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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding New Groundwater Treatment Facility Begins Operation: Boost in Cleanup Accelerated by Recovery Act Funding January 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong, CH2M HILL (509)376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is boosting its capacity for treating groundwater to remove chromium near the Columbia River by 40 percent with the recent completion of a new treatment facility. Contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) finished building and started operating the new 100-DX groundwater treatment facility in December. The facility is located near the D and DR Reactors on

2

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 7, 2011 June 7, 2011 Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility RICHLAND, Wash. - Construction of the largest ground- water treatment facility at the Hanford Site - a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project - is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish con- struction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facil- ity this year. Funding for the project comes from the $1.6 billion the Richland Operations Office received from the Recovery Act. The 52,000-square-foot facility will pump contaminated water from the ground, remove contaminants with a combination of treatment technologies, and return clean water to the aquifer. The system will have the capacity to

3

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Construction of the largest groundwater treatment facility at the Hanford Site – a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project – is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish construction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility this year. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,

4

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility’s ground wells. Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility's ground wells. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge’s EM program. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge's EM program.

5

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility’s ground wells. Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility's ground wells. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge’s EM program. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge's EM program.

6

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

7

Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system Hanford Treatment Facility Achieves First Gold Ranking for Sustainable Design in EM Complex: New groundwater treatment facility will be Hanford's largest, greenest pump-and-treat system May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Workers use a lift to access part of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility. Pump-and-treat construction managers David Fink (left) and Delise Pargmann (right) review information for the LEED gold certification of the main process building for the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility.

8

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Explosive Waste Treatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106 106 Environment a 1 Assessment for th.e Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory MASTER November 1995 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Washington, DOC. 20585 Portions of this document maly be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Table of Contents 1 . 0 2.0 3 . 0 4.0 5 . 0 6.0 7 . 0 8 . 0 Document Summary .............................................................. 1 Purpose and Need for Agency Action ............................................. 3 Description of the Proposed Action and Alternatives ............................ 4 3.1.1 Location ............................................................. 4

10

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than 6 million in cost savings, 3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin...

11

Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells Recovery Act Funds Expand Groundwater Treatment at Hanford Site: Contractor CH2M HILL drills record number of wells May 26, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Andre Armstrong CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-6773 Andre_L_Armstrong@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers at the Hanford Site have surpassed goals for drilling wells to detect and remove contamination from groundwater. The groundwater was contaminated by radioactive waste and chemicals generated during decades of producing plutonium for the Cold War at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington State. The Department of Energy (DOE) had set a goal for its contractor, CH2M HILL

12

EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION CATALYST TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) main treatment train includes the peroxide destruction module (PDM) where the hydrogen peroxide residual from the upstream ultraviolet light/hydrogen peroxide oxidation unit is destroyed. Removal of the residual peroxide is necessary to protect downstream membranes from the strong oxidizer. The main component of the PDM is two reaction vessels utilizing granular activated carbon (GAC) as the reaction media. The PDM experienced a number of operability problems, including frequent plugging, and has not been utilized since the ETF changed to groundwater as the predominant feed. The unit seemed to be underperforming in regards to peroxide removal during the early periods of operation as well. It is anticipated that a functional PDM will be required for wastewater from the vitrification plant and other future streams. An alternate media or methodology needs to be identified to replace the GAC in the PDMs. This series of bench scale tests is to develop information to support an engineering study on the options for replacement of the existing GAC method for peroxide destruction at the ETF. A number of different catalysts will be compared as well as other potential methods such as strong reducing agents. The testing should lead to general conclusions on the viability of different catalysts and identify candidates for further study and evaluation.

HALGREN DL

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings Treatment Resin Reduces Costs, Materials in Hanford Groundwater Cleanup - Efficiency delivered more than $6 million in cost savings, $3 million in annual savings June 4, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov (509) 376-4171 Dee Millikin, CHPRC Dee_Millikin@rl.gov (509) 376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is using a treatment material that has delivered more than $6 million in cost savings to date and is delivering more than $3 million in annual cost savings and efficiencies in treatment

14

Passive treatment of wastewater and contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect

A bioremediation system using inorganic oxide-reducing microbial consortia for the treatment of, inter alia coal mine and coal yard runoff uses a containment vessel for contaminated water and a second, floating phase for nutrients. Biodegradable oils are preferred nutrients.

Phifer, Mark A. (N. Augusta, SC); Sappington, Frank C. (Dahlonega, GA); Millings, Margaret R. (N. Augusta, SC); Turick, Charles E. (Aiken, SC); McKinsey, Pamela C. (Aiken, SC)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan for Test Area North (TAN) Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

SciTech Connect

This operations and maintenance plan supports the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF) remedial action work plan and identifies the approach and requirements for the operations and maintenance activities specific to the final medical zone treatment remedy. The NPTF provides the treatment system necessary to remediate the medical zone portion of the OU 1-07B contaminated groundwater plume. Design and construction of the New Pump and Treat Facility is addressed in the NPTF remedial action work plan. The scope of this operation and maintenance plan includes facility operations and maintenance, remedy five-year reviews, and the final operations and maintenance report for the NPTF.

L. O. Nelson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Management Tank Waste and Waste Processing Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Integrated Waste Treatment Facility Fact Sheet Waste Management Nuclear...

17

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho...

18

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars...

19

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1943 the Hanford Site was chosen as a location for the Manhattan Project to produce plutonium for use in nuclear weapons. The 100-N Area at Hanford was used from 1963 to 1987 for a dual-purpose, plutonium production and steam generation reactor and related operational support facilities (Diediker and Hall 1987). In November 1989, the reactor was put into dry layup status. During operations, chemical and radioactive wastes were released into the area soil, air, and groundwater. The 1325-N LWDF was constructed in 1983 to replace the 1301-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (1301-N LWDF). The two facilities operated simultaneously from 1983 to 1985. The 1301-N LWDF was retired from use in 1985 and the 1325-N LWDF continued operation until April 1991, when active discharges to the facility ceased. Effluent discharge to the piping system has been controlled by administrative means. This report discusses ground water contamination resulting from the 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal facility.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer ? five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannual groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, U-234, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occurring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannal groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occuring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Potential Radiological Doses From Groundwater Contaminated By The Saltstone Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Assessments of radiological dose from usage of groundwater potentially contaminated by the Saltstone Disposal Facility (Z-Area) were made for a hypothetical future resident farmer. These assessments were made using the routine aqueous release model LADTAP XL (C), which is the model used for demonstrating liquid pathway dose compliance at SRS. The dose factors used in LADTAP XL (C) are those specified by the Department of Energy.

GERALD, JANNIK

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

M-Area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring report -- first quarter 1994. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during first quarter 1994 as required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. During first quarter 1994, 42 point-of-compliance (POC) wells at the M-Area HWMF were sampled for drinking water parameters.

