. The radiation from the reference source is collimated to avoid attenuation of reference source gamma radiation by the sample. Signals from the well detector are processed and stored, and the stored data is analyzed to determine the radioactive isotope(s) content of the sample. Minor self-attenuation corrections are calculated from chemical composition data.

Sigg, Raymond A. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Brunnian subgroups of mapping class groups and braid groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we continue our study of the Delta-group structure on the braid groups and mapping class groups of a surface. We calculate the homotopy groups of these Delta-groups and prove some results about Brunnian braid groups and Brunnian mapping class groups. This is the second of a pair of papers on these structures. 1 Introduction and statement of results In this paper we study the sequences

A. J. Berrick; E. Hanbury; J. Wu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Group Vision Care Policy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vision Vision Care Policy Group Name: LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL SECURITY, LLC. RETIREES Group Number: 12284390 Divisions 0005 & 0006 Effective Date: JANUARY 1, 2011 EVIDENCE OF COVERAGE Provided by: VISION SERVICE PLAN INSURANCE COMPANY 3333 Quality Drive, Rancho Cordova, CA 95670 (916) 851-5000 (800) 877-7195 EOC NM 03/02 11/25/08 CLD In addition to the information contained in this Benefit Program Summary, the LANS Health & Welfare Benefit Plan for Retirees Summary Plan Description contains important information about your LANS health and welfare benefits. For additional information: For Retirees: Customer Care Center (866) 934-1200 www.ybr.com/benefits/lanl LANL Benefits Website for Retirees: http://www.lanl.gov/worklife/benefits/retirees/

331

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fermilab Icon Fermilab Icon Photo Home About About the Steering Group Members & Contributors Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Acknowledgement Contents Contents Chapter 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Chapter 2 Fermilab and the Quantum Universe Chapter 3 Fermilab and the ILC Chapter 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier Chapter 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier Chapter 6 Beyond the ILC and the LHC Chapter 7 A Fermilab Plan for Discovery Appendix Appendix Appendix Appendix A Steering Group charge Appendix B Fermilab and the ILC Appendix C The international neutrino program Appendix D Neutrino science with 8 GeV and 800 GeV protons Appendix E Muon-to-electron conversion in nuclei Appendix F Precision physics experiments with kaon beams Appendix G Facilities considered Appendix H Steps toward a muon collider

332

NERSC User Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NERSC User Group Meeting NERSC User Group Meeting Oct 18, 2010 Outline * About OpenMP * Parallel Regions * Worksharing Constructs * Synchronization * Data Scope * Tasks * Using OpenMP at NERSC 2 3 Common Architectures * Shared Memory Architecture - Multiple CPUs share global memory, could have local cache - Uniform Memory Access (UMA) - Typical Shared Memory Programming Model: OpenMP, Pthreads, ... * Distributed Memory Architecture - Each CPU has own memory - Non-Uniform Memory Access (NUMA) - Typical Message Passing Programming Model: MPI, ... * Hybrid Architecture - UMA within one SMP node - NUMA across nodes - Typical Hybrid Programming Model: mixed MPI/OpenMP, ... What is OpenMP * OpenMP is an industry standard API of C/C++ and Fortran for shared memory parallel programming.

333

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MEA BREAKOUT GROUP MEA BREAKOUT GROUP TOPICS FOCUSED ON CCMs * IONOMER * CATALYST LAYER * PERFORMANCE * DEGRADATION * FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES IONOMER * DEVELOP IMPROVED IONOMERS: PERFLUORINATED IONOMERS (O2 SOLUBILITY) HYDROCARBON IONOMERS * ANODE FLOODING ISSUES, CATHODE DRYOUT ISSUES: - DEVELOP SEPARATE IONOMERS FOR ANODE/CATHODE - IONOMER CHEMISTRY * IONOMER/CATALYST INTERACTION * CL / MEMBRANE INTERACTION * IMPROVED CL/M INTERFACES - IONOMER CROSSLINKING CATALYST LAYER * CATALYST CHALLENGES IN ANODE SIDE * FOCUS ON NON-PGM CATALYSTS * INK FORMULATION * CCM VS. GDE * DELAMINATION PERFORMANCE * BACKUP POWER APPLICATION - STATUS: 60C, 0.5V, 0.2W/CM2 (DEGRADATION ISSUES) - TARGETS: SHOULD BE SET CONSISTENT WITH DOE STATIONARY TARGETS (2015) * AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATION - INCREASE POWER DENSITY TO >0.5W/CM2

334

CHA Guidelines Working Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Community Health Assessment Guidelines have been updated from the original document published in 1997. The revisions reflect various published sources, as well as accumulated experience with community health assessment within the province of Manitoba. Special thanks to the members of the CHA Guidelines Working Group, composed of representatives of regional health authorities from across the province and Manitoba Health and Healthy Living staff. These guidelines are made

Jody Allan; Sonia Busca Owczar; Ingrid Botting; Maggie Campbell; Bunmi Fatoye; Bill Funk; Tannis Erickson; Sue Lockhart; Ales Morga; Deborah Malazdrewicz; Leonie Stranc

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A diagnostic technique for addressing group performance in capstone projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

"Students' awareness of their own group processes can be poor (or Absent)" [1]. Yet professional software development situates much work within groups, and capstone courses are often designed to develop capabilities, such as effective teamwork. Supervising ...

Tony Clear

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Radiation The objectives of this Lecture;Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Atmospheric Effects on Incoming Solar Radiation of this energy is lost to space. The third process in the atmosphere that modifies incoming solar radiation

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

337

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Meeting Summaries Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington DC TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - March 15, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Minneapolis TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - September 21, 2004 Albuquerque TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - April 22, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Jacksonville TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - January 20, 1999 Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1998

338

NIST MIRF - Accelerator Radiation Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerator Radiation Physics. Medium-energy accelerators are under investigation for production of channeling radiation ...

339

NIST Synchrotron radiation in SSD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synchrotron radiation in the Sensor Science Division. ... Synchrotron Radiation-Based Calibrations for Space Weather Prediction. ...

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radiation Detection Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Directory of Accredited Laboratories. Radiation Detection Instruments. In 2005, the Department of Homeland Security requested ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

radiation.p65  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

5 5 United States Department of Energy This fact sheet explains the potential health hazards associated with the radioactive decay of uranium and other radioactive elements found in ore and mill tailings. Potential Health Hazards of Radiation Man-made sources of radiation, most notably from medical uses and consumer products, contribute to the remaining radiation dose that individuals receive. A few household products, including smoke detectors, micro- wave ovens, and color televisions, emit small amounts of radiation. For most people, the benefits from using such products far outweigh the radiation risks. Radiation Dose Radiation is measured in various units. Individuals who have been exposed to radiation have received a radiation dose. Radiation dose to people is expressed in

342

Advanced Concepts Breakout Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshop Workshop Advanced Concepts Working Group Facilitator: John J. Petrovic Scribe: Sherry Marin Advanced Storage Techniques/ Approaches in Priority Order 1. Crystalline Nanoporous Materials (15) 2. Polymer Microspheres (12) Self-Assembled Nanocomposites (12) 3. Advanced Hydrides (11) Metals - Organic (11) 4. BN Nanotubes (5) Hydrogenated Amorphous Carbon (5) 5. Mesoporous materials (4) Bulk Amorphous Materials (BAMs) (4) 6. Iron Hydrolysis (3) 7. Nanosize powders (2) 8. Metallic Hydrogen (1) Hydride Alcoholysis (1) Overarching R&D Questions for All Advanced Materials * Maximum storage capacity - theoretical model * Energy balance / life cycle analysis * Hydrogen absorption / desorption kinetics * Preliminary cost analysis - potential for low cost, high

343

Renormalization group functional equations  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, Thomas L. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124-8046 (United States); Zachos, Cosmas K. [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439-4815 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

344

Renormalization group functional equations.  

SciTech Connect

Functional conjugation methods are used to analyze the global structure of various renormalization group trajectories and to gain insight into the interplay between continuous and discrete rescaling. With minimal assumptions, the methods produce continuous flows from step-scaling {sigma} functions and lead to exact functional relations for the local flow {beta} functions, whose solutions may have novel, exotic features, including multiple branches. As a result, fixed points of {sigma} are sometimes not true fixed points under continuous changes in scale and zeroes of {beta} do not necessarily signal fixed points of the flow but instead may only indicate turning points of the trajectories.

Curtright, T. L.; Zachos, C. K. (High Energy Physics); (Univ. of Miami)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

SPPR Group Proposal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal Proposal June 23, 2010 Agenda Purpose of Meeting Presenters Background Information  Three Terminal Plan & Market Access  Business Case  Transmission Infrastructure Program ED5-Palo Verde Project Potential Rate Impacts Discussion / Comments 2 Purpose of Meeting Provide background information Share the SPPR Group's current proposal and how it might affect Parker-Davis Project (P-DP) customers Obtain your feedback on the proposal 3 Presenters Background Information - Todd Rhoades ED5-PV Project Description - Todd Rhoades Project Marketability - John Steward Project Cost & Financing - Jack Murray Potential Rate Impacts - Jack Murray Next Steps - Todd Rhoades 4 Three Terminal Plan November 2009 5 Business Case

346

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 Phoenix TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - April 4, 2005 Albuquerque TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Presentation - April 21, 2004 New Orleans TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - January 29, 2002 Portland TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - February 6, 2001 Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Tribal Topic Group Summary - July 13, 1999

347

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Rail Topic Group Task Plan Final Rail Topic Group Paper Strawman Report Comments Matrix 2002 Summary of the Rail Topic Group Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison...

