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1

Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties Working Group Cloud Properties Working Group Low Clouds Update Low Clouds Update Jennifer Comstock Jennifer Comstock Dave Turner Dave Turner Andy Andy Vogelmann Vogelmann Instruments Instruments 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer 90/150 GHz microwave radiometer Deployed during COPS AMF Deployed during COPS AMF Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Exploring calibration w/ DPR ( Crewell Crewell & & L L ö ö hnert hnert ) ) See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening See COPS Breakout, Wednesday evening 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA 183 GHz (GVR) deployed at the NSA Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Neural network algorithm to retrieve PWV & LWP (Maria Cadeddu Cadeddu ) ) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG) Potential VAP candidate (RPWG)

2

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models RMetS Conference 4th September 2007 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations What is the distribution of cloud lifetimes? What factors determine the lifetime of an individual

Plant, Robert

3

DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 DIRSIG Cloud Modeling Capabilities; A Parametric Study Kristen Powers powers:................................................................................................................... 13 Calculation of Sensor Reaching Radiance Truth Values for Cloudless & Stratus Cloud Scenes and Atmospheric Database Creation for Stratus Cloud Scene & Calculation of Associated Sensor Reaching Radiance

Salvaggio, Carl

4

ARM Cloud Properties Working Group: Meeting Logistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Properties WG Breakout Session 2008 ARM Science Team Meeting Mar. 10, 2008, Norfolk, VA Monday March 10, 2008 1500 to 1515: R. Hogan - A Proposal for ARM support of Cloudnet...

5

Capture of field stars by giant interstellar clouds: the formation of moving stellar groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the solar neighbourhood, there are moving groups of stars with similar ages and others of stars with heterogeneous ages as the field stars. To explain these facts, we have constructed a simple model of three phases. Phase A: a giant interstellar cloud is uniformly accelerated (or decelerated) with respect to the field stars during a relatively short period of time (10 Myr) and the cloud's mass is uniformly increased; phase B: the acceleration (or deceleration) and mass accretion of the cloud cease. The star formation spreads throughout the cloud, giving origin to stellar groups of similar ages; and phase C: the cloud loses all its gaseous component at a constant rate and in parallel is uniformly decelerated (or accelerated) until reaching the initial velocity of phase A (case 1) or the velocity of the gas cloud remains constant (case 2). Both cases give equivalent results. The system equations for the star motions governed by a time-dependent gravitational potential of the giant cloud and referred to a coo...

Olano, Carlos A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Experimental studies on the group ignition of a cloud of coal particles  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work are to formulate a model to simulate transient coal pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles and to compare results of the program with those reported in the literature elsewhere. The present work is reported in the following order. An introduction to group combustion is given followed by a review of earlier works. Next, the relevance of the present work to practical application and spray combustion modeling is discussed. A group combustion model is then presented for a spherical cloud of coal particles along with a set of dimensional and nondimensional equations. Finally, nonsteady results are generated for pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles. (VC)

Annamalai, K.; Ruiz, M.; Vadakkath, A.; Gopalakrishnan, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/ Research Highlight A research team led by scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory identified specific strengths and weaknesses of four different ice cloud retrieval algorithms. Their comparisons tested the ability of the algorithms to obtain cloud properties from radar and lidar observational measurements. The team noted the sometimes large variances in heating/cooling measurements compared to the observed data. Identifying specific weaknesses will help scientists improve our understanding of cloud properties in the atmosphere, which can be used for climate model development and evaluation. "Measuring the effective size and mass of ice crystals impacts our understanding

8

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Tracking in Cloud-Resolving Models R. S. Plant1 1 Department of Meteorology, University. INTRODUCTION In recent years Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) have become an increasingly important tool for CRM data, which allows one to investigate statistical prop- erties of the lifecycles of the "clouds

Plant, Robert

9

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 1. Forward modeling and remote sensing broadening and drizzle growth in shallow liquid clouds remain not well understood. Detailed, cloudscale. Profiling, millimeterwavelength (cloud) radars can provide such observations. In particular, the first three

10

A Global Cloud Resolving Model Goals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Resolving Model Cloud Resolving Model Goals Uniform global horizontal grid spacing of 4 km or better ("cloud permitting") 100 or more layers up to at least the stratopause Parameterizations of microphysics, turbulence (including small clouds), and radiation Execution speed of at least several simulated days per wall-clock day on immediately available systems Annual cycle simulation by end of 2011. Motivations Parameterizations are still problematic. There are no spectral gaps. The equations themselves change at high resolution. GCRMs will be used for NWP within 10 years. GCRMs will be used for climate time-slices shortly thereafter. It's going to take some time to learn how to do GCRMs well. Scaling Science Length, Spatial extent, #Atoms, Weak scaling Time scale

11

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Mosaic Treatment of Subgrid Cloud-Radiation Interaction X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Champaign, Illinois Introduction Improving the representation of cloud-radiation interaction is a major challenge for the global climate simulation. The development of cloud-resolving models (CRMs) and the extensive Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARMs) provide a unique opportunity for shading some lights on this problem. Current general circulation models (GCMs) predict cloud cover fractions and hydrometeor concentra- tions only in individual model layers, where clouds are assumed to be horizontally homogeneous in a

12

A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds  

SciTech Connect

In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

2013-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

A COMPARISON OF CLOUD MICROPHYSICAL QUANTITIES WITH FORECASTS FROM CLOUD PREDICTION MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program, Bethesda, MD March 15-19, 2010 Environmental Sciences Department/Atmospheric Plains (SGP) site. Cloud forecasts generated by the models are compared with cloud microphysical and radiosonde) are used to derive the cloud microphysical quantities: ice water content, liquid water content

14

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Category: Modeling Statistical cloud schemes (or assumed probability distribution function cloud schemes) are attractive because they provide a way to implement horizontal sub-grid scale cloud heterogeneity in a self-consistent way between physical parameterizations of the a climate model, such as radiation and cloud microphysics. In this work, we will present results dealing with two aspects of our ongoing work towards the implementation of statistical cloud scheme ideas in the climate model of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory. First, we will address the representation of cloud

15

ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENHANCED CLOUD REGIME CLASSIFICATION FOR EVALUATION OF MODEL FAST PHYSICS Wuyin Lin1 , Yangang Liu1 of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-98CH10886 ABSTRACT Distinct cloud regimes exist locally and globally helps identify the meteorological conditions that are closely associated with specific cloud regimes

16

Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM Simulations of cirrus clouds using an explicit cloud model: integrating ARM water vapor and forcing data for analysis of cirrus formation and evolution Comstock, Jennifer Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Lin, Ruei-Fong NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Starr, David NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Yang, Ping Texas A&M Category: Modeling Understanding the atmospheric conditions required to initiate cirrus formation and produce observed microphysical properties is crucial to improving the representation of cirrus clouds in climate models. Ice formation in cirrus generally occurs at cold temperatures (below -30 C) and can take the form of either homogeneous or heterogeneous nucleation. The ice supersaturation required for ice formation is smaller for

17

Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Posters Cloud Parameterizations in Global Climate Models: The Role of Aerosols J. E. Penner and C. C. Chuang Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California...

18

Group pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a spherical cloud of coal particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GROUP PYROLYSIS, IGNITION, AND COMBUSTION OF A SPHERICAL CLOUD OF COAL PARTICLES A Thesis by WILLIAM RICHARD RYAN, JR. Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering GROUP PYROLYSIS, IGNITION, AND COMBUSTION OF A SPHERICAL CLOUD OF COAL PARTICLES A Thesis by WIL LI AM RI C HA RD RYA N ~ JR Approved ss to style and content by...

Ryan, William Richard

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Multiscale Models for Cumulus Cloud Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cumulus clouds involve processes on a vast range of scalesincluding cloud droplets, turbulent mixing, and updrafts and downdraftsand it is often difficult to determine how processes on different scales interact with each other. In this article, ...

Samuel N. Stechmann; Bjorn Stevens

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Disruptive technology business models in cloud computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud computing, a term whose origins have been in existence for more than a decade, has come into fruition due to technological capabilities and marketplace demands. Cloud computing can be defined as a scalable and flexible ...

Krikos, Alexis Christopher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parmaterizations in Large-Scale Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations Using Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations of Deep Convection to Inform Cloud Parameterizations in Large-Scale Models S. A. Klein National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton, New Jersey R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. -M. Xu National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia Abstract Cloud parameterizations in large-scale models struggle to address the significant non-linear effects of radiation and precipitation that arise from horizontal inhomogeneity in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid box size of the large-scale models. Statistical cloud schemes provide an attractive

22

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earths atmosphere and influence the Earths energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

23

Efficient data IO for a Parallel Global Cloud Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Execution of a Global Cloud Resolving Model (GCRM) at target resolutions of 2-4 km will generate, at a minimum, 10s of Gigabytes of data per variable per snapshot. Writing this data to disk, without creating a serious bottleneck in the execution of the ... Keywords: Data formatting, Geodesic grid, Global Cloud Resolving Model, Grid Specifications, High performance IO, Parallel IO libraries

Bruce Palmer; Annette Koontz; Karen Schuchardt; Ross Heikes; David Randall

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluation of Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Sa...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Type Occurrences Cloud Type Occurrences and Radiative Forcings Simulated by a Cloud Resolving Model Using Observations from Satellite and Cloud Radar Y. Luo and S. K. Krueger University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Introduction Because of both the various effects clouds exert on the earth-atmospheric system and the cloud feedback, correct representations of clouds in numerical models are critical for accurate climate modeling and weather forecast. Unfortunately, determination of clouds and their radiative feedback processes is still the weakest component of current general circulation models (e.g., Senior and Mitchell 1993, Cess et al. 1996). Using radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) available from satellite observations made by the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE; Barkstrom 1984), one could assess cloud radiative effects

25

Statistical representation of clouds in climate models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

novel approach for representing novel approach for representing ice microphysics in bin and bulk schemes: Application to TWP-ICE deep convection Hugh Morrison and Wojciech Grabowski National Center for Atmospheric Research ARM STM, Monday, April 1, 2009 -1) Uncertainty of ice initiation processes -2) Wide range of ice particle characteristics (e.g., shape, effective density) -3) No clear separation of physical processes for small and large crystals The treatment of ice microphysics has a large impact on model simulations, e.g., precipitation, interactions with dynamics, radiation, etc. However, it is complicated by: Pristine ice crystals, grown by diffusion of water vapor Snowflakes, grown by aggregation Pruppacher and Klett Rimed ice crystals (accretion of supercooled cloud water) Graupel (heavily

26

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

SciTech Connect

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

3D Atmospheric Radiative Transfer for Cloud System-Resolving Models: Forward Modelling and Observations  

SciTech Connect

Utilization of cloud-resolving models and multi-dimensional radiative transfer models to investigate the importance of 3D radiation effects on the numerical simulation of cloud fields and their properties.

Howard Barker; Jason Cole

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

Posters A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models S. J. Ghan and L. R. Leung Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, Washington C. C. Chuang and J. E. Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California J. McCaa University of Washington Seattle, Washington The crude treatment of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in applying these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop a parameterization for stratiform clouds in GCMs that expresses stratiform clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. In this parameterization, precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid

29

Model-Driven Cloud Data Storage Juan Castrejn1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model-Driven Cloud Data Storage Juan Castrejón1 , Genoveva Vargas-Solar2 , Christine Collet3 of traditional software development me- thods. In particular, data storage management has received a great deal. However, appropriate selection, administration and use of cloud storage implementations remain a highly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

30

Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with a Meson Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results for the elastic nucleon form factors and the electromagnetic transition amplitudes to the Delta(1232) resonance, obtained with the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model with the inclusion of a meson cloud correction are briefly presented. The pion cloud effects are explicitly discussed.

D. Y. Chen; Y. B. Dong; M. M. Giannini; E. Santopinto

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

31

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Month-Long 2D Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation and Resultant Statistics of Cloud Systems Over the ARM SGP X. Wu Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences Iowa State University Ames, Iowa X.-Z. Liang Illinois State Water Survey University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Illinois Introduction The cloud-resolving model (CRM) has recently emerged as a useful tool to develop improved representations of convections, clouds, and cloud-radiation interactions in general circulation models (GCMs). In particular, the fine spatial resolution allows the CRM to more realistically represent the detailed structure of cloud systems, including cloud geometric and radiative properties. The CRM simulations thus provide unique and comprehensive datasets, based on which more realistic GCM

32

Cloud system resolving model simulations of tropical cloud systems observed during the Tropical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. The WRF model is configured with a highest-resolving domain convection. The second regime is a monsoon break, which contains intense localized systems that are rep-based observational systems including a polarimetric weather radar, cloud radar, wind profilers, radi- ation

Jakob, Christian

33

Fragmentation of Magnetically Subcritical Clouds into Multiple Supercritical Cores and the Formation of Small Stellar Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolated low-mass stars are formed in dense cores of molecular clouds. In the standard picture, the cores are envisioned to condense out of strongly magnetized clouds through ambipolar diffusion. Most previous calculations based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric cloud evolution leading to a single core, which collapses to form an isolated star or stellar system at the center. These calculations are here extended to the nonaxisymmetric case under thin-disk approximation, which allows for a detailed investigation into the process of fragmentation, fundamental to binary, multiple system, and cluster formation. We have shown previously that initially axisymmetric, magnetically subcritical clouds with an $m=2$ density perturbation of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can develop highly elongated bars, which facilitate binary and multiple system formation. In this paper, we show that in the presence of higher order ($m\\ge 3$) perturbations of similar amplitude such clouds are capable of breaking up into a set of discrete dense cores. These multiple cores are magnetically supercritical. They are expected to collapse into single stars or stellar systems individually and, collectively, to form a small stellar group. Our calculations demonstrate that the standard scenario for single star formation involving magnetically subcritical clouds and ambipolar diffusion can readily produce more than one star, provided that the cloud mass is well above the Jeans limit and relatively uniformly distributed. The fragments develop in the central part of the cloud, after the region has become magnetically supercritical but before rapid collapse sets in. It is enhanced by the flattening of mass distribution along the field lines and by the magnetic tension force.

Zhi-Yun Li; Fumitaka Nakamura

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

34

Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models  

SciTech Connect

The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Experimental studies on the group ignition of a cloud of coal particles. Volume 1, Experimental results: Final report, August 15, 1988--October 15, 1991  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this work are to formulate a model to simulate transient coal pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles and to compare results of the program with those reported in the literature elsewhere. The present work is reported in the following order. An introduction to group combustion is given followed by a review of earlier works. Next, the relevance of the present work to practical application and spray combustion modeling is discussed. A group combustion model is then presented for a spherical cloud of coal particles along with a set of dimensional and nondimensional equations. Finally, nonsteady results are generated for pyrolysis, ignition, and combustion of a cloud of coal particles. (VC)

Annamalai, K.; Ruiz, M.; Vadakkath, A.; Gopalakrishnan, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Single-Column Modeling A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization A Stratiform Cloud Parameterization for General Circulation Models S. J. Ghan and L. R. Leung Pacific Northwest Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 C. C. Chuang and J. E. Penner Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory : Livermore. CA 94550 J. McCaa University of Washington Seattle, Washington The crude treatment of clouds in general circulation models (GCMs) is widely recognized as a major limitation in applying these models to predictions of global climate change. The purpose of this project is to develop in GCMs a stratiform cloud parameterization that expresses clouds in terms of bulk microphysical properties and their subgrid variability. Figure 1 summarizes the various cloud variables and their interactions. Precipitating cloud species are distinguished from non-precipitating species, and the liquid phase is

37

Visualization and Modeling Working Group  

SciTech Connect

During the 2005 Hurricane season, many consequence predictions were available from 36 to 96 hours before landfalls, via the Department of Energys Visualization and Modeling Working Group (VMWG). Real-time data can be tapped by local officials and utilities, and can also be accessed for post-event regulatory audits. An overview of VMWGs models, results and uses will be presented.

Fernandez, S.J. (LANL); Dodrill, K.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

COMPUTATIONAL MODELING OF ELECTRON CLOUD FOR MEIC  

SciTech Connect

This work is the continuation of [4] our earlier studies on electron cloud (EC) simulations for the medium energy electron-ion collider (MEIC) envisioned at Jefferson Lab beyond the 12 GeV upgrade of CEBAF. In this paper, we study the EC saturation density with various MEIC operational parameters. The details of the study shows saturation of line density 1.7 nC/m and tune shift per unit length 4.9 x 10{sup -7} m{sup -1}.

S. Ahmed, B. Yunn, J. Dolph, T. Satogata, G.A. Krafft

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical modeling of drizzle evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud radar Doppler spectra in drizzling stratiform clouds: 2. Observations and microphysical I, the influence of cloud microphysics and dynamics on the shape of cloud radar Doppler spectra in warm stratiform clouds was discussed. The traditional analysis of radar Doppler moments was extended

40

Cloud condensation nuclei in Western Colorado : observations and model predictions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Variations in the warm cloud?active portion of atmospheric aerosols, or cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), have been shown to impact cloud droplet number concentration and subsequently (more)

Ward, Daniel Stewart

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Comparison of Simulated Cloud Radar Output from the Multiscale Modeling Framework Global Climate Model with CloudSat Cloud Radar Observations  

SciTech Connect

Over the last few years a new type of global climate model (GCM) has emerged in which a cloud-resolving model is embedded into each grid cell of a GCM. This new approach is frequently called a multiscale modeling framework (MMF) or superparameterization. In this article we present a comparison of MMF output with radar observations from the NASA CloudSat mission, which uses a near-nadir-pointing millimeter-wavelength radar to probe the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. We account for radar detection limits by simulating the 94 GHz radar reflectivity that CloudSat would observe from the high-resolution cloud-resolving model output produced by the MMF. Overall, the MMF does a good job of reproducing the broad pattern of tropical convergence zones, subtropical belts, and midlatitude storm tracks, as well as their changes in position with the annual solar cycle. Nonetheless, the comparison also reveals a number of model shortfalls including (1) excessive hydrometeor coverage at all altitudes over many convectively active regions, (2) a lack of low-level hydrometeors over all subtropical oceanic basins, (3) excessive low-level hydrometeor coverage (principally precipitating hydrometeors) in the midlatitude storm tracks of both hemispheres during the summer season (in each hemisphere), and (4) a thin band of low-level hydrometeors in the Southern Hemisphere of the central (and at times eastern and western) Pacific in the MMF, which is not observed by CloudSat. This band resembles a second much weaker ITCZ but is restricted to low levels.

Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; Mace, Gerald G.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Stephens, Graeme L.

2009-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tropical Water Vapor and Cloud Feedbacks in Climate Models: A Further Assessment Using Coupled Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By comparing the response of clouds and water vapor to ENSO forcing in nature with that in Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) simulations by some leading climate models, an earlier evaluation of tropical cloud and water vapor ...

De-Zheng Sun; Yongqiang Yu; Tao Zhang

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Cloud-Based Model Calibration Using OpenStudio: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

OpenStudio is a free, open source Software Development Kit (SDK) and application suite for performing building energy modeling and analysis. The OpenStudio Parametric Analysis Tool has been extended to allow cloud-based simulation of multiple OpenStudio models parametrically related to a baseline model. This paper describes the new cloud-based simulation functionality and presents a model cali-bration case study. Calibration is initiated by entering actual monthly utility bill data into the baseline model. Multiple parameters are then varied over multiple iterations to reduce the difference between actual energy consumption and model simulation results, as calculated and visualized by billing period and by fuel type. Simulations are per-formed in parallel using the Amazon Elastic Cloud service. This paper highlights model parameterizations (measures) used for calibration, but the same multi-nodal computing architecture is available for other purposes, for example, recommending combinations of retrofit energy saving measures using the calibrated model as the new baseline.

Hale, E.; Lisell, L.; Goldwasser, D.; Macumber, D.; Dean, J.; Metzger, I.; Parker, A.; Long, N.; Ball, B.; Schott, M.; Weaver, E.; Brackney, L.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Validation of Climate Model Ice Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

models are used for understanding the past, present, and future climate. To be able to project future climate it is important that models provide a realistic depiction of the...

45

The Effects of Very Large Drops on Cloud Absorption. Part I: Parcel Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to bring more realism cloud-radiation calculations, arising-parcel model of cloud microphysics and a 191 waveband model of atmospheric radiation (ATRAD) have been brought to bear on the problem of cloud absorption of solar radiation, ...

W. J. Wiscombe; R. M. Welch; W. D. Hall

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop A new model of cloud drop distribution that simulates the observed drop clustering: effect of clustering on extinction coefficient estimates Knyazikhin, Yuri Boston University Marshak, Alexander NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Larsen, Michael Michigan Technological University Wiscombe, Warren BNL/NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Category: Modeling Cloud droplet size distribution is one of the most fundamental subjects in cloud physics. Understanding of spatial distribution and small-scale fluctuations of cloud droplets is essential for both cloud physics and atmospheric radiation. For cloud physics, it relates to the coalescence growth of raindrops while for radiation, it has a strong impact on a cloud's radiative properties. We have developed new size dependent models

47

Cloud Model Evaluation Using Radiometric Measurements from the Airborne Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (AirMISR)  

SciTech Connect

Detailed information on cloud properties is needed to vigorously test retrieval algorithms for satellite and ground-based remote sensors. The inherent complexity of clouds makes this information difficult to obtain from observations alone and cloud resolving models are often used to generating synthetic datasets that can be used as proxies for real data. We test the ability of a cloud resolving model to reproduce cloud structure in a case study of low-level clouds observed by the Earth Observing System (EOS) validation program in north central Oklahoma on March 3, 2000. A three-dimensional radiative transfer model is applied to synthetic cloud properties generated by a high-resolution three-dimensional cloud model in order to simulate the top of atmosphere radiances. These synthetic radiances are then compared with observations from the airborne Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (AirMISR), flown on the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft.

Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Marchand, Roger T.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Modeling aerosol growth by aqueous chemistry in nonprecipitating stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

A new microphysics module based on a two-dimensional (2D) joint size distribution function representing both interstitial and cloud particles is developed and applied to studying aerosol processing in non-precipitating stratocumulus clouds. The module is implemented in a three-dimensional dynamical framework of a large-eddy simulation (LES) model and in a trajectory ensemble model (TEM). Both models are used to study the modification of sulfate aerosol by the activation - aqueous chemistry - resuspension cycle in shallow marine stratocumulus clouds. The effect of particle mixing and different size-distribution representations on modeled aerosol processing are studied in a comparison of the LES and TEM simulations with the identical microphysics treatment exposes and a comparison of TEM simulations with a 2D fixed and moving bin microphysics. Particle mixing which is represented in LES and neglected in the TEM leads to the mean relative per particle dry mass change in the TEM simulations being about 30% lower than in analogous subsample of LES domain. Particles in the final LES spectrum are mixed in from different parcels, some of which have experienced longer in-cloud residence times than the TEM parcels, all of which originated in the subcloud layer, have. The mean relative per particle dry mass change differs by 14% between TEM simulations with fixed and moving bin microphysics. Finally, the TEM model with the moving bin microphysics is used to evaluate assumptions about liquid water mass partitioning among activated cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) of different dry sizes. These assumptions are used in large-scale models to map the bulk aqueous chemistry sulfate production, which is largely proportional to the liquid water mass, to the changes in aerosol size distribution. It is shown that the commonly used assumptions that the droplet mass is independent of CCN size or that the droplet mass is proportional to the CCN size to the third power do not perform well in the considered case. The explicitly predicted water partitioning indicates that the mean mass of droplets participating in the models aqueous chemistry calculations is proportional to the dry CCN size.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

49

CloudML : A DSL for model-based realization of applications in the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing offers a vast amount of resources, available for end users on a pay-as-you-go basis. The opportunity to choose between several cloud providers is (more)

Brandtzg, Eirik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Analytic model of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropical Hadley cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional analytic model that describes the behavior of upper tropospheric clouds in the tropical Hadley cell. The behavior of the model is...

Kyoko K. Tanaka; Tetsuo Yamamoto; Sei-ichiro Watanabe

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

CLOUD MODELING CHALLENGES FOR CLIMATE CHANGE SIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE OF ENTRAINMENT IN THE DIURNAL TRANSITION FROM SHALLOW TO DEEP CONVECTION Tony Del Genio and Jingbo Wu NASA/GISS ARM Science Team Meeting, 3/31/09 Continental rainfall rates tend to peak in mid-late afternoon or evening Time of peak rainfall, TRMM PR Hirose et al. (2008) But not in GCMs, which like to rain near noon ___ TRMM 3B42 - - - gauge colors = models IPCC AR4 models (Dai, 2006) Some recent studies * Derbyshire et al. (2004): SCMs insensitive to tropospheric humidity * Grabowski et al. (2006): Need entrainment rate to decrease with time of day * Kuang and Bretherton (2006): Weaker entrainment rates for deep than for shallow convection - increasing parcel size as cold pools form? * Khairoutdinov and Randall (2006): Demonstration of downdraft/cold pool role in transition from shallow to deep

52

Multifrequency survey of the intergalactic cloud in the M96 group  

SciTech Connect

The intergalactic cloud of neutral hydrogen in the M96 group are examined for signs of emission over a wide range of frequencies, from radio waves to X rays. Past or present stellar activity in the gas might have been expected to produce detectable visual infrared, CO, OH, or radio recombination-line emission. None was detected. The limits are used to study physical conditions in the intergalactic gas. In particular, B and V band limits on starlight and IRAS limits on the presence of dust strongly constrain the presence of stars or stellar by-products. However, given the uncertainties about physical conditions in the intergalactic environment, it is difficult to rule out entirely the presence of stellar-processed materials. Results of neutral hydrogen mapping from a large-scale survey of the intergalactic cloud and surrounding region are also presented. These observations confirm that the gas is confined to a large ringlike structure. The simplest interpretation remains that the intergalactic gas in Leo is primordial. 36 references.

Schneider, S.E.; Skrutskie, M.F.; Hacking, P.B.; Young, J.S.; Dickman, R.L.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model Climate-Weather Modeling Studies Using a Prototype Global Cloud-System Resolving Model PI Name: Venkatramani Balaji PI Email: balaji@princeton.edu Institution: Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Allocation Program: ESP Allocation Hours at ALCF: 150 Million Year: 2010 to 2013 Research Domain: Earth Science We expect our understanding of the role of clouds in climate to undergo a qualitative change as the resolutions of global models begin to encompass clouds. At these resolutions, non-hydrostatic dynamics become significant and deep convective processes are resolved. We are poised at the threshold of being able to run global scale simulations that include direct, non-parameterized, simulations of deep convective clouds. The goal of this

54

Cloud/Aerosol Parameterizations: Application and Improvement of General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

One of the biggest uncertainties associated with climate models and climate forcing is the treatment of aerosols and their effects on clouds. The effect of aerosols on clouds can be divided into two components: The first indirect effect is the forcing associated with increases in droplet concentrations; the second indirect effect is the forcing associated with changes in liquid water path, cloud morphology, and cloud lifetime. Both are highly uncertain. This project applied a cloud-resolving model to understand the response of clouds under a variety of conditions to changes in aerosols. These responses are categorized according to the large-scale meteorological conditions that lead to the response. Meteorological conditions were sampled from various fields, which, together with a global aerosol model determination of the change in aerosols from present day to pre-industrial conditions, was used to determine a first order estimate of the response of global cloud fields to changes in aerosols. The response of the clouds in the NCAR CAM3 GCM coupled to our global aerosol model were tested by examining whether the response is similar to that of the cloud resolving model and methods for improving the representation of clouds and cloud/aerosol interactions were examined.

Penner, Joyce

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Single Column Model Simulations of Cloud Sensitivity to Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-Column Model Simulations Single-Column Model Simulations of Cloud Sensitivity to Forcing A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York A. B. Wolf National Aeronautics and Space Administration SGT, Inc., Goddard Institute for Space Studies New York, New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program single-column modeling (SCM) framework has to date used several fairly brief intensive observing periods (IOPs) to evaluate the performance of climate model parameterizations. With only a few weather events in each IOP, it is difficult to separate errors associated with the instantaneous dynamical forcing from errors in parameterization. It is also impossible to determine whether model errors are systematic and climatically significant. This

56

Process-model Simulations of Cloud Albedo Enhancement by Aerosols in the Arctic  

SciTech Connect

A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Because nearly all of the albedo effects are in the liquid phase due to the removal of ice water by snowfall when ice processes are involved, albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol-cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation due to precipitation changes are small.

Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, H.; Solomon, Amy

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

57

Validation of the Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Poisson Stochastic Radiative Transfer Model Against Cloud Cascade Models T. B. Zhuravleva Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Background Starting from a very simple stochastic cloud model by Mullamaa et al. (1972), several different stochastic models have been developed to describe radiative transfer regime in single-layer broken clouds (Kargin 1984; Titov 1990; Malvagi and Pomraning 1992; Barker et al. 1992; Malvagi et al. 1993; Kargin and Prigarin 1994; Prigarin and Titov 1996; Marshak et al. 1998; Prigarin et al. 1998, 2001; Evans et al. 1999, 2001). Recently Kassianov (2003a) generalized the Titov's (1990) stochastic model

58

Polarimetric Radar Observation Operator for a Cloud Model with Spectral Microphysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-proven advantages such as hydro- meteor classification and improvement in radar data quality and rainfall modeling via improvement of micro- physical parameterization and direct assimilation of polarimetric radar the output of numerical cloud models was pioneered using the models with bulk parameterization of cloud micro

Mark, Pinsky

59

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cloud computing adoption model for governments and large enterprises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing has held organizations across the globe spell bound with its promise. As it moves from being a buzz word and hype into adoption, organizations are faced with question of how to best adopt cloud. Existing ...

Trivedi, Hrishikesh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CSP Based E-Learning Model in Cloud Computing Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing technology is widely used for system service, web service, e-learning system and all kinds of software to services using the internet. In this paper, we propose e-learning system in cloud computin...

HwaYoung Jeong; BongHwa Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

H I Self Absorption Toward Molecular Clouds: Theoretical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and available data, visit the GRS web page at www.bu.eduwww.bu.edu/G/GRSRS References chemistry deep inside the molecular clouds. We study H I self- absorption toward molecular clouds is dominated by cold atomic hydrogen formed by cosmic ray chemistry deep in the interiors of clouds. If all

63

Technische Universitt Berlin -Intelligent Networks Group The CloudNets Network Virtualization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and creates bridge interfaces Configures VLAN tags on ports Provisions virtual machines Database OL0 graph with demand/"with the sun") [3]. Non-critical CloudNets can be migrated to locations where resources are abundant and energy is cheap (move against First, the new CloudNet is mapped using a fast heuristic

Schmid, Stefan

64

On the Formation of Binary Stars and Small Stellar Groups in Magnetically Subcritical Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the standard scenario of isolated low-mass star formation, strongly magnetized molecular clouds are envisioned to condense gradually into cores, driven by ambipolar diffusion. Once the cores become magnetically supercritical, they collapse to form stars. Most previous studies based on this scenario are limited to axisymmetric calculations leading to single supercritical core formation. The assumption of axisymmetry has precluded a detailed investigation of cloud fragmentation, generally thought to be a necessary step in the formation of binary and multiple stars. In this contribution, we describe the non-axisymmetric evolution of initially magnetically subcritical clouds using a newly-developed MHD code. It is shown that non-axisymmetric perturbations of modest fractional amplitude ($\\sim 5%$) can grow nonlinearly in such clouds during the supercritical phase of cloud evolution, leading to the production of either a highly elongated bar or a set of multiple dense cores.

Fumitaka Nakamura; Zhi-Yun Li

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Transport Modeling Working Group Meeting Reports  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reports from meetings of the Transport Modeling Working Group, which meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, share experimental and computational results, and collaboratively develop methodologies for and understanding of transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks.

66

Diurnal Cycle of Precipitation in the Tropics Simulated in a Global Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analyzes the diurnal cycle of precipitation simulated in a global cloud-resolving model (GCRM) named the Nonhydrostatic Icosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM). A 30-day integration of NICAM successfully simulates the precipitation ...

Tomonori Sato; Hiroaki Miura; Masaki Satoh; Yukari N. Takayabu; Yuqing Wang

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION IN MODELING CLOUD-RADIATION INTERACTIONS OVER THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION IN MODELING CLOUD- RADIATION INTERACTIONS OVER.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Numerical weather prediction (NWP) is the basis for present-day weather forecasts, and NWP- and satellite- based observations over the Southern Great Plains to evaluate how well cloud

Johnson, Peter D.

68

Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive, Atlanta , Georgia 30332-0340, USA Abstract The solar chimney power the potential impacts on plant capacity resulting from cloud formation within or downwind of the solar chimney

Nenes, Athanasios

69

Efficient data IO for a Parallel Global Cloud Resolving Model  

SciTech Connect

Execution of a Global Cloud Resolving Model (GCRM) at target resolutions of 2-4 km will generate, at a minimum, 10s of Gigabytes of data per variable per snapshot. Writing this data to disk without creating a serious bottleneck in the execution of the GCRM code while also supporting efficient post-execution data analysis is a significant challenge. This paper discusses an Input/Output (IO) application programmer interface (API) for the GCRM that efficiently moves data from the model to disk while maintaining support for community standard formats, avoiding the creation of very large numbers of files, and supporting efficient analysis. Several aspects of the API will be discussed in detail. First, we discuss the output data layout which linearizes the data in a consistent way that is independent of the number of processors used to run the simulation and provides a convenient format for subsequent analyses of the data. Second, we discuss the flexible API interface that enables modelers to easily add variables to the output stream by specifying where in the GCRM code these variables are located and to flexibly configure the choice of outputs and distribution of data across files. The flexibility of the API is designed to allow model developers to add new data fields to the output as the model develops and new physics is added and also provides a mechanism for allowing users of the GCRM code itself to adjust the output frequency and the number of fields written depending on the needs of individual calculations. Third, we describe the mapping to the NetCDF data model with an emphasis on the grid description. Fourth, we describe our messaging algorithms and IO aggregation strategies that are used to achieve high bandwidth while simultaneously writing concurrently from many processors to shared files. We conclude with initial performance results.

Palmer, Bruce J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Heikes, Ross P.; Randall, David A.