Evans, C.S.; Washburn, F.; Jordan, J.; Van Pelt, R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1993, 10 constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility, the Old Burial Ground, the E-Area Vaults, and the proposed Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Vaults. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chloroethane (vinyl chloride), 1,1-dichloroethylene, dichloromethane (methylene chloride), lead, mercury, or tetrachloroethylene also exceeded standards in one or more wells. Elevated constituents were found in numerous Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 2} (Water Table) and Aquifer Zone 2B{sub 1}, (Barnwell/McBean) wells and in two Aquifer Unit 2A (Congaree) wells. The groundwater flow direction and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Butler, C.T.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7 7 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facility L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-047 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Pretreatment Facilities L. Holton D. Alexander M. Johnson H. Sutter August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-047 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery has completed a Technology Readiness

26

Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) Groundwater Monitoring Report: Fourth quarter 1991 and 1991 summary  

SciTech Connect

During fourth quarter 1991, tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), total radium, mercury, and lead exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) and adjacent facilities. Tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread contaminants; 55 (49%) wells exhibited elevated tritium activities, and 24 (21%) wells exhibited elevated trichloroethylene concentrations. Tritium and trichloroethylene levels exceeding the PDWS also occurred in several wells in Aquifer Unit IIA (Congaree). Levels of manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, and trichlorofluoromethane that exceeded Flag 2 criteria were found in one or more wells beneath the MWMF. Downgradient wells in the three hydrostratigraphic units at the MWMF contained elevated levels of tritium, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, total radium, chloroethene (vinyl chloride), lead, mercury, manganese, total organic halogens, nickel, iron, 1,1-dichloroethane, aluminum, nonvolatile beta, or trichlorofluoromethane. Groundwater samples from 81 (72%) of the monitoring wells at the MWMF and adjacent facilities contained elevated levels of several contaminants.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May, 2007 readiness assessment of the Management at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory, Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

28

CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Training Program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

29

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Startup Testing Suspended To Evaluate System IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment...

30

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

31

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems Hanford Site Creates One-Touch Wonder for Groundwater Treatment Systems April 29, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site’s five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. The interior of a pump-and-treat system along the Columbia River at the Hanford Site. With the push of a button, workers can now power the site's five systems along the river that are working to extract and treat contaminated groundwater. RICHLAND, Wash. - Engineers and operators supporting the Richland Operations Office at the Hanford site found a way to start and stop

32

CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Engineering program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

33

CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility May 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Quality Assurance Program at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Quality Assurance - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

34

Lessons Learned From The 200 West Pump And Treatment Facility Construction Project At The US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership For Energy And Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility  

SciTech Connect

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built in an accelerated manner with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds and has attained Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) GOLD certification, which makes it the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and LEED challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility. This paper will present the Project and LEED accomplishments, as well as Lessons Learned by CHPRC when additional ARRA funds were used to accelerate design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of the 200 West Groundwater Pump and Treatment (2W P&T) Facility to meet DOE's mission of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012.

Dorr, Kent A. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Ostrom, Michael J. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

36

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone Idaho Site Launches Startup of Waste Treatment Facility Following Federal Inspection, DOE Milestone April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit. A controlled, phased startup of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit began today after the facility passed a federal inspection. A view of the interior of the Integrated Waste

37

Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

WESTRA, A.G.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites 2008  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

39

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites 2009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides DOE Program/Project Managers, senior management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and remedial approaches...

40

Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this document is to provide DOE Program/Project Managers, upper management, and other interested parties with a snapshot in time of the status of major groundwater contamination and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

42

Lessons Learned from the 200 West Pump and Treatment Facility Construction Project at the US DOE Hanford Site - A Leadership for Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Gold-Certified Facility  

SciTech Connect

CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) designed, constructed, commissioned, and began operation of the largest groundwater pump and treatment facility in the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) nationwide complex. This one-of-a-kind groundwater pump and treatment facility, located at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation Site (Hanford Site) in Washington State, was built to an accelerated schedule with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds. There were many contractual, technical, configuration management, quality, safety, and Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) challenges associated with the design, procurement, construction, and commissioning of this $95 million, 52,000 ft groundwater pump and treatment facility to meet DOEs mission objective of treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site with a new facility by June 28, 2012. The project teams successful integration of the projects core values and green energy technology throughout design, procurement, construction, and start-up of this complex, first-of-its-kind Bio Process facility resulted in successful achievement of DOEs mission objective, as well as attainment of LEED GOLD certification, which makes this Bio Process facility the first non-administrative building in the DOE Office of Environmental Management complex to earn such an award.

Dorr, Kent A.; Ostrom, Michael J.; Freeman-Pollard, Jhivaun R.

2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Pilot Study for the Extraction and Treatment of Groundwater From a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a pilot study of groundwater remediation at a former MGP site. The project included hydrogeologic investigations, bench- and pilot-scale treatability studies, and a cost analysis. The report documents influent and effluent levels of contaminants in groundwaters classified as high-strength, medium-strength, and low-strength, depending on the degree of contamination. Detailed descriptions of the treatment systems and practical observations are also included.

1997-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response Idaho waste treatment facility startup testing suspended to evaluate system response June 20, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Brad Bugger 208-526-0833 Danielle Miller 208-526-5709 IDAHO FALLS, ID- On Saturday, June 16, startup testing was suspended at the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU) located at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho Site. Testing and plant heat-up was suspended to allow detailed evaluation of a system pressure event observed during testing on Saturday. Facility startup testing has been ongoing for the past month, evaluating system and component operation and response during operating conditions. No radioactive or hazardous waste has been introduced into the facility,

45

Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup Waste Treatment Facility Passes Federal Inspection, Completes Final Milestone, Begins Startup April 23, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Erik Simpson, 208-390-9464 Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 The Idaho site today initiated the controlled, phased startup of a new waste treatment facility scheduled to begin treating 900,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in underground tanks at a former Cold War spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility next month. A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operational readiness review team (made up of Subject Matter Experts across the country) in early April identified a dozen issues for the cleanup contractor CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to

46

West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name West Point Treatment Plant Biomass Facility Facility West Point Treatment Plant Sector Biomass Facility Type Non-Fossil Waste Location King County, Washington Coordinates 47.5480339°, -121.9836029° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.5480339,"lon":-121.9836029,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report (U). Third and fourth quarters 1996, Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 1996.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Installation of reactive metals groundwater collection and treatment systems  

SciTech Connect

Three groundwater plumes contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and radionuclides at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site are scheduled for remediation by 1999 based on the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) (DOE, 1996). These three plumes are among the top 20 environmental cleanup sites at Rocky Flats. One of these plumes, the Mound Site Plume, is derived from a previous drum storage area, and daylights as seeps near the South Walnut Creek drainage. Final design for remediation of the Mound Site Plume has been completed based on use of reactive metals to treat the contaminated groundwater, and construction is scheduled for early 1998. The two other plumes, the 903 Pad/Ryan`s Pit and the East Trenches Plumes, are derived from VOCs either from drums that leaked or that were disposed of in trenches. These two plumes are undergoing characterization and conceptual design in 1998 and construction is scheduled in 1999. The contaminants of concern in these plumes are tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, carbon tetrachloride and low levels of uranium and americium.