348

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

349

Lighting Group: People  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

People People Lighting Group Staff Phone Mailstop Email Group Leader [area code 510] Rubinstein, Francis 486-4096 90R3111 FMRubinstein@lbl.gov Staff Scientists Berman, Sam 5682 90R3111 Clear, Robert 486-4286 90R3111 RDClear@lbl.gov Research Associates Enscoe, Abby (510) 486 6077 90R3111 AIEnscoe@lbl.gov Fritz, Randolph M. (510) 495 2532 90R3111 RFritz@lbl.gov Ghatikar, Girish 486-6768 90R3111 GGhatikar@lbl.gov Granderson, Jessica 486-7692 90R3111 JGranderson@lbl.gov Howells, Jack 4096 46R0125 MRHowells@lbl.gov Kiliccote, Sila 495-2615 90R3111 SKiliccote@lbl.gov Liu, Gao 7207 70R0108B GLiu@lbl.gov Wen, Yao-Jung 4702 90R3111 YJWen@lbl.gov Yazdanian, Mehry 486-4701 90R3111 MYazdanian@lbl.gov Research Technicians Galvin, James 486-4661 47R0112 JEGalvin@lbl.gov Technical Support DiBartolomeo, Dennis 486-4702 90R3111

350

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup Tracking Subgroup March 27, 2006 March 6, 2006...

351

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries...

352

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

353

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup Rail Planning Timeline Benchmarking Project: AREVA Trip...

354

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup April 6, 2006 February 23, 2006 Draft January 24, 2006...

355

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup July 17, 2007 September 19, 2007 December 12, 2007 More...

356

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup Planning Subgroup March 30, 2006 February 15, 2006 Draft...

357

CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

Deng Xinfa [School of Science, Nanchang University, Jiangxi 330031 (China); Yu Guisheng [Department of Natural Science, Nanchang Teachers College, Jiangxi 330103 (China)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

358

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents ARCHIVED DOCUMENTS Inspections Summary Matrix TEC Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail Comparison Regulatory Summary Matrix More...

359

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

BWR radiation control: plant demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first year's progress is presented for a four-year program intended to implement and evaluate BRAC radiation reduction operational guidelines at the Vermont Yankee BWR and to document the results in sufficient detail to provide guidance to other BWR owners. Past operational, chemistry and radiation level data have been reviewed to provide a historical base of reference. Extensive sampling and chemistry monitoring systems have been installed to evaluate plant chemistry status and the effects of program implemented changes. Radiation surveys and piping gamma scans are being performed at targeted locations to quantify radiation level trends and to identify and quantify piping isotopics. Contact radiation levels on the recirculation line at Vermont Yankee have been increasing at a rate of 175 mR/h-EFPY since 1978. A materials survey of feedwater and reactor components in contact with the process liquid has been performed to identify sources of corrosion product release, particularly cobalt and nickel. A feedwater oxygen injection system has been installed to evaluate the effects of oxygen control on feedwater materials corrosion product releases. A baseline performance evaluation of the condensate treatment and reactor water cleanup systems has been completed. Data on organics and ionics at Vermont Yankee have been obtained. A methodology of BWR feedwater system layup during extended outages was developed, and an evaluation performed of layup and startup practices utilized at Vermont Yankee during the fall 1980 and 1981 refueling outages.

Palino, G.F.; Hobart, R.L.; Wall, P.S.; Sawochka, S.G.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Does an accelerated electron radiate Unruh radiation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An accelerated particle sees the Minkowski vacuum as thermally excited, and the particle moves stochastically due to an interaction with the thermal bath. This interaction fluctuates the particle's transverse momenta like the Brownian motion in a heat bath. Because of this fluctuating motion, it has been discussed that the accelerated charged particle emits extra radiation (the Unruh radiation) in addition to the classical Larmor radiation, and experiments are under planning to detect such radiation by using ultrahigh intensity lasers constructed in near future. There are, however, counterarguments that the radiation is canceled by an interference effect between the vacuum fluctuation and the fluctuating motion. In fact, in the case of an internal detector where the Heisenberg equation of motion can be solved exactly, there is no additional radiation after the thermalization is completed. In this paper, we revisit the issue in the case of an accelerated charged particle in the scalar QED. We first prove the e...

Iso, Satoshi; Zhang, Sen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Hydrology Group - UNSAT-H  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H H Recharge Estimation UNSAT-H is a FORTRAN computer code used to simulate the one-dimensional flow of water, vapor, and heat in soils. The code addresses the processes of precipitation, evaporation, plant transpiration, storage, and deep drainage. The UNSAT-H computer code is used to understand the movement of water, heat, and vapor in soils so better decisions can be made about land use, waste disposal, and climate change. Example Tests and Typical Applications include studies of the water balance behavior of surface covers over shallow land burial waste sites and studies of land disturbance effects on recharge rates. The UNSAT-H computer code is managed by the Hydrology Group at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is a U.S. Department of Energy

363

Horizon Energy Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United

Joel Theis; Jovan Ilic; Booz Allen Hamilton; Shawn Rabiei; Marija Prica; David Wilson; Jesse Goellner; Steve Pullins; Joe Miller; Tom Grabowski; Chris Wyatt

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Process for purifying phosphogysum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for reducing radioactive contamination of phosphogypsum. Phosphogypsum containing radioactive material is calcined to form hemihydrate crystals carrying the radioactive contaminants, and a portion of the crystals is converted to substantially radiation-free gypsum crystals which are readily separated from the hemihydrate crystal relics containing substantially all of the radioactive contamination.

Palmer, J.W.; Gaynor, J.C.

1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

365

Control Group Variation in the Janus Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Variation in the Janus Studies Group Variation in the Janus Studies Benjamin Haley 1 , William Liu 1 , Mary J. Kwasny 2 , Tatjana Paunesku 1 , Gayle Woloschak 1 1. Department of Radiation Oncology, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 2. Department of Preventative Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois 60611 Data from historical radiobiological mega-studies is being migrated online to enable open access to the results of these studies. The availability of these large data sets offers the possibility of merging the results of multiple studies for meta-analysis. However, researchers must overcome several hurdles in order to analyze data from disparate radiobiology studies. Variations in animal treatment, autopsy methods, and nomenclature must be accounted for before developing

366

Instrumentation @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instrumentation Instrumentation The Catalysis Group at BNL is leading research initiatives into the development of new tools and techniques that focus on the characterization of heterogeneous catalytic reactions and catalysts using imaging, spectroscopy and scattering techniques and integrated combinations of them under reaction conditions to unravel the morphology, chemical and structural properties, of catalysts, respectively. These efforts revolve around the use of synchrotron radiation (NSLS), electrons (CFN) and quantum tunneling tools with particular thrusts into imaging, spectroscopy and scattering. Groups Instrumentation(BNL) Three UHV chambers with diverse instrumentation for surface characterization: LEED, UPS, XPS, AES, TPD, ISS, PM-AP-IRRAS, Reactivity Cell. All the systems include ancillary instrumentation such as sputtering guns and metal evaporators. The IRRAS system was retrofitted with an ambient pressure (AP) cell on top of the UHV system. The sample can be prepared and characterized in UHV and then transfer in vacuum to the AP cell.

367

Lighting Group: Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software Software Lighting Software The Lighting Group has developed several computer programs in the course of conducting research on energy efficient lighting. Several of these programs have proven useful outside the research environment. One of the most popular programs for advanced lighting applications is Radiance. For more information on this program and its availability, click on the link below. RADIANCE Radiance is a suite of programs for the analysis and visualization of lighting in design. The primary advantage of Radiance over simpler lighting calculation and rendering tools is that there are no limitations on the geometry or the materials that may be simulated. Radiance is used by architects and engineers to predict illumination, visual quality and appearance of innovative design spaces, and by researchers to evaluate new

368

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Facilities for the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Facilities for the Intensity Frontier SuperNuMI (SNuMI) Project X Existing rings Project X and the ILC Project X and longer term facilities Summary Facilities for the Intensity Frontier The Steering Group considered a variety of accelerator facilities and programs using the following criteria: Support for physics research goals, effective use of accelerator assets freed up at the end of Tevatron operations, Alignment with the ILC R&D program, Potential for achievement over the next decade. Twelve facilities received consideration using some or all of these criteria. Appendix G sorts those facilities not described in this chapter based on relevance to proton- or electron-based programs. This chapter describes the facilities that would support neutrino science and precision physics at the intensity frontier. The facilities include an intense proton source and its injection to the existing rings at Fermilab for a variety of programs.