2011-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ground-based Microwave Cloud Tomography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microwave Cloud Tomography Microwave Cloud Tomography Experiment, SGP, May 15-June 15, 2009 Lead Scientist Dong Huang, BNL Co-Investigators Al Gasiewski, UC Boulder Maria Cadeddu, ANL Warren Wiscombe, BNL Radiation Processes Working Group March 30, 2009 multiple radiometers All good cloud radiation modelers should close their airplane window shades so as not to be corrupted by the spectacle of real 3D clouds. - Roger Davies In case you forget to do this, you see 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 2 Effects of cloud structure on radiation 3/30/2009 ARM RPWG 3 Typical climate model - Cloud fraction & mean water content - Horizontally uniform clouds, no side radiation - Assumption on overlap Courtesy of Bernhard Mayer Cloud structure important to radiation - Cumulus (Benner & Evans 2001, Pincus et al. 2005), deep convection (DiGiuseppe &

71

Cloud Services Cloud Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Services Cloud Services In 2012 UCD IT Services launched an exciting new set of cloud solutions called CloudEdu, which includes cloud servers, cloud storage, cloud hosting and cloud network. The CloudEdu package includes a consultancy service in design, deployment, management and utilisation

72

Study of Multi-Scale Cloud Processes Over the Tropical Western Pacific Using Cloud-Resolving Models Constrained by Satellite Data  

SciTech Connect

Clouds in the tropical western Pacific are an integral part of the large scale environment. An improved understanding of the multi-scale structure of clouds and their interactions with the environment is critical to the ARM (Atmospheric Radiation Measurement) program for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations, understanding the consequences of model biases, and providing a context for interpreting the observational data collected over the ARM Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) sites. Three-dimensional cloud resolving models (CRMs) are powerful tools for developing and evaluating cloud parameterizations. However, a significant challenge in using CRMs in the TWP is that the region lacks conventional data, so large uncertainty exists in defining the large-scale environment for clouds. This project links several aspects of the ARM program, from measurements to providing improved analyses, and from cloud-resolving modeling to climate-scale modeling and parameterization development, with the overall objective to improve the representations of clouds in climate models and to simulate and quantify resolved cloud effects on the large-scale environment. Our objectives will be achieved through a series of tasks focusing on the use of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and ARM data. Our approach includes: -- Perform assimilation of COSMIC GPS radio occultation and other satellites products using the WRF Ensemble Kalman Filter assimilation system to represent the tropical large-scale environment at 36 km grid resolution. This high-resolution analysis can be used by the community to derive forcing products for single-column models or cloud-resolving models. -- Perform cloud-resolving simulations using WRF and its nesting capabilities, driven by the improved regional analysis and evaluate the simulations against ARM datasets such as from TWP-ICE to optimize the microphysics parameters for this region. A cirrus study (Mace and co-authors) already exists for TWP-ICE using satellite and ground-based observations. -- Perform numerical experiments using WRF to investigate how convection over tropical islands in the Maritime Continent interacts with large-scale circulation and affects convection in nearby regions. -- Evaluate and apply WRF as a testbed for GCM cloud parameterizations, utilizing the ability of WRF to run on multiple scales (from cloud resolving to global) to isolate resolution and physics issues from dynamical and model framework issues. Key products will be disseminated to the ARM and larger community through distribution of data archives, including model outputs from the data assimilation products and cloud resolving simulations, and publications.

Dudhia, Jimy

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evaluation of Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Modeling with ARM Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Long-Term Cloud-Resolving Modeling with ARM Data Zeng, Xiping NASAGSFC Tao, Wei-Kuo NASAGoddard Space Flight Center Zhang, Minghua State University of New York at...

74

Intensification of precipitation extremes with warming in a cloud resolving model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to investigate the effect of warming on high percentiles of precipitation (precipitation extremes) in the idealized setting of radiative-convective equilibrium. While this idealized setting ...

Muller, Caroline

75

Evaluating Clouds, Aerosols, and their Interactions in Three Global Climate Models using COSP and Satellite Observations  

SciTech Connect

Accurately representing aerosol-cloud interactions in global climate models is challenging. As parameterizations evolve, it is important to evaluate their performance with appropriate use of observations. In this work we compare aerosols, clouds, and their interactions in three climate models (AM3, CAM5, ModelE) to MODIS satellite observations. Modeled cloud properties were diagnosed using the CFMIP Observations Simulator Package (COSP). Cloud droplet number concentrations (N) were derived using the same algorithm for both satellite-simulated model values and observations. We find that aerosol optical depth tau simulated by models is similar to observations. For N, AM3 and CAM5 capture the observed spatial pattern of higher values in near-coast versus remote ocean regions, though modeled values in general are higher than observed. In contrast, ModelE simulates lower N in most near-coast versus remote regions. Aerosol- cloud interactions were computed as the sensitivity of N to tau for marine liquid clouds off the coasts of South Africa and Eastern Asia where aerosol pollution varies in time. AM3 and CAM5 are in most cases more sensitive than observations, while the sensitivity for ModelE is statistically insignificant. This widely used sensitivity could be subject to misinterpretation due to the confounding influence of meteorology on both aerosols and clouds. A simple framework for assessing the N tau sensitivity at constant meteorology illustrates that observed sensitivity can change from positive to statistically insignificant when including the confounding influence of relative humidity. Satellite simulated values of N were compared to standard model output and found to be higher with a bias of 83 cm-3.

Ban-Weiss, George; Jin, Ling; Bauer, S.; Bennartz, Ralph; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Ming, Yi; Guo, Huan; Jiang, Jonathan

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

76

Model analysis of the anthropogenic aerosol effect on clouds over East Asia  

SciTech Connect

A coupled meteorology and aerosol/chemistry model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecast model coupled with Chemistry) was used to conduct a pair of simulations with present-day (PD) and preindustrial (PI) emissions over East Asia to examine the aerosol indirect effect on clouds. As a result of an increase in aerosols in January, the cloud droplet number increased by 650 cm{sup -3} over the ocean and East China, 400 cm{sup -3} over Central and Southwest China, and less than 200 cm{sup -3} over North China. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) increased by 40-60 g m{sup -2} over the ocean and Southeast China and 30 g m{sup -2} over Central China; the LWP increased less than 5 g m{sup -2} or decreased by 5 g m{sup -2} over North China. The effective radius (Re) decreased by more than 4 {mu}m over Southwest, Central, and Southeast China and 2 {mu}m over North China. In July, variations in cloud properties were more uniform; the cloud droplet number increased by approximately 250-400 cm{sup -3}, the LWP increased by approximately 30-50 g m{sup -2}, and Re decreased by approximately 3 {mu}m over most regions of China. In response to cloud property changes from PI to PD, shortwave (SW) cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 30 W m{sup -2} over the ocean and 10 W m{sup -2} over Southeast China, and it weakened slightly by approximately 2-10 W m{sup -2} over Central and Southwest China in January. In July, SW cloud radiative forcing strengthened by 15 W m{sup -2} over Southeast and North China and weakened by 10 W m{sup -2} over Central China. The different responses of SW cloud radiative forcing in different regions was related to cloud feedbacks and natural variability.

Gao, Yi; Zhang, Meigen; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

77

The effect of gradients of temperature of the sea surface on moving groups of cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 16N to 25N. Prom ship data, for the p . rticulax de+ca of inves;igat'on, i0, ", I, 'I2, nd 1H Inarch 1 9oH, a. map o f mean ai temperature v, as cons I ruc I? ed. . A map of sea-air temoerature differ ence vas ob- tained. Stabilii;y of . I...;he subclcud layer eras exam! ned. favorable areas and uafavorable a! cas f' or cloud dcv. i. lep- ment on the basis of' the sea-air Lemperaiure O'Lfference !vere de+ermined. Comparison?::ith an observed ?, . ? day com? posi+o cloud m . p shoved i irly good...

Stearns, John Robb

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

78

A Charge Cloud Model for H2: Or Is It a DFT Model? Frank Rioux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-electron spherical charge cloud of radius R. In atomic units (h/2 = me = e = 40 = 1) the total electronic energy based on this model is, E 9 4 R 2 24 5 R - D 2 2 R 3 + 1 D += The various energy components are identified below (3). Electron kinetic energy: T 9 4 R 2 = Electron-nucleus potential energy: Vne 6- R D 2 2

Rioux, Frank

79

Cloud speed impact on solar variability scaling ?? Application to the wavelet variability model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kleissl, J. , 2013. Deriving cloud velocity from an array ofCloud Speed Impact on Solar Variability Scaling -this work, we determine from cloud speeds. Cloud simulator

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation Title Soot microphysical effects on liquid clouds, a multi-model investigation Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Koch, Dorothy M., Yves Balkanski, Susanne E. Bauer, Richard C. Easter, Sylvaine Ferrachat, Steven J. Ghan, Corinna Hoose, Trond Iversen, Alf Kirkevåg, Jon E. Kristjánsson, Xiaohong Liu, Ulrike Lohmann, Surabi Menon, Johannes Quaas, Michael Schulz, Øyvind Seland, Toshihiko Takemura, and N. Yan Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Pagination 1051-1064 Abstract We use global models to explore the microphysical effects of carbonaceous aerosols on liquid clouds. Although absorption of solar radiation by soot warms the atmosphere, soot may cause climate cooling due to its contribution to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and therefore cloud brightness. Six global models conducted three soot experiments; four of the models had detailed aerosol microphysical schemes. The average cloud radiative response to biofuel soot (black and organic carbon), including both indirect and semi-direct effects, is -0.11 Wm-2, comparable in size but opposite in sign to the respective direct effect. In a more idealized fossil fuel black carbon experiment, some models calculated a positive cloud response because soot provides a deposition sink for sulfuric and nitric acids and secondary organics, decreasing nucleation and evolution of viable CCN. Biofuel soot particles were also typically assumed to be larger and more hygroscopic than for fossil fuel soot and therefore caused more negative forcing, as also found in previous studies. Diesel soot (black and organic carbon) experiments had relatively smaller cloud impacts with five of the models <±0.06 Wm-2 from clouds. The results are subject to the caveats that variability among models, and regional and interrannual variability for each model, are large. This comparison together with previously published results stresses the need to further constrain aerosol microphysical schemes. The non-linearities resulting from the competition of opposing effects on the CCN population make it difficult to extrapolate from idealized experiments to likely impacts of realistic potential emission changes.

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud Resolving and a Global Climate Model  

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Comparison of the Vertical Velocity Comparison of the Vertical Velocity used to Calculate the Cloud Droplet Number Concentration in a Cloud-Resolving and a Global Climate Model H. Guo, J. E. Penner, M. Herzog, and X. Liu Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, Michigan Introduction Anthropogenic aerosols are effective cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). The availability of CCN affects the initial cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) and droplet size; therefore, cloud optical properties (the so-called first aerosol indirect effect). However, the estimate of CDNC from a mechanistic treatment shows significant differences from the empirical schemes mainly due to the large bias of the large-scale vertical velocity (w) (Ghan et al. 1993, 1995; Boucher and Lohmann 1995;

82

Evaluating regional cloud-permitting simulations of the WRF model for the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE, Darwin 2006)  

SciTech Connect

Data from the Tropical Warm Pool I5 nternational Cloud Experiment (TWPICE) were used to evaluate two suites of high-resolution (4-7 km, convection-resolving) simulations of the Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model with a focus on the performance of different cloud microphysics (MP) schemes. The major difference between these two suites of simulations is with and without the reinitializing process. Whenreinitialized every three days, the four cloud MP schemes evaluated can capture the general profiles of cloud fraction, temperature, water vapor, winds, and cloud liquid and ice water content (LWC and IWC, respectively). However, compared with surface measurements of radiative and moisture fluxes and satellite retrieval of top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) fluxes, disagreements do exist. Large discrepancies with observed LWC and IWC and derived radiative heating profiles can be attributed to both the limitations of the cloud property retrievals and model performance. The simulated precipitation also shows a wide range of uncertainty as compared with observations, which could be caused by the cloud MP schemes, complexity of land-sea configuration, and the high temporal and spatial variability. In general, our result indicates the importance of large-scale initial and lateral boundary conditions in re-producing basic features of cloudiness and its vertical structures. Based on our case study, we find overall the six-hydrometer single-moment MP scheme(WSM6) [Hong and Lim, 2006] in the WRF model si25 mulates the best agree- ment with the TWPICE observational analysis.

Wang, Yi; Long, Charles N.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Dudhia, Jimy; McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaodong

2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

83

Development and Testing of a Life Cycle Model and a Parameterization of Thin Mid-level Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

We used a cloud-resolving model (a detailed computer model of cloud systems) to evaluate and improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models used for numerical weather prediction and climate modeling. We also used observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, made at DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Climate Research Facility located in the Southern Great Plains (Kansas and Oklahoma) during Intensive Observation Periods to evaluate our detailed computer model as well as a single-column version of a global atmospheric model used for numerical weather prediction (the Global Forecast System of the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction). This so-called Single-Column Modeling approach has proved to be a very effective method for testing the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models. The method relies on detailed observations of the atmospheric state, including clouds, in an atmospheric column comparable in size to a grid column used in a global atmospheric model. The required observations are made by a combination of in situ and remote sensing instruments. One of the greatest problems facing mankind at the present is climate change. Part of the problem is our limited ability to predict the regional patterns of climate change. In order to increase this ability, uncertainties in climate models must be reduced. One of the greatest of these uncertainties is the representation of clouds and cloud processes. This project, and ARM taken as a whole, has helped to improve the representation of clouds in global atmospheric models.

Krueger, Steven K.

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

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Transport Modeling Transport Modeling Working Group to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group on AddThis.com... Key Activities Plans, Implementation, & Results Accomplishments Organization Chart & Contacts Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation

85

DYNAMICAL MODEL FOR THE ZODIACAL CLOUD AND SPORADIC METEORS  

SciTech Connect

The solar system is dusty, and would become dustier over time as asteroids collide and comets disintegrate, except that small debris particles in interplanetary space do not last long. They can be ejected from the solar system by Jupiter, thermally destroyed near the Sun, or physically disrupted by collisions. Also, some are swept by the Earth (and other planets), producing meteors. Here we develop a dynamical model for the solar system meteoroids and use it to explain meteor radar observations. We find that the Jupiter Family Comets (JFCs) are the main source of the prominent concentrations of meteors arriving at the Earth from the helion and antihelion directions. To match the radiant and orbit distributions, as measured by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and Advanced Meteor Orbit Radar (AMOR), our model implies that comets, and JFCs in particular, must frequently disintegrate when reaching orbits with low perihelion distance. Also, the collisional lifetimes of millimeter particles may be longer ({approx}> 10{sup 5} yr at 1 AU) than postulated in the standard collisional models ({approx}10{sup 4} yr at 1 AU), perhaps because these chondrule-sized meteoroids are stronger than thought before. Using observations of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite to calibrate the model, we find that the total cross section and mass of small meteoroids in the inner solar system are (1.7-3.5) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} km{sup 2} and {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} g, respectively, in a good agreement with previous studies. The mass input required to keep the zodiacal cloud in a steady state is estimated to be {approx}10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} kg s{sup -1}. The input is up to {approx}10 times larger than found previously, mainly because particles released closer to the Sun have shorter collisional lifetimes and need to be supplied at a faster rate. The total mass accreted by the Earth in particles between diameters D = 5 {mu}m and 1 cm is found to be {approx}15,000 tons yr{sup -1} (factor of two uncertainty), which is a large share of the accretion flux measured by the Long Term Duration Facility. The majority of JFC particles plunge into the upper atmosphere at <15 km s{sup -1} speeds, should survive the atmospheric entry, and can produce micrometeorite falls. This could explain the compositional similarity of samples collected in the Antarctic ice and stratosphere, and those brought from comet Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. Meteor radars such as CMOR and AMOR see only a fraction of the accretion flux ({approx}1%-10% and {approx}10%-50%, respectively), because small particles impacting at low speeds produce ionization levels that are below these radars' detection capabilities.

Nesvorny, David; Vokrouhlicky, David; Pokorny, Petr; Bottke, William F. [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St., Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Janches, Diego [Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, GSFC/NASA, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jenniskens, Peter [Carl Sagan Center, SETI Institute, 515 N. Whisman Road, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Bringing Clouds into Focus: A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the  

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Bringing Clouds into Bringing Clouds into Focus Bringing Clouds into Focus A New Global Climate Model May Reduce the Uncertainty of Climate Forecasting May 11, 2010 | Tags: Lattice QCD Contact: John Hules, JAHules@lbl.gov , +1 510 486 6008 Randall-fig4.png The large data sets generated by the GCRM require new analysis and visualization capabilities. This 3D plot of vorticity isosurfaces was developed using VisIt, a 3D visualization tool with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used by the GCRM. (Image Courtesy of the NERSC Analytics Team) Clouds exert two competing effects on the Earth's temperature: they cool the planet by reflecting solar radiation back to space, but they also warm the planet by trapping heat near the surface. These two effects coexist in

87

Observed Scaling in Clouds and Precipitation and Scale Incognizance in Regional to Global Atmospheric Models  

SciTech Connect

We use observations of robust scaling behavior in clouds and precipitation to derive constraints on how partitioning of precipitation should change with model resolution. Our analysis indicates that 90-99% of stratiform precipitation should occur in clouds that are resolvable by contemporary climate models (e.g., with 200 km or finer grid spacing). Furthermore, this resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation should increase sharply with resolution, such that effectively all stratiform precipitation should be resolvable above scales of ~50 km. We show that the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) and the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model also exhibit the robust cloud and precipitation scaling behavior that is present in observations, yet the resolved fraction of stratiform precipitation actually decreases with increasing model resolution. A suite of experiments with multiple dynamical cores provides strong evidence that this `scale-incognizant' behavior originates in one of the CAM4 parameterizations. An additional set of sensitivity experiments rules out both convection parameterizations, and by a process of elimination these results implicate the stratiform cloud and precipitation parameterization. Tests with the CAM5 physics package show improvements in the resolution-dependence of resolved cloud fraction and resolved stratiform precipitation fraction.

O'Brien, Travis A.; Li, Fuyu; Collins, William D.; Rauscher, Sara; Ringler, Todd; Taylor, Mark; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic) clouds is reviewed, with an emphasis on factors that may be expected to change in a changing climate of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

89

Cloud Controlling Factors --Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Controlling Factors -- Low Clouds BJORN STEVENS, Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic conspire to determine the statistics and cli- matology of layers of shallow (boundary layer) clouds of low-cloud control- ling processes are offered: these include renewing our focus on theory, model

Stevens, Bjorn

90

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Two-moment Bulk Stratiform Cloud Microphysics in the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL)  

SciTech Connect

A two-moment bulk stratiform microphysics scheme, including recently developed physically-based droplet activation/ice nucleation parameterizations has been implemented into the Grid-point Atmospheric Model of IAP LASG (GAMIL) as an effort to enhance the model capability for studying aerosol indirect effects. Unlike the previous one-moment cloud microphysics scheme, the new scheme produces reasonable representation of cloud particle size and number concentration. This scheme captures the observed spatial variations in cloud droplet number concentrations. Simulated ice crystal number concentrations in cirrus clouds qualitatively agree with in-situ observations. The longwave and shortwave cloud forcing are in better agreement with observations. Sensitivity tests show that the column cloud droplet number concentrations calculated from two different droplet activation parameterizations are similar. However, ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phased clouds is sensitive to different heterogeneous freezing formulations. The simulation with high ice crystal number concentration in mixed-phase clouds has less liquid water path and weaker cloud forcing. Furthermore, ice crystal number concentration in cirrus clouds is sensitive to different ice nucleation parameterizations. Sensitivity tests also suggest that impact of pre-existing ice crystals on homogeneous freezing in old clouds should be taken into account.

Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Bin; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Jorge M. Villa*a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling, Simulation and Comparison Study of Cirrus Clouds' Ice Crystals Jorge M. Villa*a , Sandra of the bullets. This software allows us to create irregular models of particles using the Discrete Dipole of earth's energy dynamics, therefore affecting climate systems1 . In addition, they indirectly affect

Cruz-Pol, Sandra L.

93

Simulation of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the WRF Model at the Southern Great Plains Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aerosol direct and indirect effects were investigated for three specific cases during the March 2000 Cloud IOP at the SGP site by using a modified WRF model. The WRF model was previously altered to include a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme...

Vogel, Jonathan 1988-

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

94

From concentric eyewall to annular hurricane: A numerical study with the cloud-resolved WRF model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(secondary eyewall) in coincidence with a local tangential wind max- imum around the pre-existing eyewallFrom concentric eyewall to annular hurricane: A numerical study with the cloud-resolved WRF model Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, the transformation from a non- AH to an AH through a concentric

Wang, Bin

95

Low Clouds Contribute to Weather Prediction Model Bias | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

2 2 » Low Clouds Contribute to Weather Prediction Model Bias Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » November 2012 Low Clouds Contribute to Weather Prediction Model Bias Long-term measurement records improve the representation of clouds in climate and weather forecast models. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe

96

TRAMS: A new dynamic cloud model for Titan's methane clouds Erika L. Barth1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's atmosphere. In initial model tests over a two-dimensional domain, a warm bubble or random temperature accelerate upwards. Griffith et al. [2000] looked into the stability of Titan's atmosphere and found an LCL

Rafkin, Scot C. R.

97

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

Hogan, Robin

98

ATLAS Cloud R&D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Love, P; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Cloud shading retrieval and assimilation in a satellite-model coupled mesoscale analysis system  

SciTech Connect

A retrieval-assimilation method has been developed as a quantitative means to exploit the information in satellite imagery regarding shading of the ground by clouds, as applied to mesoscale weather analysis. Cloud radiative parameters are retrieved from satellite visible image data and used, along with parameters computed by a numerical model, to control the model's computation of downward radiative fluxes at the ground. These fluxes influence the analysis of ground surface temperatures under clouds. The method is part of a satellite-model coupled four-dimensional analysis system that merges information from visible image data in cloudy areas with infrared sounder data in clear areas, where retrievals of surface temperatures and water vapor concentrations are assimilated. The substantial impact of shading on boundary-layer development and mesoscale circulations was demonstrated in simulations, and the value of assimilating shading retrievals was demonstrated with a case study and with a simulated analysis that included the effects of several potential sources of error. The case study was performed in the northwestern Texas area, where convective cloud development was influenced by the shading effects of a persistent region of stratiform cloud cover. Analyses that included shading retrieval assimilation had consistently smaller shelter-height temperature errors than analyses without shading retrievals. When clear-area surface temperature retrievals from sounder data were analyzed along with cloudy-area shading retrievals, the contrast in heating between the shaded and clear parts of the domain led to large variations in analyzed boundary-layer depths and had a modest impact on analyzed wind flow. The analyzed locations of upward vertical motion corresponded roughly to areas of convective cloud development observed in satellite imagery. 29 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Lipton, A.E. (Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States))

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Lightning flash rate and chemistry simulation of tropical island convection using a cloud-resolved model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lightning flash rate and chemistry simulation of tropical island convection using a cloud schemes (FRPSs) and estimating the average NO production per lightning flash in this unique storm type network (LINET) provided lightning flash data for the model and a lightning placement scheme injected

Maryland at College Park, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Posters A One-Dimensional Radiative Convective Model with Detailed Cloud Microphysics J. Simmons, O. Lie-Svendsen, and K. Stamnes Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska The Arctic is a key element in determining the radiation budget of the earth. Within the polar regions, the net radiation (incoming solar radiation minus outgoing infrared radiation) is negative. To understand the role this energy deficit plays in the overall radiation budget, one must examine the prevalent atmospheric features of the Arctic. One such feature is a persistent layer of low-altitude, stratiform clouds found over the central Arctic predominantly from April to September (Tsay et al. 1984). These Arctic stratus clouds (ASC) modulate the earth's radiation budget

102

Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations  

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Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance Computation of Domain-Averaged Irradiance with a Simple Two-Stream Radiative Transfer Model Including Vertical Cloud Property Correlations S. Kato Center for Atmospheric Sciences Hampton University Hampton, Virginia Introduction Recent development of remote sensing instruments by Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM?) Program provides information of spatial and temporal variability of cloud structures. However it is not clear what cloud properties are required to express complicated cloud fields in a realistic way and how to use them in a relatively simple one-dimensional (1D) radiative transfer model to compute the domain averaged irradiance. To address this issue, a simple shortwave radiative transfer model that can treat the vertical cloud optical property correlation is developed. The model is based on the gamma-weighted

103

Simulation of polar stratospheric clouds in the specified dynamics version of the whole atmosphere community climate model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the simulation of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) in the Specified Dynamics version of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model for the Antarctic winter 2005. In this model, PSCs are assumed to form ...

Wegner, T.

104

Tracking tropical cloud systems for the diagnosis of simulations by the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model  

SciTech Connect

To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the tropical warm pool. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, J. Geophys. Res., 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest that the organization of the mesoscale convective systems is particularly sensitive to the cloud microphysics parameterization used.

Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E. P.; Jensen, M. P.; Zhang, M. H.; Boer, E.

2010-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

105

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Papers A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and...accretion, accretion discs|MHD|stars: formation|ISM: clouds...pre-main-sequence track on the HR diagram (Stahler, Shu Taam 1980...self-gravitating magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) fluid undergoing turbulence......

D. Balsara; D. Ward-Thompson; R.M. Crutcher

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Transitions of cloud-topped marine boundary layers characterized by AIRS, MODIS, and a large eddy simulation model  

SciTech Connect

Cloud top entrainment instability (CTEI) is a hypothesized positive feedback between entrainment mixing and evaporative cooling near the cloud top. Previous theoretical and numerical modeling studies have shown that the persistence or breakup of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds may be sensitive to the CTEI parameter. Collocated thermodynamic profile and cloud observations obtained from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments are used to quantify the relationship between the CTEI parameter and the cloud-topped MBL transition from stratocumulus to trade cumulus in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Results derived from AIRS and MODIS are compared with numerical results from the UCLA large eddy simulation (LES) model for both well-mixed and decoupled MBLs. The satellite and model results both demonstrate a clear correlation between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction. Despite fundamental differences between LES steady state results and the instantaneous snapshot type of observations from satellites, significant correlations for both the instantaneous pixel-scale observations and the long-term averaged spatial patterns between the CTEI parameter and MBL cloud fraction are found from the satellite observations and are consistent with LES results. This suggests the potential of using AIRS and MODIS to quantify global and temporal characteristics of the cloud-topped MBL transition.

Yue, Qing; Kahn, Brian; Xiao, Heng; Schreier, Mathias; Fetzer, E. J.; Teixeira, J.; Suselj, Kay

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Profiling clouds' inner life | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inner life Subgrid modeling pinpoints cloud transformation to uncover true reflective power An accurate understanding of clouds over the ocean is important for climate change...

108

On the Representation of High-Latitude Boundary Layer Mixed-Phase Cloud in the ECMWF Global Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Supercooled liquid water (SLW) layers in boundary layer clouds are abundantly observed in the atmosphere at high latitudes, but remain a challenge to represent in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate models. Unresolved processes such as ...

Richard M. Forbes; Maike Ahlgrimm

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mean Structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast Atlantic boundary layer clouds: Insights from satellite observations and multiscale modeling framework simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mean structure and diurnal cycle of Southeast (SE) Atlantic boundary layer clouds are described with satellite observations and multi-scale modeling framework (MMF) simulations during austral spring (September-November). Hourly resolution ...

David Painemal; Kuan-Man Xu; Anning Cheng; Patrick Minnis; Rabindra Palikonda

110

Assimilation of Satellite Cloud and Precipitation Observations in Numerical Weather Prediction Models: Introduction to the JAS Special Collection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To date, the assimilation of satellite measurements in numerical weather prediction (NWP) models has focused on the clear atmosphere. But satellite observations in the visible, infrared, and microwave provide a great deal of information on clouds ...

Ronald M. Errico; George Ohring; Fuzhong Weng; Peter Bauer; Brad Ferrier; Jean-Franois Mahfouf; Joe Turk

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while the mostly dry mountain-breeze circulations force an additional component that results in semi-diurnal variations near the coast. A series of numerical tests, however, reveal sensitivity of the simulations to the choice of vertical grid, limiting the possibility of solid quantitative statements on the amplitudes and phases of the diurnal and semidiurnal components across the domain. According to our experiments, the Mellor-Yamada-Nakanishi-Niino (MYNN) boundary layer scheme and the WSM6 microphysics scheme is the combination of schemes that performs best. For that combination, mean cloud cover, liquid water path, and cloud depth are fairly wellsimulated, while mean cloud top height remains too low in comparison to observations. Both microphysics and boundary layer schemes contribute to the spread in liquid water path and cloud depth, although the microphysics contribution is slightly more prominent. Boundary layer schemes are the primary contributors to cloud top height, degree of adiabaticity, and cloud cover. Cloud top height is closely related to surface fluxes and boundary layer structure. Thus, our study infers that an appropriate tuning of cloud top height would likely improve the low-cloud representation in the model. Finally, we show that entrainment governs the degree of adiabaticity, while boundary layer decoupling is a control on cloud cover. In the intercomparison study using WRF single-column model experiments, most parameterizations show a poor agreement of the vertical boundary layer structure when compared with large-eddy simulation models. We also implement a new Total-Energy/Mass- Flux boundary layer scheme into the WRF model and evaluate its ability to simulate both stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds. Result comparisons against large-eddy simulation show that this advanced parameterization based on the new Eddy-Diffusivity/Mass-Flux approach provides a better performance than other boundary layer parameterizations.

Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

Renormalisation group for depinning transition ind=2 ising models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a position space renormalisation group (RG) method to study generalised depinning transition in two-dimensional Ising models. The treatment encompasses (i) the original model for depinning invented by ...

D. N. Mihajlovi?; N. M. vraki?

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tracking tropical cloud systems - Observations for the diagnosis of simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model  

SciTech Connect

To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the vicinity of the ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest a computational paradox where, even though the size of the simulated systems are about half of that observed, their longevities are still similar. The explanation for this seeming incongruity will be explored.

Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E.; Jensen, M.; Zhang, M.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Evaluation of cloud fraction and its radiative effect simulated by IPCC AR4 global models against ARM surface observations  

SciTech Connect

Cloud Fraction (CF) is the dominant modulator of radiative fluxes. In this study, we evaluate CF simulations in the IPCC AR4 GCMs against ARM ground measurements, with a focus on the vertical structure, total amount of cloud and its effect on cloud shortwave transmissivity, for both inter-model deviation and model-measurement discrepancy. Our intercomparisons of three CF or sky-cover related dataset reveal that the relative differences are usually less than 10% (5%) for multi-year monthly (annual) mean values, while daily differences are quite significant. The results also show that the model-observation and the inter-model deviations have a similar magnitude for the total CF (TCF) and the normalized cloud effect, and they are twice as large as the surface downward solar radiation and cloud transmissivity. This implies that the other cloud properties, such as cloud optical depth and height, have a similar magnitude of disparity to TCF among the GCMs, and suggests that a better agreement among the GCMs in solar radiative fluxes could be the result of compensating errors in either cloud vertical structure, cloud optical depth or cloud fraction. Similar deviation pattern between inter-model and model-measurement suggests that the climate models tend to generate larger bias against observations for those variables with larger inter-model deviation. The simulated TCF from IPCC AR4 GCMs are very scattered through all seasons over three ARM sites: Southern Great Plains (SGP), Manus, Papua New Guinea and North Slope of Alaska (NSA). The GCMs perform better at SGP than at Manus and NSA in simulating the seasonal variation and probability distribution of TCF; however, the TCF in these models is remarkably underpredicted and cloud transmissivity is less susceptible to the change of TCF than the observed at SGP. Much larger inter-model deviation and model bias are found over NSA than the other sites in estimating the TCF, cloud transmissivity and cloud-radiation interaction, suggesting that the Arctic region continues to challenge cloud simulations in climate models. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF and fail to capture the seasonal variation of CF at middle and low levels in the tropics. The high altitude CF is much larger in the GCMs than the observation and the inter-model variability of CF also reaches maximum at high levels in the tropics. Most of the GCMs tend to underpredict CF by 50-150% relative to the measurement average at low and middle levels over SGP. While the GCMs generally capture the maximum CF in the boundary layer and vertical variability, the inter-model deviation is largest near surface over the Arctic. The internal variability of CF simulated in ensemble runs with the same model is very minimal.

Qian, Yun; Long, Charles N.; Wang, Hailong; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Xie, Shaocheng

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-Phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of ice number concentration in clouds are important but still pose problems. The pattern of ice development in stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) offers an opportunity to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other ...

Damao Zhang; Zhien Wang; Andrew Heymsfield; Jiwen Fan; Tao Luo

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Sensitivity of Hadley Circulation to Physical Parameters and Resolution through Changing Upper-Tropospheric Ice Clouds Using a Global Cloud-System Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relationship between upper-tropospheric ice cloud properties and the Hadley circulation intensity is examined through parameter sensitivity studies of global cloud-system-resolving simulations with explicit cloud convection. Experiments under ...

Shin-ichi Iga; Hirofumi Tomita; Yoko Tsushima; Masaki Satoh

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Final report for grant DE-FG02-06ER64182: "Evaluation and Improvement of the Cloud Resolving Model Component of the Multi-Scale Modeling Framework"  

SciTech Connect

The overall aim of the larger collaborative effort of which this project was part was to evaluate and improve the cloud system resolving model (CSRM) at the heart of the multi-scale modeling framework (MMF). Our task at the University of Colorado our effort was to develop methods that would let us evaluate the performance of cloud-scale models at the ARM SGP site using ARM remote sensing products.