Hopkins, J.K.; Primrose, A.L. [Rocky Mountain Remediation Services, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site; Vogan, J. [EnviroMetal Technologies, Inc., Guelph, Ontario (Canada); Uhland, J. [Kaiser-Hill, LLC, Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility New capability expands existing program, creates treatment product in quantity. April 13, 2012 Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward Medical Isotope Work Moves Cancer Treatment Agent Forward - Los Alamos scientist Meiring Nortier holds a thorium foil test target for the proof-of-concept production experiments. Research indicates that it will be possible to match current annual, worldwide production of Ac-225 in just two to five days of operations using the accelerator at Los Alamos and analogous facilities at Brookhaven. Alpha particles are energetic enough to destroy cancer cells but are unlikely to move beyond a tightly controlled target region and destroy

50

Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars Idaho Waste Treatment Facility Improves Worker Safety and Efficiency, Saves Taxpayer Dollars August 27, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The box retrieval forklift carriage is used to lift a degraded box as retrieval personnel monitor progress. The box retrieval forklift carriage is used to lift a degraded box as retrieval personnel monitor progress. The new soft-sided overpack is placed for shipment for treatment and repackaging. The new soft-sided overpack is placed for shipment for treatment and repackaging. The box retrieval forklift carriage is used to lift a degraded box as retrieval personnel monitor progress. The new soft-sided overpack is placed for shipment for treatment and repackaging.

51

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application documentation consists of both Part A and a Part B permit application documentation. An explanation of the Part A revisions associated with this treatment and storage unit, including the current revision, is provided at the beginning of the Part A section. Once the initial Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit is issued, the following process will be used. As final, certified treatment, storage, and/or disposal unit-specific documents are developed, and completeness notifications are made by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Washington State Department of Ecology, additional unit-specific permit conditions will be incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit through the permit modification process. All treatment, storage, and/or disposal units that are included in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application will operate under interim status until final status conditions for these units are incorporated into the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit. The Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility contains information current as of May 1, 1993.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Facility Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Gilbane Building Company Developer Narragansett Bay Commission Energy Purchaser Field's Point Location Providence RI Coordinates 41.79260859°, -71.3896966° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.79260859,"lon":-71.3896966,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

53

Waste treatment facility passes federal inspection, completes final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23, 2012 23, 2012 Media Contact: Danielle Miller, 208-526-5709 Erik Simpson, 208-390-9464 Waste treatment facility passes federal inspection, completes final milestone, begins startup The Idaho site today initiated the controlled, phased startup of a new waste treatment facility scheduled to begin treating 900,000 gallons of radioactive liquid waste stored in underground tanks at a former Cold War spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility next month. An exterior view of the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit A U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) operational readiness review team (made up of Subject Matter Experts across the country) in early April identified a dozen issues for the cleanup contractor CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to resolve before the 53,000-square-foot Integrated Waste Treatment Unit

54

Automated Demand Response Opportunities in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy intensive process which, together with water treatment, comprises about three percent of U.S. annual energy use. Yet, since wastewater treatment facilities are often peripheral to major electricity-using industries, they are frequently an overlooked area for automated demand response opportunities. Demand response is a set of actions taken to reduce electric loads when contingencies, such as emergencies or congestion, occur that threaten supply-demand balance, and/or market conditions occur that raise electric supply costs. Demand response programs are designed to improve the reliability of the electric grid and to lower the use of electricity during peak times to reduce the total system costs. Open automated demand response is a set of continuous, open communication signals and systems provided over the Internet to allow facilities to automate their demand response activities without the need for manual actions. Automated demand response strategies can be implemented as an enhanced use of upgraded equipment and facility control strategies installed as energy efficiency measures. Conversely, installation of controls to support automated demand response may result in improved energy efficiency through real-time access to operational data. This paper argues that the implementation of energy efficiency opportunities in wastewater treatment facilities creates a base for achieving successful demand reductions. This paper characterizes energy use and the state of demand response readiness in wastewater treatment facilities and outlines automated demand response opportunities.

Thompson, Lisa; Song, Katherine; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million December 11, 2012 - 1:40pm Addthis A new enclosure for processing radioactive casks has put Oak Ridge on a path to finishing cleanup work two years ahead of schedule, saving nearly $20 million. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. A new enclosure for processing radioactive casks has put Oak Ridge on a path to finishing cleanup work two years ahead of schedule, saving nearly $20 million. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. Erin Szulman Erin Szulman Special Assistant, Office of Environmental Management What Are The Two Types of Waste? One is contact-handled, which has lower radioactivity and can be

56

Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million Waste Treatment Facility Saves Taxpayers Nearly $20 Million December 11, 2012 - 1:40pm Addthis A new enclosure for processing radioactive casks has put Oak Ridge on a path to finishing cleanup work two years ahead of schedule, saving nearly $20 million. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. A new enclosure for processing radioactive casks has put Oak Ridge on a path to finishing cleanup work two years ahead of schedule, saving nearly $20 million. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Environmental Management. Erin Szulman Erin Szulman Special Assistant, Office of Environmental Management What Are The Two Types of Waste? One is contact-handled, which has lower radioactivity and can be

57

Energy Efficiency Strategies for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Water and wastewater systems are significant energy consumers with an estimated 3%-4% of total U.S. electricity consumption used for the movement and treatment of water and wastewater. Water-energy issues are of growing importance in the context of water shortages, higher energy and material costs, and a changing climate. In this economic environment, it is in the best interest for utilities to find efficiencies, both in water and energy use. Performing energy audits at water and wastewater treatment facilities is one way community energy managers can identify opportunities to save money, energy, and water. In this paper the importance of energy use in wastewater facilities is illustrated by a case study of a process energy audit performed for Crested Butte, Colorado's wastewater treatment plant. The energy audit identified opportunities for significant energy savings by looking at power intensive unit processes such as influent pumping, aeration, ultraviolet disinfection, and solids handling. This case study presents best practices that can be readily adopted by facility managers in their pursuit of energy and financial savings in water and wastewater treatment. This paper is intended to improve community energy managers understanding of the role that the water and wastewater sector plays in a community's total energy consumption. The energy efficiency strategies described provide information on energy savings opportunities, which can be used as a basis for discussing energy management goals with water and wastewater treatment facility managers.