369

Particle Data Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About PDG About PDG About the PDG PDG authors Order PDG products PDG citation Encoder tools Job at LBNL Contact Us Downloads Resources Errata Archives Atomic Nuclear Properties Online HEP Info Non-PDG Databases Durham-RAL databases Current experiments Guide to Data Partial-wave analyses Contact Us News The "Reviews, Tables, Plots" section has been updated. The next book edition is due in early summer 2014, and the booklet in late summer 2014. Funded By: US DOE US NSF CERN MEXT (Japan) INFN (Italy) MEC (Spain) IHEP & RFBR (Russia) Mirrors: USA (LBNL) Brazil CERN Indonesia Italy Japan (KEK) Russia (Novosibirsk) Russia (Protvino) UK (Durham) The Review of Particle Physics J. Beringer et al. (Particle Data Group), Phys. Rev. D86, 010001 (2012) and 2013 partial update for the 2014 edition.

370

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Edition and 2007 Web Update 6 Edition and 2007 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors New authors of 2007 Web Update M. Antonelli, 102 H. Baer, 64 G. Bernardi, 103 M. Carena, 51 M.-C. Chen, 11 B. Dobrescu, 51 J.-F. Grivaz, 104 T. Gutsche, 105 J. Huston, 45 T. Junk, 51 C.-J. Lin, 1 H. Mahlke, 106 P. Mohr, 107 P. Nevski, 75 S. Rolli, 108 A. Romaniouk, 109 B. Seligman, 110 M. Shaevitz, 111 B. Taylor, 107 M. Titov, 56,112 G. Weiglein, 78 A. Wheeler, 69 Authors of the 2006 Review of Particle Physics W.-M. Yao et al. (Particle Data Group), J. Phys. G 33, 1 (2006) (bibtex format) Also see: PS format or PDF format. AUTHORS OF LISTINGS AND REVIEWS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors (RPP 2006)

371

Working Group Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K. Zorika G. Zhang Focus of Discussion The session convened on March 2, with brief introductions by Bill Clements. The purpose of the session was to discuss the scientific merits of retrofitting TOGA/TAO buoys with shortwave radiometers. Three questions were posed at the outset of the session to focus the discussion.

372

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

61 61 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.11.150 © 2012 Future Science Ltd In 1950 Reese et al. proposed a mechanism for cel- lulose hydrolysis, which involved two general com- ponents, C 1 and C x , acting in sequence [1]. According to the model, the C 1 component first disrupted and swelled the crystalline cellulose, possibly releasing soluble oligo saccharides into solution. The C x compo- nent, which was shown to have endoglucanase activity, was then able to effectively hydrolyze the previously inaccessible substrate along with the soluble oligo- saccharides. Furthermore, the activity of the mixture was found to be higher than the activity of each com- ponent acting alone, indicating that the components were acting synergistically. In the following years, a number of groups began to identify and characterize

373

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

374

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab In This Section: Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab Guidelines The Steering Group's proposed plan Executive Summary: A Plan for Fermilab The Fermilab Steering Group has developed a plan to keep U.S. accelerator-based particle physics on the pathway to discovery, both at the Terascale with the LHC and the ILC and in the domain of neutrinos and precision physics with a high-intensity accelerator. The plan puts discovering Terascale physics with the LHC and the ILC as Fermilab's highest priority. While supporting ILC development, the plan creates opportunities for exciting science at the intensity frontier. If the ILC remains near the Global Design effort's technically driven timeline, Fermilab would continue neutrino science with the NOνA experiment, using the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) proton plan, scheduled to begin operating in 2011. If ILC construction must wait somewhat longer, Fermilab's plan proposes SNuMI, an upgrade of NuMI to create a more powerful neutrino beam. If the ILC start is postponed significantly, a central feature of the proposed Fermilab plan calls for building an intense proton facility, Project X, consisting of a linear accelerator with the currently planned characteristics of the ILC combined with Fermilab's existing Recycler Ring and the Main Injector accelerator. The major component of Project X is the linac. Cryomodules, radio-frequency distribution, cryogenics and instrumentation for the linac are the same as or similar to those used in the ILC at a scale of about one percent of a full ILC linac.

375

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

376

Integrating grouped and ungrouped data: the point process case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ND), South Dakota (SD), Wisconsin (WI) and Iowa (IA). WeNorth Dakota South Dakota Wisconsin Wyoming observationsTotal wildfires Michigan Wisconsin Total wildfires Total

Hernandez Magallanes, Irma del Consuelo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

INTERPERSONAL RELATIONS AND GROUP PROCESSES Going Green to Be Seen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

describe one of the most successful cars in recent U.S. history: the Toyota Prius, a small-statured automobile coveted across demographic categories. Why is the Prius is so successful? One possibility is that the Prius is a hybrid gas­electric vehicle, meaning that it costs less to fuel. Yet it costs many thousands

Sorenson, Michael

378

New Process for Separation and Recovery of Platinum Group Metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

2010 Vittorio de Nora Award Winner: Designing Crushing and Grinding Circuits for ... Materialization of Manganese by Selective Precipitation from Used Battery.

379

Swatch Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Swatch Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Swatch Group Place Switzerland Product String representation "The Swatch Grou ... ther industries" is too long. References Swatch...

380

Parabolic subgroups of Garside groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Garside monoid is a cancellative monoid with a finite lattice generating set; a Garside group is the group of fractions of a Garside monoid. The family of Garside groups contains the Artin-Tits groups of spherical type. We generalise the well-known notion of a parabolic subgroup of an Artin-Tits group into that of a parabolic subgroup of a Garside group. We also define the more general notion of a Garside subgroup of a Garside group, which is related to the notion of LCMhomomorphisms between Artin-Tits groups. We prove that most of the properties of parabolic subgroups extend to this subgroups.

Eddy Godelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

NSLS Committees | Interlock Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interlock Working Group Charge The NSLS Interlock Working Group shall review all new construction and modification of NSLS and SDL personnel protection interlock systems. It is the...

382

Verdeo Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Verdeo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Verdeo Group Place Washington, DC Zip 20006 Sector Carbon Product Washington based integrated carbon solutions company. References...

383

Enovos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enovos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Enovos Group Place Germany Sector Solar Product Germany-based utility. The utility has interests in solar energy. References Enovos...

384

Copelouzos Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Copelouzos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Copelouzos Group Place Athens, Greece Product Fully integrated business development organisation, servicing key industrial and...

385

Samaras Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twitter icon Samaras Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Samaras Group Place Greece Sector Renewable Energy, Services Product Greek consultancy services provider with...

386

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne Theory Group: Postdoctoral Position The Theory Group in the Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory is seeking exceptional candidates for a postdoctoral position...

387

Police Group, Emergency Services Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Police Group Logo Police Group Mission Statement: To serve and protect the Brookhaven National Laboratory site, its employees, guests, and physical assets from unwanted...

388

Interagency Advanced Power Group -- Steering group meeting minutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document contains the draft meeting minutes of the Steering Group of the Interagency Advanced Power Group. Included are the discussions resulting from the presentation of working group reports and the results of a discussion of IAPG policies and procedures. In the appendix are the reports of the following working groups: Electrical, Mechanical, Solar, and Systems.

Not Available

1993-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Surgery groups of the fundamental groups of hyperplane arrangement complements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a recent result of Bartels and Lueck (arXiv:0901.0442) we deduce that the Farrell-Jones Fibered Isomorphism conjecture in L-theory is true for any group which contains a finite index strongly poly-free normal subgroup, in particular, for the Artin full braid groups. As a consequence we explicitly compute the surgery groups of the Artin pure braid groups. This is obtained as a corollary to a computation of the surgery groups of a more general class of groups, namely for the fundamental group of the complement of any fiber-type hyperplane arrangement in the complex n-space.

S. Roushon.; 491-500

390

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - General Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

General Radiation Information Answers to Questions about Radiation Dose Ranges Charts - tables showing radiation dose ranges from radio diagnostics to cancer radiotherapy....

391

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Websites about Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Websites About Radiation The ABC's of Nuclear Science A Teacher's Guide To The Nuclear Science Wall Chart Answers to Questions about Radiation and You Background Radiation:...

392

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

393

TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Topic Groups Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually by phone and email between TEC's semiannual general meetings, participate in conference calls and report back to the Department and TEC members. The Topic Groups are intended to work on significant issues, produce a relevant product and sunset the group when the work is

394

Plutonium radiation surrogate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A self-contained source of gamma-ray and neutron radiation suitable for use as a radiation surrogate for weapons-grade plutonium is described. The source generates a radiation spectrum similar to that of weapons-grade plutonium at 5% energy resolution between 59 and 2614 keV, but contains no special nuclear material and emits little .alpha.-particle radiation. The weapons-grade plutonium radiation surrogate also emits neutrons having fluxes commensurate with the gamma-radiation intensities employed.