Pincus, Robert [University of Colorado] [University of Colorado

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

118

Vertical Velocity Focus Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Velocity Focus Group Velocity Focus Group ARM 2008 Science Team Meeting Norfolk, VA March 10-14 Background Vertical velocity measurements have been at the top of the priority list of the cloud modeling community for some time. Doppler measurements from ARM profiling radars operating at 915-MHz, 35-GHz and 94-GHz have been largely unexploited. The purpose of this new focus group is to develop vertical velocity ARM products suitable for modelers. ARM response to their request has been slow. Most ARM instruments are suitable for cloud observations and have limited capabilities in precipitation Using ARM datasets for evaluating and improving cloud parameterization in global climate models (GCMs) is not straightforward, due to gigantic scale mismatches. Consider this... Looking only vertically drastically limits opportunities

119

ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The computing model of the ATLAS experiment was designed around the concept of grid computing and, since the start of data taking, this model has proven very successful. However, new cloud computing technologies bring attractive features to improve the operations and elasticity of scientific distributed computing. ATLAS sees grid and cloud computing as complementary technologies that will coexist at different levels of resource abstraction, and two years ago created an R&D working group to investigate the different integration scenarios. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D has been able to demonstrate the feasibility of offloading work from grid to cloud sites and, as of today, is able to integrate transparently various cloud resources into the PanDA workload management system. The ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D is operating various PanDA queues on private and public resources and has provided several hundred thousand CPU days to the experiment. As a result, the ATLAS Cloud Computing R&D group has gained...

Panitkin, S; The ATLAS collaboration; Caballero Bejar, J; Benjamin, D; DiGirolamo, A; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Hover, J; Kucharczuk, K; Medrano LLamas, R; Ohman, H; Paterson, M; Sobie, R; Taylor, R; Walker, R; Zaytsev, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Final Report on the Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds bw, effective radius of water drops re, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database and have submitted it to ARM for consideration of its inclusion on the ARM database as a PI product. This report describes the development of this database, and also describes research that has been conducted on cloud-aerosol interactions using the data obtained during RACORO. A list of conference proceedings and publications is also included.

McFarquhar, Greg

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Growing network model for community with group structure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a growing network model for a community with a group structure. The community consists of individual members and groups, gatherings of members. The community grows as a new member is introduced by an existing member at each time step. The new member then creates a new group or joins one of the groups of the introducer. We investigate the emerging community structure analytically and numerically. The group size distribution shows a power-law distribution for a variety of growth rules, while the activity distribution follows an exponential or a power law depending on the details of the growth rule. We also present an analysis of empirical data from online communities the Groups in http://www.yahoo.com and the Cafe in http://www.daum.net, which show a power-law distribution for a wide range of group sizes.

Jae Dong Noh; Hyeong-Chai Jeong; Yong-Yeol Ahn; Hawoong Jeong

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing, and cloud coverage. However, the treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is crude and the partitioning of condensed water into liquid droplets and ice crystals is prescribed as temperature dependent functions. In our previous 2007 ARM metric reports a new mixed-phase cloud microphysics parameterization (for ice nucleation and water vapor deposition) was documented and implemented in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3). The new scheme was tested against the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE) observations using the single column modeling and short-range weather forecast approaches. In this report this new parameterization is further tested with CAM3 in its climate simulations. It is shown that the predicted ice water content from CAM3 with the new parameterization is in better agreement with the ARM measurements at the Southern Great Plain (SGP) site for the mixed-phase clouds.

X Liu; SJ Ghan; S Xie; J Boyle; SA Klein

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Cloud in the operational DWD mesoscale model An extensive documentation of the physics included in the Lokal Modell (LM) can be found  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Lokal Modell (LM) can be found in Doms et al. (2004). Here a short summary of the cloud physics is given-scale clouds Since 26th of April 2004 the Lokal Modell (LM) uses a two-category ice scheme which explicitly S that are considered in this two-category ice scheme of LM. The individual microphysical processes are: Sc condensation

Reading, University of

124

Model-Evaluation Tools for Three-Dimensional Cloud Verification via Spaceborne Active Sensors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clouds pose many operational hazards to the aviation community in terms of ceilings and visibility, turbulence, and aircraft icing. Realistic descriptions of the three-dimensional (3D) distribution and temporal evolution of clouds in numerical ...

Steven D. Miller; Courtney E. Weeks; Randy G. Bullock; John M. Forsythe; Paul A. Kucera; Barbara G. Brown; Cory A. Wolff; Philip T. Partain; Andrew S. Jones; David B. Johnson

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Accounting for Unresolved Spatial Variability in Large Scale Models: Development and Evaluation of a Statistical Cloud Parameterization with Prognostic Higher Order Moments  

SciTech Connect

This project focused on the variability of clouds that is present across a wide range of scales ranging from the synoptic to the millimeter. In particular, there is substantial variability in cloud properties at scales smaller than the grid spacing of models used to make climate projections (GCMs) and weather forecasts. These models represent clouds and other small-scale processes with parameterizations that describe how those processes respond to and feed back on the largescale state of the atmosphere.

Robert Pincus

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

126

Relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo, and new surface-based approach for determining cloud albedo  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on three interconnected topics: (1) quantitative relationship between surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo; (2) surface-based approach for measuring cloud albedo; (3) multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations of surface shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. An analytical expression is first derived to quantify the relationship between cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo. The analytical expression is then used to deduce a new approach for inferring cloud albedo from concurrent surface-based measurements of downwelling surface shortwave radiation and cloud fraction. High-resolution decade-long data on cloud albedos are obtained by use of this surface-based approach over the US Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiaton Measurement (ARM) Program at the Great Southern Plains (SGP) site. The surface-based cloud albedos are further compared against those derived from the coincident GOES satellite measurements. The three long-term (1997-2009) sets of hourly data on shortwave cloud radiative forcing, cloud fraction and cloud albedo collected over the SGP site are analyzed to explore the multiscale (diurnal, annual and inter-annual) variations and covariations. The analytical formulation is useful for diagnosing deficiencies of cloud-radiation parameterizations in climate models.

Liu, Y.; Wu, W.; Jensen, M. P.; Toto, T.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

BNL | Cloud Lifecycle Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure Cloud Life Cycle Infrastructure An important component of any long-term atmospheric measurement program is the quality control and maintenance of the datastreams from instrument systems. Further, the raw measurements from atmospheric remote sensing instrumentation are not directly useable by the majority of the scientific community. These raw measurements must be interpreted and converted to geophysical quantities that can be more readily used by a greater number of scientists to address important questions regarding the Earth's climate system. The cloud life cycle infrastructure group at BNL is led by Dr. Michael Jensen and is responsible for the development and production of cloud-related value-added products (VAPs). The cloud life cycle infrastructure group also provides mentorships for the millimeter cloud

128

Attribution Analysis of Cloud Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uncertainty on cloud feedback is the primary contributor to the large spread of equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) in climate models. In this study, we compare the short-term cloud feedback in climate models with observations, and evaluate...

Zhou, Chen

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Environment and the Lifetime of Tropical Deep Convection in a Cloud-Permitting Regional Model Simulation  

SciTech Connect

By applying a cloud tracking algorithm to tropical convective systems simulated by a regional high resolution model, the study documents environmental conditions before and after convective systems are initiated over ocean and land by following them during their lifetime. The comparative roles of various environmental fields in affecting the lifetime of convection are also quantified. The statistics of lifetime, maximum area, propagation speed and direction of the simulated deep convection agrees well with geostationary satellite observations. Over ocean, convective systems enhance surface fluxes through the associated wind gusts as well as cooling and drying of the boundary layer. A significant relationship is found between the mean surface fluxes during their lifetime and the longevity of the systems which in turn is related to the initial intensity of the moist updraft and to a lesser extent upper level shear. Over land, on the other hand, convective activity suppresses surface fluxes through cloud cover and the lifetime of convection is related to the upper level shear during their lifetime and strength of the heat fluxes several hours before the initiation of convection. For systems of equal lifetime, those over land are significantly more intense than those over ocean especially during early stages of their lifetime.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; McFarlane, Sally A.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observations Observations and Modeling of Shallow Convective Clouds: Implications for the Indirect Aerosol Effects Sylwester Arabas 1 , Joanna Slawinska 1 , Wojciech Grabowski 2 , Hugh Morrison 2 , Hanna Pawlowska 1 1 : Institute of Geophysics, University of Warsaw, Poland 2 : National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA 348 constants for reference state and lateral boundary conditions 349 ibcx=icyx 350 ibcy=icyy*j3 351 ibcz=icyz 352 irlx=irelx 353 irly=irely*j3 354 irdbc=0 355 fcr0=fcr0*icorio 356 itdl=0 357 tdt=40.*3600. 358 u0tdl=u00 359 360 361 constants for thermodynamics 362 c bv=sqrt(st*g) 363 bv=st 364 st=bv**2/g 365 cp=3.5*rg 366 cap=rg/cp 367 pr00=rg*rh00*tt00

131

Groups  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

groups/all/feed en Buildings groups/all/feed en Buildings http://en.openei.org/community/group/buildings Description: This group is dedicated to discussions about green buildings, energy use in buildings, occupant comfort in buildings, and building technologies. The OpenEI Buildings Community Group will be dedicated to discussions, blogs, and postings about new building technologies, green buildings, energy use in buildings, and occupant experience (comfort levels) in green buildings.group/buildings" target="_blank">read more architecture building reviews buildings technology comfort energy use facilities management green building LEED technologies usgbc

132

Tropical and subtropical cloud transitions in weather and climate prediction models: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-Section Intercomparison (GPCI)  

SciTech Connect

A model evaluation approach is proposed where weather and climate prediction models are analyzed along a Pacific Ocean cross-section, from the stratocumulus regions off the coast of California, across the shallow convection dominated trade-winds, to the deep convection regions of the ITCZ: the GCSS/WGNE Pacific Cross-section Intercomparison (GPCI). The main goal of GPCI is to evaluate, and help understand and improve the representation of tropical and sub-tropical cloud processes in weather and climate prediction models. In this paper, a detailed analysis of cloud regime transitions along the cross-section from the sub-tropics to the tropics for the season JJA of 1998 is presented. This GPCI study confirms many of the typical weather and climate prediction model problems in the representation of clouds: underestimation of clouds in the stratocumulus regime by most models with the corresponding consequences in terms of shortwave radiation biases; overestimation of clouds by the ECMWF Re-Analysis (ERA40) in the deep tropics (in particular) with the corresponding impact in the outgoing longwave radiation; large spread between the different models in terms of cloud cover, liquid water path and shortwave radiation; significant differences between the models in terms of vertical crosssections of cloud properties (in particular), vertical velocity and relative humidity. An alternative analysis of cloud cover mean statistics is proposed where sharp gradients in cloud cover along the GPCI transect are taken into account. This analysis shows that the negative cloud bias of some models and ERA40 in the stratocumulus regions (as compared to ISCCP) is associated not only with lower values of cloud cover in these regimes, but also with a stratocumulus-to-cumulus transition that occurs too early along the trade-wind Lagrangian trajectory. Histograms of cloud cover along the cross-section differ significantly between models. Some models exhibit a quasi-bimodal structure with cloud cover being either very large (close to 100%) or very small, while other models show a more continuous transition. The ISCCP observations suggest that reality is in-between these two extreme examples. These different patterns reflect the diverse nature of the cloud, boundary layer, and convection parameterizations in the participating weather and climate prediction models.

Teixeira, J.; Cardoso, S.; Bonazzola, M.; Cole, Jason N.; DelGenio, Anthony D.; DeMott, C.; Franklin, A.; Hannay, Cecile; Jakob, Christian; Jiao, Y.; Karlsson, J.; Kitagawa, H.; Koehler, M.; Kuwano-Yoshida, A.; LeDrian, C.; Lock, Adrian; Miller, M.; Marquet, P.; Martins, J.; Mechoso, C. R.; Meijgaard, E. V.; Meinke, I.; Miranda, P.; Mironov, D.; Neggers, Roel; Pan, H. L.; Randall, David A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Rockel, B.; Rossow, William B.; Ritter, B.; Siebesma, A. P.; Soares, P.; Turk, F. J.; Vaillancourt, P.; Von Engeln, A.; Zhao, M.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A turbulent MHD model for molecular clouds and a new method of accretion on to star-forming cores D gravitationally unstable and collapse to form stars. Key words: accretion, accretion discs ­ MHD ­ stars on to a well- defined pre-main-sequence track on the HR diagram (Stahler, Shu & Taam 1980), and hence

Ward-Thompson, Derek

134

Observed Characteristics of Clouds and Precipitating Systems Associated with the Tropical Circulation in Global Models and Reanalyses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................ 90 a. Reanalysis Datasets .................................................................. 90 b. ISCCP Cloud Regimes ............................................................. 92 c. Model Setup... FIGURE Page A-1 Annual average, zonal mean meridional mass streamfunction values for each reanalysis dataset during the 1979-2008 period ............ 144 A-2 Same as Fig. A-1, but for JJA...

Stachnik, Justin Paul

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

135

Bringing Clouds into Focus: A New Global Climate Model May Reduce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a parallel distributed architecture, which is being extended to support the geodesic grid used by the GCRM. (Image Courtesy of the NERSC Analytics Team) Clouds exert two...

136

Bayesian modelling of the cool core galaxy group NGC 4325  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an X-ray analysis of the radio-quiet cool-core galaxy group NGC 4325 (z=0.026) based on Chandra and ROSAT observations. The Chandra data were analysed using XSPEC deprojection, 2D spectral mapping and forward-fitting with parametric models. Additionally, a Markov chain Monte Carlo method was used to perform a joint Bayesian analysis of the Chandra and ROSAT data. The results of the various analysis methods are compared, particularly those obtained by forward-fitting and deprojection. The spectral mapping reveals the presence of cool gas displaced up to 10 kpc from the group centre. The Chandra X-ray surface brightness shows the group core to be highly disturbed, and indicates the presence of two small X-ray cavities within 15 kpc of the group core. The XSPEC deprojection analysis shows that the group has a particularly steep entropy profile, suggesting that an AGN outburst may be about to occur. With the evidence of prior AGN activity, but with no radio emission currently observed, we suggest that the group in in a pre-outburst state, with the cavities and displaced gas providing evidence of a previous, weak AGN outburst.

Paul A. Russell; Trevor J. Ponman; Alastair J. R. Sanderson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system-level optimisation. Keywords-green computing; Cloud computing; energy consumption; performanceIn 1st ICSE Workshop on Green and Sustainable Software Engineering, Zurich, Switzerland, 3rd June 2012 An Energy Consumption Model and Analysis Tool for Cloud Computing Environments FeiFei Chen, Jean

Schneider, Jean-Guy

138

Antilinear deformations of Coxeter groups, an application to Calogero models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct complex root spaces remaining invariant under antilinear involutions related to all Coxeter groups. We provide two alternative constructions: One is based on deformations of factors of the Coxeter element and the other based on the deformation of the longest element of the Coxeter group. Motivated by the fact that non-Hermitian Hamiltonians admitting an antilinear symmetry may be used to define consistent quantum mechanical systems with real discrete energy spectra, we subsequently employ our constructions to formulate deformations of Coxeter models remaining invariant under these extended Coxeter groups. We provide explicit and generic solutions for the Schroedinger equation of these models for the eigenenergies and corresponding wavefunctions. A new feature of these novel models is that when compared with the undeformed case their solutions are usually no longer singular for an exchange of an amount of particles less than the dimension of the representation space of the roots. The simultaneous scattering of all particles in the model leads to anyonic exchange factors for processes which have no analogue in the undeformed case.

Andreas Fring; Monique Smith

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modelling of e-cloud build-up in grooved vacuum chambers usingPOSINST  

SciTech Connect

Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a wayto limitelectron cloud accumulation in the ILC-DR. We report onsimulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accountingfor e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact withprevious estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for groovedsurfaces.

Venturini, Marco; Celata, C.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, Mauro

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Transport Modeling Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport Modeling Working Group Transport Modeling Working Group The Transport Modeling Working Group meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, share experimental and computational results, and collaboratively develop methodologies for and understanding of transport phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. Its members include principle investigators and supporting personnel from transport-related projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Learn more about DOE research activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Fuel cell operation relies on effective mass transport of species through individual components and across the interfaces between components. Among these species are hydrogen, oxygen, water, protons, and electrons. Transport behavior is a function of operating conditions and component properties such as microstructure and surface properties. Understanding and optimizing the controlling transport phenomena are critical to the efficient and cost-effective operation of polymer electrolyte fuel cells. A better understanding of mass transport in the fuel cell, especially of water, has the potential to lead to improved designs and more efficient systems.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A geometric basis for the standard-model gauge group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A geometric approach to the standard model in terms of the Clifford algebra Cl_7 is advanced. A key feature of the model is its use of an algebraic spinor for one generation of leptons and quarks. Spinor transformations separate into left-sided ("exterior") and right-sided ("interior") types. By definition, Poincare transformations are exterior ones. We consider all rotations in the seven-dimensional space that (1) conserve the spacetime components of the particle and antiparticle currents and (2) do not couple the right-chiral neutrino. These rotations comprise additional exterior transformations that commute with the Poincare group and form the group SU(2)_L, interior ones that constitute SU(3)_C, and a unique group of coupled double-sided rotations with U(1)_Y symmetry. The spinor mediates a physical coupling of Poincare and isotopic symmetries within the restrictions of the Coleman--Mandula theorem. The four extra spacelike dimensions in the model form a basis for the Higgs isodoublet field, whose symmetr...

Trayling, G; Trayling, Greg

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Research Highlights Sorted by Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Working Group Aerosol Life Cycle | Cloud Life Cycle | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Aerosol | Cloud Modeling | Cloud Properties | Radiative Processes Aerosol Life Cycle 2013 Bhattacharya, A. Wildfires Lead to More Warming Than Climate Models Predict, a New Mexico Fire Study Reports ASR Fast, J. . Development and Validation of a Black Carbon Mixing State Resolved Three-Dimensional Model ARM ASR Gilles, M., Moffet, R. Spectro-microscopic Measurements of Carbonaceous Aerosol Aging in Central California ARM ASR Kafle, D. N., Coulter, R. L. Micropulse Lidar-Derived Aerosol Optical Depth Climatology at ARM Sites Worldwide ARM Keppel-Aleks, G. Determining the Future of CO2 Using an Earth System Model ARM Li, Z. A Mixed Bag of Aerosols over Northeastern China ARM

143

Final Report fir DE-SC0005507 (A1618): The Development of an Improved Cloud Microphysical Product for Model and Remote Sensing Evaluation using RACORO Observations  

SciTech Connect

We proposed to analyze data collected during the Routine Aerial Facilities (AAF) Clouds with Low Optical Water Depths (CLOWD) Optical Radiative Observations (RACORO) in order to develop an integrated product of cloud microphysical properties (number concentration of drops in different size bins, total liquid drop concentration integrated over all bin sizes, liquid water content LWC, extinction of liquid clouds, effective radius of water drops, and radar reflectivity factor) that could be used to evaluate large-eddy simulations (LES), general circulation models (GCMs) and ground-based remote sensing retrievals, and to develop cloud parameterizations with the end goal of improving the modeling of cloud processes and properties and their impact on atmospheric radiation. We have completed the development of this microphysical database. we investigated the differences in the size distributions measured by the Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) and the Forward Scattering Probe (FSSP), between the one dimensional cloud imaging probe (1DC) and the two-dimensional cloud imaging probe (2DC), and between the bulk LWCs measured by the Gerber probe against those derived from the size resolved probes.

McFarquhar, Greg M.

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Renormalization group maps for Ising models in lattice gas variables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real space renormalization group maps, e.g., the majority rule transformation, map Ising type models to Ising type models on a coarser lattice. We show that each coefficient of the renormalized Hamiltonian in the lattice gas variables depends on only a finite number of values of the renormalized Hamiltonian. We introduce a method which computes the values of the renormalized Hamiltonian with high accuracy and so computes the coefficients in the lattice gas variables with high accuracy. For the critical nearest neighbor Ising model on the square lattice with the majority rule transformation, we compute over 1,000 different coefficients in the lattice gas variable representation of the renormalized Hamiltonian and study the decay of these coefficients. We find that they decay exponentially in some sense but with a slow decay rate. We also show that the coefficients in the spin variables are sensitive to the truncation method used to compute them.

Tom Kennedy

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

145

Securely Managing Cryptographic Keys used within a Cloud Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to rapidly develop/host cloud applications Infrastructure as a Service (Iaas) - Networked access to processing power, storage Cloud Deployment Models Public Cloud Private Cloud Community Cloud Hybrid administers the Cloud Infrastructure? Who has access to my data? My activity history? Key Management Where

146

Application of new simulation algorithms for modeling rf diagnostics of electron clouds  

SciTech Connect

Traveling wave rf diagnostics of electron cloud build-up show promise as a non-destructive technique for measuring plasma density and the efficacy of mitigation techniques. However, it is very difficult to derive an absolute measure of plasma density from experimental measurements for a variety of technical reasons. Detailed numerical simulations are vital in order to understand experimental data, and have successfully modeled build-up. Such simulations are limited in their ability to reproduce experimental data due to the large separation of scales inherent to the problem. Namely, one must resolve both rf frequencies in the GHz range, as well as the plasma modulation frequency of tens of MHz, while running for very long simulations times, on the order of microseconds. The application of new numerical simulation techniques allow us to bridge the simulation scales in this problem and produce spectra that can be directly compared to experiments. The first method is to use a plasma dielectric model to measure plasma-induced phase shifts in the rf wave. The dielectric is modulated at a low frequency, simulating the effects of multiple bunch crossings. This allows simulations to be performed without kinetic particles representing the plasma, which both speeds up the simulations as well as reduces numerical noise from interpolation of particle charge and currents onto the computational grid. Secondly we utilize a port boundary condition model to simultaneously absorb rf at the simulation boundaries, and to launch the rf into the simulation. This method improves the accuracy of simulations by restricting rf frequencies better than adding an external (finite) current source to drive rf, and absorbing layers at the boundaries. We also explore the effects of non-uniform plasma densities on the simulated spectra.

Veitzer, Seth A.; Smithe, David N.; Stoltz, Peter H. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, CO, 80303 (United States)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Prediction of In-Cloud Icing Conditions at Ground Level Using the WRF Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-cloud icing on aircraft and ground structures can be observed every winter in many countries. In extreme cases ice can cause accidents and damage to infrastructure such as power transmission lines, telecommunication towers, wind turbines, ski ...

Bjrn Egil Kringlebotn Nygaard; Jn Egill Kristjnsson; Lasse Makkonen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Modeling transparency and collaborativeness in distributed work groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transparency and collaborativeness are two essential features required for dependability. These two issues in social groups are not well studied. The present paper studies these two aspects in distributed work group environment such as Self Help Groups ... Keywords: SHG, collaboration, distributed work groups, self help group, transparency

A. B. Sagar

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect

Chicago Matters: Beyond Burnham (WTTW). Chicago has become a world center of "cloud computing." Argonne experts Pete Beckman and Ian Foster explain what "cloud computing" is and how you probably already use it on a daily basis.

Pete Beckman and Ian Foster

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Correlation between present-day model simulation of Arctic cloud radiative forcing and sea ice consistent with positive winter convective cloud feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A positive feedback on winter sea-ice loss, based on warming due to radiative forcing caused by the onset of convective clouds in response to sea-ice loss, has recently been proposed. This feedback has thus far been ...

Emanuel, Kerry Andrew

151

The Effects of Parceling on Testing Group Differences in Second-Order CFA Models: A Comparison between Multi-Group CFA and MIMIC Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA) and multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) to investigate group difference in the context of the second-order factor model with either the unparceled or parceled data had never been thoroughly...

Zou, Yuanyuan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Study to Investigate Cloud Feedback Processes and Evaluate GCM Cloud Variations Using Statistical Cloud Property Composites From ARM Data  

SciTech Connect

The representation of clouds in Global Climate Models (GCMs) remains a major source of uncertainty in climate change simulations. Cloud climatologies have been widely used to either evaluate climate model cloud fields or examine, in combination with other data sets, climate-scale relationships between cloud properties and dynamical or microphysical parameters. Major cloud climatologies have been based either on satellite observations of cloud properties or on surface observers views of cloud type and amount. Such data sets provide either the top-down view of column-integrated cloud properties (satellites) or the bottom-up view of the cloud field morphology (surface observers). Both satellite-based and surface cloud climatologies have been successfully used to examine cloud properties, to support process studies, and to evaluate climate and weather models. However, they also present certain limitations, since the satellite cloud types are defined using radiative cloud boundaries and surface observations are based on cloud boundaries visible to human observers. As a result, these data sets do not resolve the vertical distribution of cloud layers, an issue that is important in calculating both the radiative and the hydrologic effects of the cloud field. Ground-based cloud radar observations, on the other hand, resolve with good accuracy the vertical distribution of cloud layers and could be used to produce cloud type climatologies with vertical layering information. However, these observations provide point measurements only and it is not immediately clear to what extent they are representative of larger regimes. There are different methods that can be applied to minimize this problem and to produce cloud layering climatologies useful for both cloud process and model evaluation studies. If a radar system is run continuously over a number of years, it eventually samples a large number of dynamical and microphysical regimes. If additional data sets are used to put the cloud layering information into the context of large-scale dynamical regimes, such information can be used to study interactions among cloud vertical distributions and dynamical and microphysical processes and to evaluate the ability of models to simulate those interactions. The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has established several Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) that provide continuous, long-term observations of clouds and radiation. ARM, with its overall goal of improving the treatment of radiation and clouds in climate models has provided unique observing systems for accelerating progress on the representation of cloud processes. In this project, six and a half years (January 1998 to June 2004) of cloud observations collected at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Oklahoma ACRF were used to produce a cloud-type climatology. The climatology provides cloud amounts for seven different cloud types as well as information on the detailed structure of multi-layer cloud occurrences. Furthermore, the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model output was used to define the dynamic regimes present during the observations of the cloud conditions by the vertically pointing radars at the SGP ACRF. The cloud-type climatology and the ECMWF SGP data set were then analyzed to examine and map dynamical conditions that favor the creation of single-layer versus multi-layer cloud structures as well as dynamical conditions that favor the occurrence of drizzle in continental stratus clouds. In addition, output from the ECMWF weather model forecasts was analyzed with the objective to compare model and radar derived cloud type statistics, in order to identify the major model deficiencies in cloud vertical distribution and map their seasonal variations. The project included two primary goals. The first was to create a cloud type climatology over the Southern Great Planes site that will show how cloud vertical distribution varies with dynamic and thermodynamic regime and how these variations would affect cloud climate fe

George Tselioudis

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

153

Interconnecting Federated Clouds by Using Publish-Subscribe Service  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud Federation is an emerging computing model where multiple resources from independent Cloud providers are leveraged to create large-scale distributed virtual computing clusters, operating as into a single Cloud organization. This model enables the ... Keywords: Cloud Computing, Cloud Federation, Denial of Service, Intercommunication, Publish/Subscribe Service, Reliability

Christian Esposito; Massimo Ficco; Francesco Palmieri; Aniello Castiglione

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An Intercomparison of Radar-Based Liquid Cloud Microphysics Retrievals and Implication for Model Evaluation Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Facility of the US Department of Energy provides long-term continuous cloud and radiation datasets Forks, ND 58202, U.S.A. 4 University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, U.S.A. Corresponding Author Dong of single-frequency radar approaches. It is therefore suggested that data users should use the retrievals

Dong, Xiquan

155

Trace-Based Analysis and Prediction of Cloud Computing User Behavior Using the Fractal Modeling Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, pbogdan, pedram}@usc.edu Abstract--The problem of big data analytics is gaining increasing research infrastructure to tackle the problem of big data analytics "on" the cloud [4], we will This work is supported Technique Shuang Chen, Mahboobeh Ghorbani, Yanzhi Wang, Paul Bogdan, Massoud Pedram Department of Electrical

Pedram, Massoud

156

Testing the Fixed Anvil Temperature Hypothesis in a Cloud-Resolving Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using cloud-resolving simulations of tropical radiativeconvective equilibrium, it is shown that the anvil temperature changes by less than 0.5 K with a 2-K change in SST, lending support to the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis. The ...

Zhiming Kuang; Dennis L. Hartmann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Evaluating the present-day simulation of clouds, precipitation, and radiation in climate models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] This paper describes a set of metrics for evaluating the simulation of clouds, radiation, and precipitation in the present-day climate. As with the skill scores used to measure the accuracy of short-term weather forecasts, these metrics are low-order statistical measures of agreement with relevant, well-observed physical quantities

Robert, Pincus

158

EnKF Assimilation of High-Resolution, Mobile Doppler Radar Data of the 4 May 2007 Greensburg, Kansas, Supercell into a Numerical Cloud Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kalman filter (EnKF) technique into a non- hydrostatic, compressible numerical weather prediction model weather prediction (NWP) models to improve under- standing of convective storm dynamics is now a fairly, Kansas, Supercell into a Numerical Cloud Model ROBIN L. TANAMACHI,*,1,# LOUIS J. WICKER,@ DAVID C. DOWELL

Xue, Ming

159

Cloud Computing at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home R & D Archive Cloud Computing Cloud Computing Cloud computing is gaining a foothold in the business world, but can clouds meet the specialized needs of scientists?...

160

pCloud: A Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment  

SciTech Connect

This research conducted by the Newton Energy Group, LLC (NEG) is dedicated to the development of pCloud: a Cloud-based Power Market Simulation Environment. pCloud is offering power industry stakeholders the capability to model electricity markets and is organized around the Software as a Service (SaaS) concept -- a software application delivery model in which software is centrally hosted and provided to many users via the internet. During the Phase I of this project NEG developed a prototype design for pCloud as a SaaS-based commercial service offering, system architecture supporting that design, ensured feasibility of key architecture's elements, formed technological partnerships and negotiated commercial agreements with partners, conducted market research and other related activities and secured funding for continue development of pCloud between the end of Phase I and beginning of Phase II, if awarded. Based on the results of Phase I activities, NEG has established that the development of a cloud-based power market simulation environment within the Windows Azure platform is technologically feasible, can be accomplished within the budget and timeframe available through the Phase II SBIR award with additional external funding. NEG believes that pCloud has the potential to become a game-changing technology for the modeling and analysis of electricity markets. This potential is due to the following critical advantages of pCloud over its competition: - Standardized access to advanced and proven power market simulators offered by third parties. - Automated parallelization of simulations and dynamic provisioning of computing resources on the cloud. This combination of automation and scalability dramatically reduces turn-around time while offering the capability to increase the number of analyzed scenarios by a factor of 10, 100 or even 1000. - Access to ready-to-use data and to cloud-based resources leading to a reduction in software, hardware, and IT costs. - Competitive pricing structure, which will make high-volume usage of simulation services affordable. - Availability and affordability of high quality power simulators, which presently only large corporate clients can afford, will level the playing field in developing regional energy policies, determining prudent cost recovery mechanisms and assuring just and reasonable rates to consumers. - Users that presently do not have the resources to internally maintain modeling capabilities will now be able to run simulations. This will invite more players into the industry, ultimately leading to more transparent and liquid power markets.

Rudkevich, Aleksandr; Goldis, Evgeniy

2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Role of Modified Chaplygin Gas as a Dark Energy Model in Collapsing Spherically Symmetric Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, gravitational collapse of a spherical cloud, consists of both dark matter and dark energy in the form of modified Chaplygin gas is studied. It is found that dark energy alone in the form of modified Chaplygin gas forms black hole. Also when both components of the fluid are present then the collapse favors the formation of black hole in cases the dark energy dominates over dark matter. The conclusion is totally opposite to the usually known results.

Ujjal Debnath; Subenoy Chakraborty

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cloud Computing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing has been given a great deal of attention during recent years. Almost all the technology market leaders and leading hosting service providers (more)

Siddiqui, Muhammad Anas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

QN_CloudChamberV1.4  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Build a Cosmic-Ray Cloud Chamber How to Build a Cosmic-Ray Cloud Chamber October 2008, Version 1.4 * QuarkNet version. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. * Instructions written by Jeremy Paschke, York High School and Anne Mary Teichert, Fermilab. * Model initially designed and built by Robert Peterson, Fermilab. If you have further questions, or improvements of your own you would like to share with the QuarkNet group, please contact: Jeremy Paschke, York High School Physics Instructor (jpaschke@elmhurst205.org), or Bob Peterson, Fermilab Education Specialist, (rspete@fnal.gov). Justification: Showing your class a working cloud chamber is one of the best ways to generate student interest in modern physics. The cloud chamber described below will display natural background radiation (muons generated by

164

Radiative Importance of ThinŽ Liquid Water Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program Accomplishments of the Cloud Properties Working Group (CPWG) August 2006 Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Using ARM Data to Establish Testable Metrics for GCM Predictions of Cloud Feedback Gerald Mace University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah The scientific underpinning of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is largely based on the premise that long term ground-based measurements of certain quantities provide information sufficient to test the skill of general circulation models (GCMs) to predict radiative heating and cloud feedbacks (Stokes and Schwartz, 1994; Ackerman and Stokes, 2003). This hypothesis is based on the assumption that some set of long-term ground-based measurements provide sufficient information to characterize the physical state of the atmospheric

165

Dust in brown dwarfs and extra-solar planets IV. Assessing TiO2 and SiO nucleation for cloud formation modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Clouds form in atmospheres of brown dwarfs and planets. The cloud particle formation processes are similar to the dust formation process studied in circumstellar shells of AGB stars and in Supernovae. Cloud formation modelling in substellar objects requires gravitational settling and element replenishment in addition to element depletion. All processes depend on the local conditions, and a simultaneous treatment is required. We apply new material data in order to assess our cloud formation model results regarding the treatment of the formation of condensation seeds. We re-address the question of the primary nucleation species in view of new (TiO2)_N-cluster data and new SiO vapour pressure data. We apply the density functional theory using the computational chemistry package Gaussian 09 to derive updated thermodynamical data for (TiO2)_N-clusters as input for our TiO2 seed formation model. We test different nucleation treatments and their effect on the overall cloud structure by solving a system of dust momen...