Daw, J.; Hallett, K.; DeWolfe, J.; Venner, I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL's waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility Final Hanford Offsite Waste Shipment Leaves Idaho Treatment Facility August 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Idaho State Patrol Troopers Rick Stouse and Tony Anderson inspected the TRUPACTS, containers which contain TRU waste, and trailer containing the final shipment of Hanford offsite waste. The Idaho State Patrol officers have played an important role in AMWTP's success by inspecting every one of AMWTP's nearly 3,900 shipments. Idaho State Patrol Troopers Rick Stouse and Tony Anderson inspected the TRUPACTS, containers which contain TRU waste, and trailer containing the final shipment of Hanford offsite waste. The Idaho State Patrol officers have played an important role in AMWTP's success by inspecting every one of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Risk management program for the 283-W water treatment facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Risk Management (RM) Program covers the 283-W Water Treatment Facility (283W Facility), located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. A RM Program is necessary for this facility because it stores chlorine, a listed substance, in excess of or has the potential to exceed the threshold quantities defined in Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 68 (EPA, 1998). The RM Program contains data that will be used to prepare a RM Plan, which is required by 40 CFR 68. The RM Plan is a summary of the RM Program information, contained within this document, and will be submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ultimately for distribution to the public. The RM Plan will be prepared and submitted separately from this document.

GREEN, W.E.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

62

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Richland, Washington, 99352 07-DESIGN-046 Technology Readiness Assessment for the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) HLW Waste Vitrification Facility L. Holton D. Alexander C. Babel H. Sutter J. Young August 2007 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 07-DESIGN-046 iii Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of River Protection (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental and Radioactive Waste Management (EM), Office of Project Recovery have completed a

63

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental Regulatory Planning Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL's waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Laboratory evaluation of the in situ chemical treatment approach to soil and groundwater remediation  

SciTech Connect

Results of initial proof of principle laboratory testing activities successfully demonstrated the viability of the in situ chemical treatment approach for remediation of soil and groundwater contaminated by hexavalent chromium. Testing activities currently in progress further indicate that soils contaminated with hexavalent chromium and uranium at concentrations of several hundred parts per million can be successfully treated with 100 ppM hydrogen sulfide gas mixtures. Greater than 90% immobilization of hexavalent chromium and 50% immobilization of uranium have been achieved in these tests after a treatment period of one day. Activities associated with further development and implementation of the in situ chemical treatment approach include conducting additional bench scale tests with contaminated geomedia, and undertaking scale-up laboratory tests and a field demonstration. This report discusses the testing and further development of this process.

Thorton, E.C. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Trader, D.E. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Environmental implementation plan: Chapter 7, Groundwater protection  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS) uses large quantities of groundwater for drinking, processing, and non-contact cooling. Continued industrial and residential growth along with additional agricultural irrigation in areas adjacent to SRS will increase the demand for groundwater. This increasing demand will require a comprehensive management system to ensure the needed quality and quantity of groundwater is available for all users. The Groundwater Protection Program and the Waste Management Program establish the overall framework for protecting this resource. Ground water under SRS is monitored extensively for radiological, hazardous, and water quality constituents. Groundwater quality is known to have been affected at 33 onsite locations, but none of the contaminant plumes have migrated offsite. Onsite and offsite drinking water supplies are monitored to ensure they are not impacted. The site has more than 1800 monitoring wells from which groundwater samples are analyzed for radiological and non-radiological constituents. SRS is complying with all applicable regulations related to groundwater protection, waste treatment, and waste disposal. The existing waste storage facilities are permitted or are being permitted. Existing hazardous- and mixed-waste storage facilities are being included in the site Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B Permit. Part B permitting has been initiated for many of the planned hazardous- and mixed-waste treatment and disposal facilities.

Wells, D. [comp.

1994-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility: Environmental Information Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the treatment of radioactive liquid waste is an integral function of the LANL mission: to assure U.S. military deterrence capability through nuclear weapons technology. As part of this mission, LANL conducts nuclear materials research and development (R&D) activities. These activities generate radioactive liquid waste that must be handled in a manner to ensure protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Radioactive liquid waste currently generated at LANL is treated at the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), located at Technical Area (TA)-50. The RLWTF is 30 years old and nearing the end of its useful design life. The facility was designed at a time when environmental requirements, as well as more effective treatment technologies, were not inherent in engineering design criteria. The evolution of engineering design criteria has resulted in the older technology becoming less effective in treating radioactive liquid wastestreams in accordance with current National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and Department of Energy (DOE) regulatory requirements. Therefore, to support ongoing R&D programs pertinent to its mission, LANL is in need of capabilities to efficiently treat radioactive liquid waste onsite or to transport the waste off site for treatment and/or disposal. The purpose of the EID is to provide the technical baseline information for subsequent preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the RLWTF. This EID addresses the proposed action and alternatives for meeting the purpose and need for agency action.

Haagenstad, H.T.; Gonzales, G.; Suazo, I.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project  

SciTech Connect

The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

Not Available

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater Treatment March 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis RICHLAND, Wash. - A new resin EM, the Richland Operations Office, and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are using in contaminated groundwater treatment is expected to increase efficiency and reduce costs in the operation of pump-and-treat facilities along the Columbia River at the Hanford site. The higher performance resin, SIR-700, is expected to reduce DOE's estimated operation and maintenance costs over the lifetime of the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility by approximately $20 million. In comparison to this expected cost savings, the construction cost for the treatment

70

Applications of Energy Efficiency Technologies in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Depending on the level and type of treatment, municipal wastewater treatment (WWT) can be an energy intensive process, constituting a major cost for the municipal governments. According to a 1993 study wastewater treatment plants consume close to 1% of the electrical power in Northern and Central California. Activated sludge is the most common method for wastewater treatment, and at the same time the most energy intensive process. New energy efficient technologies can help reduce energy consumption of these processes, while improving the treatment effectiveness. Energy efficient technologies can be implemented in retrofit, expansion as well as new construction. This paper details the application of energy efficient technologies in retrofit as well as new construction projects, outlining significant opportunities for energy efficiency and conservation as well as demand response in various types of WWT facilities. This is based on detailed assessments of over 10 wastewater treatment plants in Northern California. The results show that energy savings in the range of 15,000 kWh per year to over 3.2 million kWh per year with paybacks in the range of 1.7 years to 8.9 years are readily achievable in retrofit projects. Application of energy efficient technologies in new construction can be most beneficial in the lifetime of the plant, which usually exceeds 30 years. Based on our experience in evaluation of design by others in energy efficiency design assistance of 7 plants, energy efficiency opportunities in new construction will be elaborated. This paper will discuss common energy efficient practices in new construction and outline additional opportunities that can help further improve energy efficiency of new construction projects. Finally, based on a recent survey, wastewater treatment plants have excellent opportunities for demand response. In Northern California, several WWT plants have participated and greatly benefited from demand response opportunities. Opportunities for demand response based on detailed assessment of 10 plants will be discussed."