Frank, Michael I. (Dublin, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Physics at the Intensity Frontier In This Section: Physics at the Intensity Frontier Neutrino science Precision physics Summary Physics at the Intensity Frontier The Standard Model of Particle Physics succeeds brilliantly at explaining the nature of the physical universe, but it leaves many open questions. Despite the development of myriad intriguing theories to address these questions, ultimately only experiment can light the way to discovery. In our own time, experiments at the energy frontier can search directly for new phenomena beyond the Standard Model. Alongside the compelling physics of Terascale explorations at the LHC and the ILC, another window on discovery has opened with the remarkable recent developments in neutrino science and with the ability to detect new physics phenomena in ultrarare events or in the small perturbations they induce in other processes. This chapter focuses on accelerator-based opportunities at the intensity frontier. Experiments in symmetry-violating processes and rare decays can provide windows into new mass scales of many thousands of TeV. Neutrino experiments may tell us about physics at even higher energies near unification or about an entirely new source of CP violation that may help explain the excess of matter over antimatter in the universe

396

Electric Power Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. This report was prepared as a result of work sponsored in part by the California Energy Commission. It does not necessarily represent the views of the Energy Commission, its employees, or the State of California. The

B. J. Kirby; J. W. Van Dyke; C. Martinez; A. Rodriguez

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gold and Black Group Paws Training Plans Gold Group Black Group Week Day Distance Description Day://www.badgerlandstriders.org/home/Races/TheDeerRun.htm. Black Group The goal of the Black Group is to go from moderate running to 13 miles over a ten week include periodic walking breaks as needed. The Black Group should run four days a week on a Monday

Saldin, Dilano

398

The Brattle Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The opinions and views expressed in this staff report do not necessarily represent those of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, its Chairman, or individual Commissioners, and are not binding on the Commission. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The analysis presented in this report was produced by a team of consultants from The Brattle Group (TBG), Freeman, Sullivan & Co. (FSC) and Global Energy Partners (GEP). Each firm led different parts of the project, typically with significant input from the other firms. TBG managed the project and was the lead contractor to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). TBG also had the lead in producing this report. FSC was the lead contractor on model development, and also developed the state and customer-segment level load shapes that were used as starting points for developing demand response impacts. FSC and TBG worked together to develop price impacts that reflect the extensive research that has been done in this area. GEP had the lead on data development with input from both TBG and FSC. Gary Fauth, an independent consultant specializing in advanced metering business case analysis, had the lead role in producing the advanced metering deployment scenario that underlies one of the potential estimates. Senior staff from all three firms worked jointly to develop scenario definitions and to provide defensible input assumptions for key drivers of demand response potential.

Ahmad Faruqui; Ryan Hledik; Stephen S. George; Josh Bode; Paul Mangasarian; Ingrid Rohmund; Greg Wikler; Debyani Ghosh; Sharon Yoshida

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

World Bank Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

purpose of this Good Practice Note is to increase the awareness of the health risks related to occupational asbestos exposure, provide a list of resources on international good practices available to minimize these risks, and present an overview of some of the available product alternatives on the market. The need to address asbestos-containing materials (ACM) as a hazard is no longer under debate but a widely accepted fact. Practices regarding asbestos that are normally considered acceptable by the World Bank Group (WBG) in projects supported through its lending or other instruments are addressed in the WBGs General Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) Guidelines. 1 This Good Practice Note provide background and context for the guidance in the WBG EHS Guidelines. Good practice is to minimize the health risks associated with ACM by avoiding their use in new construction and renovation, and, if installed asbestos-containing materials are encountered, by using internationally recognized standards and best practices (such as those presented in Appendix 3) to mitigate their impact. In all cases, the Bank expects borrowers and other clients of World Bank funding to use alternative materials wherever feasible.

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Physics & Astronomy Experimental Particle Physics Group Kelvin Building, University­taking conditions are described. An analysis of the detector performance, using silica aerogel, air and C 4 F 10 gas tag of B mesons using kaons. The RICH­1 detector [1--3] combines gas and aerogel radiators to provide

Glasgow, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Charter  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Health, Safety and Security Focus Group [Name of Work Group] Work Group Charter (Date) I. PURPOSE The HSS Focus Group [Name of Work Group] is one of several HSS Work Groups, established to address worker health, safety and security programs improvements across the U.S. Department of Energy Complex. The [Name of Work Group] has been established to (state specific purpose). II. OBJECTIVES (State the desired impact(s) and major outcome(s) for, the Work Group) 1. Establish specific improvement goals, intended outputs and supporting activities that respond to identified worker health and safety improvement needs. 2. Establish measurable indicators when possible to support findings, recommendations and accomplishments.

402

CFN | Thin Films Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility Thin-Film Processing Facility Online Manager (FOM) website FOM manual ESR for lab 1L32 (High-Resolution SEM and x-ray microanalysis) CFN Operations Safety Awareness (COSA) form for 1L32 (ESR #1) Technical article on LABE detector (Analytical SEM) Request form for off-hours access (.doc, First time only, renewals done via email) Lab Tool capabilities Primary contact Training schedule Backup contact Booking calendar Booking rules SOP 1L32 Analytical SEM Camino Thurs 10-12 PM Stein FOM yes yes Hitachi S-4800 SEM Stein Tues 1-3 PM Black FOM no yes booking calendar: yes = need to reserve tool time in calendar before using tool booking rules: yes = specific rules exist for reserving tool time SOP = standard operating procedure (basic instructions)

403

future science group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

35 35 ISSN 1759-7269 10.4155/BFS.13.56 © 2013 Future Science Ltd While lignocellulosic feedstocks represent a promising renewable and sustainable alternative to petroleum- based fuels, high production costs associated with con- version processes currently prevent them from being economically viable for large-scale implementation [1]. The production of biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstocks requires the depolymerization of cell wall carbohydrates into simple sugars that can be utilized during fermentation. However, the desired cellulose microfibrils are surrounded by a matrix of lignin and hemicellulose, which greatly inhibits their accessibility to hydrolytic enzymes [1,2]. Lignin is a phenolic polymer that reinforces the secondary cell wall, confers struc-

404

February 2012 Facilities Coordinator's Group Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Sal · Parnassus Avenue repaving project ­ Sal · Environmental Room Pilot PM Program Update ­ Jewel WO management processes ­ Completed · Improved group organizational structure (restructured labor · Q&A and wrap-up - Jewel #12;2 Environmental Room Pilot PM Program · Environmental Rooms - Warm

Mullins, Dyche

405

Tachyons and Gravitational Cherenkov Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND GRAVITATIONAL CHERENKOV RADIATION CHARLES SCHWARTZwould emit gravitational radiation. It is very small.gravitational waves; Cherenkov radiation. In a recent work,

Schwartz, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advisor Paul Hoover Special Assistant and Issues Management Coordinator Elinor Gwynn Radiation Protection Radiation Protection The Radiation Protection Division supports the...

407

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

408

Hypothesis Test: Comparing Two Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Hypothesis Test: Comparing Two Groups Hypothesis Test: Two-sample Elements of two-sample test of two paired groups Comparing proportions of two groups Hypothesis test errors GOG 502/PLN 504 Youqin Huang 42 Two-sample Test Hypothesis tests on the difference between two different groups Examples

Huang, Youqin

409

Affine buildings for dihedral groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct rank 2 thick nondiscrete affine buildings associated with an arbitrary finite dihedral group.

Berenstein, Arkady

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Security Outreach and Integration Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Outreach and Integration Group. Welcome. The US economy, citizens, and government rely on information technology. ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

411

Maryland Radiation Act (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The policy of the state is to provide for the constructive use of radiation and control radiation emissions. This legislation authorizes the Department of the Environment to develop comprehensive...

412

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

413

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nonionizing Radiation and HIV Name: Flora R Pitchford Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: What are the effects of nonionizing radiation on DNA , RNA or any other cell...

414

Radiation and Ozone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation is the driving force for the general circulation of the atmosphere and controls the Earth's climate. Ozone is responsible for the warm stratosphere and protects life on Earth from harmful solar ultraviolet radiation. In July 1959, the ...

G. Ohring; R. D. Bojkov; H-J. Bolle; R. D. Hudson; H. Volkert

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Multizone naphtha reforming process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a catalytic reforming process for conversion of a naphtha hydrocarbon at reforming conditions having at least two segregated catalyst zones. The improvement comprises contacting the hydrocarbon in a first zone with a first catalyst comprising tin and at least one platinum group metal deposited on a solid catalyst support followed by contacting in a second zone with a second catalyst comprising at least one metal selected from the group consisting of platinum group metals deposited on a solid catalyst support.

Fleming, B.

1987-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Catalytic coal hydroliquefaction process  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for the liquefaction of coal in a hydrogen donor solvent in the presence of hydrogen and a co-catalyst combination of iron and a Group VI or Group VIII non-ferrous metal or compounds of the catalysts.