Lee, G; Giles, H; Bromley, S T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

3. New Cloud Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Cloud Climatology New Cloud Climatology Computed for the summers (May-Au- gust) 2000 through 2004 (Berg and Kassianov 2008). Uses ARSCL VAP, Total Sky Imager, and radar wind profiler. * * Initial Evaluation of the Cumulus Potential Scheme at the ACRF SGP Site Larry Berg, William Gustafson, and Evgueni Kassianov Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1. Motivation Shallow clouds are poorly predicted by current global and regional scale models. A new parameterization has been devel- oped that links the boundary-layer turbu- lence and the shallow clouds. 2. The CuP Parameterization The Cumulus Potential (CuP) param- eterization uses Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of temperature and moisture to represent the subgrid scale

167

Aerosol Indirect Effect on the Grid-scale Clouds in the Two-way Coupled WRF-CMAQ: Model Description, Development, Evaluation and Regional Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study implemented first, second and glaciations aerosol indirect effects (AIE) on resolved clouds in the two-way coupled WRF-CMAQ modeling system by including parameterizations for both cloud drop and ice number concentrations on the basis of CMAQpredicted aerosol distributions and WRF meteorological conditions. The performance of the newly-developed WRF-CMAQ model, with alternate CAM and RRTMG radiation schemes, was evaluated with the observations from the CERES satellite and surface monitoring networks (AQS, IMPROVE, CASTNet, STN, and PRISM) over the continental U.S. (CONUS) (12-km resolution) and eastern Texas (4-km resolution) during August and September of 2006. The results at the AQS surface sites show that in August, the NMB values for PM2.5 over the eastern/western U.S (EUS/WUS) and western U.S. (WUS) are 5.3% (?0.1%) and 0.4% (-5.2%) for WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG), respectively. The evaluation of PM2.5 chemical composition reveals that in August, WRF-CMAQ/CAM (WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) consistently underestimated the observed SO4 2? by -23.0% (-27.7%), -12.5% (-18.9%) and -7.9% (-14.8%) over the EUS at the CASTNet, IMPROVE and STN sites, respectively. Both models (WRF-CMAQ/CAM, WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG) overestimated the observed mean OC, EC and TC concentrations over the EUS in August at the IMPROVE sites. Both models generally underestimated the cloud field (SWCF) over the CONUS in August due to the fact that the AIE on the subgrid convective clouds was not considered when the model simulations were run at the 12 km resolution. This is in agreement with the fact that both models captured SWCF and LWCF very well for the 4-km simulation over the eastern Texas when all clouds were resolved by the finer domain. Both models generally overestimated the observed precipitation by more than 40% mainly because of significant overestimation in the southern part of the CONUS in August. The simulations of WRF-CMAQ/CAM and WRF-CMAQ/RRTMG show dramatic improvements for SWCF, LWCF, COD, cloud fractions and precipitation over the ocean relative to those of WRF default cases in August. The model performance in September is similar to that in August except for greater overestimation of PM2.5 due to the overestimations of SO4 2-, NH4 +, NO3 -, and TC over the EUS, less underestimation of clouds (SWCF) over the land areas due to about 10% lower SWCF values and less convective clouds in September.

Yu, Shaocai; Mathur, Rohit; Pleim, Jonathan; Wong, David; Gilliam, R.; Alapaty, Kiran; Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

168

Cloud Computing Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the introductory chapter we define the concept of cloud computing and cloud services, and we introduce layers and types of cloud computing. We discuss the differences between cloud computing and cloud servi...

Borko Furht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

6, 93519388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al Chemistry and Physics Discussions Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS satellite data and global 6, 9351­9388, 2006 Aerosol-cloud interaction inferred from MODIS and models G. Myhre et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Explicit renormalization-group analysis of the D=2 random-bond Ising model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown by an explicit momentum-space renormalization-group analysis that the true renormalization-group equations for the D=2 random-bond Ising model agree with the equations obtained using the replica trick.

Ganpathy Murthy

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

A Modeling Study of Irrigation Effects on Surface Fluxes and Land-Air-Cloud Interactions in the Southern Great Plains  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors incorporate an operational-like irrigation scheme into the Noah land surface model as part of the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). A series of simulations, with and without irrigation, is conducted over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) for an extremely dry (2006) and wet (2007) year. The results show that including irrigation reduces model bias in soil moisture and surface latent heat (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes, especially during a dry year. Irrigation adds additional water to the surface, leading to changes in the planetary boundary layer. The increase in soil moisture leads to increases in the surface evapotranspiration and near-surface specific humidity but decreases in the SH and surface temperature. Those changes are local and occur during daytime. There is an irrigation-induced decrease in both the lifting condensation level (ZLCL) and mixed-layer depth. The decrease in ZLCL is larger than the decrease in mixed-layer depth, suggesting an increasing probability of shallow clouds. The simulated changes in precipitation induced by irrigation are highly variable in space, and the average precipitation over the SGP region only slightly increases. A high correlation is found among soil moisture, SH, and ZLCL. Larger values of soil moisture in the irrigated simulation due to irrigation in late spring and summer persist into the early fall, suggesting that irrigation-induced soil memory could last a few weeks to months. The results demonstrate the importance of irrigation parameterization for climate studies and improve the process-level understanding on the role of human activity in modulating landaircloud interactions.

Qian, Yun; Huang, Maoyi; Yang, Ben; Berg, Larry K.

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

Backus, George A.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

A high-resolution, cloud-assimilating numerical weather prediction model for solar irradiance forecasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MultiscaleNumericalWeatherPredictionModel. Progressassimilatingnumericalweatherpredictionmodelforsolarcustomizable numericalweatherpredictionmodelthatis

Mathiesen, Patrick; Collier, Craig; Kleissl, Jan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign  

SciTech Connect

Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

175

Investigation of Thin Cirrus Cloud Optical and Microphysical Properties on the Basis of Satellite Observations and Fast Radiative Transfer Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

function of ?CALIOP. the frequency is scaled by dividing the largest frequency in each ?CALIOP bin. Data are from collocated MODIS and CALIOP measurements made in August 2006. ............... 126 5.7 Daytime frequencies of (a) cloud, (b) ice cloud, (c...) and Stubenrauch et al. (2006) investigated the climatology of thin cirrus properties. 1.2.2 Limb-view-instrument-based observations Limb-view-instruments observe cloud or atmosphere by eliminating the signals from the surface and therefore increase the SNRs...

Wang, Chenxi

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

On modelling of grouped reliability data for wind turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Special Issue Maintenance Modelling...data for wind turbines F. P. A...generation by wind turbines (WTs) has...turbines or maintenance activities...generation by wind turbines (WTs) has...turbines or maintenance activities......

F. P. A. Coolen; F. Spinato; D. Venkat

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Changing the Climate Sensitivity of an Atmospheric General Circulation Model through Cloud Radiative Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conducting probabilistic climate projections with a particular climate model requires the ability to vary the models characteristics, such as its climate sensitivity. In this study, the authors implement and validate a ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

178

Dynamic Cloud Infrastructure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis will explore and investigate the possibility of implementing nested clouds to increase flexibility. A nested cloud is a private cloud running inside another (more)

Gundersen, Espen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Securing Cloud Storage Service.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Cloud computing brought flexibility, scalability, and capital cost savings to the IT industry. As more companies turn to cloud solutions, securing cloud based services (more)

Zapolskas, Vytautas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S sub n and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory); Lee, S.J. (Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Models of fragmentation phenomena based on the symmetric group S{sub n} and combinational analysis  

SciTech Connect

Various models for fragmentation phenomena are developed using methods from permutation groups and combinational analysis. The appearance and properties of power laws in these models are discussed. Various exactly soluble cases are studied.

Mekjian, A.Z. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory; Lee, S.J. [Rutgers--the State Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

1991-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Koala: A DiscreteEvent Simulation Model of Infrastructure Clouds Koala is a discrete-event simulator that can model infrastructure as a service (IaaS) clouds of up  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of configurations for node platforms), (4) Internet/Intranet layer (including the ability to locate cloud clusters, the node, the Internet/Intranet and the VM behavior layers. Further, Koala can record temporally varying behavioral characteristics: (1) congestion, (2) cloud-wide resource usage, (3) variance in cluster load, (4

183

Constrained water cloud generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fast generation of large cloudy volumes with imposed cloud cover fractions and ambient vertical profiles is very important for the realistic simulation of atmospheric scenes. The model proposed here is the second step of a two-step model composed on the one hand of a volume generator based on a Fourier filtering method and on the other hand of a physical generator filling the volume with physical parameters. After a description of the general generation scheme, this paper focuses on the simulation of vertical profiles of water content (liquid, vapour) coupled with other state parameters (temperature, pressure, vertical velocity) via thermodynamic and hydrodynamic equations by local forcing of ambient conditions. The method for solving these equations is explained and applied to practical cases. First, by assuming that the actual temperature at the cloud base is equal to the dew temperature and by imposing a moist pseudo-adiabatic temperature gradient between the cloud top and bottom, the temperature profile in the cloud is found. When conditional instability occurs, the initial temperature profile between the ground and the cloud base is iteratively shifted to lower values until absolute stability is reached. Then the liquid water content is calculated by integrating the equation of water conservation, and the water vapour content by assuming that the cloud is everywhere saturated. Eventually, the vertical velocity is estimated by integration of the momentum equation. This method gives results in good agreement with published measurements, analytical and numerical models. Eventually, further developments of the column model, including the effects of phase transitions, turbulence, horizontal motions and mixing with the surrounding medium, are proposed in the concluding section.

Roland P.H. Berton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cloud Microphysics Spring 2013 **odd years?**  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ATS724 Cloud Microphysics (2-0-0) Spring 2013 **odd years?** Prerequisites: ATS620, ATS621; Ph, as the class will involve designing and building a simple cloud microphysical model. Course Description: **Sue and observations of nucleation, mechanisms of cloud droplet-spectra broadening, precipitation particle growth

185

BALTEX BRIDGE cloud liquid water network project: CLIWA-NET  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3/2008 3/2008 ARM-08 Photo courtesy Bjorn Stevens ARM-GEWEX Cloud System Studies (GCSS) Collaborations: Past-Present-Future A. Pier Siebesma siebesma@knmi.nl chair GCCS KNMI, De Bilt, The Netherlands Technical University Delft Multiscale Physics Group Delft, The Netherlands 4/3/2008 ARM-08 Topics Introduction to GCSS activities Examples and Results for parameterization development in the past. (has it made a difference?) Past and Present Collaborations and results between ARM and GCSS The Future: How can we do better? 4/3/2008 ARM-08 Objective of GCSS GCSS is developing improved parameterizations of cloud systems for climate models and numerical weather prediction models by improving our understanding of the physical processes for all the climate relevant cloud types 4/3/2008 ARM-08

186

On the Diurnal Cycle of Deep Convection, High-Level Cloud, and Upper Troposphere Water Vapor in the Multiscale Modeling Framework  

SciTech Connect

The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF), also called superparameterization, embeds a cloud-resolving model (CRM) at each grid column of a general circulation model to replace traditional parameterizations of moist convection and large-scale condensation. This study evaluates the diurnal cycle of deep convection, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere water vapor by applying an infrared (IR) brightness temperature (Tb) and a precipitation radar (PR) simulator to the CRM column data. Simulator results are then compared with IR radiances from geostationary satellites and PR reflectivities from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). While the actual surface precipitation rate in the MMF has a reasonable diurnal phase and amplitude when compared with TRMM observations, the IR simulator results indicate an inconsistency in the diurnal anomalies of high-level clouds between the model and the geostationary satellite data. Primarily because of its excessive high-level clouds, the MMF overestimates the simulated precipitation index (PI) and fails to reproduce the observed diurnal cycle phase relationships among PI, high-level clouds, and upper troposphere relative humidity. The PR simulator results show that over the tropical oceans, the occurrence fraction of reflectivity in excess of 20 dBZ is almost 1 order of magnitude larger than the TRMM data especially at altitudes above 6 km. Both results suggest that the MMF oceanic convection is overactive and possible reasons for this bias are discussed. However, the joint distribution of simulated IR Tb and PR reflectivity indicates that the most intense deep convection is found more often over tropical land than ocean, in agreement with previous observational studies.

Zhang, Yunyan; Klein, Stephen A.; Liu, Chuntao; Tian, Baijun; Marchand, Roger T.; Haynes, J. M.; McCoy, Renata; Zhang, Yuying; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

187

Grouped graphical Granger modeling for gene expression regulatory networks discovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Hinkley (2006) for a review]. More precisely...method to uncover gene regulatory networks for the human...As future work we plan to consider a variant...time-delayed gene regulatory networks based on temporal...et al. Modelling regulatory pathways in E.coli......

Aurlie C. Lozano; Naoki Abe; Yan Liu; Saharon Rosset

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Euro Working Group for Commodities and Financial Modelling 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A.; MEADE N. Factor Neutral Portfolios FOYE J. Rethinking the International Application of the Factor Models - ROOM 4064 CONTRIBUTED SESSION: ENERGY CHAIR: D'ECCLESIA R. PISCIELLA P.; VESPUCCI M. T.; BERTOCCHI M generation capacity expansion CALDANA R.; FUSAI G.; RONCORONI A. On the Rational Construction of Electricity

Schettini, Raimondo

189

CME THEORY AND MODELS Report of Working Group D  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and School of Physics, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa 8Imperial College, Space contemporary models are highlighted. Two of these focus on how energy stored in the coronal magnetic field can corona into the advectively dominated solar wind. The section on evolution and propagation presents two

California at Berkeley, University of

190

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups Minjung, and then we use the model to analyze terrorism data. We see that the richer Dirichlet process random effects, empirical studies of terrorism, logistic regression, gen- eralized linear mixed models, hierarchical models

Gill, Jeff

191

Nonlinear Advection Algorithms Applied to Interrelated Tracers: Errors and Implications for Modeling AerosolCloud Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Monotonicity constraints and gradient-preserving flux corrections employed by many advection algorithms used in atmospheric models make these algorithms nonlinear. Consequently, any relations among model variables transported separately are not ...

Mikhail Ovtchinnikov; Richard C. Easter

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Improvement of modelling capabilities for assessing urban contamination : The EMRAS Urban Remediation Working Group.  

SciTech Connect

The Urban Remediation Working Group of the International Atomic Energy Agency's Environmental Modeling for Radiation Safety (EMRAS) programme was established to improve modeling and assessment capabilities for radioactively contaminated urban situations, including the effects of countermeasures. An example of the Working Group's activities is an exercise based on Chernobyl fallout data in Ukraine, which has provided an opportunity to compare predictions among several models and with available measurements, to discuss reasons for discrepancies, and to identify areas where additional information would be helpful.

Thiessen, K. M.; Batandjieva, B.; Andersson, K. G.; Arkhipov, A.; Charnock, T. W.; Gallay, F.; Gaschak, S.; Golikov, V.; Hwang, W. T.; Kaiser, J. C.; Kamboj, S.; Steiner, M.; Tomas, J.; Trifunovic, D.; Yu, C.; Ziemer, R. L.; Zlobenko, B.; Environmental Science Division; SENES Oak Ridge; IAEA; Riso National Lab.; Chernobyl Center for Nuclear Safety; Health Protection Agency; IRSN; Inst. of Radiation Hygene of the Ministry of Public Health, Russian Federation; KAERI, Republic of Korea; GSF, Germany; BfS, Germany; CPHR, Cuba; State Office for Radiation Protection, Croatia; AECL, Canada; National Academy of Science, Ukraine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cloud Computing Adam Barker  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing 1 Adam Barker #12;Overview · Introduction to Cloud computing · Enabling technologies · Di erent types of cloud: IaaS, PaaS and SaaS · Cloud terminology · Interacting with a cloud: management consoles · Launching an instance · Connecting to an instance · Running your application · Clouds

St Andrews, University of

194

Cloud Computing for Telecom Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Context: Cloud computing is reshaping the service-delivery and business-models in Information and Communications Technology (ICT). The Information Technology (IT) sector has benefited from it in (more)

Sapkota, Sagar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Wireless Cloud Networks for the Factory of Things: Connectivity Modeling and Layout Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements in an oil refinery site (modelled by 3D CAD) using industry standard ISA IEC 62734 devices operating at 2.4GHz. A graph-theoretic approach to node deployment is discussed by focusing on practical network architecture. Field device (FD) layout over 3D-CAD model of the plant (oil refinery site). Bottom

Savazzi, Stefano

196

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud Computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Cloud Computing Strategy working paper, April 2011 1 of 25 NIST Strategy to build a USG Cloud of United States Government (USG) secure and effective adoption of the Cloud Computing2 model to reduce costs and improve services. The working document describes the NIST Cloud Computing program efforts

197

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Findings from Terrorism Data: Dirichlet Process Random Effects Models for Latent Groups Minjung such a model can best be implemented, and then we use the model to analyze terrorism data. We seeG99. Keywords and phrases: terrorists, empirical studies of terrorism, logistic regression, gen

Casella, George

198

Multi Cloud Architecture to Provide Data Security And Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Cloud servers are being used to store data and application but its security is a major issue in current context. To solve the data security problems in public environment we propose an effective model for security and integrity of data stored in a cloud, through data segmentation followed by data encryption programs in a multiple cloud architecture. This architecture forms a multi cloud system where primary cloud is available for multiple users for data storage offering lesser load on client systems thereby using the cloud computing architecture. This architecture introduces a secondary cloud controlled by a single administrator which provides the data backup for primary cloud after undergoing specific segmentation and encryption algorithms to ensure security and integrity of data. The proposed system also offers protection against virus attacks by using linux as the base OS. Keywords-- Encryption, Linux, Multi cloud system, Primary cloud, Secondary cloud, Segmentation.

Nikhil Dutta; Himanshu Bakshi; Mujammill Mulla; Viraj Shinde

199

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing has emerged as a model for hosting computing infrastructure and outsourcing management of that infrastructure. It offers the promise of simplified provisioning and (more)

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a "grid-of-clouds" infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a "cloud factory" for managing cloud VM instances. Nex...

Barreiro Megino, FH; The ATLAS collaboration; De, K; Gable, I; Hendrix, V; Panitkin, S; Paterson, M; De Silva, A; van der Ster, D; Taylor, R; Vitillo, RA; Walker, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

SCM Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud microphysical parameterizations cloud microphysical parameterizations with SCM, CAPT and M-PACE observations X. Liu (PNNL) S. Xie, J. Boyle, S. Klein (LLNL) S. J. Ghan (PNNL) H. Morrison, A. Gettelman (NCAR) Goal: Improve Climate Model Parameterizations Tools: single column models (SCM) and DOE CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT) (LLNL CAPT team) ARM measurements provide unique data for model evaluation and guidance for parameterization improvement Motivations Cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds has a significant impact on cloud radiative forcing, precipitation formation, etc. The treatment of mixed-phase clouds in most current climate models is often oversimplified Liquid/ice partitioning according to a temperature dependent function; Neglect ice nucleation and Bergeron-Findeisen

202

An Artificial Neural Network Model to Reduce False Alarms in Satellite Precipitation Products Using MODIS and CloudSat Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument aboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aqua and Terra platform with 36 spectral bands provides valuable information about cloud microphysical characteristics and therefore ...

Nasrin Nasrollahi; Kuolin Hsu; Soroosh Sorooshian

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

On the Usage of Spectral and Broadband Satellite Instrument Measurements to Differentiate Climate Models with Different Cloud Feedback Strengths  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Top-of-atmosphere radiometric signals associated with different high- and low-cloudradiative feedbacks have been examined through the use of an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE). The OSSE simulates variations in the spectrally ...

Daniel R. Feldman; Daniel M. Coleman; William D. Collins

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Investigation of the Dynamical, Macrophysical and Radiative Properties of High Clouds Combining Satellite Observations and Climate Model Simulations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the physical mechanism governing the fixed anvil temperature (FAT) hypothesis and test of FAT hypothesis with CTT measurements; and 3) the intercomparison of cloud fraction and radiative effects between satellite-based observations and reanalysis product...

Li, Yue

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

205

Separating Cloud Forming Nuclei from Interstitial Aerosol  

SciTech Connect

It has become important to characterize the physicochemical properties of aerosol that have initiated the warm and ice clouds. The data is urgently needed to better represent the aerosol-cloud interaction mechanisms in the climate models. The laboratory and in-situ techniques to separate precisely the aerosol particles that act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN), termed as cloud nuclei (CN) henceforth, have become imperative in studying aerosol effects on clouds and the environment. This review summarizes these techniques, design considerations, associated artifacts and challenges, and briefly discusses the need for improved designs to expand the CN measurement database.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

206

Cloud Computing: Rain-Clouds System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Cloud Computing is the on demand service can be provided to the users at any time. It delivers the software, data access, computing as a service rather than the product. The Cloud application simplifies the computing technology by providing pay-per-use customer relationship. It is the theory that familiar to cheaper devices with low processing power, lower storage capacities, great flexibility and many more things. The security of cloud computing is a major factor as users store sensitive and confidential information with cloud storage providers. The range of these providers may be un trusted and harmful. The purpose of adopting cloud computing in an organization is to decide between a public cloud ? and private cloud ? by means of privacy. Public clouds often known as provider clouds are administrated by third parties and services are offered on pay-per-use basis. Private clouds or internal clouds are owned by the single firm but it has some metrics such as lacking of availability of services (such as memory, server) and network resources which leads it to down. Due to this, technology moves toward the concept of Multi clouds or Rain Clouds. This paper displays the use of multi-clouds or rain clouds due to its ability to handle the huge amount of data traffic that affect the cloud computing user.

Harinder Kaur

207

An exploration of the stages of change model in a group treatment program for male batterers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the adequacy of the Stages of Change model in a group therapy treatment program for male batterers. The sample consisted of three groups with a total sample size of 22 participants. Data for this study...

Wells, Robert Davis

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

208

A Case Study of Radar Observations and WRF LES Simulations of the Impact of Ground-Based Glaciogenic Seeding on Orographic Clouds and Precipitation. Part I: Observations and Model Validations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Profiling airborne radar data and accompanying large-eddy-simulation (LES) modeling are used to examine the impact of ground-based glaciogenic seeding on cloud and precipitation in a shallow stratiform orographic winter storm. This storm occurred ...

Xia Chu; Lulin Xue; Bart Geerts; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Model nebulae and determination of the chemical composition of the Magellanic Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...devices. Some advantages and limitations...devices. Some advantages and limitations...devices. Some advantages and limitations...from one to five solar masses are believed...whose emergent energy flux is presumed...There are several disadvantages in the model nebular...

L. H. Aller; C. D. Keyes; S. J. Czyzak

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Timmreck. 2013 Sea-salt injections into the low-latitude marine boundary layer: the transient response in three Earth system models. J. Geophys. Res. 118, 12195-12206. ( doi:10.1002/2013JD020432 ) 62 Jenkins, AKL , and PM Forster...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cloud Security by Max Garvey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Security Survey by Max Garvey #12;Cloudy Cloud is Cloudy What is the cloud? On Demand Service Network access Resource pooling Elasticity of Resources Measured Service #12;Cloud Types/Variants Iaa Cloud Public Cloud Hybrid Cloud combination. Private cloud with overflow going to public cloud. #12

Tolmach, Andrew

212

An Assessment of Microwave Absorption Models and Retrievals of Cloud Liquid Water Using Clear-Sky Data  

SciTech Connect

Passive microwave radiometers have a long history in the remote sensing of atmospheric liquid and water vapor. Retrievals of these quantities are sensitive to variations in pressure and temperature of the liquid and water vapor. Rather than use a statistical or climatological approach to account for the natural variability in atmospheric pressure and temperature, additional information on the atmospheric profile at the time of the radiometer measurements can be directly incorporated into the retrieval process. Such an approach has been referred to in the literature as a physical-iterative solution. This paper presents an assessment of the accuracy of the column liquid water path that can be expected using such an iterative technique as a result of uncertainties in the microwave emissions from oxygen and water vapor. It is shown that the retrieval accuracy is influenced by the accuracy of the instrument measurements and the quality of the atmospheric profiles of temperature and pressure, as one would expect. But also critical is the uncertainty in the absorption coefficients used in the underlying microwave radiative transfer model. The uncertainty in the absorption coefficients is particularly problematic in that it may well bias the liquid water retrieval. The differences between 3 absorption models examined in this paper are equivalent to a bias of 15 to 30 g/m2, depending on the total column water vapor. An examination of typical liquid water paths from the Southern Great Plains region of the United States shows that errors of this magnitude have significant implications for shortwave radiation and retrievals of cloud effective particle size.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Westwater, Ed R.; Clough, Shepard A.; Cady-Pereira, Karen; Liljegren, James C.

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Multi-frequency study of Local Group Supernova Remnants The curious case of the Large Magellanic Cloud SNR J0528-6714  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. Recent ATCA, XMM-Newton and MCELS observations of the Magellanic Clouds (MCs) cover a number of new and known SNRs which are poorly studied, such as SNR J0528-6714 . This particular SNR exhibits luminous radio-continuum emission, but is one of the unusual and rare cases without detectable optical and very faint X-ray emission (initially detected by ROSAT and listed as object [HP99] 498). We used new multi-frequency radio-continuum surveys and new optical observations at H{\\alpha}, [S ii] and [O iii] wavelengths, in combination with XMM-Newton X-ray data, to investigate the SNR properties and to search for a physical explanation for the unusual appearance of this SNR. Methods. We analysed the X-ray and Radio-Continuum spectra and present multi-wavelength morphological studies of this SNR. Results. We present the results of new moderate resolution ATCA observations of SNR J0528-6714. We found that this object is a typical older SNR with a radio spectral index of {\\alpha}=-0.36 \\pm 0.09 and a diameter of D...

Crawford, E J; Haberl, F; Pietsch, W; Payne, J L; De Horta, A Y

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The Shell Model, the Renormalization Group and the Two-Body Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The no-core shell model and the effective interaction $V_{{\\rm low} k}$ can both be derived using the Lee-Suzuki projection operator formalism. The main difference between the two is the choice of basis states that define the model space. The effective interaction $V_{{\\rm low} k}$ can also be derived using the renormalization group. That renormalization group derivation can be extended in a straight forward manner to also include the no-core shell model. In the nuclear matter limit the no-core shell model effective interaction in the two-body approximation reduces identically to $V_{{\\rm low} k}$. The same considerations apply to the Bloch-Horowitz version of the shell model and the renormalization group treatment of two-body scattering by Birse, McGovern and Richardson.

B. K. Jennings

2005-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

215

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics #12;Cloud Computing: what is it? · Cloud Computing is a distributed infrastructure where resources, software, and data are provided in an on-demand fashion. · Cloud Computing abstracts infrastructure from application. · Cloud Computing should save you time the way software

Ferrara, Katherine W.

216

Mobility Models for UAV Group Reconnaissance Applications Erik Kuiper Simin Nadjm-Tehrani  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobility Models for UAV Group Reconnaissance Applications Erik Kuiper Simin Nadjm-Tehrani Saab synthetic models. Given a particular application, e.g. networks of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs present the criteria that characterize desirable mobility properties for the movement of UAVs

217

DFG-Research Training Group 1932 ,,Stochastic Models for Innovations in the Engineering Sciences"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The DFG-Research Training Group 1932 ,,Stochastic Models for Innovations in the Engineering, stochastic models for system-on-chip design, hardware accel- eration for Monte Carlo methods in finance of the University of Kaiserslautern and the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics ITWM; · Independent

Steidl, Gabriele

218

Proceedings of the Thirty-ninth Meeting of the Agricultural Research Modellers' Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

components of such `socio-ecological systems' (SESs), is necessary. Agent-based modelling is one approach Kingdom #12;PLENARY LECTURE Modelling the sustainability of rural systems: concepts, approaches and tools R. MATTHEWS* Integrated Land Use Systems Group, Macaulay Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8

Maini, Philip K.

219

MISR Cloud Detection over Ice and Snow Based on Linear Correlation Matching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MISR Cloud Detection over Ice and Snow Based on Linear Correlation Matching Tao Shi , Bin Yu , and Amy Braverman Abstract Cloud detection is a crucial step in any climate modelling or prediction data to retrieve or estimate the cloud height and hence cloud detection. However, cloud detection even

Sekhon, Jasjeet S.

220

Enlarged Transformation Group: Star Models,Dark Matter Halos and Solar System Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previously a theory has been presented which extends the geometrical structure of a real four-dimensional space-time via a field of orthonormal tetrads with an enlarged transformation group. This new transformation group, called the conservation group, contains the group of diffeomorphisms as a proper subgroup and we hypothesize that it is the foundational group for quantum geometry. The fundamental geometric object of the new geometry is the curvature vector, C^\\mu . Using the scalar Lagrangian density C^\\mu C_\\mu \\sqrt{-g}, field equations for the free field have been obtained which are invariant under the conservation group. In this paper, this theory is further extended by development of a suitable Lagrangian for a field with sources. Spherically symmetric solutions for both the free field and the field with sources are given. A stellar model and an external, free-field model are developed. The theory implies that the external stress-energy tensor has non-compact support and hence may give the geometrical foundation for dark matter. The resulting models are compared to the internal and external Schwarzschild models. The theory may explain the Pioneer anomaly and the corona heating problem.

Edward Lee Green

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Application of cellular automata approach for cloud simulation and rendering  

SciTech Connect

Current techniques for creating clouds in games and other real time applications produce static, homogenous clouds. These clouds, while viable for real time applications, do not exhibit an organic feel that clouds in nature exhibit. These clouds, when viewed over a time period, were able to deform their initial shape and move in a more organic and dynamic way. With cloud shape technology we should be able in the future to extend to create even more cloud shapes in real time with more forces. Clouds are an essential part of any computer model of a landscape or an animation of an outdoor scene. A realistic animation of clouds is also important for creating scenes for flight simulators, movies, games, and other. Our goal was to create a realistic animation of clouds.

Christopher Immanuel, W. [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India)] [Department of Physics, Vel Tech High Tech Dr. Rangarajan Dr. Sakunthala Engineering College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 062 (India); Paul Mary Deborrah, S. [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, The American College, Tamil Nadu, Madurai 625 002 (India); Samuel Selvaraj, R. [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)] [Research Department of Physics, Presidency College, Tamil Nadu, Chennai 600 005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Cloud Computing og availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing og availability Projekt i pålidelighed Henrik Lavdal - 20010210 Søren Bardino Kaa - 20011654 Gruppe 8 19-03-2010 #12;Cloud Computing og availability Side 2 af 28 Indholdsfortegnelse ...........................................................................................5 Cloud computing

Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

223

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Federal Cloud Computing: The Definitive Guide for Cloud Service Providers offers an in-depth look at topics surrounding federal cloud computing within the federal government, including the Federal Cloud Computing Strategy, Cloud Computing Standards, ...

Matthew Metheny

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsCloud IOP govCampaignsCloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Cloud IOP 1998.04.27 - 1998.05.17 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary Monday, April 27, 1998 IOP Opening Activities: Heavy rain (nearly 2.5" since 12Z 4/26/98) at the central facility (CF) dominated the first day of the Cloud Physics/Single Column Model IOP and limited the daily activities. A 1430 GMT sonde launch commenced the 3-hour sonde launch schedule at the CF and 4 boundary facilities (BFs). Scientists/Instrumentation on Site: Citation: Has arrived and is located at the Ponca City Airport. No flights are currently planned. Flights are tentatively planned for stratus sampling when precipitation ends.

225

Clouds, Aerosols and Precipitation in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Marine Boundary Layer (CAP-MBL) Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean Graciosa Island, Azores, NE Atlantic Ocean May 2009-December 2010 May 2009-December 2010 Rob Wood, University of Washington Rob Wood, University of Washington AMF Deployment Team Thanks to Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Mark Miller: AMF Site Scientist Kim Nitschke: AMF Site Manager CAP-MBL Proposal Team Importance of Low-Clouds for Climate Imperative that we understand the processes controlling the formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to formation, maintenance and dissipation of low clouds in order to improve their representation in climate models. Which clouds matter for climate sensitivity? Cli t F db k

226

Accurately modeling benzene and alkylbenzenes using a group contribution based SAFT approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In recent work, the GC-SAFT-VR equation, which combines the SAFT equation for potentials of variable range (VR) with a group contribution (GC) approach, was proposed. Parameters for key functional groups (such as CH3, CH2, CH, CH2CH, CO, C6H5, ether, ester, OH, NH2, CHO, COOH) were obtained by fitting to experimental vapor pressure and saturated liquid density data for selected low molecular weight fluids and then used to predict the phase behavior of both pure non-associating and associating fluids and their mixtures, generally without adjusting the group parameters to binary mixture data. In the GC-SAFT-VR approach the benzene ring was modeled as a single group (C6H6 for benzene and C6H5, for alkylbenzenes) however, in common with other group-contribution based SAFT approaches, this approach fails to reproduce the correct curvature seen in the experimental liquid density of alkylbenzenes. In this work, to improve upon the model adopted for ring molecules, the benzene ring is explicitly considered through the connectivity of several smaller groups to more accurately capture the ?? interactions. We demonstrate that the improved model better captures the curvature present in the experimental saturated liquid density data of pure alkylbenzenes. Additionally, mixtures of several non-associating and associating fluids with benzene and alklybenzenes are studied.

Gaurav Das; M. Carolina dos Ramos; Clare McCabe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of Cloud Points of Biodiesel ... Despite the lack of accurate data for the cloud points of biodiesel, the results obtained here allow for an adequate evaluation of the model proposed, showing that it can produce good predictions of the cloud points of mixtures of fatty acid esters. ... Because of its environmental benefits, resulting from a decrease in CO2 emissions, its origin from renewable resources, and the increase in crude oil costs, biodiesel is become increasingly attractive. ...

J. C. A. Lopes; L. Boros; M. A. Krhenbhl; A. J. A. Meirelles; J. L. Daridon; J. Pauly; I. M. Marrucho; J. A. P. Coutinho

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

On Demand Surveillance Service in Vehicular Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toward Vehicular Service Cloud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.2 Open Mobile Cloud Requirement . . . . .3.1 Mobile Cloud

Weng, Jui-Ting

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Utilizing CLASIC observations and multiscale models to study the impact of improved Land surface representation on modeling cloud- convection  

SciTech Connect

The CLASIC experiment was conducted over the US southern great plains (SGP) in June 2007 with an objective to lead an enhanced understanding of the cumulus convection particularly as it relates to land surface conditions. This project was design to help assist with understanding the overall improvement of land atmosphere convection initiation representation of which is important for global and regional models. The study helped address one of the critical documented deficiency in the models central to the ARM objectives for cumulus convection initiation and particularly under summer time conditions. This project was guided by the scientific question building on the CLASIC theme questions: What is the effect of improved land surface representation on the ability of coupled models to simulate cumulus and convection initiation? The focus was on the US Southern Great Plains region. Since the CLASIC period was anomalously wet the strategy has been to use other periods and domains to develop the comparative assessment for the CLASIC data period, and to understand the mechanisms of the anomalous wet conditions on the tropical systems and convection over land. The data periods include the IHOP 2002 field experiment that was over roughly same domain as the CLASIC in the SGP, and some of the DOE funded Ameriflux datasets.