Chow, S.; Werner, L.; Wu, Y. Y.; Ganji, A. R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

LITERATURE SURVEY FOR GROUNDWATER TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR NITRATE IODINE-129 AND URANIUM 200-ZP-1 OPERABLE UNIT HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This literature review presents treatment options for nitrate, iodine-129, and uranium, which are present in groundwater at the 200-ZP-I Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) within the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this review is to determine available methods to treat or sequester these contaminants in place (i.e., in situ) or to pump-and-treat the groundwater aboveground (i.e., ex situ). This review has been conducted with emphasis on commercially available or field-tested technologies, but theoretical studies have, in some cases, been considered when no published field data exist. The initial scope of this literature review included only nitrate and iodine-I 29, but it was later expanded to include uranium. The focus of the literature review was weighted toward researching methods for treatment of nitrate and iodine-129 over uranium because of the relatively greater impact of those compounds identified at the 200-ZP-I OU.

BYRNES ME

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment: Results of Mixed Waste Treatment at the M-4 Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Processing alternatives for commercial nuclear plant mixed wastes are limited. In order to expand potential treatment options, EPRI entered a collaborative research agreement to process mixed wastes at an environmental facility. This report documents the success of that effort to date.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Treatment of measurement uncertainties at the power burst facility  

SciTech Connect

The treatment of measurement uncertainty at the Power Burst Facility provides a means of improving data integrity as well as meeting standard practice reporting requirements. This is accomplished by performing the uncertainty analysis in two parts, test independent uncertainty analysis and test dependent uncertainty analysis. The test independent uncertainty analysis is performed on instrumentation used repeatedly from one test to the next, and does not have to be repeated for each test except for improved or new types of instruments. A test dependent uncertainty analysis is performed on each test based on the test independent uncertainties modified as required by test specifications, experiment fixture design, and historical performance of instruments on similar tests. The methodology for performing uncertainty analysis based on the National Bureau of Standards method is reviewed with examples applied to nuclear instrumentation.

Meyer, L.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988: Volume 1, Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the progress of 12 Hanford ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1988. During this quarter, field activities at the 300 Area process trenches, the Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill, the 183-H Solar Evaporation Basins, the 1324-N/NA Surface Impoundment and Percolation Ponds, the 1301-N and 1325-N Liquid Waste Disposal Facilities, and the 216-A-36B Crib consisted of ground-water sampling and analyses, and water-level monitoring. The 200 Area Low-Level Burial Grounds section includes well development data, sediment analysis, and water-level measurements. Ground-water sampling was begun at this site, and results will be included in next quarter's report. Twelve new wells were installed during the quarter, two at the 216-A-29 Ditch, size at the 216-A-10 Crib, and four at the 216-B-3 Pond. Preliminary characterization data for these new wells are included in this report. Driller's logs and other drilling and site characterization data will be provided in the next quarterly report. At the 2101-M Pond, construction was completed on four wells, and initial ground-water samples were taken. The drilling logs, geophysical logging data, and as-built diagrams are included in this report in Volume 2. 19 refs., 24 figs., 39 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Treatment Facility F: Accelerated Removal and Validation Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Accelerated Removal and Validation (ARV) phase of remediation at the Treatment Facility F (TFF) site at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to accelerate removal of gasoline from the site when compared to normal, single shift, pump-and-treat operations. The intent was to take advantage of the in-place infrastructure plus the increased underground temperatures resulting from the Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project (DUSDP). Operations continued 24-hours (h) per day between October 4 and December 12, 1993. Three contaminant removal rate enhancement approaches were explored during the period of continuous operation. First, we tried several configurations of the vapor pumping system to maximize the contaminant removal rate. Second, we conducted two brief trials of air injection into the lower steam zone. Results were compared with computer models, and the process was assessed for contaminant removal rate enhancement. Third, we installed equipment to provide additional electrical heating of contaminated low-permeability soil. Four new electrodes were connected into the power system. Diagnostic capabilities at the TFF site were upgraded so that we could safely monitor electrical currents, soil temperatures, and water treatment system processes while approximately 300 kW of electrical energy was being applied to the subsurface.

Sweeney, J.J.; Buettner, M.H.; Carrigan, C.R. [and others

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

78

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

Biological Information Document, Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This document is intended to act as a baseline source material for risk assessments which can be used in Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements. The current Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) does not meet current General Design Criteria for Non-reactor Nuclear Facilities and could be shut down affecting several DOE programs. This Biological Information Document summarizes various biological studies that have been conducted in the vicinity of new Proposed RLWTF site and an Alternative site. The Proposed site is located on Mesita del Buey, a mess top, and the Alternative site is located in Mortandad Canyon. The Proposed Site is devoid of overstory species due to previous disturbance and is dominated by a mixture of grasses, forbs, and scattered low-growing shrubs. Vegetation immediately adjacent to the site is a pinyon-juniper woodland. The Mortandad canyon bottom overstory is dominated by ponderosa pine, willow, and rush. The south-facing slope was dominated by ponderosa pine, mountain mahogany, oak, and muhly. The north-facing slope is dominated by Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, and oak. Studies on wildlife species are limited in the vicinity of the proposed project and further studies will be necessary to accurately identify wildlife populations and to what extent they utilize the project area. Some information is provided on invertebrates, amphibians and reptiles, and small mammals. Additional species information from other nearby locations is discussed in detail. Habitat requirements exist in the project area for one federally threatened wildlife species, the peregrine falcon, and one federal candidate species, the spotted bat. However, based on surveys outside of the project area but in similar habitats, these species are not expected to occur in either the Proposed or Alternative RLWTF sites. Habitat Evaluation Procedures were used to evaluate ecological functioning in the project area.

Biggs, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

CORROSION STUDY FOR THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY (ETF) CHROME (VI) REDUCTANT SOLUTION USING 304 & 316L STAINLESS STEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility has developed a method to regenerate spent resin from the groundwater pump and treat intercepting chrome(VI) plumes (RPP-RPT-32207, Laboratory Study on Regeneration of Spent DOWEX 21K 16-20 Mesh Ion Exchange Resin). Subsequent laboratory studies have shown that the chrome(VI) may be reduced to chrome(III) by titrating with sodium metabisulfite to an oxidation reduction potential (ORP) of +280 mV at a pH of 2. This test plan describes the use of cyclic potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization techniques to ascertain the electrochemical corrosion and pitting propensity of the 304 and 316L stainless steel in the acidified reducing the solution that will be contained in either the secondary waste receiver tank or concentrate tank.