Garg, Diwakar (Macungie, PA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Engineering Design and Automation in the Applied Engineering Technologies (AET) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of some design and automation-related projects ongoing within the Applied Engineering Technologies (AET) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. AET uses a diverse set of technical capabilities to develop and apply processes and technologies to applications for a variety of customers both internal and external to the Laboratory. The Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) represents a new paradigm for the processing of nuclear material from retired weapon systems in an environment that seeks to minimize the radiation dose to workers. To achieve this goal, ARIES relies upon automation-based features to handle and process the nuclear material. Our Chemical Process Development Team specializes in fuzzy logic and intelligent control systems. Neural network technology has been utilized in some advanced control systems developed by team members. Genetic algorithms and neural networks have often been applied for data analysis. Enterprise modeling, or discrete event simulation, as well as chemical process simulation has been employed for chemical process plant design. Fuel cell research and development has historically been an active effort within the AET organization. Under the principal sponsorship of the Department of Energy, the Fuel Cell Team is now focusing on technologies required to produce fuel cell compatible feed gas from reformation of a variety of conventional fuels (e.g., gasoline, natural gas), principally for automotive applications. This effort involves chemical reactor design and analysis, process modeling, catalyst analysis, as well as full scale system characterization and testing. The group's Automation and Robotics team has at its foundation many years of experience delivering automated and robotic systems for nuclear, analytical chemistry, and bioengineering applications. As an integrator of commercial systems and a developer of unique custom-made systems, the team currently supports the automation needs of many Laboratory programs.

Wantuck, P. J. (Paul J.); Hollen, R. M. (Robert M.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radiation protection at CERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper gives a brief overview of the general principles of radiation protection legislation; explains radiological quantities and units, including some basic facts about radioactivity and the biological effects of radiation; and gives an overview of the classification of radiological areas at CERN, radiation fields at high-energy accelerators, and the radiation monitoring system used at CERN. A short section addresses the ALARA approach used at CERN.

Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Silari, Marco; Streit-Bianchi, Marilena; Theis, Christian; Vincke, Heinz; Vincke, Helmut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation Dosimetry Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation Dosimetry Data. Stopping-Power and Range Tables for Electrons, Protons, and Helium Ions. MJ Berger The databases ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Radiation Shields Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Materials Solutions for the Nuclear Renaissance. Presentation Title, Radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

EGSI: TGKA Based Security Architecture for Group Communication in Grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security is one of the most important issues in the grid. Several processes generated by a user need to communicate securely. The existing architectures do not provide support for secure group communication in grid. Grid applications differ in various ... Keywords: Application class awareness, access controls, distributed systems, group key agreement, group communication

Rajesh Ingle; G. Sivakumar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

F: Precision physics experiments with kaon beams F: Precision physics experiments with kaon beams The charged kaon experiment enabled by the Tevatron Stretcher and Project X could deliver a precision measurement of the K+→π+νv branching fraction that matches the small theoretical uncertainty. In parallel, the charged kaon experiment can probe many other decay channels including a precision measurement of K+→e+ν and a search for K+→π+μe which are both uniquely incisive probes of Terascale physics and beyond. The neutral kaon experiment driven by the enormous 8 GeV beam power provided by Project X could discover and measure the ultrarare KL→π0νv process. As the sensitivity reaches down to the Standard Model branching ratio of 3×10-11, several extensions of the Standard Model would be excluded or, even better, new Terascale phenomena would be detected. Upon attaining the Standard Model sensitivity the neutral kaon experiment then becomes sensitive to very high mass scale (>1000 TeV/c2) through precision measurement of the KL→π0νv branching fraction.

423

Radiation (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation (North Dakota) Radiation (North Dakota) Radiation (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Environmental Regulations The Department of Health is the designated agency to receive registration applications and issue certificates necessary for the production, storage, processing, and disposal of radioactive wastes. The Industrial Commission of North Dakota is tasked with monitoring and enforcing provisions related

424

Fermilab Steering Group Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acknowledgement Acknowledgement The Fermilab Steering Group is grateful to many members of the particle physics and accelerator community for their expert advice and contributions to the preparation of this report: Robert Abrams, Nikolai Andreev, Charles Ankenbrandt, Giorgio Apollinari, Jeff Appel, Rick Baartman, Jonathan Bagger, Wander Baldini, Barry Barish, Gerald Blazey, Dixon Bogert, Ed Bonnema, James Brau, Steven Brice, Stanley Brodsky, Daniel Broemmelsiek, Alan Bross, Charles Brown, Douglas Bryman, William Bugg, Alexey Burov, Phillip Burrows, Maksim Bychkov, Robert Cahn, Marcela Carena, Jean-Paul Carneiro, Harry Carter, Robert Carey, Brian Chase, David Christian, Michael Church, Willie Clark, Janet Conrad, John Corlett, Mary Anne Cummings, Dan Dale, Chris Damerell, Paul Debevec, André de Gouvea, Fritz DeJongh, Marcel Demarteau, Paul Derwent, Milind Diwan, Harold Lee Dodds, Gerald Dugan, Craig Dukes, Estia Eichten, Eckhard Elsen, Louis Emery, Peter Fisher, George Flanagan, Tony Favale, Gary Feldman, Buck Field, David Finley, Bonnie Fleming, Brian Foster, Emil Frlez, Kenneth Ganezer, Consolato Gattuso, Stephen Geer, Norman Gelfand, Terry Goldman, Keith Gollwitzer, Maury Goodman, Paul Grannis, Daniel Green, Terry Grimm, Alan Hahn, Reidar Hahn, Michael Harrison, Ayman Hawari, David Hertzog, Robert Hirosky, David Hitlin, Richard Holmes, Maxine Hronek, Patrick Hurh, Jim Hylen, Gerald Jackson, Andreas Jansson, David Johnson, Jeffrey Johnson, Rol Johnson, John Johnstone, Chang Kee Jung, Steven Kahn, Peter Kammel, Yuri Kamyshkov, David Kawall, Kara Keeter, Christina Keller, Robert Kephart, Harold Kirk, David Kirkby, Arkadiy Klebaner, Sergey Korenev, Ioanis Kourbanis, Andreas Kronfeld, Krishna Kumar, James Lackey, Kenneth Lande, Valeri Lebedev, Kevin Lesko, Tony Leveling, Mats Lindroos, Laurence Littenberg, Vladimir Lobashev, Kevin Lynch, William Marciano, Daniel Marlow, John Marriner, Michael Martens, Dongming Mei, Mark Messier, Peter Meyers, Phillip Miller, Shekhar Mishra, Hugh Montgomery, Kevin Munday, Homer Neal, David Neuffer, Andrew Norman, Kenneth Olsen, Peter Ostroumov, Satoshi Ozaki, Robert Palmer, Vaia Papadimitriou, Stephen Parke, Kent Paschke, Ralph Pasquinelli, Todd Pedlar, Stephen Peggs, Susan Pfiffner, Henryk Piekarz, Thomas Phillips, Dinko Pocanic, Milorad Popovic, James Popp, Eric Prebys, Chris Quigg, Regina Rameika, Ronald Ray, Lee Roberts, Tom Roberts, Natalie Roe, Jerome Rosen, Marc Ross, Howard Rubin, Randy Ruchti, Richard Sah, Niki Saoulidou, Kate Scholberg, Alan Schwartz, Yannis Semertzidis, Abraham Seiden, Melvyn Shochet, Marilyn Smith, Henry Sobel, Paul Souder, Giulio Stancari, Michelle Stancari, Raymond Stefanski, James Stone, Sheldon Stone, Michael Syphers, Alex Tarasiewicz, Eddie Tatar, Rex Tayloe, Alvin Tollestrup, Yagmur Torun, Todd Treado, Michael Turner, Fred Ullrich, John Urbin, Alexander Valishev, Leonid Vorobiev, Nick Walker, Robert Webber, Bernard Wehring, Steven Werkema, Christopher White, Herman White, James Whitmore, David Wildman, Kent Alan Williams, William Willis, Phil Winkle, William Snow, Stanley Wojcicki, Hitoshi Yamamoto, Peter Yamin, Katsuya Yonehara, Cary Yoshikawa, Albert Young, Michael Zeller, Michael Zisman, Alexander Zlobin, and Robert Zwaska

425

Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum achievable emittance in the synchrotron light sources for short bunches.

Novokhatski, Alexander; /SLAC

2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Accounting of heterogeneity in the estimation of radiation risks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem is considered of taking account of heterogeneity in the individual radiosensitivity in evaluating the radiation risk of the origin of a disease in a group of persons subjected to the radiation action. Mathematical models are described for ... Keywords: 87.15.Aa

A. I. Mikhalskii; V. K. Ivanov; S. Yu. Chekin; M. A. Maksyutov; V. V. Kashcheev

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Radiation transport. Progress report, April 1-December 31, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research and development progress in radiation transport by the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Group X-6 for the last nine months of CY 83 is reported. Included are unclassified tasks in the areas of Fission Reactor Neutronics, Deterministic Transport Methods, Monte Carlo Radiation Transport, and Cross Sections and Physics.