Niyogi, Devdutta S. [Purdue

2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Cloud computing models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Technology has always been considered a major pain point of enterprise organizations, from the perspectives of both cost and management. However, the information technology industry has experienced a dramatic ...

Gorelik, Eugene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

A HEART CELL GROUP MODEL FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A HEART CELL GROUP MODEL FOR THE IDENTIFICATION OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA Mohamed A. Mneimneh, Micheal signal are an indicator for ischemia. For this purpose, this work proposes an approach based on a heart of 75.66%. 1 INTRODUCTION Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of death in the world with almost

Povinelli, Richard J.

232

WEAKLY ALMOST PERIODIC FUNCTIONS, MODEL-THEORETIC STABILITY, AND MINIMALITY OF TOPOLOGICAL GROUPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

examples from analysis such as the separable, infinite-dimensional Hilbert space, the measure algebra field at the interface of model theory, permutation group theory, combinatorics, and, more recently of a standard probability space, and separable atomless Lp Banach lattices (p

Tsankov, Todor

233

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing For Bioinformatics EC2 and AMIs #12;Quick-starting an EC2 instance (let's get our feet wet!) Cloud Computing #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance Quick Start · On EC2 console, we can click on Launch Instance · This will let us get up and going quickly #12;Cloud Computing: EC2 instance

Ferrara, Katherine W.

234

DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Tag Cloud  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Database Tag Cloud Database Tag Cloud This tag cloud is a specific type of weighted list that provides a quick look at the content of the DOE R&D Accomplishments database. It can be easily browsed because terms are in alphabetical order. With this tag cloud, there is a direct correlation between font size and quantity. The more times a term appears in the bibliographic citations, the larger the font size. This tag cloud is also interactive. Clicking on a term will activate a search for that term. Search results will then be received. absorption Accelerator Accelerators Acid Acids AEC air Alpha Analysis Angular Applications Applied Argonne Aspects atmospheric Atom Atomic atoms Background Basic Batteries Beam Beams Beta Biological Biology BNL Brookhaven Calculations Calvin Capture carbon Cells CH Change changes Chemical Chemistry CHLORINE climate Coal Collisions complex Complexes Compounds computed Computerized conditions Conservation Conversion Cosmic Cosmology Cross Crystal current cycle data Decay density design Detection detectors development Devices Diagnostic Diffraction Dioxide Discovery distribution DNA Effect Effects Efficiency Electric electricity Electromagnetic Electron Electrons Element elementary elements Emission Energy Environmental Equations even Exchange Experiment Experimental experiments Fermi field fields First Fission Fossil Free fuel fuels Fusion Future Gamma Gas Genome global greenhouse group Hadron Health heat Heating heavy high Historical history Human Hydrocarbons Hydrogen Imaging impacts important Information Institute Interaction Interactions International Invariance ion Ions Isotope Isotopes Kinetics large laser Lawrence LBL LBNL lepton level light Linear Lithium Livermore living LLNL long low Magnetic Mass material Materials mathematics Matter Measurement measurements Mechanics mechanism medical Medicine Mesons Metabolism Method methods Model Models Molecular Molecules momentum mu Nambu Neutral Neutrino Neutrinos Neutron neutrons Nuclear Nuclei Nucleon Odd Organic ORNL Oxides oxygen Particle Particles path PET Photosynthesis physical Physics pi Plants Plasma Plutonium Policy Polymers Positron Power problem processes production program Programs progress Properties Proton Protons Quantum Quark Radiation Radioactive Radioisotopes range Ratio ray Reaction Reactions Reactor Reactors Renewable report Research resolution Resonance results Review RTG scattering science Sciences scientific Seaborg Separation Solar Source Sources Space Spectra Spectroscopy spectrum Spin Stability state States storage Strong Structure Studies study supernovae symmetry Symposium Synthesis system Systems Tau technical Techniques technologies Technology Teller Temperature theoretical Theories Theory Therapy Thermal Thermoelectric Thin Time Tomography Top Tracer Transfer Transport type types Upton Uranium uses Velocity Water Weak Wigner yields

235

Observed Southern Ocean Cloud Properties and Shortwave Reflection. Part II: Phase Changes and Low Cloud Feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate models produce an increase in cloud optical depth in midlatitudes associated with climate warming, but the magnitude of this increase and its impact on reflected solar radiation vary from model to model. Transition from ice to liquid in ...

Daniel T. McCoy; Dennis L. Hartmann; Daniel P. Grosvenor

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Waste area Grouping 2 Phase I remedial investigation: Sediment and Cesium-137 transport modeling report  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of five reports issued in 1996 that provide follow-up information to the Phase I Remedial Investigation (RI) Report for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The five reports address areas of concern that may present immediate risk to public health at the Clinch River and ecological risk within WAG 2 at ORNL. A sixth report, on groundwater, in the series documenting WAG 2 RI Phase I results were part of project activities conducted in FY 1996. The five reports that complete activities conducted as part of Phase I of the Remedial Investigation (RI) for WAG 2 are as follows: (1) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Seep Data Assessment, (2) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Tributaries Data Assessment, (3) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Ecological Risk Assessment, (4) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Human Health Risk Assessment, (5) Waste Area Grouping 2, Phase I Task Data Report: Sediment and {sup 137}Cs Transport Modeling In December 1990, the Remedial Investigation Plan for Waste Area Grouping 2 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory was issued (ORNL 1990). The WAG 2 RI Plan was structured with a short-term component to be conducted while upgradient WAGs are investigated and remediated, and a long-term component that will complete the RI process for WAG 2 following remediation of upgradient WAGs. RI activities for the short-term component were initiated with the approval of the Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA), and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC). This report presents the results of an investigation of the risk associated with possible future releases of {sup 137}Cs due to an extreme flood. The results are based on field measurements made during storms and computer model simulations.

Clapp, R.B.; Bao, Y.S.; Moore, T.D.; Brenkert, A.L.; Purucker, S.T.; Reece, D.K.; Burgoa, B.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Investigation of Low-Cloud Characteristics Using Mesoscale Numerical Model Data for Improvement of Fog-Detection Performance by Satellite Remote Sensing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The comprehensive relationship between meteorological conditions and whether low water cloud touches the surface, particularly at sea, is examined with the goal of improving low-cloud detection by satellite. Gridpoint-value data provided by an ...

Haruma Ishida; Kentaro Miura; Teruaki Matsuda; Kakuji Ogawara; Azumi Goto; Kuniaki Matsuura; Yoshiko Sato; Takashi Y. Nakajima

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Sensitivity Study of Radiative Fluxes at the Top of Atmosphere to Cloud-Microphysics and Aerosol Parameters in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we investigated the sensitivity of net radiative fluxes (FNET) at the top of atmosphere (TOA) to 16 selected uncertain parameters mainly related to the cloud microphysics and aerosol schemes in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5). We adopted a quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) sampling approach to effectively explore the high dimensional parameter space. The output response variables (e.g., FNET) were simulated using CAM5 for each parameter set, and then evaluated using generalized linear model analysis. In response to the perturbations of these 16 parameters, the CAM5-simulated global annual mean FNET ranges from -9.8 to 3.5 W m-2 compared to the CAM5-simulated FNET of 1.9 W m-2 with the default parameter values. Variance-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to show the relative contributions of individual parameter perturbation to the global FNET variance. The results indicate that the changes in the global mean FNET are dominated by those of cloud forcing (CF) within the parameter ranges being investigated. The size threshold parameter related to auto-conversion of cloud ice to snow is confirmed as one of the most influential parameters for FNET in the CAM5 simulation. The strong heterogeneous geographic distribution of FNET variation shows parameters have a clear localized effect over regions where they are acting. However, some parameters also have non-local impacts on FNET variance. Although external factors, such as perturbations of anthropogenic and natural emissions, largely affect FNET variations at the regional scale, their impact is weaker than that of model internal parameters in terms of simulating global mean FNET in this study. The interactions among the 16 selected parameters contribute a relatively small portion of the total FNET variations over most regions of the globe. This study helps us better understand the CAM5 model behavior associated with parameter uncertainties, which will aid the next step of reducing model uncertainty via calibration of uncertain model parameters with the largest sensitivity.

Zhao, Chun; Liu, Xiaohong; Qian, Yun; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; McFarlane, Sally A.; Wang, Hailong; Yang, Ben; Ma, Po-Lun; Yan, Huiping; Bao, Jie

2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

239

ARM Cloud Aerosol Precipitation Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite Observation CAS Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer CCN Cloud Condensation Nuclei CIP Cloud Imaging Probe CPC Condensation Particle Counter CSPHOT Cimel sunphotometer CVI...

240

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE VARIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE CLOUD RADIATIVE FORCING, CLOUD FRACTION AND CLOUD ALBEDO: THEIR RELATIONSHIP AND MULTISCALE/Atmospheric Sciences Division Brookhaven National Laboratory P.O. Box, Upton, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Cloud-induced climate change. Cloud-radiative forcing, cloud fraction, and cloud albedo are three key quantities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

How to Do/Evaluate Cloud Computing Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­ Simulations · Only when you can WELL justify, e.g., energy efficiency with realistic data like Google clusterS (Software as a Service) · Salesforce.com · Deployment Models ­ Private cloud ­ Public cloud ­ Hybrid cloud, theoretical and computational science (simulation), The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery

Hong,Seokhee

242

Space group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with Z2 topological order  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study square lattice space group symmetry fractionalization in a family of exactly solvable models with $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order in two dimensions. In particular, we have obtained a complete understanding of which distinct types of symmetry fractionalization (symmetry classes) can be realized within this class of models, which are generalizations of Kitaev's $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ toric code to arbitrary lattices. This question is motivated by earlier work of A. M. Essin and one of us (M. H.), where the idea of symmetry classification was laid out, and which, for square lattice symmetry, produces 2080 symmetry classes consistent with the fusion rules of $\\mathbb{Z}_2$ topological order. This approach does not produce a physical model for each symmetry class, and indeed there are reasons to believe that some symmetry classes may not be realizable in strictly two-dimensional systems, thus raising the question of which classes are in fact possible. While our understanding is limited to a restricted class of models, it is complete in the sense that for each of the 2080 possible symmetry classes, we either prove rigorously that the class cannot be realized in our family of models, or we give an explicit model realizing the class. We thus find that exactly 487 symmetry classes are realized in the family of models considered. With a more restrictive type of symmetry action, where space group operations act trivially in the internal Hilbert space of each spin degree of freedom, we find that exactly 82 symmetry classes are realized. In addition, we present a single model that realizes all $2^6 = 64$ types of symmetry fractionalization allowed for a single anyon species ($\\mathbb{Z}_2$ charge excitation), as the parameters in the Hamiltonian are varied. The paper concludes with a summary and a discussion of two results pertaining to more general bosonic models.

Hao Song; Michael Hermele

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

First Observations of Tracking Clouds Using Scanning ARM Cloud Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large-drop formation (weather radar first echo). These measurements also complement cloud and precipitation tracking using ...

Paloma Borque; Pavlos Kollias; Scott Giangrande

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Radiometric Measurements from the NASA Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR): Two- and Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Modeling of an Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Cloud Deck  

SciTech Connect

In December 1999, NASA launched the Terra satellite. This platform carries five instruments that measure important properties of the Earth climate system. One of these instruments is the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MISR. This instrument measures light reflected from the Earth at a spatial resolution of 275-1100 m, at four wavelengths (446, 558, 672, and 866 nm), and at nine different viewing angles that vary from +70 to -70 degrees along the direction of flight [Diner et al., 2002]. These multiangle data have the potential to provide information on aerosols, surface, and cloud characteristics that compliments traditional single-view-direction satellite measurements. Before this potential can be realized, the accuracy of the satellite radiance measurements must be carefully assessed, and the implications of the radiometric accuracy on remote-sensing algorithms must be evaluated. In this article, we compare MISR multiangle measurements against two-dimensional (2-D) and 3-D radiative transfer calculations from an inhomogeneous cloud scene. Inputs to the radiative transfer code are based entirely on independently gathered data (ground-based radar, lidar, microwave radiometer, in situ aircraft data, etc.). The 2-D radiative transfer calculations compare favorably near nadir and in most of the forward scattering directions, but differ by as much as 10% in the backscattering directions. Using 3-D radiative transfer modeling, we show that this difference is due to the 3-D structure of the cloud deck, including variations in the cloud top height on scales less than 275 m, which are not resolved in the 2-D simulations. Comparison of the 2-D calculations to the MISR measurements, after accounting for the 3-D structure, show residual differences that are less than 4% at all angles at the MISR blue and green wavelengths. The comparison also reveals that the MISR measurements at the red and near-infrared wavelengths are too bright relative to measurements in the blue and green bands. On the basis of the results of this study, along with results from five other comparisons, the MISR calibration is being adjusted to reduce the red and nearinfrared Radiances.

Marchand, Roger T.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cell model of in-cloud scavenging of highly soluble gases Alexander Baklanov a,b,n  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fully online integrated atmospheric chemistry and meteorology models and Earth system models requires

Elperin, Tov

246

ARM - Measurement - Cloud fraction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud fraction Fraction of sky covered by clouds, observed directly or derived from SW...

247

ARM - Measurement - Cloud size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud size Information about the physical dimensions of a cloud, including such measurements...

248

North Australian Cloud Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A satellite classification and climatology of propagating mesoscale cloud fines in northern Australia is presented. These cloud fines range from long, narrow lines of shallow convection to extensive deep convective squall lines with mesoscale ...

W. Drosdowsky; G. J. Holland

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Calibration of Radiation Codes Used in Climate Models: Comparison of Clear-Sky Calculations with Observations from the Spectral Radiation Experiment and the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program R. G. Ellingson, S. Shen, and J. Warner University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Background The InterComparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) showed large differences between model calculations of longwave fluxes and heating rates-even for clear-sky conditions (Luther et al. 1988). The discrepancies could not be resolved with either pyrgeometer measurements or line-by-line calculations because * Pyrgeometer errors are the magnitude of the discrepancies. * Uncertainties in the physics of line wings and in the proper treatment of the continuum make it impossible

250

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...will not be as effective in marine stratocumulus clouds that are...Engineering steps to implement marine cloud brightening (a) Introduction...brightening by increasing the CCN of marine stratus clouds (by way of...vessel and the optimum means of propulsion. In fact, both these aspects...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

XSEDE Cloud Survey Report David Lifka, Cornell Center for Advanced Computing Ian Foster, ANL, ANL and The University of Chicago A National Science Foundation-sponsored cloud user survey was conducted from September 2012 to April 2013 by the XSEDE Cloud Integration Investigation Team to better

Walter, M.Todd

252

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Cloud Computing Recommendations SRCPAC December 3, 2014 #12;Mandate and Membership SRCPAC convened this committee in Sept 2014 to investigate the role that cloud computing should play in our & Academic Affairs (Social Work) #12;Questions discussed · What cloud resources are available? · Which kinds

Qian, Ning

253

Cloud Detection over Snow and Ice Using MISR Data , Eugene E. Clothiaux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Detection over Snow and Ice Using MISR Data Tao Shi , Bin Yu , Eugene E. Clothiaux , and Amy J. Braverman Abstract Clouds play a major role in Earth's climate and cloud detection prediction and global climate model studies. To advance the observational capabilities of detecting clouds

Yu, Bin

254

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDY OF CLOUD LIFETIME EFFECTS USING THE SGP HETEROGENEOUS DISTRIBUTED RADAR NETWORK: PRELIMINARY-dimensional morphology and life cycle of clouds. Detailing key cloud processes as they transit from the formation stage to precipitation onset and cloud dissipation is critical towards establishing uncertainties in climate models

255

Exploration model for unconformity-related hydrocarbon accumulations in Cherokee Group for western Kansas  

SciTech Connect

The sandstones of the Desmoinesian Cherokee Group in western Kansas are important hydrocarbon producers. The Start oil field in Rush and Ness Counties is an example of an unconformity-related Cherokee accumulation from which an exploration model can be made. In this field, the upper Cherokee member is economically important and is interpreted to be a marine unit deposited on the distal portion of an alluvial plain. Traps and reservoirs in this unit were formed by winnowing of clay and silt-sized material from sediments deposited on the crests of paleohighs. Four maps are useful in exploring for upper Cherokee hydrocarbon accumulations such as Start. An isopach map of the Cherokee group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee Group is useful for locating thins that coincide with paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. An isopach map from the Cherokee top down to the first sandstone porosity is useful. Thins of this interval define areas where wave and current action have winnowed finer material from sands. Closed anticlines on a Cherokee structure map are areas where Cherokee reservoirs are likely to be oil bearing rather than water bearing. An isopach map from the Cimarronian stone Corral anhydrite top down to the Missourian Lansing Group top is also useful. Thins of this interval correspond to paleohighs on the basal Pennsylvanian unconformity. This interval can be picked from seismic records. Prospective areas occur where isopach thins of Stone Corral to Lansing, of Cherokee Group, and of Cherokee top to first sandstone porosity coincide with Cherokee anticlinal structure.

Bieber, D.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

The Structure of the Local Interstellar Medium IV: Dynamics, Morphology, Physical Properties, and Implications of Cloud-Cloud Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an empirical dynamical model of the local interstellar medium based on 270 radial-velocity measurements for 157 sight lines toward nearby stars. Physical-parameter measurements (i.e., temperature, turbulent velocity, depletions) are available for 90 components, or one-third of the sample, enabling initial characterizations of the physical properties of LISM clouds. The model includes 15 warm clouds located within 15 pc of the Sun, each with a different velocity vector. We derive projected morphologies of all clouds and estimate the volume filling factor of warm partially ionized material in the LISM to be between ~5.5% and 19%. Relative velocities of potentially interacting clouds are often supersonic, consistent with heating, turbulent, and metal-depletion properties. Cloud-cloud collisions may be responsible for the filamentary morphologies found in ~1/3 of LISM clouds, the distribution of clouds along the boundaries of the two nearest clouds (LIC and G), the detailed shape and heating of the Mic Cloud, the location of nearby radio scintillation screens, and the location of a LISM cold cloud. Contrary to previous claims, the Sun appears to be located in the transition zone between the LIC and G Clouds.

Seth Redfield; Jeffrey L. Linsky

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group Reports Summary of Single-Column Model Intensive Observation Period Workshop at Annual Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Science Team Meeting D. A. Randall Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado R. T. Cederwall Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California * Study previous observation simulation system experiments (OSSEs) (i.e., Bill Frank, Pennsylvania State University [PSU]) and conduct OSSEs as necessary to evaluate data network. * Implement additional "boundary" facilities and investigate possible interim capabilities for upcoming SCM IOPs. * Improve resolution of wind profiles observed in lowest 1 km, using data sources such as towers of opportunity, doppler sodar, and doppler radar.

258

Energy-Efficient Demand Provisioning in the Cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose optimized provisioning models to guarantee minimum energy consumption of Internet and cloud services where high performance data centers are located at the...

Kantarci, Burak; Mouftah, Hussein T

259

Electron cloud observations : a retrospective.  

SciTech Connect

A growing number of observations of electron cloud effects (ECEs) have been reported in positron and proton rings. Low-energy, background electrons ubiquitous in high-intensity particle accelerators. Amplification of electron cloud (EC) can occur under certain operating conditions, potentially giving rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade accelerator performance. EC observations and diagnostics have contributed to a better understanding of ECEs, in particular, details of beam-induced multipacting and cloud saturation effects. Such experimental results can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters for modeling efforts and analytical calculations to improve prediction capability. Electron cloud effects are increasingly important phenomena in high luminosity, high brightness, or high intensity machines - Colliders, Storage rings, Damping rings, Heavy ion beams. EC generation and instability modeling increasingly complex and benchmarked against in situ data: {delta}, {delta}{sub 0}, photon reflectivity, and SE energy distributions important. Surface conditioning and use of solenoidal windings in field-free regions are successful cures: will they be enough? What are new observations and how do they contribute to body of work and understanding physics of EC?

Harkay, K.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterizaton  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization Testing a New Cirrus Cloud Parameterization in NCAR CCM3 D. Zurovac-Jevtic, G. J. Zhang, and V. Ramanathan Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institute of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Cirrus cloud cover and ice water content (IWC) are the two most important properties of cirrus clouds. However, in general circulation models (GCMs), their treatment is very crude. For example, in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Climate Model (CCM3), IWC is prescribed as a function of column-integrated water vapor and height (Hack 1998). The in situ observations in the tropics indicate that the cirrus IWC is an order of magnitude larger than what is prescribed in the model (McFarquhar and Heymsfield 1996). The comparison with the International

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Evaluation of a Forward Operator to Assimilate Cloud Water Path into WRF-DART  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud properties into storm-scale models has received limited attention despite its potential to provide a wide array of information to a model analysis. Available retrievals include cloud water path (CWP), which ...

Thomas A. Jones; David J. Stensrud; Patrick Minnis; Rabindra Palikonda

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid cloud combines aspects of public and private clouds: a company may build a compute cloud own its own infrastructure,

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

THE GALFA-H I COMPACT CLOUD CATALOG  

SciTech Connect

We present a catalog of 1964 isolated, compact neutral hydrogen clouds from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Survey Data Release One. The clouds were identified by a custom machine-vision algorithm utilizing the difference of Gaussian kernels to search for clouds smaller than 20'. The clouds have velocities typically between |V{sub LSR}| =20 and 400 km s{sup -1}, line widths of 2.5-35 km s{sup -1}, and column densities ranging from 1 to 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The distances to the clouds in this catalog may cover several orders of magnitude, so the masses may range from less than a solar mass for clouds within the Galactic disk, to greater than 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at the tip of the Magellanic Stream. To search for trends, we separate the catalog into five populations based on position, velocity, and line width: HVCs; galaxy candidates; cold low-velocity clouds (LVCs); warm, low positive-velocity clouds in the third Galactic quadrant; and the remaining warm LVCs. The observed HVCs are found to be associated with previously identified HVC complexes. We do not observe a large population of isolated clouds at high velocities as some models predict. We see evidence for distinct histories at low velocities in detecting populations of clouds corotating with the Galactic disk and a set of clouds that is not corotating.

Saul, Destry R.; Peek, J. E. G.; Grcevich, J.; Putman, M. E.; Brown, A. R. H.; Hamden, E. T. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Douglas, K. A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary/Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada); Korpela, E. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stanimirovic, S.; Lee, M.; Burkhart, B.; Pingel, N. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N Charter St, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Heiles, C. [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gibson, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Begum, A. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, ITI Campus (Gas Rahat) Building, Govindpura, Bhopal-23 (India); Tonnesen, S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

264

1. ABSTRACT Clouds substantially affect the observed infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initial guess Clouds vary over orders from BT difference between observed of magnitude and Jacobians of clouds 4. TESTING ASSUMPTIONS: FORWARD MODEL ERRORS * Comparing model that includes scattering (CHARTS heights and optical depths can be adequately modeled by our approach 3. ASSUMPTIONS / APPROACH In order

265

Evaluation of tropical cloud and precipitation statistics of CAM3 using CloudSat and CALIPSO data  

SciTech Connect

The combined CloudSat and CALIPSO satellite observations provide the first simultaneous measurements of cloud and precipitation vertical structure, and are used to examine the representation of tropical clouds and precipitation in the Community Atmosphere Model Version 3 (CAM3). A simulator package utilizing a model-to-satellite approach facilitates comparison of model simulations to observations, and a revised clustering method is used to sort the subgrid-scale patterns of clouds and precipitation into principal cloud regimes. Results from weather forecasts performed with CAM3 suggest that the model underestimates the horizontal extent of low and mid-level clouds in subsidence regions, but overestimates that of high clouds in ascending regions. CAM3 strongly overestimates the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime, but underestimates the horizontal extent of clouds and precipitation at low and middle levels when this regime occurs. This suggests that the model overestimates convective precipitation and underestimates stratiform precipitation consistent with a previous study that used only precipitation observations. Tropical cloud regimes are also evaluated in a different version of the model, CAM3.5, which uses a highly entraining plume in the parameterization of deep convection. While the frequency of occurrence of the deep convection with heavy precipitation regime from CAM3.5 forecasts decreases, the incidence of the low clouds with precipitation and congestus regimes increases. As a result, the parameterization change does not reduce the frequency of precipitating convection that is far too high relative to observations. For both versions of CAM, clouds and precipitation are overly reflective at the frequency of the CloudSat radar and thin clouds that could be detected by the lidar only are underestimated.

Zhang, Y; Klein, S; Boyle, J; Mace, G G

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

266

Rocky Flats Closure: the Role of Models in Facilitating Scientific Communication With Stakeholder Groups  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup site for a previous manufacturing plant that made components for the U.S. nuclear weapons arsenal. The facility was shut down in 1989 to address environmental and safety concerns, and left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, surface and ground water. In 1995, the Site contractor established the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) advisory group to provide advice and technical expertise on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in the air, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Through a combination of expert judgment supported by state-of-the-art scientific measurements, it was shown that under environmental conditions at Rocky Flats, plutonium and americium form insoluble oxides that adhere to small soil, organic, and mineral particles and colloids, or are colloidal materials themselves. A series of models ranging from conceptual, geostatistical, and large-scale wind and surface water erosion models were used to guide stakeholder interactions. The nature of these models, and their use in public communication is described.

Clark, D.L.; Choppin, G.R.; Dayton, C.S.; Janecky, D.R.; Lane, L.J.; Paton, I.

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Rocky Flats closure: The role of models in facilitating scientific communication with stakeholder groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) was a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) environmental cleanup site for a previous manufacturing plant that made components for the U.S. nuclear weapons arsenal. The facility was shut down in 1989 to address environmental and safety concerns, and left behind a legacy of contaminated facilities, soils, surface and ground water. In 1995, the Site contractor established the Actinide Migration Evaluation (AME) advisory group to provide advice and technical expertise on issues of actinide behavior and mobility in the air, surface water, groundwater, and soil. Through a combination of expert judgment supported by state-of-the-art scientific measurements, it was shown that under environmental conditions at Rocky Flats, plutonium and americium form insoluble oxides that adhere to small soil, organic, and mineral particles and colloids, or are colloidal materials themselves. A series of models ranging from conceptual, geostatistial, and large-scale wind and surface water erosion models were used to guide stakeholder interactions. The nature of these models, and their use in public communication is described.

David L. Clark; Gregory R. Choppin; Christine S. Dayton; David R. Janecky; Leonard J. Lane; Ian Paton

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Time Correlations in Backscattering Radar Reflectivity Measurements from Cirrus Clouds K. Ivanova, H. N. Shirer, and E. E. Clothiaux Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction The state variables of the atmosphere exhibit correlations at various spatial and temporal scales. These correlations are crucial for understanding short- and long-term trends in climate. Cirrus clouds are important phenomena in the troposphere affecting climate. To improve future parameterization of cirrus clouds in climate models, we must understand the cloud properties and how they change within the cloud. We consider fluctuations of cloud radar signals obtained at isodepths within cirrus clouds

269

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets. For climate model applications it is therefore important to understand the factors which determine the type of convective cloud that will occur. In this study, we concentrate on describing the factors that limit the cloud-top heights of mid-

270

Radiative-Convective Equilibrium Revisited: the Greenhouse Effect of Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A parameterized spectral radiative-convective equilibrium model is built and the heating rates and temperature profiles for various absorbers are calculated and compared with the results of a classical model. Then using an optical depth that is dependent on both the extinction coefficient and the cloud-water path the validity of the black-cloud assumption is tested. It is determined under what conditions one would need to know the liquid or ice water path of the cloud and when one can simply treat the cloud as a black object. A distribution of both ice and water clouds is inputted into the model and the global average surface temperature is obtained. The sensitivity of the surface temperature to a change in either the ice or liquid water path of the cloud is also evaluated.

R. Davies; C. Radley

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cluster Formation in Contracting Molecular Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore, through a simplified, semi-analytic model, the formation of dense clusters containing massive stars. The parent cloud spawning the cluster is represented as an isothermal sphere. This sphere is in near force balance between self-gravity and turbulent pressure. Self-gravity, mediated by turbulent dissipation, drives slow contraction of the cloud, eventually leading to a sharp central spike in density and the onset of dynamical instability. We suggest that, in a real cloud, this transition marks the late and rapid production of massive stars. We also offer an empirical prescription, akin to the Schmidt law, for low-mass star formation in our contracting cloud. Applying this prescription to the Orion Nebula Cluster, we are able to reproduce the accelerating star formation previously inferred from the distribution of member stars in the HR diagram. The cloud turns about 10 percent of its mass into low-mass stars before becoming dynamically unstable. Over a cloud free-fall time, this figure drops to 1 percent, consistent with the overall star formation efficiency of molecular clouds in the Galaxy.

Eric Huff; Steven Stahler

2007-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Using a cloud resolving model to generate the beam-filling correction for microwave retrieval of oceanic rainfall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the CRM along a sloping radiometer view path is conducted to calculate the beam-filling corrections. The best resolution of the CRM we can get is 3km and the beam-filling corrections based on radar data come from another member of our group, Roy...

Feng, Kai

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterizations, and Indirect Aerosol Effects P. H. Daum and Y. Liu Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York...

274

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

275

Cloud Computing: An Architectural Perspective .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud Computing is a term heavily used in today's world. Not even a day passes by without hearing the words "Cloud Computing". It has become (more)

Pandya, Hetalben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

BNL | Aerosol, Cloud, Precipitation Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Atmospheric aerosols exert important "indirect effects" on clouds and climate by serving as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei that affect cloud radiative and microphysical properties. For example, an increase in CCN increases the number concentration of droplets enhances cloud albedo, and suppresses precipitation that alters cloud coverage and lifetime. However, in the case of moist and strong convective clouds, increasing aerosols may increase precipitation and enhance storm development. Although aerosol-induced indirect effects on climate are believed to have a significant impact on global climate change, estimating their impact continues to be one of the most uncertain climate forcings.

277

Cloud Platform Support for API Governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more cloud-like model, digital assets (code, data and software environments) increasingly require curation as web-accessible services. Service-izing digital assets consists of encapsulating assets in software that exposes them to web and mobile applications via well-defined yet flexible, network accessible, application programming interfaces (APIs). In this paper, we postulate that recent advances in cloud computing make cloud platforms as-aservice (PaaS) ideal for deployment, lifecycle management, and policy-based control i.e. API governance for extant and future digital assets. Toward this end, we overview API governance as a PaaS technology and outline some early results generated by our investigation of a prototype we are developing, called EAGER, for implementing API governance at scale. Index TermsAPI Governance; PaaS; cloud platforms; API similarity;

Ra Krintz; Hiranya Jayathilaka; Stratos Dimopoulos; Er Pucher; Rich Wolski; Tevfik Bultan

278

Dynamical and Microphysical Evolution during Mixed-Phase Cloud Glaciation Simulated Using the Bulk Adaptive Habit Prediction Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A bulk microphysics scheme predicting ice particle habit evolution has been implemented in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model. Large-eddy simulations are analyzed to study the effects of ice habit and number concentration on the bulk ice ...

Kara J. Sulia; Hugh Morrison; Jerry Y. Harrington

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

ARM - Measurement - Cloud extinction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

extinction extinction ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud extinction The removal of radiant energy from an incident beam by the process of cloud absorption and/or scattering. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NEPHELOMETER : Nephelometer Field Campaign Instruments CEP : Cloud Extinction Probe CLDAEROSMICRO : Cloud and Aerosol Microphysical Properties EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters

280

On the Microphysical Properties of Ice Clouds as Inferred from the Polarization of Electromagnetic Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

campaigns ranging in effective diameter from 10 micrometers to 90 micrometers. Bulk scattering properties for the MODIS Collection 5 ice cloud product are used in this study, along with properties for two mid-latitude ice cloud models, a polar...

Cole, Benjamin

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

On the Feasibility of Precisely Measuring the Properties of a Precipitating Cloud with a Weather Radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the results of an investigation are presented that are concerned with the feasibility of employing a weather radar to make precise measurements of the properties of a precipitating cloud. A schematic cloud is proposed as a model...

Runnels, R.C.

282

Investigation of the aerosol-cloud interaction using the WRF framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, a two-moment bulk microphysical scheme with aerosol effects is developed and implemented into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to investigate the aerosol-cloud interaction. Sensitivities of cloud properties...

Li, Guohui

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a filtered field. In this manuscript, we also demonstrate that this multiphase model fully fulfills the second law of thermodynamics and fulfills the necessary requirements for a well-posed initial-value problem. In the next manuscripts, we will further develop specific closures for multiphase RANS, LES, and hybrid-LES.

S. Dartevelle

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

284

Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF): Data from Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs Bosons Research of the Higgs Group  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a Tevatron experiment at Fermilab. The Tevatron, a powerful particle accelerator, accelerates protons and antiprotons close to the speed of light, and then makes them collide head-on inside the CDF detector. The CDF detector is used to study the products of such collisions. The CDF Physics Group at Fermilab is organized into six working groups, each with a specific focus. The Higgs group searches for Standard Model and Supersymmetric Higgs bosons. Their public web page makes data and numerous figures available from both CDF Runs I and II.