DUNCAN, J.B.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Discharges in 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents radioactive discharges from the TA50 Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facilities (RLWTF) during calendar 2011. During 2011, three pathways were available for the discharge of treated water to the environment: discharge as water through NPDES Outfall 051 into Mortandad Canyon, evaporation via the TA50 cooling towers, and evaporation using the newly-installed natural-gas effluent evaporator at TA50. Only one of these pathways was used; all treated water (3,352,890 liters) was fed to the effluent evaporator. The quality of treated water was established by collecting a weekly grab sample of water being fed to the effluent evaporator. Forty weekly samples were collected; each was analyzed for gross alpha, gross beta, and tritium. Weekly samples were also composited at the end of each month. These flow-weighted composite samples were then analyzed for 37 radioisotopes: nine alpha-emitting isotopes, 27 beta emitters, and tritium. These monthly analyses were used to estimate the radioactive content of treated water fed to the effluent evaporator. Table 1 summarizes this information. The concentrations and quantities of radioactivity in Table 1 are for treated water fed to the evaporator. Amounts of radioactivity discharged to the environment through the evaporator stack were likely smaller since only entrained materials would exit via the evaporator stack.

Del Signore, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwate Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report, First and Second Quarters 1998, Volumes I, II, & III  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah river Site (SRS) during first and second quarters 1998. This program is required by South Carolina Hazardous Waste Permit SC1-890-008-989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations. Report requirements are described in the 1995 RCRA Renewal Permit, effective October 5, 1995, Section IIIB.H.11.b for the M-Area HWMF and Section IIIG.H.11.b for the Met Lab HWMF.

Chase, J.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

83

EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence 106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California EA-1106: Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, San Joaquin County, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to build, permit, and operate the Explosive Waste Treatment Facility to treat explosive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site, Site 300. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 16, 1996 EA-1106: Finding of No Significant Impact Explosive Waste Treatment Facility at Site 300, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory April 16, 1996

84

Mixed and low-level waste treatment facility project. Volume 3, Waste treatment technologies (Draft)  

SciTech Connect

The technology information provided in this report is only the first step toward the identification and selection of process systems that may be recommended for a proposed mixed and low-level waste treatment facility. More specific information on each technology will be required to conduct the system and equipment tradeoff studies that will follow these preengineering studies. For example, capacity, maintainability, reliability, cost, applicability to specific waste streams, and technology availability must be further defined. This report does not currently contain all needed information; however, all major technologies considered to be potentially applicable to the treatment of mixed and low-level waste are identified and described herein. Future reports will seek to improve the depth of information on technologies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

SURFACE-ALTERED ZEOLITES AS PERMEABLE BARRIERS FOR IN SITU TREATMENT OF CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of this effort is to develop and test a zeolite-based permeable barrier system for containing and remediating contaminated groundwater. The projected product is an engineered and tested permeable barrier system that can be adopted by the commercial sector.

Robert S. Bowman; Zhaohui Li; Stephen J. Roy; Todd Burt; Timothy L. Johnson; Richard L. Johnson

1999-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) NUCLEAR SAFETY (NS) Objective: NS.1 Facility safety documentation is in place and has been implemented that describes the "safety envelope" of the facility. (CR 7) Criterion: An unreviewed safety question (USQ) screen/evaluation has been completed and approved for the installation and use of the DTF for drum treatment in the DTF. Objective: NS.2 The facility systems and procedures, for the DTF and drum treatment activities, are consistent with the description of the facility, procedures, and accident analysis included in the safety basis. (CR9) Criterion: The DTF and drum treatment activities are adequately described in the documented safety analysis (DSA) or changes have been identified for inclusion in the next annual update.

87

Integrated Facilities Disposition Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Facilities Disposition Program Tank Waste Corporate Board Meeting at ORNL Sharon Robinson Dirk Van Hoesen Robert Jubin Brad Patton July 29, 2009 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy The Integrated Facility Disposition Program (IFDP) addresses the remaining EM Scope at both ORNL and Y-12 Cost Range: $7 - $14B Schedule: 26 Years 3 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Scope of work * Treatment and disposition of legacy materials and waste * D&D 327 (1.5 M ft 2 ) excess facilities generating >2 M yd 3 debris * Soil and groundwater remedial actions generating >1 M yd 3 soils * Facilities surveillance and maintenance * Reconfiguration of waste management facilities * Ongoing waste management operations * Project management

88

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

89

Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater Hanford Site Treating Record Amount of Contaminated Groundwater July 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE (509) 376-4171 Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Tania Reyes, CHPRC (509) 373-6828 Tania_Reyes@rl.gov Department of Energy goal for fiscal year 2013 met early Note: Photos and graphics are available for downloading on our website link: http://ow.ly/mO5cT RICHLAND, Wash. - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) has exceeded this year's goal for treating 1.4 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater at the Hanford Site in Washington state. "In the last few years, DOE built three new groundwater treatment facilities, and now we are seeing the results," said Briant Charboneau,

90

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the DTF, its support systems, tools, and drum treatment activities identified in ORPS corrective actions, NCRs or CARS have been adequately resolved. b. Lessons learned from...

91

Federal Facility Compliance Act, Proposed Site Treatment Plan: Background Volume. Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

This Federal Facility Compliance Act Site Treatment Plan discusses the options of radioactive waste management for Ames Laboratory. This is the background volume which discusses: site history and mission; framework for developing site treatment plans; proposed plan organization and related activities; characterization of mixed waste and waste minimization; low level mixed waste streams and the proposed treatment approach; future generation of TRU and mixed wastes; the adequacy of mixed waste storage facilities; and a summary of the overall DOE activity in the area of disposal of mixed waste treatment residuals.

1995-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Sanitary Waste Water Treatment System for the Hanford Decontamination Laundry Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is an engineering report for the Decontamination Laundry Facility (DLF) which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The proposed Sanitary Waste Treatment System is new and does not involve interfacing with existing sanitary waste treatment systems. It will utilize a subsurface soil absorption system (SSAS), which are frequently used to dispose of sanitary waste water from facilities at the Hanford Site, since a majority of its` facilities are located in remote areas. Construction of the DLF is scheduled to start in 1992 and startup of the DLF is planned during the summer of 1994.

Yanochko, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sanitary Waste Water Treatment System for the Hanford Decontamination Laundry Facility  

SciTech Connect

This is an engineering report for the Decontamination Laundry Facility (DLF) which will be located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The proposed Sanitary Waste Treatment System is new and does not involve interfacing with existing sanitary waste treatment systems. It will utilize a subsurface soil absorption system (SSAS), which are frequently used to dispose of sanitary waste water from facilities at the Hanford Site, since a majority of its' facilities are located in remote areas. Construction of the DLF is scheduled to start in 1992 and startup of the DLF is planned during the summer of 1994.