O'Dell, R.D.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Preliminary Process and Market Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

13, 2013 BBNP Preliminary Process & Market Study ? LBNL Project Manager: Ed Vine DOE Project Manager: Jeff Dowd Project Team: Research Into Action, Inc., NMR Group,...

429

Process / CI Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 7 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Post Travel Summary Document Number: ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: ADMP-004, Contractor Travel Process Notify of Changes: EOTA Staff Referenced Document(s): ADMF-007 EOTA Pre-Travel Authorization Form ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 11_0221 Initial Release ADMF-017 Post Travel Summary 11_0221 Page 3 of 3

430

Absence of Black Holes Information Paradox in Group Field Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we will analyse the black hole information paradox in group field cosmology. We will first construct a group field cosmology with third quantized gauge symmetry. Then we will argue that that in this group field cosmology the process that change the topology of spacetime are unitarity process. Thus, the information paradox from this perspective appears only because we are using a second quantized formalism to explain a third quantized process. A similar paradox would also occur if we analyse a second quantized process in first quantized formalism. Hence, we will demonstrated that in reality there is no information paradox but only a breakdown of the second quantized formalism.

Mir Faizal

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radiation detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

Nelson, Melvin A. (Santa Barbara, CA); Davies, Terence J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Morton, III, John R. (Livermore, CA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

PERSONAL RADIATION MONITOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transistorized, fountain pen type radiation monitor to be worn on the person is described. Radiation produces both light flashes in a small bulb and an audible warning tone, the frequency of both the tone and light flashes being proportional to radiation intensity. The device is powered by a battery and a blocking oscillator step-up power supply The oscillator frequency- is regulated to be proportional to the radiation intensity, to provide adequate power in high radiation fields, yet minimize battery drain at low operating intensities. (AEC)

Dilworth, R.H.; Borkowski, C.J.

1961-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Sandia Laboratories radiation facilities  

SciTech Connect

This brochure is designed as a basic source of information for prospective users of Sandia Laboratories Radiation Facilities. It contains a brief description of the various major radiation sources, a summary of their output characteristics, and additional information useful to experimenters. Radiation source development and source upgrading is an ongoing program, with new source configurations and modes of operation continually being devised to satisfy the ever-changing radiation requirements of the users. For most cases, the information here should allow a potential user to assess the applicability of a particular radiation facility to a proposed experiment and to permit some preirradiation calculations and planning.

Choate, L.M.; Schmidt, T.R.; Schuch, R.L.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DOE STGWG Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Group More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries STGWG Meeting - May...

435

NVLAP Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ionizing Radiation Dosimetry LAP. ... This site has been established for applicants to the accreditation program for ionizing radiation dosimetry. ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Welcome. The Radiation and Biomolecular Physics Division is a division ... disseminate the national standards for ionizing radiations and radioactivity ...

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course. ... 2012 NIST Radiation Thermometry Short Course October 15-19, 2012 NIST Gaithersburg, Maryland. ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

NIST Ionizing Radiation Division - 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Ionizing Radiation Division of the Physics Laboratory supports the ... meaningful, and compatible measurements of ionizing radiations (x rays ...

439

TERSat: Trapped Energetic Radiation Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation damage caused by interactions with high-energy particles in the Van Allen Radiation Belts is a leading

Clements, Emily B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iv Data Management Group Annual Report 2003 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located ........................................................................................................ 3 Text-based Data Retrieval System `drs

Toronto, University of

442

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2001 prepared by: Data Management Group Joint Program..............................................................................2 Text Based Data Retrieval System `drs' ..........................................................2 Internet Browser Data Retrieval System (iDRS)..............................................3 Complex Data

Toronto, University of

443

Professional Educators Common Interest Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Promoting teaching excellence for those involved in university education and industrial training in lipids and oils. Professional Educators Common Interest Group Professional Educators Common Interest Group aocs awards Educators fats global info

444

MTorres Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTorres Group Place Murcia, Spain Zip 30320 Sector Wind energy Product Wind turbine manufacturer References MTorres Group1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase...

445

Daesung Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Daesung Group Place Jongno-Gu Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip 110-300 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Daesung Group, a Korea-based energy provider and electric machinary...

446

Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

447

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, NIST.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

448

Dimensional Metrology Group Staff Directory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... James Bowie, Group Office Manager, Secretary, 301-975-3468. Christopher Blackburn, Physical Science Technician, 301-975-6413. ...

2013-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Surface and Nanostructure Metrology Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Surface and Nanostructure Metrology Group in the Semiconductor & Dimensional Metrology Division of the Physical Measurement Laboratory ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

450

Security Components and Mechanisms Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security Components and Mechanisms Group. Welcome. ... A security checklist is a document that contains instructions for securely configuring ...

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

451

Groups & Services, Information Technology Division, ITD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groups & Services Groups & Services Homepage | Contact Us Customer Support Cyber Security Enterprise Computing Services Network Services BCF Facility Services Web Services Unix Services Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Overview Cyber Security Policy Development: Developing and communicating Cyber Security policy and processes. Network and Application Review: Reviewing and approving all external connections to and from the BNL Intranet. Incident Investigation: Investigating Cyber Security "incidents" that are referred to the Cyber Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT). CSIRT will assist local administrators with technical and forensic investigations. Intrusion Detection Management: Supporting the Intrusion Detection system at BNL, which includes tracking events, assessing risk, and

452

Molecular doping of graphene with ammonium groups  

SciTech Connect

Successful doping of an electronic material entails the existence of stable dopant configurations that cause a shift in the Fermi level without altering significantly the electronic states of the host system. The selection of chemical groups that satisfy these conditions when adsorbed on graphene is still an open challenge. Here we show with first-principles calculations that ammonium groups meet the criteria of stable physisorption and efficient doping of graphene. We also describe processes of deactivation of ammonium dopants through their dissociation over graphene impurities or nanoribbon edges. Finally, we show that carbon nanotubes can be used to spatially confine the dopants and avert their edge-related de-activation.

Tsetseris, L. [Vanderbilt University; Pantelides, Sokrates T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Continuous Emission of A Radiation Quantum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is in accordance with such experiments as single photon self-interference that a photon, conveying one radiation energy quantum "$ h \\times$ frequency", is spatially extensive and stretches an electromagnetic wave train. A wave train, hence an energy quantum, can only be emitted by its source gradually. In both the two processes the wave and "particle" attributes of the radiation field are simultaneously prominent, where an overall satisfactory theory has been lacking. This paper presents a first principles treatment, in a unified framework of the classical and quantum mechanics, of the latter process, the emission of a single radiation quantum based on the dynamics of the radiation-emitting source, a charged oscillator which is itself extensive across its confining potential well. During the emission of one single radiation quantum, the extensive charged oscillator undergoes a continuous radiation damping and is non-stationary. This process is in this work treated using a quasi stationary approach, whereby the classical equation of motion, which directly facilitates the correspondence principle for a particle oscillator, and the quantum wave equation are established for each sufficiently brief time interval. As an inevitable consequence of the division of the total time for emitting one single quantum, a fractional Planck constant $h$ is introduced. The solutions to the two simultaneous equations yield for the charged oscillator a continuously exponentially decaying Hamiltonian that is at the same time quantised with respect to the fractional-$h$ at any instant of time; and the radiation wave field emitted over time stretches a wave train of finite length. The total system of the source and radiation field maintains at any time (integer $n$ times) one whole energy quantum, $h \\times$ frequency, in complete accordance with the notion of quantum mechanics and experiment.

J. X. Zheng-Johansson

2013-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

454

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 #12;Data Management Group Annual Report 1997 A co-operative project that is jointly funded by members of the Toronto Area Transportation Planning Data Collection: (416) 978-3941 #12;Data Management Group 1997 Annual Report Table of Contents 1 INTRODUCTION

Toronto, University of

455

Data Management Group Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Management Group Annual Report 2004 City of Hamilton City of Toronto GO Transit Regional of York Toronto Transit Commission The Data Management Group is a research program located of the funding partners: Ministry of Transportation, Ontario #12;SUMMARY The Data Management Group (DMG

Toronto, University of

456

Standardizing Naming Conventions in Radiation Oncology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. Materials and Methods: The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. Results: In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this nomenclature. Conclusions: Use of standardized naming conventions is important to facilitate comparison of dosimetry across patient datasets. The guidelines presented here will facilitate international acceptance across a wide range of efforts, including groups organizing clinical trials, Radiation Oncology Institute, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, Integrating the Healthcare Enterprise, Radiation Oncology domain (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM).