285

Cloud Computing Synopsis and Recommendations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This document reprises the NIST-established definition of cloud computing, describes cloud computing benefits and open issues, presents an overview of major classes of cloud technology, and provides guidelines and recommendations on how organizations ... Keywords: cloud computing, computer security, virtualization

Mark Lee Badger; Timothy Grance; Robert Patt-Corner; Jeffery M, Voas

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Convective Cloud Lifecycles Lunchtime seminar 19th May 2009 Bob Plant Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, UK #12;Introduction Obtain life cycle statistics for clouds in CRM simulations Why Conclusions Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.1/3 #12;Why bother? Convective Cloud Lifecycles ­ p.2/3 #12;Some

Plant, Robert

287

Formation and Spread of Aircraft-Induced Holes in Clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cloud layer; a local sounding showed that...identified from local radiosondes, wind profilers, and...and Forecasting (WRF) model (10). The WRF model was configured...thermodynamic and wind conditions. The...surface and therefore local meteorology and...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Gregory Thompson; Hugh Morrison; Aaron Bansemer; Roy M. Rasmussen; Patrick Minnis; Zhien Wang; Damao Zhang

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Accretion onto a black hole in a string cloud background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the accretion process onto the black hole with a string cloud background, where the horizon of the black hole has an enlarged radius $r_H=2 M/(1-\\alpha)$, due to the string cloud parameter $\\alpha\\; (0 \\leq \\alpha cloud parameter $\\alpha$. We also find the gas compression ratios and temperature profiles below the accretion radius and at the event horizon. It is shown that the mass accretion rate, for both the relativistic and the non-relativistic fluid by a black hole in the string cloud model, increases with increase in $\\alpha$.

Apratim Ganguly; Sushant G. Ghosh; Sunil D. Maharaj

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

289

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Cloud Radiative Forcing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ARM Climate Research Facility: Part 2. The Vertical Redistribution of Radiant Energy by Clouds. Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally University of Utah Kato, Seiji Hampton University/NASA Langley Research Center Documentation with data of the effects of clouds on the radiant energy balance of the surface and atmosphere represent a critical shortcoming in the set of observations that are needed to ascertain the validity of model simulations of the earth's climate. While clouds are known to cool the climate system from TOA radiation budget studies, the redistribution of energy between the surface and atmosphere and within the atmosphere by clouds has not been examined in detail. Using data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP)

290

In Clouds We Trust  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can bring. Many have realised that giving a third party control of part of the IT infrastructure can help reduce capital expenditure and maximise asset utilisation to provide a quantitative return on investment (ROI). Cloud can also remove resource......

Jim Damoulakis

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Moving into the Cloud.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cloud computing is the notion of abstracting and outsourcing hardware or software resources over the Internet, often to a third party on a pay-as-you-go basis. (more)

Mikalsen, Christian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flexible MapReduce Workflows for Cloud Data Analytics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data analytics applications handle large data sets subject to multiple processing phases, some of which can execute in parallel on clusters, grids or clouds. Such applications can benefit from using MapReduce model, only requiring the end-user to define ... Keywords: Cloud, Data Analytics Applications, MapReduce, Text Mining, Workflow

Carlos Goncalves, Luis Assuncao, Jose C. Cunha

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

RETRIEVING THREE-DIMENSIONAL CLOUD STRUCTURE USING A TOMOGRAPHY METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Wiscombe January 2008 To be presented at the 15th Conference on Clouds and Precipitation Cancun, Mexico the cloud models were mature enough to make much headway. Now, the time is ripe for a renewed push. We have with the U.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges

294

Evaluating the MMF Using CloudSat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi CloudSat, ARM, and the Multi - - scale scale Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Modeling Framework (MMF) in the Tropical Western Pacific Tropical Western Pacific Tom Ackerman Tom Ackerman University of Washington University of Washington Collaborators on the ARM Project Collaborators on the ARM Project Roger Marchand, U. Washington Roger Marchand, U. Washington Steve Klein, LLNL Steve Klein, LLNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Sally McFarlane, PNNL Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Robert Pincus, U. Colorado (NY office) Kuan Kuan - - Man Man Xu Xu , NASA Langley , NASA Langley Anning Anning Chen, Hampton University Chen, Hampton University Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Pete Henderson, U. Colorado Yunyan Zhang, LLNL Yunyan Zhang, LLNL

295

Migrating enterprise storage applications to the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.1 Cloud Providers . . . . . . . . . . . .2.1.1 Cloud Storage . . . . . . . . .2.1.2 Cloud Computation . . . . . . 2.2 Enterprise Storage

Vrable, Michael Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

A Web Portal for Management of Aneka-Based MultiCloud Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or hybrid Clouds. Our evaluation results show that Aneka scheduling algorithm performs ef- ficiently and commercial products, have mainly focused on Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) model due to the uncertainty in Cloud infrastructures. Our Cloud Web Portal (CWP) aims to provide an open source portal for easy adjust

Buyya, Rajkumar

297

Testing the Role of Radiation in Determining Tropical Cloud-Top Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cloud-resolving model is used to test the hypothesis that radiative cooling by water vapor emission is the primary control on the temperature of tropical anvil clouds. The temperature of ice clouds in the simulation can be increased or decreased ...

Bryce E. Harrop; Dennis L. Hartmann

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a variety of atmospheric conditions. Data from field campaigns with appropriate forcing descriptors have been traditionally used by modelers for evaluating and improving parameterization schemes.

Jensen, Mike; Bartholomew, Mary Jane; Genio, Anthony Del; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

299

Thin Cloud Length Scales Using CALIPSO and CloudSat Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin clouds are the most difficult cloud type to observe. The recent availability of joint cloud products from the active remote sensing instruments aboard CloudSat and the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite (CALIPSO) facilitates...

Solbrig, Jeremy E.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

SciTech Connect

A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote Sensor Retrieval Algorithm (CombRet) produces vertical profiles of liquid or ice water content (LWC or IWC), droplet effective radius (re), ice crystal generalized effective size (Dge), cloud phase, and cloud boundaries. The algorithm was compared with 3 other independent algorithms to help estimate the uncertainty in the cloud properties, fluxes, and heating rates (Comstock et al. 2013). The dataset is provided at 2 min temporal and 90 m vertical resolution. The current dataset is applied to time periods when the MMCR (Millimeter Cloud Radar) version of the ARSCL (Active Remotely-Sensed Cloud Locations) Value Added Product (VAP) is available. The MERGESONDE VAP is utilized where temperature and humidity profiles are required. Future additions to this dataset will utilize the new KAZR instrument and its associated VAPs.

Comstock, Jennifer

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

302

Neutron scattering studies and modeling of high mobility group 14 core nucleosome complex  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron scattering studies and modeling of high mobility...were studied by use of small-angle neutron scattering techniques. By varying the H2O...occurring in active nucleosomes. Neutron scattering studies and modeling of high mobility...

E C Uberbacher; J K Mardian; R M Rossi; D E Olins; G J Bunick

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cost minimization for computational applications on hybrid cloud infrastructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We address the problem of task planning on multiple clouds formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming problem (MINLP). Its specification with AMPL modeling language allows us to apply solvers such as Bonmin and Cbc. Our model assumes multiple heterogeneous compute and storage cloud providers, such as Amazon, Rackspace, GoGrid, ElasticHosts and a private cloud, parameterized by costs and performance, including constraints on maximum number of resources at each cloud. The optimization objective is the total cost, under deadline constraint. We compute the relation between deadline and cost for a sample set of data- and compute-intensive tasks, representing bioinformatics experiments. Our results illustrate typical problems when making decisions on deployment planning on clouds and how they can be addressed using optimization techniques.

Maciej Malawski; Kamil Figiela; Jarek Nabrzyski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Test of the Simulation of Tropical Convective Cloudiness by a Cloud-Resolving Model MARIO A. LOPEZ, DENNIS L. HARTMANN, PETER N. BLOSSEY, ROBERT WOOD,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

un- certainties in projections of future climates (Bony et al. 2006; Solomon et al. 2007). Clouds solar radiation, although their effect on the net energy balance is often much less than with intense tropical convective systems are known to have long lifetimes and to cover large areas, accounting

Hartmann, Dennis

305

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observing Warm Clouds in 3D Using ARM Scanning Cloud Radars and a Novel Ensemble Method For original submission and image(s), see ARM Research Highlights http:www.arm.gov...

306

Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic spring and fall seasons performed under the Cloud-Associated Parameterizations Testbed framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level stratocumulus, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m{sup -2}. Introducing a new ice nucleation parameterization slightly improves the model performance for low-level mixed-phase clouds by increasing cloud liquid water content through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process. The CAM5 single-column model testing shows that changing the instantaneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C causes a large increase in modeled cloud liquid water content through the slowing down of cloud liquid and rain-related processes (e.g., autoconversion of cloud liquid to rain). The underestimation of aerosol concentrations in CAM5 in the Arctic also plays an important role in the low bias of cloud liquid water in the single-layer mixed-phase clouds. In addition, numerical issues related to the coupling of model physics and time stepping in CAM5 are responsible for the model biases and will be explored in future studies.

Liu X.; Lin W.; Xie, S.; Boyle, J.; Klein, S. A.; Shi, X.; Wang, Z.; Ghan, S. J.; Earle, M.; Liu, P. S. K.; Zelenyuk, A.

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

307

6, 43414373, 2006 Cloud-borne aerosol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g., par- ticle nucleation, coagulation, gravitational settling, dry deposition); some involve AP attached to a single type of cloud/precipitation particle (e.g., aqueous and heteroge-25 neous chemistry), and some, transformation, and removal processes on the attachment state, one might expect that model simulations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

308

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

309

Cloud Based Applications and Platforms (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation to the Cloud Computing East 2014 Conference, where we are highlighting our cloud computing strategy, describing the platforms on the cloud (including Smartgrid.gov), and defining our process for implementing cloud based applications.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

3D Printed Molecules and Extended Solid Models for Teaching Symmetry and Point Groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several full-color 3D printers available that can print multiple colors within one object. ... In contrast to the fragile color printing molecular model attempts, models printed on the Stratasys Dimension Elite 3D printer reported in this article using the ABS P430 model material and P400SR dissolvable support material consistently produced structures with excellent mechanical integrity. ... Both file preparation methods produced successful 3D prints of equal quality using a Stratasys Dimension Elite 3D printer. ...

Vincent F. Scalfani; Thomas P. Vaid

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

311

Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Sensitivity of Cirrus Cloud Radiative Properties to Ice Crystal Size and Shape in General Circulation Model Simulations D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada J. E. Kristjánsson Department of Geophysics University of Oslo, Norway M. J. Newman Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico Introduction Recent research (e.g., Mitchell and Arnott 1994) has shown that the radiative properties of cirrus clouds (i.e., optical depth, albedo, emissivity) depend on the shapes and sizes of ice crystals. For instance, the cloud albedo may vary by a factor of two, depending on whether hexagonal columns or bullet rosette ice crystals are assumed for a given ice water path (IWP). This variance occurs primarily because, at sizes characteristic of cirrus

312

Electron Cloud observation in the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Operation of LHC with bunch trains at different spacings has revealed the formation of an electron cloud inside the machine. The main observations of electron cloud build up are the pressure rise measured at the vacuum gauges in the warm regions, as well as the increase of the beam screen temperature in the cold regions due to an additional heat load. The effects of the electron cloud were also visible as instability and emittance growth affecting the last bunches of longer trains, which could be improved running with higher chromaticity or larger transverse emittances. A summary of the 2010 and 2011 observations and measurements and a comparison with models will be presented. The efficiency of scrubbing to improve the machine running performance will be briefly discussed.

Rumolo, G; Baglin, V; Bartosik, H; Biancacci, N; Baudrenghien, P; Bregliozzi, G; Chiggiato, P; Claudet, S; De Maria, R; Esteban-Muller, J; Favier, M; Hansen, C; Hfle, W; Jimenez, J M; Kain, V; Lanza, G; Li, K S B; Maury Cuna, G H I; Mtral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roncarolo, F; Salvant, B; Shaposhnikova, E N; Steinhagen, R J; Tavian, L J; Valuch, D; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Zimmermann, F; Iriso, U; Dominguez, O; Koukovini-Platia, E; Mounet, N; Zannini, C; Bhat, C M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Condensation Nuclei Retrievals at Cloud Base in North Dakota · Mariusz Starzec #12;Motivation Compare University of Wyoming (UWyo) and Droplet Measurement Technologies (DMT) cloud condensation nuclei condensation nuclei concentration (CCNC) at any supersaturation (SS) #12;Background Aerosols act as nuclei

Delene, David J.

314

HNCO in molecular clouds  

SciTech Connect

In a survey of 18 molecular clouds, HNCO J/sub K/-1K1..-->..J'/sub K/'-1K'1 = 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 05/ and 4/sub 04/..-->..3/sub 03/ emission was etected in seven clouds, and possibly in one other. Emission in these transitions originates in high-density regions (n> or approx. =10/sup 6/ cm/sup -3/). The molecule's excitation requirements allow us to derive limits to excitation temperatures an optical depths. We discuss the possibility of clumping with respect to the beam and compare our results with data from other molecular species. The HNCO emission from Sgr A is an ordder of magnitude larger than the other detected sources as is the ratio ..delta..T +- /sub A/(HNCO 5/sub 05/..-->..4/sub 04/)/..delta..T +- /sub A/(C/sup 18/O 1..-->..0). HNCO is probably a constituent of most molecular clouds.

Jackson, J.M.; Armstrong, J.T.; Barrett, A.H.

1984-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals of ARM Ground-based Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasize on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice effective radius. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval algorithms used by these cloud products, including the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao, Chuanfeng; Xie, Shaocheng; Klein, Stephen A.; Protat, Alain; Shupe, Matthew D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min; Dunn, Maureen; Hogan, Robin; Huang, Dong; Jensen, Michael; Mace, Gerald G.; McCoy, Renata; O'Conner, Ewan J.; Turner, Dave; Wang, Zhien

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Testing Cloud Microphysics Parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE Observations  

SciTech Connect

Arctic clouds simulated by the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) are evaluated with observations from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) and Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (M-PACE), which were conducted at its North Slope of Alaska site in April 2008 and October 2004, respectively. Model forecasts for the Arctic Spring and Fall seasons performed under the Cloud- Associated Parameterizations Testbed (CAPT) framework generally reproduce the spatial distributions of cloud fraction for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase stratocumulus, and multilayer or deep frontal clouds. However, for low-level clouds, the model significantly underestimates the observed cloud liquid water content in both seasons and cloud fraction in the Spring season. As a result, CAM5 significantly underestimates the surface downward longwave (LW) radiative fluxes by 20-40 W m-2. The model with a new ice nucleation parameterization moderately improves the model simulations by increasing cloud liquid water content in mixed-phase clouds through the reduction of the conversion rate from cloud liquid to ice by the Wegener-Bergeron- Findeisen (WBF) process. The CAM5 single column model testing shows that change in the homogeneous freezing temperature of rain to form snow from -5 C to -40 C has a substantial impact on the modeled liquid water content through the slowing-down of liquid and rain-related processes. In contrast, collections of cloud ice by snow and cloud liquid by rain are of minor importance for single-layer boundary layer mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic.

Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Shi, Xiangjun; Wang, Zhien; Lin, Wuyin; Ghan, Steven J.; Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

2009-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

318

Opaque cloud detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of detecting clouds in a digital image comprising, for an area of the digital image, determining a reflectance value in at least three discrete electromagnetic spectrum bands, computing a first ratio of one reflectance value minus another reflectance value and the same two values added together, computing a second ratio of one reflectance value and another reflectance value, choosing one of the reflectance values, and concluding that an opaque cloud exists in the area if the results of each of the two computing steps and the choosing step fall within three corresponding predetermined ranges.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM)

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Cloud Initialization in the Rapid Update Cycle of HIRLAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Nowcasting Satellite Application Facility (NWC SAF) cloud mask from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) satellite is introduced in the initialization step of an hourly Rapid Update Cycle (RUC) of the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM)...

Siebren de Haan; Siebe H. van der Veen

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Effects of aerosols on deep convective cumulus clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work investigates the effects of anthropogenic aerosols on deep convective clouds and the associated radiative forcing in the Houston area. The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble model (GCE) coupled with a spectral-bin microphysics is employed...

Fan, Jiwen

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Airflow Through Midlatitude Cyclones and the Comma Cloud Pattern  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Airflow through a developing midlatitude disturbance is analyzed in a relative-wind isentropic system in order to provide insight into how the cloud pattern evolves into the familiar comma shape. The model presented makes use of various concepts ...

Toby N. Carlson

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Mixing Line Analysis of Clouds and Cloudy Boundary Layers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diagnostic study of the thermodynamic structure of nonprecipitating clouds and cloudy boundary layers is formulated using a mixing line and saturation point approach. A parametric model for the mean structure is developed as a tool for ...

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

5, 60136039, 2005 FRESCO cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 5, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction cloud information over deserts from SCIAMACHY O2 A-band N. Fournier 1 , P. Stammes 1 , M. de Graaf 1 , R, 6013­6039, 2005 FRESCO cloud algorithm N. Fournier et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction Conclusions

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

3, 33013333, 2003 Cirrus cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity J. Str and Physics Discussions Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient relative humidity: A comparison¨om (johan@itm.su.se) 3301 #12;ACPD 3, 3301­3333, 2003 Cirrus cloud occurrence as function of ambient

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

8, 96979729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval algorithm P. Wang et al. Title Page Abstract Chemistry and Physics Discussions FRESCO+: an improved O2 A-band cloud retrieval algorithm for tropospheric on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 9697 #12;ACPD 8, 9697­9729, 2008 FRESCO+ cloud retrieval

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

326

Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 4 Cloud Formation, Evolution and Destruction We now begin to trace the journey towards a star. How long does this take? The answer is surprisingly short: a good many clouds already contain new stars and these stars tend to be young. The typical cloud cannot spend long, if any time at all

Estalella, Robert

327

Collaborative Integrity Verification in Hybrid Clouds Yan Zhu1,2, Hongxin Hu3, Gail-Joon Ahn3, Yujing Han1, Shimin Chen1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and they can also support a hybrid cloud model by supplementing a local infrastructure with computing capacity from external public clouds. By using virtual infrastructure management (VIM) [1], a hybrid cloud canCollaborative Integrity Verification in Hybrid Clouds Yan Zhu1,2, Hongxin Hu3, Gail-Joon Ahn3

Duchowski, Andrew T.

328

Who is this cloud?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

WHO IS THIS CLOUD? is a generative artwork in progress. It is a piece of art dedicated to the memory of a loved one and the idea of existence and transformation. The computer "Beings" will be animated according to their inner program, to weather sensors ... Keywords: Turing pattern, artificial life art, cellular automata, generative art, transhumanism

Lola B. Deswarte; Alain Lioret; Barbara Tannery

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Uncertainties in modeling low-energy neutrino-induced reactions on iron-group nuclei  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Charged-current neutrino-nucleus cross sections for 54,56Fe and 58,60Ni are calculated and compared using frameworks based on relativistic and Skyrme energy-density functionals and on the shell model. The current theoretical uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus cross sections are assessed in relation to the predicted Gamow-Teller transition strength and available data, to multipole decomposition of the cross sections, and to cross sections averaged over the Michel flux and Fermi-Dirac distribution. By employing different microscopic approaches and models, the decay-at-rest (DAR) neutrino-56Fe cross section and its theoretical uncertainty are estimated to be ???th=(25857)10?42cm2, in very good agreement with the experimental value ???exp=(25610843)10?42cm2.

N. Paar; T. Suzuki; M. Honma; T. Marketin; D. Vretenar

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Traversable wormholes in a string cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study spherically symmetric thin-shell wormholes in a string cloud background in (3+1)-dimensional spacetime. The amount of exotic matter required for the construction, the traversability and the stability under radial perturbations, are analyzed as functions of the parameters of the model. Besides, in the Appendices a non perturbative approach to the dynamics and a possible extension of the analysis to a related model are briefly discussed.

Martin Richarte; Claudio Simeone

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

331

University of Wisconsin, Machine Learning Research Group Working Paper BUILDING GENOME EXPRESSION MODELS USING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using actual E. coli microarray data, discussing the strengths and weaknesses of the two algorithms to interpret. This paper explores the effectiveness of two algorithms for this task: PFOIL (a standard machine the genes whose expression levels were up- (or down-) regulated. The goal of the models is to assist a human

Shavlik, Jude W.

332

Posters Parameterization of Thin Mid-Level Stratiform Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Posters Parameterization of Thin Mid-Level Stratiform Clouds S. K. Krueger Department of Meteorology University of Utah Salt Lake City, Utah Thin mid-level stratiform ("altocumulus") clouds have received little attention from either modelers or observational programs, yet these clouds cover large portions of the earth and significantly affect the radiation fields. Since altocumulus are vertically sub-grid scale in general circulation models (GCMs), they have either been neglected or represented implicitly through a "fractional cloudiness" scheme. Such schemes are not suitable for climate modeling because they lack theoretical foundations that indicate their limits of applicability. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) program offers an

333

ARM - Evaluation Product - CMWG Data - SCM-Forcing Data, Cloud  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCMWG Data - SCM-Forcing Data, Cloud ProductsCMWG Data - SCM-Forcing Data, Cloud Microphysical Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : CMWG Data - SCM-Forcing Data, Cloud Microphysical Properties and Radiative Heating Profiles Site(s) GAN HFE NSA SGP TWP General Description SCM-forcing data are derived from the ARM Program observational data using the constrained variational analysis approach (Zhang and Lin 1997 and Zhang et al. 2001). The resulting products include both the large-scale forcing terms and the evaluation fields, which can be used for driving the Single-Column Models (SCMs) and Cloud Resolving Models (CRMs) and validating model simulations. Results from our studies are then used to

334

Chapter 23 - Emerging Security Challenges in Cloud Computing, from Infrastructure-Based Security to Proposed Provisioned Cloud Infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, we discuss the threats, challenges, and guidance associated with securing an organizations core IT infrastructure at the network, host, and application levels in the cloud. According to the best knowledge of the authors, up to now, there are no research with this perspective on cloud security in the literature. This chapter represents our first discussion of this infrastructure security in the context of SPI service delivery models (SaaS, PaaS, and IaaS). Non-information security professionals are cautioned not to simply equate infrastructure security to infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) security. Although infrastructure security is more highly relevant to customers of IaaS, similar consideration should be given to providers platform-as-a-service (PaaS) and software-as-a-service (SaaS) environments, since they have ramifications to customer threat, risk, and compliance management. Another dimension is the cloud business model (public, private, and hybrid clouds), which is orthogonal to the SPI service delivery model; what we highlight is the relevance of discussion points as they apply to public and private clouds. When discussing public clouds, the scope of infrastructure security is limited to the layers of infrastructure that move beyond the organizations control and into the hands of service providers (i.e., when responsibility to a secure infrastructure is transferred to the cloud service provider [CSP], based on the SPI delivery model). Information in this chapter is critical for customers in gaining an understanding of what security a CSP provides and what security the customer is responsible for providing. This chapter discusses conceptual issues, basic requirements, and practical suggestions for designing dynamically configured security infrastructure provisioned on demand as part of the cloud-based infrastructure. We end this chapter by describing general-use cases for provisioning cloud infrastructure that provide bases for defining security infrastructure requirements.

Mohammad Reza Movahedisefat; Seyyed Mohammad Reza Farshchi; Davud Mohammadpur

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Toward understanding of differences in current cloud retrievals of ARM ground-based measurements  

SciTech Connect

Accurate observations of cloud microphysical properties are needed for evaluating and improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models and better estimate of the Earth radiative budget. However, large differences are found in current cloud products retrieved from ground-based remote sensing measurements using various retrieval algorithms. Understanding the differences is an important step to address uncertainties in the cloud retrievals. In this study, an in-depth analysis of nine existing ground-based cloud retrievals using ARM remote sensing measurements is carried out. We place emphasis on boundary layer overcast clouds and high level ice clouds, which are the focus of many current retrieval development efforts due to their radiative importance and relatively simple structure. Large systematic discrepancies in cloud microphysical properties are found in these two types of clouds among the nine cloud retrieval products, particularly for the cloud liquid and ice particle effective radius. Note that the differences among some retrieval products are even larger than the prescribed uncertainties reported by the retrieval algorithm developers. It is shown that most of these large differences have their roots in the retrieval theoretical bases, assumptions, as well as input and constraint parameters. This study suggests the need to further validate current retrieval theories and assumptions and even the development of new retrieval algorithms with more observations under different cloud regimes.

Zhao C.; Dunn M.; Xie, S.; Klein, S. A.; Protat, A.; Shupe, M. D.; McFarlane, S. A.; Comstock, J. M.; Delano, J.; Deng, M.; Hogan, R. J.; Huang, D.; Jensen, M. P.; Mace, G. G.; McCoy, R.; OConnor, E. J.; Turner, D. D.; Wang, Z.

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

336

Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-of-the-art coupled atmosphere-ocean models: the NCAR Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR1 Community Earth System Model (CESM) and the NCEP Global2Climate Dynamics Diagnosis of the Marine Low Cloud Simulation in the NCAR Community Earth System

Bretherton, Chris

337

Failure-aware resource provisioning for hybrid Cloud infrastructure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid Cloud computing is receiving increasing attention in recent days. In order to realize the full potential of the hybrid Cloud platform, an architectural framework for efficiently coupling public and private Clouds is necessary. As resource failures due to the increasing functionality and complexity of hybrid Cloud computing are inevitable, a failure-aware resource provisioning algorithm that is capable of attending to the end-users quality of service (QoS) requirements is paramount. In this paper, we propose a scalable hybrid Cloud infrastructure as well as resource provisioning policies to assure QoS targets of the users. The proposed policies take into account the workload model and the failure correlations to redirect users requests to the appropriate Cloud providers. Using real failure traces and a workload model, we evaluate the proposed resource provisioning policies to demonstrate their performance, cost as well as performancecost efficiency. Simulation results reveal that in a realistic working condition while adopting user estimates for the requests in the provisioning policies, we are able to improve the users QoS about 32% in terms of deadline violation rate and 57% in terms of slowdown with a limited cost on a public Cloud.

Bahman Javadi; Jemal Abawajy; Rajkumar Buyya

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Cloud Retrievals from Landsat-7 During ARESE II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Retrievals from Landsat-7 During ARESE II Cloud Retrievals from Landsat-7 During ARESE II L. Oreopoulos, G. Wen, and A. Marshak Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology University of Maryland Baltimore County Baltimore, Maryland R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland D. Kratz National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Radiation and Aerosols Branch Hampton, Virginia Background on Landsat-7 While for most Landsat data users clouds are contaminants that should be avoided whenever possible, our group takes advantage of the high spatial resolution of enhanced thematic mapper plus (ETM+) to study clouds at scales where three-dimensional (3D) radiative effects are important. This abstract

339

Long-lived artificial ion clouds in the earth's ionosphere  

SciTech Connect

The authors report on two observations made over the Caribbean during the summer of 1991 of barium ion cloud releases, ten hours after the clouds were released. One release was made in the morning twilight, and one in the evening twilight, and each was observed again in the following twilight period by a low light level TV imager and a TV spectrograph onboard a Russian research vessel. These observations were very surprising at the time, but the authors present arguments as to why in retrospect they may not be so unusual in practise. Such cloud releases may provide very sensitive tests of ionspheric convection models.

Milinevsky, G.P. (Kiev Univ., Ukraine (Russian Federation)); Kashirin, A.I. (NPO Typhoon, Obninsk (Russian Federation)); Romanovsky, Yu.A. (Institute of Applied Geophysics, Moscow (Russian Federation)); Stenbaek-Nielson, H.C. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (United States)); Kelley, M.C. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

1993-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Factors influencing the microphysics and radiative properties of liquid-dominated Arctic clouds: insight from observations of aerosol and clouds during ISDAC  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft measurements during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in April 2008 are used to investigate aerosol indirect effects in Arctic clouds. Two aerosol-cloud regimes are considered in this analysis: single-layer stratocumulus cloud with below-cloud aerosol concentrations (N{sub a}) below 300 cm{sup -3} on April 8 and April 26-27 (clean cases); and inhomogeneous layered cloud with N{sub a} > 500 cm{sup -3} below cloud base on April 19-20, concurrent with a biomass burning episode (polluted cases). Vertical profiles through cloud in each regime are used to determine average cloud microphysical and optical properties. Positive correlations between the cloud droplet effective radius (Re) and cloud optical depth ({tau}) are observed for both clean and polluted cases, which are characteristic of optically-thin, non-precipitating clouds. Average Re values for each case are {approx} 6.2 {mu}m, despite significantly higher droplet number concentrations (Nd) in the polluted cases. The apparent independence of Re and Nd simplifies the description of indirect effects, such that {tau} and the cloud albedo (A) can be described by relatively simple functions of the cloud liquid water path. Adiabatic cloud parcel model simulations show that the marked differences in Na between the regimes account largely for differences in droplet activation, but that the properties of precursor aerosol also play a role, particularly for polluted cases where competition for vapour amongst the more numerous particles limits activation to larger and/or more hygroscopic particles. The similarity of Re for clean and polluted cases is attributed to compensating droplet growth processes for different initial droplet size distributions.

Earle, Michael; Liu, Peter S.; Strapp, J. Walter; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; McFarquhar, Greg; Shantz, Nicole C.; Leaitch, W. R.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Parameterizations of Cloud Microphysics and Indirect Aerosol Effects  

SciTech Connect

1. OVERVIEW Aerosols and especially their effect on clouds are one of the key components of the climate system and the hydrological cycle [Ramanathan et al., 2001]. Yet, the aerosol effect on clouds remains largely unknown and the processes involved not well understood. A recent report published by the National Academy of Science states "The greatest uncertainty about the aerosol climate forcing - indeed, the largest of all the uncertainties about global climate forcing - is probably the indirect effect of aerosols on clouds [NRC, 2001]." The aerosol effect on clouds is often categorized into the traditional "first indirect (i.e., Twomey)" effect on the cloud droplet sizes for a constant liquid water path [Twomey, 1977] and the "semi-direct" effect on cloud coverage [e.g., Ackerman et al., 2000]. Enhanced aerosol concentrations can also suppress warm rain processes by producing a narrow droplet spectrum that inhibits collision and coalescence processes [e.g., Squires and Twomey, 1961; Warner and Twomey, 1967; Warner, 1968; Rosenfeld, 1999]. The aerosol effect on precipitation processes, also known as the second type of aerosol indirect effect [Albrecht, 1989], is even more complex, especially for mixed-phase convective clouds. Table 1 summarizes the key observational studies identifying the microphysical properties, cloud characteristics, thermodynamics and dynamics associated with cloud systems from high-aerosol continental environments. For example, atmospheric aerosol concentrations can influence cloud droplet size distributions, warm-rain process, cold-rain process, cloud-top height, the depth of the mixed phase region, and occurrence of lightning. In addition, high aerosol concentrations in urban environments could affect precipitation variability by providing an enhanced source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Hypotheses have been developed to explain the effect of urban regions on convection and precipitation [van den Heever and Cotton, 2007 and Shepherd, 2005]. Recently, a detailed spectral-bin microphysical scheme was implemented into the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model. Atmospheric aerosols are also described using number density size-distribution functions. A spectral-bin microphysical model is very expensive from a computational point of view and has only been implemented into the 2D version of the GCE at the present time. The model is tested by studying the evolution of deep tropical clouds in the west Pacific warm pool region and summertime convection over a mid-latitude continent with different concentrations of CCN: a low "clean" concentration and a high "dirty" concentration. The impact of atmospheric aerosol concentration on cloud and precipitation will be investigated. 2. MODEL DESCRIPTION AND CASE STUDIES 2.1 GCE MODEL The model used in this study is the 2D version of the GCE model. Modeled flow is anelastic. Second- or higher-order advection schemes can produce negative values in the solution. Thus, a Multi-dimensional Positive Definite Advection Transport Algorithm (MPDATA) has been implemented into the model. All scalar variables (potential temperature, water vapor, turbulent coefficient and all five hydrometeor classes) use forward time differencing and the MPDATA for advection. Dynamic variables, u, v and w, use a second-order accurate advection scheme and a leapfrog time integration (kinetic energy semi-conserving method). Short-wave (solar) and long-wave radiation as well as a subgrid-scale TKE turbulence scheme are also included in the model. Details of the model can be found in Tao and Simpson (1993) and Tao et al. (2003). 2.2 Microphysics (Bin Model) The formulation of the explicit spectral-bin microphysical processes is based on solving stochastic kinetic equations for the size distribution functions of water droplets (cloud droplets and raindrops), and six types of ice particles: pristine ice crystals (columnar and plate-like), snow (dendrites and aggregates), graupel and frozen drops/hail. Each type is described by a special size distribution function containing 33 categories (bin

Tao, Wei-Kuo [NASA/GSFC] [NASA/GSFC

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

The Magellan Final Report on Cloud Computing  

SciTech Connect

The goal of Magellan, a project funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), was to investigate the potential role of cloud computing in addressing the computing needs for the DOE Office of Science (SC), particularly related to serving the needs of mid- range computing and future data-intensive computing workloads. A set of research questions was formed to probe various aspects of cloud computing from performance, usability, and cost. To address these questions, a distributed testbed infrastructure was deployed at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The testbed was designed to be flexible and capable enough to explore a variety of computing models and hardware design points in order to understand the impact for various scientific applications. During the project, the testbed also served as a valuable resource to application scientists. Applications from a diverse set of projects such as MG-RAST (a metagenomics analysis server), the Joint Genome Institute, the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider, and the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO), were used by the Magellan project for benchmarking within the cloud, but the project teams were also able to accomplish important production science utilizing the Magellan cloud resources.

,; Coghlan, Susan; Yelick, Katherine

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainmentmixing processes in clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds Chunsong Lu, 1,2 Yangang Liu, 2 Shengjie Niu, 1 Steven Krueger, 3 and Timothy Wagner 4 Received 11 July 2012; revised 29 November 2012; accepted 5 December 2012; published 16 January 2013. [1] Different turbulent entrainment-mixing processes (e.g., homogeneous and inhomogeneous) occur in clouds; accurate representation of these processes is critical for improving cloud-related parameterizations in large-scale models, but poorly understood and quantified. Using in situ aircraft observations over the U. S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site during the March 2000 Cloud Intensive Observation Period and numerical simulations with the Explicit Mixing Parcel Model (EMPM), here we explore the potential of using degree of homogeneous mixing

344

A Catalog of HI Clouds in the Large Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 21 cm neutral hydrogen interferometric survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) combined with the Parkes multi-beam HI single-dish survey clearly shows that the HI gas is distributed in the form of clumps or clouds. The HI clouds and clumps have been identified using a thresholding method with three separate brightness temperature thresholds ($T_b$). Each catalog of HI cloud candidates shows a power law relationship between the sizes and the velocity dispersions of the clouds roughly following the Larson Law scaling $\\sigma_v \\propto R^{0.5}$, with steeper indices associated with dynamically hot regions. The clouds in each catalog have roughly constant virial parameters as a function mass suggesting that that the clouds are all in roughly the same dynamical state, but the values of the virial parameter are significantly larger than unity showing that turbulent motions dominate gravity in these clouds. The mass distribution of the clouds is a power law with differential indices between -1.6 and -2.0 for the three catalogs. In contrast, the distribution of mean surface densities is a log-normal distribution.