Yanochko, R.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

Chase, J.

2000-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

96

Operation and Maintenance Manual for the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This Operation and Maintenance Manual lists operator and management responsibilities, permit standards, general operating procedures, maintenance requirements and monitoring methods for the Sewage Treatment Plant at the Central Facilities Area at the Idaho National Laboratory. The manual is required by the Municipal Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03) the sewage treatment plant.

Norm Stanley

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

98

Test of a magnetic device for the amelioration of scale formation at Treatment Facility D  

SciTech Connect

A commercial device (Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign}, Norfolk, VA) designed to treat water by means of a magnetic field has been evaluated for its effect on the formation of calcite scale at LLNL Treatment Facility D. At this facility, volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) are removed by air stripping, which raises the water pH, causing the deposition of calcium carbonate as calcite scale downstream. To evaluate the magnetic treatment technique, the ground water was passed through the Descal-A-Matic{reg_sign} device before treatment by the air stripping unit, and the resulting scale formation and other water characteristics were compared with those found during a test with no water treatment and a test with chemical treatment with a polyphosphate additive. No beneficial effect was found when using the magnetic device. 6 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Krauter, P.W., Harrar, J.E., Orloff, S.P., Bahowick, S.M.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1 through December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and {open_quotes}Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities{close_quotes} (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 265), as amended. Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. This report contains data from Hanford Site groundwater monitoring projects. The location of each facility is shown. Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) manages the RCRA groundwater monitoring projects for federal facilities on the Hanford Site. Performing project management, preparing groundwater monitoring plans, well network design and installation, specifying groundwater data needs, performing quality control (QC) oversight, data management, and preparing project sampling schedules are all parts of this responsibility. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) administers the contract for analytical services and provides groundwater sampling services to WHC for the RCRA groundwater monitoring program. This quarterly report contains data received between October and December 1994, which are the cutoff dates for this reporting period. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter, but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radioactive Liquid Waste Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory OAS-L-13-15 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 26, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR ACQUISITION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT MANAGER LOS ALAMOS FIELD OFFICE FROM: David Sedillo Western Audits Division Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility Replacement Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) is a Government- owned, contractor operated Laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) nuclear weapons complex. Los Alamos' primary responsibility is to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional water treatment facilities are the norm for producing potable water for U.S. metropolitan areas. Rapidly-growing urban populations, competing demands for water, imperfect water markets, and uncertainty of future water supplies contribute to high interests in alternative sources of potable water for many U.S. municipalities. In situations where multiple supply alternatives exist, properly analyzing which alternative is the most-economically efficient over the course of its useful life requires a sound economic and financial analysis of each alternative using consistent methodology. This thesis discusses such methodology and provides an assessment of the life-cycle costs of conventional water treatment using actual data from an operating surface-water treatment facility located in McAllen, Texas: the McAllen Northwest facility. This facility has a maximum-designed operating capacity of 8.25 million gallons per day (mgd), but due to required shutdown time and other limitations, it is currently operating at 78% of the designed capacity (6.44 mgd). The economic and financial life-cycle costs associated with constructing and operating the McAllen Northwest facility are analyzed using a newly-developed Excel 2 spreadsheet model, CITY H O ECONOMICS . Although specific results are applicable only to the McAllen Northwest facility, the baseline results of $771.67/acre-foot (acft)/ yr {$2.37/1,000 gallons/yr} for this analysis provide insight regarding the life-cycle costs for conventional surface-water treatment. The baseline results are deterministic (i.e., noninclusive of risk/uncertainty about datainput values), but are expanded to include sensitivity analyses with respect to several critical factors including the facilitys useful life, water rights costs, initial construction costs, and annual operations and maintenance, chemical, and energy costs. For example, alternative costs for water rights associated with sourcing water for conventional treatment facilities are considered relative to the assumed baseline cost of $2,300/ac-ft, with results ranging from a low of $653.34/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,000/ac-ft) to a high of $1,061.83/ac-ft/yr (when water rights are $2,600/ac-ft). Furthermore, modifications to key data-input parameters and results are included for a more consistent basis of comparison to enable comparisons across facilities and/or technologies. The modified results, which are considered appropriate to compare to other similarly calculated values, are $667.74/ac-ft/yr {2.05/1,000 gallons/yr}.

Rogers, Callie Sue

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Audit of the radioactive liquid waste treatment facility operations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) generates radioactive and liquid wastes that must be treated before being discharged to the environment. Presently, the liquid wastes are treated in the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (Treatment Facility), which is over 30 years old and in need of repair or replacement. However, there are various ways to satisfy the treatment need. The objective of the audit was to determine whether Los Alamos cost effectively managed its Treatment Facility operations. The audit determined that Los Alamos` treatment costs were significantly higher when compared to similar costs incurred by the private sector. This situation occurred because Los Alamos did not perform a complete analysis of privatization or prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its treatment operations, although a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan requirement was incorporated into the contract in 1996. As a result, Los Alamos may be spending $2.15 million more than necessary each year and could needlessly spend $10.75 million over the next five years to treat its radioactive liquid waste. In addition, Los Alamos has proposed to spend $13 million for a new treatment facility that may not be needed if privatization proves to be a cost effective alternative. We recommended that the Manager, Albuquerque Operations Office (Albuquerque), (1) require Los Alamos to prepare a {open_quotes}make-or-buy{close_quotes} plan for its radioactive liquid waste treatment operations, (2) review the plan for approval, and (3) direct Los Alamos to select the most cost effective method of operations while also considering other factors such as mission support, reliability, and long-term program needs. Albuquerque concurred with the recommendations.

1997-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

M-area hazardous waste management facility groundwater monitoring and corrective-action report, First quarter 1995, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, in three volumes, describes the ground water monitoring and c corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during the fourth quarter 1994 and first quarter 1995. Concise description of the program and considerable data documenting the monitoring and remedial activities are included in the document. This is Volume 1 covering the following topics: sampling and results; hydrogeologic assessment; water quality assessment; effectiveness of the corrective-action program; corrective-action system operation and performance; monitoring and corrective-action program assessment; proposed monitoring and corrective-action program modifications. Also included are the following appendicies: A-standards; B-flagging criteria; C-figures; D-monitoring results tables; E-data quality/usability assessment.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

3Q/4Q00 Annual M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during 2000. This program is required by South Carolina Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Permit SC1890008989 and Section 264.100(g) of the South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations.

Cole, C.M. Sr.