Santanam, Lakshmi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Hurkmans, Coen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Catharina Hospital, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brame, Scott; Straube, William [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tripuraneni, Prabhakar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Scripps Clinic, LaJolla, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter, E-mail: wbosch@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Advanced Technology Consortium, Image-guided Therapy QA Center, St. Louis, MO (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Radiation Detection Computational Benchmark Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Modeling forms an important component of radiation detection development, allowing for testing of new detector designs, evaluation of existing equipment against a wide variety of potential threat sources, and assessing operation performance of radiation detection systems. This can, however, result in large and complex scenarios which are time consuming to model. A variety of approaches to radiation transport modeling exist with complementary strengths and weaknesses for different problems. This variety of approaches, and the development of promising new tools (such as ORNLs ADVANTG) which combine benefits of multiple approaches, illustrates the need for a means of evaluating or comparing different techniques for radiation detection problems. This report presents a set of 9 benchmark problems for comparing different types of radiation transport calculations, identifying appropriate tools for classes of problems, and testing and guiding the development of new methods. The benchmarks were drawn primarily from existing or previous calculations with a preference for scenarios which include experimental data, or otherwise have results with a high level of confidence, are non-sensitive, and represent problem sets of interest to NA-22. From a technical perspective, the benchmarks were chosen to span a range of difficulty and to include gamma transport, neutron transport, or both and represent different important physical processes and a range of sensitivity to angular or energy fidelity. Following benchmark identification, existing information about geometry, measurements, and previous calculations were assembled. Monte Carlo results (MCNP decks) were reviewed or created and re-run in order to attain accurate computational times and to verify agreement with experimental data, when present. Benchmark information was then conveyed to ORNL in order to guide testing and development of hybrid calculations. The results of those ADVANTG calculations were then sent to PNNL for compilation. This is a report describing the details of the selected Benchmarks and results from various transport codes.

Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; McDonald, Ben S.

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

458

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Solar radiation model validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several mathematical models have been developed within the past few years which estimate the solar radiation from other weather variables. Some of these models have been used to generate data bases which are extensively used in the design and analysis of solar system. Three of these solar radiation models have been used in developing the Augmented SOLMET Solar Data Tapes for the 26 SOLMET sites and the 222 ERSATZ Solar Data Tapes. One of the models, a theoretical one, predicts the solar noon radiation for clear sky conditions from the optical air mass, precipitable water vapor and turbidity variables. A second model, an empirical one, predicts the hourly total horizontal radiation from meteorological variables. And, a third model, also an empirical one, predicts the hourly direct normal radiation from the hourly total horizontal radiation. A study of the accuracy of these three solar radiation models is reported here. To assess the accuracy of these models, data were obtained from several US National Weather Service Stations and other sources, used the models to estimate the solar-radiation, and then compared the modeled radiation values with observed radiation values. The results of these comparisons and conclusions regarding the accuracy of the models are presented.

Hall, I.J.; Prairie, R.R.; Anderson, H.E.; Boes, E.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

RADIATION: A TOOL FOR INDUSTRY. A Survey of Current Technology  

SciTech Connect

This one-year survey of industrial applications of ionizing radiation is based on interviews with workers in the field and on analysis of selected literature. ionizing radiation at kilowatt power levels from electron accelerators and from radionuclides is finding a few special applications, notably sterilization and be in various stages of process development and tcsting. These are concentrated heavily in the plastics field, though examples are found in petrochemical synthesis, product sterilization, and portable energy sources such as batteries. Ionizing radiation is not yet a processing tool of major importance to industry generally, however, because it has not yet demonstrated sufficient advantages over established methods of achieving a similar result. Thus, though ionizing radiation produces free radicals under a wide variety of conditions, it has, with few exceptions, not proved superior to other agents, such as heat and chemicals, that also produce free radicals. Insufficient specificity of action, low yields, and costs higher than those of competitive processes are among the chief difficulties found. Possible unique features of radiation have not been fully explored. Optimization of enviromental variables has not been thoroughly studied. Indirect advantages associated with radiation, such as greater processing or packaging flexibility, have already proved significantly important but have not yet been thoroughly evaluated in most potential applications. Even radiation engineering is relatively undeveloped and radiation economics uncertain. Skillfully oriented research and development on such problems will improve the likelihood of radiation becoming a tool of major importance for U.S. industry. (auth)

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 WBT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP- 018 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

462

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 WBT Programming Process 110426 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: WBT Programming Process Document Number: ITTP-016 Rev. 110426 Document Owner: Doug Bond...

463

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 ILT Course Development Process 110512 Page 1 of 7 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: ILT Course Development Process Document Number: ISDP-016 Rev. 110512 Document Owner:...

464

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 NetworkTechnical Support Process 110406 Page 1 of 5 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: NetworkTechnical Support Process Document Number: ITTP-014 Rev. 110406 Document...

465

Process Deviation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Training Production Process Overview 110620 1 of 6 EOTA - Business Process Document Title: Training Production Process Document Number: ISDP-002 Rev. 110620 Document Owner:...

466

RHIC II Science Working Groups  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workshops Workshops The series of RHIC II Science Workshops began in November 2004, at which time seven Working Groups were initiated. These groups met in workshops through 2005, with the purpose of providing an organized forum for the community to address and describe quantitatively the most important science issues for the proposed RHIC II luminosity upgrade, and corresponding detector upgrades. Each Working Group was led by three convenors representing theory and experiment, and each has produced a detailed report (except for the "New Directions" group, which provided a sounding board and input to the other groups). The Working Group reports are linked below. The summary "white paper" document, "Future Science at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider" (PDF), is based on these reports, and was prepared by a Writing Committee that included at least one convenor from each of the Working Groups.

467

Studsvik Processing Facility Update  

SciTech Connect

Studsvik has completed over four years of operation at its Erwin, TN facility. During this time period Studsvik processed over 3.3 million pounds (1.5 million kgs) of radioactive ion exchange bead resin, powdered filter media, and activated carbon, which comprised a cumulative total activity of 18,852.5 Ci (6.98E+08 MBq). To date, the highest radiation level for an incoming resin container has been 395 R/hr (3.95 Sv/h). The Studsvik Processing Facility (SPF) has the capability to safely and efficiently receive and process a wide variety of solid and liquid Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams including: Ion Exchange Resins (IER), activated carbon (charcoal), graphite, oils, solvents, and cleaning solutions with contact radiation levels of up to 400 R/hr (4.0 Sv/h). The licensed and heavily shielded SPF can receive and process liquid and solid LLRWs with high water and/or organic content. This paper provides an overview of the last four years of commercial operations processing radioactive LLRW from commercial nuclear power plants. Process improvements and lessons learned will be discussed.

Mason, J. B.; Oliver, T. W.; Hill, G. M.; Davin, P. F.; Ping, M. R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

Surface erosion of fusion reactor components due to radiation blistering and neutron sputtering  

SciTech Connect

Radiation blistering and neutron sputtering can lead to the surface erosion of fusion reactor components exposed to plasma radiations. Recent studies of methods to reduce the surface erosion caused by these processes are discussed. (auth)

Das, S.K.; Kaminsky, M.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM 2003 Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman Chief Scientist ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement WARNING! WARNING! Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message Today is April 1 But that has NO bearing on this message ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Two Topics Two Topics * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years * Status of ARM (quick overview) * Science plan - ARM in the next 5 years ARM ARM Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Atmospheric Radiation Measurement ARM Status - Science ARM Status - Science * Steadily increasing productivity - Poster session - over 220 posters (may need to do something about submissions next year) - Peer-reviewed articles: 2.5 to 3 per year per

470

RADIATION WAVE DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radiation waves can be detected by simultaneously measuring radiation- wave intensities at a plurality of space-distributed points and producing therefrom a plot of the wave intensity as a function of time. To this end. a detector system is provided which includes a plurality of nuclear radiation intensity detectors spaced at equal radial increments of distance from a source of nuclear radiation. Means are provided to simultaneously sensitize the detectors at the instant a wave of radiation traverses their positions. the detectors producing electrical pulses indicative of wave intensity. The system further includes means for delaying the pulses from the detectors by amounts proportional to the distance of the detectors from the source to provide an indication of radiation-wave intensity as a function of time.

Wouters, L.F.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

471

FINAL Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) January 28-30, 2002 New Orleans, Louisiana Meeting Summary The Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 20 th semi-annual meeting January 28-30, 2002, in New Orleans, Louisiana. This was the tenth anniversary of TEC, and 102 attendees from national, State, Tribal, and local government organizations; industry and professional groups and other interested parties in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs, met to address a variety of issues related to DOE's radioactive materials transportation activities. The TEC process includes the involvement of these key stakeholders in developing solutions to DOE transportation issues through their actual participation in the work product. These members provide continuing and improved

472

Oxford Catalysts Group plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oxford Catalysts Group plc Oxford Catalysts Group plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Oxford Catalysts Group plc Place Oxford, United Kingdom Zip OX2 6UD Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Developer of catalysts for room-temperature hydrogen production, hot steam production and Fischer-Tropsch processes. Coordinates 43.781517°, -89.571699° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.781517,"lon":-89.571699,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

473

Lighting Science Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Science Group Science Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Lighting Science Group Place Dallas, Texas Zip 75201 Product LED design company, with multiple patents pending in power management, bulb design and manufacturing processes which it collectively refers to as ODL (Optimized Digital Lighting) technology. Coordinates 32.778155°, -96.795404° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.778155,"lon":-96.795404,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

474

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

ODD NITROGEN PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. , Ultraviolet solar radiation related to mesosphericrate coefficients, solar radiation intensity, parameteriza~50 km). The intensity of solar radiation has been measured

Johnston, Harold S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Radiation coloration resistant glass  

SciTech Connect

A radiation coloration resistant glass is disclosed which is used in a radiation environment sufficient to cause coloration in most forms of glass. The coloration resistant glass includes higher proportions by weight of water and has been found to be extremely resistant to color change when exposed to such radiation levels. The coloration resistant glass is free of cerium oxide and has more than about 0.5% by weight water content. Even when exposed to gamma radiation of more than 10.sup.7 rad, the coloration resistant glass does not lose transparency.