S. Kim; E. Rosolowsky; Y. Lee; Y. Kim; Y. C. Jung; M. A. Dopita; B. G. Elmegreen; K. C. Freeman; R. J. Sault; M. J. Kesteven; D. McConnell; Y. -H. Chu

2007-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

345

Study of Mechanisms of Aerosol Indirect Effects on Glaciated Clouds: Progress during the Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

This 3-year project has studied how aerosol pollution influences glaciated clouds. The tool applied has been an 'aerosol-cloud model'. It is a type of Cloud-System Resolving Model (CSRM) modified to include 2-moment bulk microphysics and 7 aerosol species, as described by Phillips et al. (2009, 2013). The study has been done by, first, improving the model and then performing sensitivity studies with validated simulations of a couple of observed cases from ARM. These are namely the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) over the tropical west Pacific and the Cloud and Land Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) over Oklahoma. During the project, sensitivity tests with the model showed that in continental clouds, extra liquid aerosols (soluble aerosol material) from pollution inhibited warm rain processes for precipitation production. This promoted homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets and aerosols. Mass and number concentrations of cloud-ice particles were boosted. The mean sizes of cloud-ice particles were reduced by the pollution. Hence, the lifetime of glaciated clouds, especially ice-only clouds, was augmented due to inhibition of sedimentation and ice-ice aggregation. Latent heat released from extra homogeneous freezing invigorated convective updrafts, and raised their maximum cloud-tops, when aerosol pollution was included. In the particular cases simulated in the project, the aerosol indirect effect of glaciated clouds was twice than of (warm) water clouds. This was because glaciated clouds are higher in the troposphere than water clouds and have the first interaction with incoming solar radiation. Ice-only clouds caused solar cooling by becoming more extensive as a result of aerosol pollution. This 'lifetime indirect effect' of ice-only clouds was due to higher numbers of homogeneously nucleated ice crystals causing a reduction in their mean size, slowing the ice-crystal process of snow production and slowing sedimentation. In addition to the known indirect effects (glaciation, riming and thermodynamic), new indirect effects were discovered and quantified due to responses of sedimentation, aggregation and coalescence in glaciated clouds to changing aerosol conditions. In summary, the change in horizontal extent of the glaciated clouds ('lifetime indirect effects'), especially of ice-only clouds, was seen to be of higher importance in regulating aerosol indirect effects than changes in cloud properties ('cloud albedo indirect effects').

Phillips, Vaughan T. J.

2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

346

ARM - Field Campaign - Ground-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsGround-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP govCampaignsGround-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Ground-based Cloud Tomography Experiment at SGP 2009.05.26 - 2009.07.17 Lead Scientist : Dong Huang For data sets, see below. Description Knowledge of 3D cloud properties is pressingly needed in many research fields. One of the problems encountered when trying to represent 3D cloud fields in numerical models is that the existing techniques cannot provide necessary observations at the required spatial scale and resolution. We tested a new promising technique for measuring 3D cloud microphysical structure, called cloud microwave tomography, at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site for one month in late April 2009. Five microwave scanning

347

ARM - PI Product - Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for ProductsCloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP 2002.01.01 - 2012.02.08 Site(s) TWP General Description A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote

348

Size of Cloud from Shadow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Size of Cloud from Shadow Size of Cloud from Shadow Name: mike Status: other Grade: other Location: N/A Country: USA Date: Summer 2011 Question: I see a cloud and I see its shadow in a field - knowing high sun angles - is there a way of telling how far away the cloud is or how big? - I am thinking if the shadow is 30' wide and the sun is at 2:00 pm- ? Replies: Hi Mike, Try this, draw a small circle representing the Sun. Somewhere below this circle and maybe to the right, draw an oblong, make this oblong bigger than the circle. Now connect the leftmost edge of the circle with the leftmost edge of the oblong with a straight line. Do the same for the rightmost edges. The oblong now represent the shadow of a cloud on the ground, and the lines represent the rays of the sun passing along the edges of the cloud.

349

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

350

ARM - Measurement - Cloud droplet size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

droplet size droplet size ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud droplet size Linear size (e.g. radius or diameter) of a cloud particle Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. Field Campaign Instruments CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor MIRAI : JAMSTEC Research Vessel Mirai PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments SPEC-CPI : Stratton Park Engineering Company - Cloud particle imager

351

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight Cumulus Clouds and Reflected Sunlight from Landsat ETM+ G. Wen and L. Oreopoulos National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center University of Maryland Baltimore County Joint Center of Earth System Technology Greenbelt, Maryland R. F. Cahalan and S. C. Tsay National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Cumulus clouds attenuate solar radiation casting shows on the ground. Cumulus clouds can also enhance solar radiation in the clear region nearby. The enhancement of down-welling solar radiation has been observed at the ground level in the clear region near cumulus clouds (Mims and Frederick 1994). The additional diffuse radiation source from cumulus clouds makes the clear gaps appear to be

352

Applicability of the Willow Architecture for Cloud Management Zach Hill, Marty Humphrey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Grid computing can be applied to Cloud infrastructures. Our analysis is further refined by considering for Grid computing can be applied to Cloud infrastructures. Our analysis and discussion is further refined-Science Group, Department of Computer Science, University of Virginia Abstract. The differences between Grids

Humphrey, Marty

353

Laboratory simulations show diabatic heating drives cumulus-cloud evolution and entrainment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carried out for a cloud system in radiative-convective...here offer a powerful tool that can complement...Group I to the Fourth Assessment Report, IPCC , ed Solomon SD...the Perturbed Climate System , Laboratory cloud simulation: Capabilities...dome to collect air and steam bubbles, which are released...

Roddam Narasimha; Sourabh Suhas Diwan; Subrahmanyam Duvvuri; K. R. Sreenivas; G. S. Bhat

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

DISCOVERY OF THE PIGTAIL MOLECULAR CLOUD IN THE GALACTIC CENTER  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports the discovery of a helical molecular cloud in the central molecular zone (CMZ) of our Galaxy. This 'pigtail' molecular cloud appears at (l, b, V{sub LSR}) {approx_equal} (-0.{sup 0}7, + 0.{sup 0}0, - 70 to -30 km s{sup -1}), with a spatial size of {approx}20 Multiplication-Sign 20 pc{sup 2} and a mass of (2-6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }. This is the third helical gaseous nebula found in the Galactic center region to date. Line intensity ratios indicate that the pigtail molecular cloud has slightly higher temperature and/or density than the other normal clouds in the CMZ. We also found a high-velocity wing emission near the footpoint of this cloud. We propose a formation model of the pigtail molecular cloud. It might be associated with a magnetic tube that is twisted and coiled because of the interaction between clouds in the innermost x{sub 1} orbit and ones in the outermost x{sub 2} orbit.

Matsumura, Shinji; Oka, Tomoharu; Tanaka, Kunihiko [Institute of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8522 (Japan); Nagai, Makoto [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kamegai, Kazuhisa [Institute of Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Tetsuo [Joint ALMA Observatory, El Golf 40, Piso 18, Las Condes, Santiago (Chile)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Climate zones for maritime clouds  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we use a commercially available lidar ceilometer to investigate how the basic structure of marine boundary-layer clouds varies for four different marine climate regimes. We obtained most of the data used in this analysis from ship-based ceilometer measurements recorded during several different atmospheric and oceanographic field programs conducted in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. For comparison, we show the results obtained at a mid-latitude continental location and at an ice camp on the Arctic ice shelf. For each analyzed case, we use an extended time series to generate meaningful cloud base and cloud fraction statistics. The Vaisala CT 12K ceilometer uses a GaAs diode laser to produce short (150 ns), high-intensity pulses of infrared radiation (904 nm wavelength). The return signals from a large number of consecutive pulses are coherently summed to boost the signal-to-noise ratio. Each resulting 30-s profile of backscattered power (15-m resolution) is analyzed to detect cloud layers using a specified cloud detection limit. In addition to measurements of cloud base, the ceilometer can also provide information on cloud fraction using a time series of the {open_quotes}cloud{close_quotes} or {open_quotes} no cloud{close_quotes} status reported in the 30-s data.

White, A.B.; Ruffieux, D. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

TC_CLOUD_REGIME.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical cloud properties as a function of regime Regimes? Monsoon versus Break * Different synoptic vertical velocity profiles - Changes convective inhibition, corresponding...

357

Declarative Automated Cloud Resource Orchestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

orchestration · Cloud resource orchestration constraint optimization problems 4 Provider operational] · Orchestration procedures Transactions · Either commit or abort Distributed communication and optimization

Plotkin, Joshua B.

358

Cicada: Predictive Guarantees for Cloud Network Bandwidth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In cloud-computing systems, network-bandwidth guarantees have been shown to improve predictability of application performance and cost. Most previous work on cloud-bandwidth guarantees has assumed that cloud tenants know ...

LaCurts, Katrina

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Magellan: experiences from a Science Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. From Clusters To Clouds: xCAT 2 Is Out Of The Bag.Cost of Doing Science on the Cloud: The Montage Example. Incost of doing science on the cloud: the montage example. In

Ramakrishnan, Lavanya

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Electron-Cloud Build-Up: Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties In?uencing Electron Cloud Phenomena, Appl. Surf.Dissipation of the Electron Cloud, Proc. PAC03 (Portland,is no signi?cant electron-cloud under nominal operating

Furman, M.A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Renormalization-group approach to the Anderson model of dilute magnetic alloys. I. Static properties for the symmetric case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temperature-dependent impurity susceptibility for the symmetric Anderson model is calculated for all physically relevant values of its parameters U (the Coulomb correlation energy) and ? (the impurity-level width). It is shown that, when U>??, for temperatures Tmodel exhibits a local moment and that its susceptibility maps neatly onto that of the spin- Kondo model with an effective coupling given by ?Jeff=-8??U. Furthermore, this mapping is shown for remarkably large values of |?Jeff|. At very low temperatures (much smaller than the Kondo temperature) the local moment is frozen out, just as for the Kondo model, leading to a strong-coupling regime of constant susceptibility at zero termperature. The results also depict the formation of a local moment from the free orbital as T drops below U, a feature not present in the Kondo model. Finally, when U??? there is a direct transition from free-orbital regime for T?? to the strong-coupling regime for T??. The calculations were performed using the numerical renormalization group originally developed by Wilson for the Kondo problem. In addition to the actual numerical calculations, analytic results are presented. In particular, the effective Hamiltonians, i.e., fixed-point Hamiltonian plus relevant and marginal operators, are constructed for the free-orbital, local-moment, and strong-coupling regimes. Analytic formulas for the impurity susceptibility and free energy in all three regimes are developed. The impurity specfic heat in the strong-coupling regime is calculated.

H. R. Krishna-murthy; J. W. Wilkins; K. G. Wilson

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A TRUSTED STORAGE SYSTEM FOR THE CLOUD.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Data stored in third party storage systems like the cloud might not be secure since confidentiality and integrity of data are not guaranteed. Though cloud (more)

Karumanchi, Sushama

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Cometary Origin of the Zodiacal Cloud and Carbonaceous Micrometeorites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The zodiacal cloud is a thick circumsolar disk of small debris particles produced by asteroid collisions and comets. The relative proportion in which these two source populations contribute to the zodiacal cloud and the exact physical mechanism that generates the bulk of observed dust were unknown. Here we model the IRAS observations of thermal emission from asteroid and cometary particles to explain the origin of the zodiacal cloud. We find that >90% of the observed mid-infrared emission is produced by particles from the Jupiter-family comets (JFCs). We suggest that spontaneous disruptions of JFCs, rather than the usual cometary activity driven by sublimating volatiles, is the main mechanism that liberates cometary particles into the zodiacal cloud. Our results imply that JFC particles dominate the accretion rate of micrometeorites by Earth. Since their atmospheric entry speeds are typically low, many large JFC grains should survive frictional heating and land on the Earth's surface. This explains why most a...

Nesvorny, David; Levison, Harold F; Bottke, William F; Vokrouhlicky, David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cloud of strings for radiating black holes in Lovelock gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present exact spherically symmetric null dust solutions in the third order Lovelock gravity with a string cloud background in arbitrary $N$ dimensions,. This represents radiating black holes and generalizes the well known Vaidya solution to Lovelock gravity with a string cloud in the background. We also discuss the energy conditions and horizon structures, and explicitly bring out the effect of the string clouds on the horizon structure of black hole solutions for the higher dimensional general relativity and Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet theories. It turns out that the presence of the coupling constant of the Gauss-Bonnet terms and/or background string clouds completely changes the structure of the horizon and this may lead to a naked singularity. We recover known spherically symmetric radiating models as well as static black holes in the appropriate limits.

Sushant G. Ghosh; Sunil D. Maharaj

2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

365

HPPC EUROPAR August 31 Naples | Computer Architecture Group, Dept. Computer Science | 1 The Massively Parallel Computing Model GCA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HPPC ­ EUROPAR August 31 Naples | Computer Architecture Group, Dept. Computer Science | 1 Architecure Group #12;HPPC ­ EUROPAR August 31 Ischia | Computer Architecture Group, Dept. Computer Science Architecture Group, Dept. Computer Science | 3 Outline PART I: Global Cellular Automata (GCA) Cellular

Hoffmann, Rolf

366

Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;© Fraunhofer ISST Fraunhofer Innovation Cluster »Cloud Computing for Logistics« Budget 3 * 3 Mio© Fraunhofer ISST CLOUD COMPUTING APPLICATIONS FOR LOGISTICS Jakob Rehof Professor, Chair of Software Engineering, Technical University of Dortmund Director, Fraunhofer-ISST Dortmund and Berlin First

Rajamani, Sriram K.

367

REVISITING THE ROLE OF M31 IN THE DYNAMICAL HISTORY OF THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

We study the dynamics of the Magellanic Clouds in a model for the Local Group whose mass is constrained using the timing argument/two-body limit of the action principle. The goal is to evaluate the role of M31 in generating the high angular momentum orbit of the Clouds, a puzzle that has only been exacerbated by the latest Hubble Space Telescope proper motion measurements. We study the effects of varying the total Local Group mass, the relative mass of the Milky Way (MW) and M31, the proper motion of M31, and the proper motion of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) on this problem. Over a large part of this parameter space, we find that tides from M31 are insignificant. For a range of LMC proper motions approximately 3{sigma} higher than the mean and total Local Group mass >3.5 x 10{sup 12} M{sub sun}, M31 can provide a significant torque to the LMC orbit. However, if the LMC is bound to the MW, then M31 is found to have negligible effect on its motion, and the origin of the high angular momentum of the system remains a puzzle. Finally, we use the timing argument to calculate the total mass of the MW-LMC system based on the assumption that they are encountering each other for the first time, their previous perigalacticon being a Hubble time ago, obtaining M{sub MW} + M{sub LMC} = (8.7 {+-} 0.8) x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}.

Kallivayalil, Nitya; Sanderson, Robyn [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 70 Vassar Street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Besla, Gurtina; Alcock, Charles [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)], E-mail: nitya@mit.edu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead...

Dedes, L; Kalberla, P W M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

An enigmatic HI cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discovery of an HI cloud with peculiar properties at equatorial coordinates (J2000) ra=07h49m, dec=04d30m is presented. The HI object was detected at 21cm using the 300-m NAIC Arecibo telescope. Subsequent follow-up high-resolution observations with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) telescope at L-Band revealed more details about its morphology. The most intriguing aspect of the object is the clear velocity gradient of 1 km/s, which is present in the data, an indication of either rotation or expansion. The gas appears to be cold, and its morphology is somewhat elliptical with clumpy substructure. Assuming disk rotation, the dynamical mass could be determined as a function of distance.Depending on the exact nature of the velocity gradient in the HI cloud, we can reach some preliminary conclusions about the nature of the object. Expansion would imply association with a circumstellar envelope of an evolved AGB star, while in the case of rotation, a comparison between the visible and the dynamical mass can lead to some preliminary conclusions. A common feature of those conclusions is the presence of a gravitational potential well, which is required to account for the rotation of the trapped HI gas. This potential well could be associated with a dark galaxy or some other exotic object.

L. Dedes; C. Dedes; P. W. M Kalberla

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

370

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

371

TWP Island Cloud Trail Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies Pacific Island Cloud Trail Studies W. M. Porch Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico S. Winiecki University of Chicago Chicago, Illinois Introduction Images and surface temperature measurements from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Multi- spectral Thermal Imaging (MTI) satellite are combined with geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS) images during 2000 and 2001 to better understand cloud trail formation characteristics from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site. Figure 1 shows a comparison on two consecutive days in December 2000. The day for which a cloud trail developed was more moist and cooler at the altitude the cloud developed (about 600 m) and there was very little

372

ARM - Measurement - Cloud condensation nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condensation nuclei condensation nuclei ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud condensation nuclei Small particles (typically 0.0002 mm, or 1/100 th the size of a cloud droplet) about which cloud droplets coalesce. Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System CCN : Cloud Condensation Nuclei Particle Counter Field Campaign Instruments AOS : Aerosol Observing System

373

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

374

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

Protat, Alain

375

IONIZATION IN ATMOSPHERES OF BROWN DWARFS AND EXTRASOLAR PLANETS. III. BREAKDOWN CONDITIONS FOR MINERAL CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Electric discharges were detected directly in the cloudy atmospheres of Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, are debatable for Venus, and indirectly inferred for Neptune and Uranus in our solar system. Sprites (and other types of transient luminous events) have been detected only on Earth, and are theoretically predicted for Jupiter, Saturn, and Venus. Cloud formation is a common phenomenon in ultra-cool atmospheres such as in brown dwarf and extrasolar planetary atmospheres. Cloud particles can be expected to carry considerable charges which may trigger discharge events via small-scale processes between individual cloud particles (intra-cloud discharges) or large-scale processes between clouds (inter-cloud discharges). We investigate electrostatic breakdown characteristics, like critical field strengths and critical charge densities per surface, to demonstrate under which conditions mineral clouds undergo electric discharge events which may trigger or be responsible for sporadic X-ray emission. We apply results from our kinetic dust cloud formation model that is part of the DRIFT-PHOENIX model atmosphere simulations. We present a first investigation of the dependence of the breakdown conditions in brown dwarf and giant gas exoplanets on the local gas-phase chemistry, the effective temperature, and primordial gas-phase metallicity. Our results suggest that different intra-cloud discharge processes dominate at different heights inside mineral clouds: local coronal (point discharges) and small-scale sparks at the bottom region of the cloud where the gas density is high, and flow discharges and large-scale sparks near, and maybe above, the cloud top. The comparison of the thermal degree of ionization and the number density of cloud particles allows us to suggest the efficiency with which discharges will occur in planetary atmospheres.

Helling, Ch.; Jardine, M.; Stark, C. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Diver, D., E-mail: ch@leap2010.eu [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

376

Zenith Radiance Retrieval of Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

retrievals of cloud properties retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Preliminary retrievals of cloud properties from the AMF/COPS campaign Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC Christine Chiu, UMBC/JCET Alexander Marshak, GSFC Yuri Knyazikhin, Boston University Warren Wiscombe, GSFC The cloud optical properties of interest are: The cloud optical properties of interest are: * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff * Cloud optical depth τ - the great unknown * Radiative cloud fraction * Cloud effective drop size, r eff τ = 3 2 LWP r eff r eff in μm, LWP in g/m 2 The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer (2NFOV) The 2-ch narrow-field-of-view radiometer

377

Microsoft Word - arm.modeling.nugget11.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameterization and Modeling Working Group Parameterization and Modeling Working Group Accomplishments Development of the means for climate and cloud resolving models to simulate the conditions at all ARM sites A challenge for ARM has been relating data taken at a few points to global climate model simulations. The program has taken the lead in the development of "forcing" datasets that permit single-column versions of the climate models (Figure 1) and cloud resolving models (Figure 2) to simulate the weather that occurs at the ARM sites and thus permit direct comparison of model simulations to observations. A "forcing" dataset quantifies the impact of the regions adjacent to the ARM site on conditions at the ARM site. Previous work had produced "forcing datasets" only for Intensive Observing Periods at

378

The magnetic cloud of January 10, 1997  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The magnetic cloud of January 1011, 1997, was observed by SOHO and WIND spacecraft ahead of the Earth's magnetosphere. Plasma parameters registered by their instrumentation show remarkable differences in the solar wind speed, proton density and tempersture that is difficult to explain taking into account simply their distance. The interplanetary magnetic field (measured on board WIND only), would be fitted nearly equivalently by both cylindrical and spherical models. In order to explain observed divergences we speculate on possible model of a poloidal spheromak that develops into a toroid during its propagation.

A. Geranios; S. Fischer; M. Vandas; G. Zastenker

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Cloud feedback studies with a physics grid  

SciTech Connect

During this project the investigators implemented a fully parallel version of dual-grid approach in main frame code ICON, implemented a fully conservative first-order interpolation scheme for horizontal remapping, integrated UCLA-LES micro-scale model into ICON to run parallely in selected columns, and did cloud feedback studies on aqua-planet setup to evaluate the classical parameterization on a small domain. The micro-scale model may be run in parallel with the classical parameterization, or it may be run on a "physics grid" independent of the dynamics grid.

Dipankar, Anurag [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg; Stevens, Bjorn [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Hamburg

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

380

BNL | Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment Convective processes play a critical role in the Earth's energy balance through the redistribution of heat and moisture in the atmosphere and their link to the hydrological cycle. Accurate representation of convective processes in numerical models is vital towards improving current and future simulations of Earths climate system. Despite improvements in computing power, current operational weather and global climate models are unable to resolve the natural temporal and spatial scales important to convective processes and therefore must turn to parameterization schemes to represent these processes. In turn, parameterization schemes in cloud-resolving models need to be evaluated for their generality and application to a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

382

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING INFRASTRUCTURE AND OPERATIONS PROGRAM A six-week in-depth program in the architectures, infrastructure, and operations of Cloud Computing DePaul University's Cloud Computing Infrastructure and Operations Program provides specialized knowledge in Cloud infrastructure with emphasis

Schaefer, Marcus

383

Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© Locus Technologies 2014 Lost in the Cloud? There's an App for That David McConaughy Locus Technologies 1997-2014 4 #12;Cloud-based EMIS 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 5 #12; Cloud Synch data back to EIM cloud for analysis 2014© Locus Technologies 1997-2014 9 #12;Mobile Apps for Data

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

384

7, 1711717146, 2007 Dependence of cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 7, 17117­17146, 2007 Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud height on temperature T. Wagner et a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Dependence of cloud fraction and cloud top height on surface temperature derived from spectrally resolved UV/vis satellite observations T

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Cloud Computing An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Computing ­ An enterprise perspective Raghavan Subramanian Infosys Technologies Limited #12;2Infosys Confidential Overview of cloud computing? Cloud computing* Computing in which dynamically scalable of cloud computing 1. On-demand self-service 2. Ubiquitous network access 3. Location independent resource

Rajamani, Sriram K.

386

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: ? Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. ? Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. ? Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

387

Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming Alexandru Iosup Pierre (Vrije U.). Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming (Rain for the Thirsty) #12;Cloud Futures Workshop 2010 ­ Cloud Computing Support for Massively Social Gaming 2 Intermezzo: Tips on how

Iosup, Alexandru

388

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD, DRIZZLE, AND TURBULENCE OBSERVATIONS IN MARINE STRATOCUMULUS CLOUDS IN THE AZORES Jasmine at the Azores provided a unique, long-term record (May 2009 to December 2010) of cloud observations in a regime dominated by low-level stratiform clouds. First, a comprehensive cloud classification scheme that utilizes

389

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

Zhong, Lin

390

Numerical simulation of frontal rainbands over Ukraine under different mechanisms of cloud and precipitation formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-dimension diagnostic and prognostic models were used for numerical simulation of cloud system accompanied the passage of a cyclone over Ukraine. The response of time and space distribution of cloud particle spectra integral features and precipitation on changing of cloud and precipitation formation mechanisms (condensation sublimation collection by large drop and ice particles for droplets etc) was investigated. The nested and stretched grid was used to simulate the narrow band of heavy rainfall that frequently appeared ahead a cold front. The numerical experiments for different values of cloud condensation nucleus concentration were carried out for the above rainband. Comparison between spectra for different conditions was performed.

A. M. Pirnach; S. V. Krakovskaia; A. V. Belokobylski

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions  

SciTech Connect

The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

392

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Title Using Surface Remote Sensors to Derive Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Forcing: An Example from M-PACE Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors de Boer, Gijs, William D. Collins, Surabi Menon, and Charles N. Long Journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Volume 11 Start Page 11937 Pagination 11937-11949 Abstract Measurements from ground-based cloud radar, high spectral resolution lidar and microwave radiometer are used in conjunction with a column version of the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model (RRTMG) and radiosonde measurements to derive the surface radiative properties under mixed-phase cloud conditions. These clouds were observed during the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mixed-Phase Arctic Clouds Experiment (M-PACE) between September and November of 2004. In total, sixteen half hour time periods are reviewed due to their coincidence with radiosonde launches. Cloud liquid (ice) water paths are found to range between 11.0-366.4 (0.5-114.1) gm-2, and cloud physical thicknesses fall between 286-2075 m. Combined with temperature and hydrometeor size estimates, this information is used to calculate surface radiative flux densities using RRTMG, which are demonstrated to generally agree with measured flux densities from surface-based radiometric instrumentation. Errors in longwave flux density estimates are found to be largest for thin clouds, while shortwave flux density errors are generally largest for thicker clouds. A sensitivity study is performed to understand the impact of retrieval assumptions and uncertainties on derived surface radiation estimates. Cloud radiative forcing is calculated for all profiles, illustrating longwave dominance during this time of year, with net cloud forcing generally between 50 and 90 Wm-2.

393

Constraining cloud lifetime effects of aerosols using A-Train satellite observations  

SciTech Connect

Aerosol indirect effects have remained the largest uncertainty in estimates of the radiative forcing of past and future climate change. Observational constraints on cloud lifetime effects are particularly challenging since it is difficult to separate aerosol effects from meteorological influences. Here we use three global climate models, including a multi-scale aerosol-climate model PNNL-MMF, to show that the dependence of the probability of precipitation on aerosol loading, termed the precipitation frequency susceptibility (S{sub pop}), is a good measure of the liquid water path response to aerosol perturbation ({lambda}), as both Spop and {lambda} strongly depend on the magnitude of autoconversion, a model representation of precipitation formation via collisions among cloud droplets. This provides a method to use satellite observations to constrain cloud lifetime effects in global climate models. S{sub pop} in marine clouds estimated from CloudSat, MODIS and AMSR-E observations is substantially lower than that from global climate models and suggests a liquid water path increase of less than 5% from doubled cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. This implies a substantially smaller impact on shortwave cloud radiative forcing (SWCF) over ocean due to aerosol indirect effects than simulated by current global climate models (a reduction by one-third for one of the conventional aerosol-climate models). Further work is needed to quantify the uncertainties in satellite-derived estimates of S{sub pop} and to examine S{sub pop} in high-resolution models.

Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ecuyer, Tristan L.; Zhang, Kai; Morrison, H.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Easter, Richard C.; Marchand, Roger; Chand, Duli; Qian, Yun; Penner, Joyce E.

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Testing a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Cloud Condensation Nuclei a Cloud Condensation Nuclei Remote Sensing Method S. J. Ghan Climate Dynamics Group Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Under certain conditions vertical profiles of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectra can be retrieved from ground-based measurements. Surface measurements of the CCN spectrum are scaled by the ratio of the backscatter (or extinction) profile to the surface backscatter (or extinction). The backscatter (or extinction) profile is measured by Raman lidar, and is corrected to dry conditions using the vertical profile of relative humidity (also measured by Raman Lidar) and surface measurements of the dependence of backscatter (or extinction) on relative humidity. This method should be accurate up to

395

Millimeter Wave Cloud Radar (MMCR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) systems probe the extent and composition of clouds at millimeter wavelengths. The MMCR is a zenith-pointing radar that operates at a frequency of 35 GHz. The main purpose of this radar is to determine cloud boundaries (e.g., cloud bottoms and tops). This radar will also report radar reflectivity (dBZ) of the atmosphere up to 20 km. The radar possesses a doppler capability that will allow the measurement of cloud constituent vertical velocities.

KB Widener; K Johnson

2005-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Domain walls with non-Abelian clouds  

SciTech Connect

Domain walls in U(N) gauge theories, coupled to Higgs scalar fields with degenerate masses, are shown to possess normalizable non-Abelian Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes, which we call non-Abelian clouds. We construct the moduli space metric and its Kaehler potential of the effective field theory on the domain walls by focusing on two models: a U(1) gauge theory with several charged Higgs fields, and a U(N) gauge theory with 2N Higgs fields in the fundamental representation. We find that non-Abelian clouds spread between two domain walls and that their rotation induces a long-range repulsive force, in contrast to a U(1) mode in models with fully nondegenerate masses which gives a short-range force. We also construct a bound state of dyonic domain walls by introducing the imaginary part of the Higgs masses. In the latter model we find that when all walls coincide, SU(N){sub L}xSU(N){sub R}xU(1) symmetry is broken down to SU(N){sub V}, and U(N){sub A} NG modes and the same number of quasi-NG modes are localized on the wall. When n walls separate, off-diagonal elements of U(n) NG modes have wave functions spreading between two separated walls (non-Abelian clouds), whereas some quasi-NG modes turn to NG bosons as a result of further symmetry breaking U(n){sub V}{yields}U(1){sub V}{sup n}. In the case of 4+1-dimensional bulk, we can dualize the effective theory to the supersymmetric Freedman-Townsend model of non-Abelian 2-form fields.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Centre & IT Equipment Energy Use. Proc. Digital Power...2007. pp. 1323. ACM, New York. [7] Energy Star, http://www...pp. 164177. ACM, New York. [32] Pratt, I...Vol. 53 No. 7, 2010 Energy-Efficient Cloud Computing......

Andreas Berl; Erol Gelenbe; Marco Di Girolamo; Giovanni Giuliani; Hermann De Meer; Minh Quan Dang; Kostas Pentikousis

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

COREGISTRATION OF DSM AND 3D POINT CLOUDS ACQUIRED BY A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COREGISTRATION OF DSM AND 3D POINT CLOUDS ACQUIRED BY A MOBILE MAPPING SYSTEM Corregistro do DSM e Clouds; DSM. 1. INTRODUCTION The production of realistic 3D map databases is a matter of increasing) presented in Figure 1. Figure 1 ­ (Left) Digital Surface Model (DSM) obtained by correlation between aerial

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

399

TRACKING TROPICAL CLOUD SYSTEMS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF SIMULATIONS BY THE WEATHER RESEARCH AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACKING TROPICAL CLOUD SYSTEMS FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF SIMULATIONS BY THE WEATHER RESEARCH using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, J. Geophys. Res., 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using

400

Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions European temperature extremes in CMIP5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions European temperature extremes in CMIP5 extremes in CMIP5 EUCLIPSE ­ May 2012 ­ Paris #12;Introduction Large-scale circulation Clouds Conclusions Introduction Objectives European temperature extremes: understand model biases & uncertainties under future

Ribes, Aurélien

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Impossibility of secure cloud quantum computing for classical client  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first generation quantum computer will be implemented in the cloud style, since only few groups will be able to access such an expensive and high-maintenance machine. How the privacy of the client can be protected in such a cloud quantum computing? It was theoretically shown [A. Broadbent, J. F. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposium on Foundation of Computer Science, 517 (2009)], and experimentally demonstrated [S. Barz, E. Kashefi, A. Broadbent, J. F. Fitzsimons, A. Zeilinger, and P. Walther, Science {\\bf335}, 303 (2012)] that a client who can generate randomly-rotated single qubit states can delegate her quantum computing to a remote quantum server without leaking any privacy. The generation of a single qubit state is not too much burden for the client, and therefore we can say that "almost classical client" can enjoy the secure cloud quantum computing. However, isn't is possible to realize a secure cloud quantum computing for a client who is completely free from any quantum technology? Here we show that perfectly-secure cloud quantum computing is impossible for a completely classical client unless classical computing can simulate quantum computing, or a breakthrough is brought in classical cryptography.

Tomoyuki Morimae; Takeshi Koshiba

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Toward a more physical representation of precipitation scavenging in global chemistry models: cloud overlap and ice physics and their impact on tropospheric ozone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more of a test of model climatology. In all cases, the HNO 3results to a gridded air- craft climatology is the issue of

Neu, J. L; Prather, M. J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Impact of Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud Properties Ice Crystal Roughness on Satellite Retrieved Cloud Properties P. Minnis 1 , P. W. Heck 2 , R. F. Arduini 3 , R. Palikonda 3 , J. K. Ayers 3 , M. M. Khaiyer 3 , P. Yang 4 , Y. Xie 4 3 Science Systems & Applications, Inc. Hampton, VA 1 NASA Langley Research Center Hampton, VA Current Cirrus Models Inadequate Cirrus cloud optical depths τ (heights z e ) are often over (under) estimated when derived from solar reflectances. In situ data suggest smaller asymmetry factors, g, than used in most retrieval models. Multi-angle measurements point to smoother phase functions than for solid, smooth xtals. Calculations show that solid crystals with roughened facets or embedded bubbles --both observed in real cirrus particles-- yield smoother phase functions & smaller g

404

The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Las Vegas, Nevada Introduction We have used a single-column model (SCM) to examine the sensitivity of fundamental quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameterizations of clouds and cloud microphysics. When an SCM, which consists of one isolated column of a global atmospheric model, is forced with observational estimates of horizontal advection terms, the parameterizations within the SCM produce time-dependent fields which can be

405

Magnetism Group  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of the Institute of Physics and the Physical Society has announced the establishment of a Magnetism Group. The aim of the new Group is to further interest in ... Group. The aim of the new Group is to further interest in magnetism by holding regular discussion meetings and in other ways. It is intended that these ...

1965-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

406

The Dependence of Cirrus Cloud-Property Retrievals on Size-Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Dependence of Cirrus Cloud-Property Retrievals on Size-Distribution The Dependence of Cirrus Cloud-Property Retrievals on Size-Distribution Shape d'Entremont, Robert Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mitchell, David Desert Research Institute Category: Cloud Properties Our project has focused on using satellite- and ground-based passive thermal infrared radiance observations to retrieve cirrus cloud properties, most importantly ice water path (IWP), effective particle size (Deff), and visible extinction optical thickness (tau). During this past year we began comparing our cirrus retrieval results with aircraft observations at the ARM CART site, and we are participating in a summary intercomparison study with other retrieval algorithms as a member of the high-clouds working group. Our passive-infrared retrieval scheme, based on different wavelength

407

Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report  

SciTech Connect

Clouds represent a critical component of the Earths atmospheric energy balance as a result of their interactions with solar and terrestrial radiation and a redistribution of heat through convective processes and latent heating. Despite their importance, clouds and the processes that control their development, evolution and lifecycle remain poorly understood. Consequently, the simulation of clouds and their associated feedbacks is a primary source of inter-model differences in equilibrium climate sensitivity. An important step in improving the representation of cloud process simulations is an improved high-resolution observational data set of the cloud systems including their time evolution. The first order quantity needed to understand the important role of clouds is the height of cloud occurrence and how it changes as a function of time. To this end, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities (ACRF) suite of instrumentation has been developed to make the observations required to improve the representation of cloud systems in atmospheric models.

M Jensen; K Johnson; JH Mather

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

408

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Networking the Cloud: Enabling Enterprise Computing and Storage Abstract: Cloud computing has been changing how enterprises run and manage their IT systems. Cloud computing platforms provide introduction on Cloud Computing. We propose a Virtual Cloud Pool abstraction to logically unify cloud

409

ISDAC Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Modeling Modeling of aerosol effects on Arctic stratiform clouds: Preliminary results from the ISDAC case study (poster 13J) Mikhail Ovchinnikov, Steve Ghan, Jiwen Fan, Xiaohong Liu (PNNL), Alexei Korolev, Peter Liu (Env. Canada) Shaocheng Xie (LLNL), Hugh Morrison (NCAR), ISDAC PI's, and members of the CMWG 2 Indirect Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign Science questions: How do properties of the arctic aerosol during April differ from those measured during the MPACE in October? To what extent do the different properties of the arctic aerosol during April produce differences in the microphysical and macrophysical properties of clouds and the surface energy balance? To what extent can cloud models and the cloud parameterizations used in climate models simulate the sensitivity of arctic clouds and

410

The Temperature of Interstellar Clouds from Turbulent Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To evaluate the effect of turbulent heating in the thermal balance of interstellar clouds, we develop an extension of the log-Poisson intermittency model to supersonic turbulence. The model depends on a parameter, d, interpreted as the dimension of the most dissipative structures. By comparing the model with the probability distribution of the turbulent dissipation rate in a simulation of supersonic and super-Alfvenic turbulence, we find a best-fit value of d=1.64. We apply this intermittency model to the computation of the mass-weighted probability distribution of the gas temperature of molecular clouds, high-mass star-forming cores, and cold diffuse HI clouds. Our main results are: i) The mean gas temperature in molecular clouds can be explained as the effect of turbulent heating alone, while cosmic ray heating may dominate only in regions where the turbulent heating is low; ii) The mean gas temperature in high-mass star-forming cores with typical FWHM of ~6 km/s (corresponding to a 1D rms velocity of 2.5 km/s) may be completely controlled by turbulent heating, which predicts a mean value of approximately 36 K, two to three times larger than the mean gas temperature in the absence of turbulent heating; iii) The intermittency of the turbulent heating can generate enough hot regions in cold diffuse HI clouds to explain the observed CH+ abundance, if the rms velocity on a scale of 1 pc is at least 3 km/s, in agreement with previous results based on incompressible turbulence. Because of its importance in the thermal balance of molecular clouds and high-mass star-forming cores, the process of turbulent heating may be central in setting the characteristic stellar mass and in regulating molecular chemical reactions.

Liubin Pan; Paolo Padoan

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Validation of MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using MODIS-Retrieved Cloud Fractions Using Whole Sky Imager Measurements at the Three ARM Sites Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Given the importance of clouds in modulating the surface energy budget, it is critical to obtain accurate estimates of their fractional amount in the atmospheric column for use in modeling studies. Satellite remote sensing of cloud properties such as cloud amount has the advantage of providing global coverage on a regular basis. Ground-based surveys of cloud fraction offer a practical database for use in determining the accuracy of these remotely sensed estimates of cloud fraction on a regional scale.

412

Phenomenological implications of the nucleon's meson cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long-distance structure of the interacting nucleon receives important contributions from its couplings to light hadronic degrees of freedom -- a light meson cloud -- while an analogous nonperturbative mechanism is expected to generate an intrinsic charm (IC) component to the proton wavefunction. We investigate both possibilities, keeping for the former a special eye to improving the theoretical understanding of the pion-nucleon vertex in light of proposed measurements. Regarding the latter possibility of IC, we highlight recent results obtained by a global QCD analysis of the light-front model proposed in Ref. [1].

T. J. Hobbs

2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - air parcel model Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences ; Environmental Sciences and Ecology 11 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study Summary: to impact cloud...

414

Group X  

SciTech Connect

This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

Fields, Susannah

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

415

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

416

Contributions to the 3D city modeling : 3D polyhedral building model reconstruction from aerial images and 3D facade modeling from terrestrial 3D point cloud and images.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this work is to develop research on 3D building modeling. In particular, the research in aerial-based 3D building reconstruction is a topic (more)

Hammoudi, Karim

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Marine cloud brightening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research and forecasting (WRF) model with a new treatment...Convergent branches of the local circulation, located...same numerical model (WRF) and similar model settings...different prescribed vertical wind speeds of 0.2, 0...carried out a number of wind-tunnel experiments that...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A test of the intergenerational conflict model in Indonesia shows no evidence of earlier menopause in female-dispersing groups  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Research articles 1001 70 60 202 A test of the intergenerational conflict model...from the Indonesia Family Life Survey, we test this model at multiple timescales: deep...model's assumptions. However, a more direct test of the Cant and Johnstone model would be...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Behavior of nanoparticle clouds around a magnetized microsphere under magnetic and flow fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When a micron-sized magnetizable particle is introduced into a suspension of nanosized magnetic particles, the nanoparticles accumulate around the microparticle and form thick anisotropic clouds extended in the direction of the applied magnetic field. This phenomenon promotes colloidal stabilization of bimodal magnetic suspensions and allows efficient magnetic separation of nanoparticles used in bioanalysis and water purification. In the present work, size and shape of nanoparticle clouds under the simultaneous action of an external uniform magnetic field and the flow have been studied in details. In experiments, dilute suspension of iron oxide nanoclusters (of a mean diameter of 60 nm) was pushed through a thin slit channel with the nickel microspheres (of a mean diameter of 50$\\mu$m) attached to the channel wall. The behavior of nanocluster clouds was observed in the steady state using an optical microscope. In the presence of strong enough flow, the size of the clouds monotonically decreases with increasing flow speed in both longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields. This is qualitatively explained by enhancement of hydrodynamic forces washing the nanoclusters away from the clouds. In the longitudinal field, the flow induces asymmetry of the front and the back clouds. To explain the flow and the field effects on the clouds, we have developed a simple model based on the balance of the stresses and particle fluxes on the cloud surface. This model, applied to the case of the magnetic field parallel to the flow, captures reasonably well the flow effect on the size and shape of the cloud and reveals that the only dimensionless parameter governing the cloud size is the ratio of hydrodynamic-to-magnetic forces - the Mason number. At strong magnetic interactions considered in the present work (dipolar coupling parameter $\\alpha \\geq 2$), the Brownian motion seems not to affect the cloud behavior.

Ccilia Magnet; Pavel Kuzhir; Georges Bossis; Alain Meunier; Sebastien Nave; Andrey Zubarev; Claire Lomenech; Victor Bashtovoi

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

420

DYNAMIC EVOLUTION OF SERVICE ARCHITECTURE IN MOBILE CLOUD APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.liu@napier.ac.uk Keywords: Service-Oriented Architecture, SaaS in Cloud, Dynamic Evolution, Algebraic Model, Pervasive Systems. Abstract: Although software services and service-oriented architecture have been researched. The Service Oriented Architecture and Web Service technique provide a systematic solution for building

Liu, Xiaodong

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cloud Processes: Insights over a Decade into the Links between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Resolving Models Satellite and radar data Field Campaigns Radar Simulators (image: C. McGee) Grid Diffuse Sensible heat flux Latent heat flux Latent heat flux Aerosol direct effects Incoming solar radiation Direct Diffuse Sensible heat flux SiB RAMS CO2 Fluxes: Photosynthesis Respiration CO2 Radiative

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

422

Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Posters Ship-Based Measurements of Cloud Optical Properties During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment A. B. White Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado C. W. Fairall National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX), conducted in June 1992, was designed with the broad goal of improving the dynamical, radiative, and microphysical models of marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds. This goal was pursued by combining measurements from a number of different platforms including aircraft,

423

Towards the correspondence between Q-clouds and sphalerons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-linear classical equations of motion may admit degenerate solutions at fixed charges. While the solutions with lower energies are classically stable, the ones with larger energies are unstable and refereed as Q-clouds. We consider a theory in which the homogeneous charged condensate is classically stable and argue that Q-clouds correspond to sphalerons between the stable Q-balls and the condensate. For the model with analytic solution, we present Arrhenius formula for the quantum production of Q-balls from the condensate at large temperatures.

Nugaev, Emin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A high-spectral-resolution radiative transfer model for simulating multi-layered clouds and aerosols in the infrared spectral region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fast and flexible model is developed to simulate the transfer of thermal infrared radiation at wavenumbers from 700 to 1300 cm?1 with a spectral resolution of 0.1 cm?1 for scattering/absorbing atmospheres. In a single run and at multiple user-...

Chenxi Wang; Ping Yang; Xu Liu

425

Mesoscale model cloud scheme assessment using satellite observations Jean-Pierre Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre Cammas, Patrick J. Mascart, and Jean-Pierre Pinty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the convective towers in the generation of synthetic BT maps. INDEX TERMS: 3329 Meteorology and Atmospheric-scale cloudiness in the model. A similar test conducted on the ice water and the liquid water paths confirms Dynamics: Mesoscale meteorology; 3360 Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics: Remote sensing; 3354

Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

426

Cloud Feedbacks on Climate: A Challenging Scientific Problem  

SciTech Connect

One reason it has been difficult to develop suitable social and economic policies to address global climate change is that projected global warming during the coming century has a large uncertainty range. The primary physical cause of this large uncertainty range is lack of understanding of the magnitude and even sign of cloud feedbacks on the climate system. If Earth's cloudiness responded to global warming by reflecting more solar radiation back to space or allowing more terrestrial radiation to be emitted to space, this would mitigate the warming produced by increased anthropogenic greenhouse gases. Contrastingly, a cloud response that reduced solar reflection or terrestrial emission would exacerbate anthropogenic greenhouse warming. It is likely that a mixture of responses will occur depending on cloud type and meteorological regime, and at present, we do not know what the net effect will be. This presentation will explain why cloud feedbacks have been a challenging scientific problem from the perspective of theory, modeling, and observations. Recent research results on observed multidecadal cloud-atmosphere-ocean variability over the Pacific Ocean will also be shown, along with suggestions for future research.

Norris, Joel (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego) [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UC San Diego

2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

427

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Broadband Longwave Radiative Cooling Rates in Inhomogeneous Stratocumulus Clouds M. Ovtchinnikov and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington D. B. Mechem and Y. L. Kogan Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma R. F. Cahalan National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico R. G. Ellingson and E. E.Takara Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida K. F. Evans University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction We are concerned with three-dimensional (3D) effects of longwave (LW) radiative transfer (RT) through inhomogeneous clouds. In cloud models, LW RT is typically calculated under the independent

428

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

429

ARM - Measurement - Cloud optical depth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

optical depth optical depth ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud optical depth Amount of light cloud droplets or ice particles prevent from passing through a column of atmosphere. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites Field Campaign Instruments EC-CONVAIR580-BULK : Environment Canada Convair 580 Bulk Parameters GOES : Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites

430

Biotic communities and brachiopod paleoecology of the Early Permian McCloud Formation, northern California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1986) Rex Alan Hanger, B. S. , Texas A&M University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas E. Yancey The McCloud Formation from the Eastern Klamath Mountains of northern California is a thick sequence of limestones of Early Permian (Wolfcampian... structure and composition in response to numerous environmental parameters but primarily the continual decrease of water depth in the area throughout the Early Permian. Brachiopods are the most abundant taxonomic group of the McCloud Formation fauna...

Hanger, Rex Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

ARM - Field Campaign - Spring Cloud IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP govCampaignsSpring Cloud IOP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Spring Cloud IOP 2000.03.01 - 2000.03.26 Lead Scientist : Gerald Mace For data sets, see below. Summary The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program conducted a Cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) in March 2000 that was the first-ever effort to document the 3-dimensional cloud field from observational data. Prior numerical studies of solar radiation propagation through the atmosphere in the presence of clouds have been limited by the necessity to use theoretical representations of clouds. Three-dimensional representations of actual clouds and their microphysical properties, such as the distribution of ice and water, had previously not been possible

432

Widget:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Widget Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Widget:LogoCloud Jump to: navigation, search This widget adds css selectors and javascript for the Template:LogoCloud. For...

433

Template:LogoCloud | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Would be nice if logos could be vertically centered within each line of the cloud TODO: Provide a way to toggle the mouse-over behavior Usage For rendering a cloud of logos....

434

IBM research division cloud computing initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud computing represents the latest phase in the evolution of Internet-based computing. In this paper, we describe the fundamental building blocks of cloud computing and the initiative undertaken by the IBM Research Division in this area, which includes ...

M. Naghshineh; R. Ratnaparkhi; D. Dillenberger; J. R. Doran; C. Dorai; L. Anderson; G. Pacifici; J. L. Snowdon; A. Azagury; M. VanderWiele; Y. Wolfsthal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud seeding as a technique for studying aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus hygroscopic aerosols were introduced into a solid marine stratocumulus cloud (200 m thick) by burning hygroscopic flares mounted on an aircraft. The cloud microphysical response in two parallel seeding plumes

Miami, University of

436

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire 1. What Cloud service will you be providing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Service Security Requirements Questionnaire Exhibit G 1. What Cloud service will you) as Low/Moderate/High? If so, which? 4. Has your cloud service been audited by any eternal agencies for security and quality control? If so, please provide evidence. 5. Has your cloud service been industry

437

HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agenda HPI Cloud Symposium ,Operating The Cloud` 25.09.2013, Hasso-Plattner-Institut, Auditorium Building 09:30h Registration 10:00h Opening Prof. Dr. Christoph Meinel, HPI Potsdam 10:30h Cloud-RAID: Eine Methode zur Bereitstellung zuverlässiger Speicherressourcen in ?ffentlichen Clouds Maxim Schnajkin, HPI

Weske, Mathias

438

The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Cloud Adoption Toolkit: Supporting Cloud Adoption Decisions in the Enterprise Ali Khajeh-Hosseini, David Greenwood, James W. Smith, Ian Sommerville Cloud Computing Co-laboratory, School of Computer Science University of St Andrews, UK {akh, dsg22, jws7, ifs}@cs.st-andrews.ac.uk Abstract Cloud computing

Sommerville, Ian

439

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud Verifier: Verifiable Auditing Service for IaaS Clouds Joshua Schiffman Security Architecture University Park, PA, USA yus138,hvijay,tjaeger@cse.psu.edu Abstract--Cloud computing has commoditized compute paradigm, its adoption has been stymied by cloud platform's lack of trans- parency, which leaves customers

Jaeger, Trent

440

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CLOUD COMPUTING AND INFORMATION POLICY 1 Cloud Computing and Information Policy: Computing in a Policy Cloud? Forthcoming in the Journal of Information Technology and Politics, 5(3). Paul T. Jaeger University of Maryland Jimmy Lin University of Maryland Justin M. Grimes University of Maryland #12;CLOUD

Lin, Jimmy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groups cloud modeling" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Editorial Cloud networking and communications Cloud computing is having an important impact attention has been devoted to system aspects of Cloud computing. More recently, however, the focus is shifting towards Cloud net- working and communications with evolutionary and revo- lutionary propositions

Boutaba, Raouf

442

The Smith Cloud: high-velocity accretion and dark-matter confinement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Smith Cloud is a massive system of metal-poor neutral and ionized gas M_gas >= 2x10^6 M_sun) that is presently moving at high velocity (V_GSR ~300 km s^-1) with respect to the Galaxy at a distance of 12 kpc from the Sun. The kinematics of the cloud's cometary tail indicates that the gas is in the process of accretion onto the Galaxy, as first discussed by Lockman et al. (2008). Here, we re-investigate the cloud's orbit by considering the possibility that the cloud is confined by a dark matter halo. This is required for the cloud to survive its passage through the Galactic corona. We consider three possible models for the dark matter halo (NFW, Einasto, Burkert) including the effects of tidal disruption and ram-pressure stripping during the cloud's infall onto and passage through the Galactic disk. For the NFW and Einasto dark-matter models, we are able to determine reasonable initial conditions for the Smith Cloud, although this is only marginally possible with the Burkert model. For all three models, the...

Nichols, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Recommendation for Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Instability in the ILC  

SciTech Connect

Electron cloud has been identified as one of the highest priority issues for the international Linear Collider (ILC) Damping Rings (DR). An electron cloud Working Group (WG) has evaluated the electron cloud effect and instability, and mitigation solutions for the electron cloud formation. Working group deliverables include recommendations for the baseline and alternate solutions to the electron cloud formation in various regions of the ILC Positron DR, which is presently assumed to be the 3.2 km design. Detailed studies of a range of mitigation options including coatings, clearing electrodes, grooves and novel concepts, were carried out over the previous several years by nearly 50 researchers, and the results of the studies form the basis for the recommendation. The recommendations are the result of the working group discussions held at numerous meetings and during a dedicated workshop. In addition, a number of items requiring further investigation were identified during the discussions at the Cornell meeting and studies will be carried out at CesrTA, a test accelerator dedicated to electron cloud studies, and other institutions.

Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Demma, T.; Guiducci, S.; Suetsugu, Y.; Shibata, K.; Ohmi, K.; Dugan, G.; Palmer, M.; Crittenden, J. A.; Harkay, K.; Boon, L.; Furman, M. A.; Yin Vallgren, A. C.

2011-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

The role of sodium bicarbonate in the nucleation of noctilucent clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the sublimation of H2O to bulk ice. A 1-dimensional model of sodium chemistry was then employed to show and particles; cloud physics and chemistry; middle atmosphere ± composition and chemistry) Introduction

Boyer, Edmond

445

Entering the Era of +30-Year Satellite Cloud Climatologies: A North American Case Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The emergence of satellite-based cloud records of climate length and quality hold tremendous potential for climate model development, climate monitoring, and studies on global water cycling and its subsequent energetics. This article examines the ...

Michael J. Foster; Andrew Heidinger

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Using A-Train Arctic cloud observations to constrain and improve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than predicted by climate models... * * 2007 Stroeve et al., 2007 OUTLINE: 1. New A-train satellite data 2. Summer 2007 anomalies 3. Beyond Summer 2007 New cloud and radiation...

447

Imagery Randomized Block Analysis (IRBA) Applied to the Verification of Cloud Edge Detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recently developed statistical method is described for evaluating the effectiveness of numerical models. This method is applied to the verification of the effectiveness of satellite imagery cloud edge detectors. Digital satellite data are ...

Frank P. Kelly; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Paul W. Mielke Jr.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Upper-Ocean Processes under the Stratus Cloud Deck in the Southeast Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual mean heat budget of the upper ocean beneath the stratocumulus/stratus cloud deck in the southeast Pacific is estimated using Simple Ocean Data Assimilation (SODA) and an eddy-resolving Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM). Both are ...

Yangxing Zheng; George N. Kiladis; Toshiaki Shinoda; E. Joseph Metzger; Harley E. Hurlburt; Jialin Lin; Benjamin S. Giese

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong A Thesis Submitted;Level Set Implementations on Unstructured Point Cloud by HO, Hon Pong This is to certify that I have implementations on unstructured point cloud 15 3.1 Level set initialization

Duncan, James S.

450

Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Pierangela Samarati*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Security: Issues and Concerns Authors Pierangela Samarati* Università degli Studi di Milano, Italy sabrina.decapitani@unimi.it Keywords cloud security confidentiality integrity availability secure data storage and processing Summary The cloud has emerged as a successful computing paradigm

Samarati, Pierangela

451

Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cloud Computing: Centralization and Data Sovereignty Primavera De Filippi, Smari McCarthy Abstract: Cloud computing can be defined as the provision of computing resources on-demand over and elasticity of costs, problems arise concerning the collection of personal information in the Cloud

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

452

Preliminary Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studies on the Variational Assimilation Studies on the Variational Assimilation of Cloud-Radiation Observations Using ARM Observations M. Janisková, J.-F. Mahfouf, and J.-J. Morcrette European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Shinfield Park, Reading Berskshire, United Kingdom Abstract A linearized cloud scheme and a radiation scheme including cloud effects have been developed at European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) to assimilate cloud properties in the framework of the four-dimensional variational (4D-Var) assimilation system. To investigate the potential of those schemes to modify the model temperature, humidity and cloud profiles and produce a better match to the observed radiation fluxes, one-dimensional variational (1D-Var) assimilation experiments have been carried out using data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM)

453

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? … An ISCCP Perspective  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the How Representative are the Cloud Regimes at the TWP Sites? - An ISCCP Perspective C. Jakob Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre Melbourne, Australia G. Tselioudis National Aeronautic and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York Introduction The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has established comprehensive cloud and radiation observatories in various locations across the globe with the aim of collecting measurements and developing models to better understand the processes that control solar and thermal infrared radiative transfer in clouds and at the surface. The locales of the individual ARM sites were chosen because they represent typical cloud regimes occurring in various climate regimes (Stokes and Schwartz

454

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Radiative Influences on Glaciation Time-Scales of Mixed-Phase Clouds Harrington, Jerry The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase stratus clouds are dominant in the Arctic during much of the year. These clouds typically have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Time scales for the complete glaciation of such clouds (the Bergeron process) are typically computed using the classical mass growth equations for crystals and liquid drops. However, mixed phase arctic stratus have significant infrared cooling and solar heating (during the warm season) rates that can affect the growth of water drops and ice crystals, and therefore the strength of the Bergeron process. To examine the influence of radiative heating and cooling on the Bergeron process, we incorporate a

455

Helix Nebula and CERN: A Symbiotic approach to exploiting commercial clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent paradigm shift toward cloud computing in IT, and general interest in "Big Data" in particular, have demonstrated that the computing requirements of HEP are no longer globally unique. Indeed, the CERN IT department and LHC experiments have already made significant R&D investments in delivering and exploiting cloud computing resources. While a number of technical evaluations of interesting commercial offerings from global IT enterprises have been performed by various physics labs, further technical, security, sociological, and legal issues need to be address before their large-scale adoption by the research community can be envisaged. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud is an initiative that explores these questions by joining the forces of three European research institutes (CERN, ESA and EMBL) with leading European commercial IT enterprises. The goals of Helix Nebula are to establish a cloud platform federating multiple commercial cloud providers, along with new business models, which can sustain ...

Barreiro Megino, Fernando Harald; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramn; van der Ster, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A solution for the management of multimedia sessions in hybrid clouds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cloud-based systems expanded considerably in recent years, as the demand for cheaper and easily scalable resources provisioning solutions increased. In this context, the deployment of multimedia services in the cloud, as a way to increase their usability and overcome their processing overhead, gained additional interest. Throughout this paper we present the design of a management system for multimedia services built on top of a hybrid cloud. This describes a model of service unit deployment automation as well as a services composition scheme adapted to the IaaS cloud architecture and resources pool. We propose a modular and flexible architecture to handle service composition, automated service deployment with execution flow management and scalable storage capabilities. Finally we analyse the benefits of using the service management system with a hybrid cloud back-end.

Cristina Dutu; Elena Apostol; Catalin Leordeanu; Valentin Cristea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect

Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds updrafts and downdraftswhich resemble airflow in a convection ovenand many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earths climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earths climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Automata groups  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-presentation. We also find the L-presentation for several other groups generated by three-state automata, and we describe the defining relations in the Grigorchuk groups G_w. In case when the sequence w is almost periodic these relations provide an L...

Muntyan, Yevgen

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Mesurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Analysis of Cloud Variability and Sampling Errors in Surface and Satellite Measurements Z. Li, M. C. Cribb, and F.-L. Chang Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland A. P. Trishchenko and Y. Luo Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Introduction Radiation measurements have been widely employed for evaluating cloud parameterization schemes and model simulation results. As the most comprehensive program aiming to improve cloud parameteri- zation schemes, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has an essential goal to make observations on the scale of a general circulation model gridbox, so as to define the physics underlying some of the important parameterizations in the general circulation models used in climate change

460

EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud 2: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas EA-1852: Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Project, Cloud County, Kansas Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to authorize the expenditure of federal funds by Cloud County Community College (CCCC) for a wind energy project. CCCC has installed three wind turbines and proposes to install a fourth turbine on their campus in Concordia, Kansas, for use in their wind energy training curriculum and to provide electricity for their campus. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time. Documents Available for Download January 10, 2011 EA-1852: Notice of Scoping Cloud County Community College Wind Energy Technology Project, Cloud

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461

A Comparison of Multiscale Variations of Decade-long Cloud Fractions from Six Different Platforms over the Southern Great Plains in the United States  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates 1997-2011 observationally based cloud fraction estimates from different platforms over the Southern Great Plains, United States, including three ground-based estimates and three satellite-based estimates at multiple temporal and spatial scales. They are: 1) the Active Remotely Sensed Clouds Locations (ARSCL); 2) the Total Sky Imager (TSI); 3) the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA); 4) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES); 5) the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP); and 6) Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Pathfinder Atmospheres Extended (PATMOS-x). A substantial disagreement is evident among different estimates, especially for ISCCP and ARSCL with statistically significant larger cloud fractions than the other estimates. For example, ISCCP and ARSCL mean cloud fractions in January are ~21% and 8% larger than the average from all the other estimates, respectively. Three estimates (ISCCP, ARSCL, GOES) exhibit an 8%-10% overall increase in the annually averaged cloud fractions from 1998 to 2009; the other three estimates (TSI, RFA, and PATMOS-x) exhibit no significant tendency of increase in this decade. Monthly cloud fractions from all the estimates exhibit Gaussian-like distributions while the distributions of daily cloud fractions are dependent on spatial scales. Investigations of high-resolution cloud fractions reveal that the differences stem from the inconsistent definitions of cloud fraction. Findings from this study suggest caution when using observationally based cloud fraction estimates for climate studies, highlighting that the consistency in defining cloud fraction between models and observations is crucial for studying the Earths climate.

Wu, Wei; Liu, Yangang; Jensen, Michael; Toto, Tami; Foster, Michael J.; Long, Charles N.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

462

Refinement, Validation and Application of Cloud-Radiation Parameterization in a GCM  

SciTech Connect

The research performed under this award was conducted along 3 related fronts: (1) Refinement and assessment of parameterizations of sub-grid scale radiative transport in GCMs. (2) Diagnostic studies that use ARM observations of clouds and convection in an effort to understand the effects of moist convection on its environment, including how convection influences clouds and radiation. This aspect focuses on developing and testing methodologies designed to use ARM data more effectively for use in atmospheric models, both at the cloud resolving model scale and the global climate model scale. (3) Use (1) and (2) in combination with both models and observations of varying complexity to study key radiation feedback Our work toward these objectives thus involved three corresponding efforts. First, novel diagnostic techniques were developed and applied to ARM observations to understand and characterize the effects of moist convection on the dynamical and thermodynamical environment in which it occurs. Second, an in house GCM radiative transfer algorithm (BUGSrad) was employed along with an optimal estimation cloud retrieval algorithm to evaluate the ability to reproduce cloudy-sky radiative flux observations. Assessments using a range of GCMs with various moist convective parameterizations to evaluate the fidelity with which the parameterizations reproduce key observable features of the environment were also started in the final year of this award. The third study area involved the study of cloud radiation feedbacks and we examined these in both cloud resolving and global climate models.

Dr. Graeme L. Stephens

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

Cloud Liquid Water Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pdry ­ Dry Power Term Pwet ­ Wet Power Term P=PdryPwet #12;Dry Power Term Energy is transferred, and temperature PdryC Ts-Ta pv x King et. al, 1981 · C ­ Calibration Constant · x - Calibration Constant · Ts the fact that this model does not pass through (0,0). va=kvx a #12;Calibration Equation Dry Term is: Pdry

Delene, David J.

464

An explanatory case study on cloud computing applications in the built environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fragmentation of practices is one of the key issues in the built environment. However, with advances in Information and Communication Technology (ICT), particularly cloud computing, the fragmentation of working practices can be potentially overcome. The technology could enhance communication and information flow in various stages along a project life cycle. Due to the increasing demands and the newly developed cloud computing applications, it is critical to review and identify the appropriate cloud computing applications in the built environment. A total of forty two cloud computing applications consisting of general cloud applications, Building Information Modelling (BIM), and project management cloud applications were selected and critically reviewed. A decision-making model was also developed to assist parties in selecting a suitable application. The explanatory case study has discovered numerous possible cloud computing applications in various disciplines, for example, Google Apps, Autodesk BIM 360, and Viewpoint are the applications with the most features. The findings contribute to creating a certain awareness and an insight to reduce the fragmented working practices in the built environment.

Heap-Yih Chong; John Son Wong; Xiangyu Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

466

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Laser transmission through thin cirrus clouds K. N. Liou, Y. Takano, S. C. Ou, and M. W. Johnson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser transmission through thin cirrus clouds K. N. Liou, Y. Takano, S. C. Ou, and M. W. Johnson A near-infrared airborne-laser transmission model for thin cirrus clouds has been developed on the basis optical depth, and ice crystal size on laser transmission for tactical applications. We show

Takano, Yoshihide

468

Grids, Clouds and Parallel Computing Challenges in eScience Workshop http://dexl.lncc.br/CIS/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(characteristics) fit different architectures and we describe a hybrid model with Grids for data, traditionaleScience: Grids, Clouds and Parallel Computing Challenges in eScience Workshop http Bloomington #12;eScience: Grids, Clouds and Parallel Computing · We analyze the different tradeoffs and goals

469

The Role of Gravity Waves in the Formation and Organization of Clouds during TWPICE  

SciTech Connect

All convective clouds emit gravity waves. While it is certain that convectively-generated waves play important parts in determining the climate, their precise roles remain uncertain and their effects are not (generally) represented in climate models. The work described here focuses mostly on observations and modeling of convectively-generated gravity waves, using the intensive observations from the DoE-sponsored Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), which took place in Darwin, from 17 January to 13 February 2006. Among other things, the research has implications the part played by convectively-generated gravity waves in the formation of cirrus, in the initiation and organization of further convection, and in the subgrid-scale momentum transport and associated large-scale stresses imposed on the troposphere and stratosphere. The analysis shows two groups of inertia-gravity waves are detected: group L in the middle stratosphere during the suppressed monsoon period, and group S in the lower stratosphere during the monsoon break period. Waves belonging to group L propagate to the south-east with a mean intrinsic period of 35 h, and have vertical and horizontal wavelengths of about 5-6 km and 3000-6000 km, respectively. Ray tracing calculations indicate that these waves originate from a deep convective region near Indonesia. Waves belonging to group S propagate to the south-south-east with an intrinsic period, vertical wavelength and horizontal wavelength of about 45 h, 2 km and 2000-4000 km, respectively. These waves are shown to be associated with shallow convection in the oceanic area within about 1000 km of Darwin. The intrinsic periods of high-frequency waves are estimated to be between 20-40 minutes. The high-frequency wave activity in the stratosphere, defined by mass-weighted variance of the vertical motion of the sonde, has a maximum following the afternoon local convection indicating that these waves are generated by local convection. The wave activity is strongest in the lower stratosphere below 22 km and, during the suppressed monsoon period, is modulated with a 3-4-day period. The concentration of the wave activity in the lower stratosphere is consistent with the properties of the environment in which these waves propagate, whereas its 3-4-day modulation is explained by the variation of the convection activity in the TWP-ICE domain. At low rainfall intensity the wave activity increases as rainfall intensity increases. At high values of rainfall intensity, however, the wave activity associated with deep convective clouds is independent of the rainfall intensity. The convection and gravity waves observed during TWP-ICE are simulated with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. These simulations are compared with radiosonde observations described above and are used to determine some of the properties of convectively generated gravity waves. The gravity waves appear to be well simulated by the model. The model is used to explore the relationships between the convection, the gravity waves and cirrus.

Reeder, Michael J. [Monash University; Lane, Todd P. [University of Melbourne; Hankinson, Mai Chi Nguyen [Monash University

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

470

UNDERSTANDING TRENDS ASSOCIATED WITH CLOUDS IN IRRADIATED EXOPLANETS  

SciTech Connect

Unlike previously explored relationships between the properties of hot Jovian atmospheres, the geometric albedo and the incident stellar flux do not exhibit a clear correlation, as revealed by our re-analysis of Q0-Q14 Kepler data. If the albedo is primarily associated with the presence of clouds in these irradiated atmospheres, a holistic modeling approach needs to relate the following properties: the strength of stellar irradiation (and hence the strength and depth of atmospheric circulation), the geometric albedo (which controls both the fraction of starlight absorbed and the pressure level at which it is predominantly absorbed), and the properties of the embedded cloud particles (which determine the albedo). The anticipated diversity in cloud properties renders any correlation between the geometric albedo and the stellar flux weak and c