Tomozawa, Minoru (Troy, NY); Watson, E. Bruce (Troy, NY); Acocella, John (Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Radiation Shielding Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shielding Radiation Shielding Applications Heavy concrete is standard concrete in which conventional aggregate (typically gravel) is replaced with aggregate composed of a dense...

478

Radiation Hazards Program (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Health, set allowable radiation standards and mitigation practices, as well as procedures for the transportation of hazardous material.

479

Synchrotron Radiation Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synchrotron Radiation Effects in the IR Solenoid Flux Excluder Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0007 Draft 23-September-1998 Abstract We examine the emittance dilution due to synchrotron...

480

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups radiative processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Atomic Radiation (Illinois)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This article states permissible levels of radiation in unrestricted areas, environmental standards for uranium fuel cycle and information about notification of incidents.

482

Quick Reference Information - Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma and x-rays are photons. Protons: Positively charged elementary particles found in atomic nuclei. Radiation: The propagation of energy through space, or some other medium,...

483

Living with radiation  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an account of the hopes and fears associated with ionizing radiation, extending from nuclear energy and medical radiation to nuclear weapons. They argue that a justified fear of nuclear weapons has led to a widespread, unjustified, and unreasoning fear of the beneficial applications of radiation. Although these two aspects of atomic energy are tied together-they both involve the nucleus of the atom and its radioactive rays-a deep misunderstanding of this relationship by the general public has evolved since the time of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The authors' aim is to place the beneficial applications of nuclear radiation in perspective.

Wagner, H.N. Jr. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA). Div. of Nuclear Medicine); Ketchum, L.E. (Proclinica, Inc., New York, NY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study Science Objective This field campaign is designed to increase scientific knowledge about the evolution of black carbon, primary organic...

485

Milestone Plan Process Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Milestone Plan Process Improvement Background In response to our community's concern over the milestone plan (MP) process within the system, the STRIPES Project Office initiated an in-depth evaluation of the required steps and issues surrounding this process. We concluded that the MP process could be improved for most users by tuning the system configuration. With the approval of both the STRIPES Executive Steering Committee and the STRIPES Project Office, we launched the MP Process Improvement Initiative. After many meetings with members of the STRIPES Team and Working Group, we are ready to "go-live" with this initiative. On October 1 st , 2012 the new MP process will be implemented for use by most field offices.

486

Military Munitions Waste Working Group report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the findings of the Military Munitions Waste Working Group in its effort to achieve the goals directed under the Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-Site Innovative Technologies (DOIT Committee) for environmental restoration and waste management. The Military Munitions Waste Working Group identified the following seven areas of concern associated with the ordnance (energetics) waste stream: unexploded ordnance; stockpiled; disposed -- at known locations, i.e., disposal pits; discharged -- impact areas, unknown disposal sites; contaminated media; chemical sureties/weapons; biological weapons; munitions production; depleted uranium; and rocket motor and fuel disposal (open burn/open detonation). Because of time constraints, the Military Munitions Waste Working Group has focused on unexploded ordnance and contaminated media with the understanding that remaining waste streams will be considered as time permits. Contents of this report are as follows: executive summary; introduction; Military Munitions Waste Working Group charter; description of priority waste stream problems; shortcomings of existing approaches, processes and technologies; innovative approaches, processes and technologies, work force planning, training, and education issues relative to technology development and cleanup; criteria used to identify and screen potential demonstration projects; list of potential candidate demonstration projects for the DOIT committee decision/recommendation and appendices.

Not Available

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

487

Group decision support using Toulmin argument structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the need for sound science, technology, and management assessment relative to environmental policy decision making through an approach that involves a logical structure for evidence, a framed decision-making process, and an environment that encourages group participation. Toulmin-based logic possesses these characteristics and is used as the basis for development of a group decision support system. This system can support several user groups, such as pesticide policy-making experts, who can use the support system to state arguments for or against an important policy issue, and pest management experts, who can use the system to assist in identifying and evaluating alternatives for controlling pests on agricultural commodities. The resulting decision support system assists in improving the clarity of the lines of reasoning used in specific situations; the warrants, grounds, and backings that are used to support claims and specific lines of reasoning; and the contradictions, rebuttals, and arguments surrounding each step in the reasoning process associated with evaluating a claim or counterclaim. Experts and decisions makers with differing views can better understand each other`s thought processes. The net effect is enhanced communications and understanding of the whole picture and, in many cases, consensus on decisions to be taken.

Janssen, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). School of Information Technology and Engineering; Sage, A.P. [George Mason Univ., Fairfax, VA (United States). School of Information Technology and Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Connected gradings and fundamental group.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main purpose of this paper is to provide explicit computations of the fundamental group of several algebras. For this purpose, given a $k$-algebra $A$, we consider the category of all connected gradings of $A$ by a group $G$ and we study the relation between gradings and Galois coverings. This theoretical tool gives information about the fundamental group of $A$, which allows its computation using complete lists of gradings.

Claude Cibils (I3M); Maria Julia Redondo (Departamento De Matematica UNS); Andrea Solotar (Departamento De Matematica UBA)

489

Biomass Interest Group Meetings - 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biomass Interest Group (BIG) provides technology updates and information exchange for funders of EPRI Program 84.005. The group sponsors research projects and technology summaries. This report assembles presentation materials from webcasts and other meetings conducted by the Biomass Interest Group in 2007. Presentations covered several technologies including the prospect of using cellulosic feedstock in the production of ethanol, as well as gasification, the synthesis of biodiesel, and the cofiring o...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Training - Medical Training Training - Medical Training TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training The TEC Training and Medical Training Issues Topic Group was formed to address the training issues for emergency responders in the event of a radioactive material transportation incident. The Topic Group first met in 1996 to assist DOE in developing an approach to address radiological emergency response training needs and to avoid redundancy of existing training materials. The group worked with the Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) to review existing training material to determine its applicability, developed a front-end analysis describing an approach, and developed the Modular Emergency Response Radiological Transportation Training (MERRTT). In 1998, the Medical Training Issues

491

Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda Transuranic Waste Transportation Working Group Agenda More Documents & Publications...

492

Employee Resource Groups | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Diversity and Inclusion Employee Resource Groups Employee Resource Groups Diversity and Inclusion Employee Resource Groups Related Documents Special Emphasis...

493

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Staff Ian C. Clot Henning Esbensen Lucas Platter Craig D. Roberts Robert B. Wiringa Postdoctoral Fellows Alessandro Lovato Mario Pitschmann Joint with UWisconsin-Madison...

494

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Secretary: Debbie Morrison EMail: morrison@anl.gov Phone: 630252-4100 Fax: 630252-3903 Address: Theory Group Physics Division, Building 203 Argonne National...

495

Argonne Physics Division - Theory Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23rd Annual Midwest Theory Get-Together 2010 Theory Group Theoretical research in Argonne's Physics Division addresses a broad range of problems involving the stucture and dynamics...

496

Electronics, Lighting and Networks Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronics, Lighting and Networks Group NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress approves...

497

Martifer Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Martifer Group Place Oliveira de Frades, Portugal Zip 3684-001 Sector Biofuels, Solar, Wind energy Product Portugal-based company divided across four core business units including...

498

Bazan Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search Name Bazan Group Place Pontal, Brazil Zip 14180-000 Product Bioethanol production company Coordinates -21.023149, -48.037099 Loading map......

499

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Instantaneous Radiative Flux (IRF) Working Group August 2006 AERI Observations at Southern Great Plains Improve Infrared Radiative Transfer Models Turner et al., JAS, 2004 * AERI observations used to evaluate clear sky IR radiative transfer models * Long-term comparisons have improved - Spectral line database parameters - Water vapor continuum absorption models * Reduced errors in computation of downwelling radiative IR flux by approx 4; current uncertainty is on the order of 1.5 W/m 2 AERI - (Pre-ARM Model) AERI - (Model in 2003) 1 RU = 1 mW / (m 2 sr cm -1 ) Excellent Agreement in Clear Sky Shortwave Radiative Transfer Between Obs and Calcs Shortwave Flux Bias (Solid) Shortwave Flux RMS (Hatched) W m -2 * Comparison of shortwave radiative flux at the surface

500

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order "The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement has completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with construction deficiencies at the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site. The investigation addressed specific areas of potential noncompliance with DOE nuclear safety requirements established in 10 C.F.R. Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management." Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. - NCO-2010-02 More Documents & Publications Consent Order, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc. -