2001-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

105

2010 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2009, through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of special compliance conditions Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2010 permit year, approximately 2.2 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

2012 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2011, through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Site description Facility and system description Permit required monitoring data and loading rates Status of compliance conditions and activities Discussion of the facilitys environmental impacts. During the 2012 permit year, no wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area of the Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Project C-018H, 242-A Evaporator/PUREX Plant Process Condensate Treatment Facility, functional design criteria. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the Functional Design Criteria (FDC) for Project C-018H, the 242-A Evaporator and Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant Condensate Treatment Facility (Also referred to as the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility [ETF]). The project will provide the facilities to treat and dispose of the 242-A Evaporator process condensate (PC), the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant process condensate (PDD), and the PUREX Plant ammonia scrubber distillate (ASD).

Sullivan, N.

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Request for modification of 200 Area effluent treatment facility final delisting  

SciTech Connect

A Delisting Petition submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in August 1993 addressed effluent to be generated at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility from treating Hanford Facility waste streams. This Delisting Petition requested that 71.9 million liters per year of treated effluent, bearing the designation 'F001' through 'F005', and/or 'F039' that is derived from 'F001' through 'F005' waste, be delisted. On June 13, 1995, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency published the final rule (Final Delisting), which formally excluded 71.9 million liters per year of 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility effluent from ''being listed as hazardous wastes'' (60 FR 31115 now promulgated in 40 CFR 261). Given the limited scope, it is necessary to request a modification of the Final Delisting to address the management of a more diverse multi-source leachate (F039) at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility. From past operations and current cleanup activities on the Hanford Facility, a considerable amount of both liquid and solid Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 regulated mixed waste has been and continues to be generated. Ultimately this waste will be treated as necessary to meet the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Land Disposal Restrictions. The disposal of this waste will be in Resource Conservation and Recovery Act--compliant permitted lined trenches equipped with leachate collection systems. These operations will result in the generation of what is referred to as multi-source leachate. This newly generated waste will receive the listed waste designation of F039. This waste also must be managed in compliance with the provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

BOWMAN, R.C.

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Audit Report Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project OAS-M-13-03 August 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 August 8, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SENIOR ADVISOR FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Cost Transfers at the Department's Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Facility Construction Project" BACKGROUND In 2005, the Department of Energy (Department) awarded the Idaho Cleanup Project contract to CH2M ♦ WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) to remediate the Idaho National Laboratory. The Sodium

110

Environmental assessment for the Waste Water Treatment Facility at the West Valley Demonstration Project and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect

The possible environmental impacts from the construction and operation of a waste water treatment facility for the West Valley Demonstration Project are presented. The West Valley Project is a demonstration project on the solidification of high-level radioactive wastes. The need for the facility is the result of a rise in the work force needed for the project which rendered the existing sewage treatment plant incapable of meeting the nonradioactive waste water treatment needs.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

111

2011 Annual Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Sites Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000141-03), for the wastewater land application site at Idaho National Laboratory Site's Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment Plant from November 1, 2010, through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Site description; (2) Facility and system description; (3) Permit required monitoring data and loading rates; (4) Status of special compliance conditions and activities; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 permit year, approximately 1.22 million gallons of treated wastewater was land-applied to the irrigation area at Central Facilities Area Sewage Treatment plant.

Michael G. Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT & M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI!ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized.

RYAN GW

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

Risk assessment of CST-7 proposed waste treatment and storage facilities Volume I: Limited-scope probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of proposed CST-7 waste treatment & storage facilities. Volume II: Preliminary hazards analysis of proposed CST-7 waste storage & treatment facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In FY 1993, the Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Management Group [CST-7 (formerly EM-7)] requested the Probabilistic Risk and Hazards Analysis Group [TSA-11 (formerly N-6)] to conduct a study of the hazards associated with several CST-7 facilities. Among these facilities are the Hazardous Waste Treatment Facility (HWTF), the HWTF Drum Storage Building (DSB), and the Mixed Waste Receiving and Storage Facility (MWRSF), which are proposed for construction beginning in 1996. These facilities are needed to upgrade the Laboratory`s storage capability for hazardous and mixed wastes and to provide treatment capabilities for wastes in cases where offsite treatment is not available or desirable. These facilities will assist Los Alamos in complying with federal and state requlations.

Sasser, K.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 100-D Ponds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 183-D Water Treatment Facility (WTF) discharges effluent to the 120-0-1 Ponds (100-D Ponds) located north of the 100-D Area perimeter fence. This report satisfies one of the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-17-00B as agreed by the US Department of Energy, Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency. Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00B includes a requirement to assess impacts to groundwater from disposal of the 183-D WTF effluent to the 100-D Ponds. In addition, the 100-D Ponds are a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 treatment, storage, and disposal facility covered by the 100-D Ponds Closure Plan (DOE-RL 1993a). There is evidence of groundwater contamination, primarily nitrate, tritium, and chromium, in the unconfined aquifer beneath the 100-D Area and 100 Areas in general. The contaminant plumes are area wide and are a result of past-practice reactor and disposal operations in the 100-D Area currently being investigated as part of the 100-DR-1 and 100-HR-3 Operable Units (DOE-RL 1992b, 1992a). Based on current effluent conditions, continued operation of the 100-D Ponds will not adversely affect the groundwater quality in the 100-D Area. Monitoring wells near the pond have slightly higher alkaline pH values than wells in the rest of the area. Concentrations of known contaminants in these wells are lower than ambient 100-D Area groundwater conditions and exhibit a localized dilution effect associated with discharges to the pond. Hydraulic impact to the local groundwater system from these discharges is minor. The groundwater monitoring well network for the 100-D Ponds is adequate.

Alexander, D.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Federal Facility Compliance Act: Conceptual Site Treatment Plan for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is required by section 3021(b) of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), as amended by the Federal Facility Compliance Act (the Act), to prepare plans describing the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating mixed waste. The Act requires site treatment plans (STPs or plans) to be developed for each site at which DOE generates or stores mixed waste and submitted to the State or EPA for approval, approval with modification, or disapproval. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) is the preliminary version of the plan required by the Act and is being provided to California, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and others for review. A list of the other DOE sites preparing CSTPs is included in Appendix 1.1 of this document. Please note that Appendix 1.1 appears as Appendix A, pages A-1 and A-2 in this document.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Monitoring Plan for RCRA Groundwater Assessment at the 216-U-12 Crib  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains a revised and updated monitoring plan for RCRA interim status groundwater assessment, site hydrogeology, and a conceptual model of the RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal unit. Monitoring under interim status is expected to continue until the 216-U-12 crib is incorporated as a chapter into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit or administratively closed as proposed to EPA and Ecology.

Williams, Bruce A.; Chou, Charissa J.

2005-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Method to remove uranium/vanadium contamination from groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R. (DeBeque, CO); Morrison, Stanley (Grand Junction, CO)

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

120

Expediting Groundwater Sampling at Hanford and Making It Safer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) manages the groundwatermonitoring programs at the Department of Energy's 586-square-mile Hanford site in southeastern Washington state. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), and the Atomic Energy Act (AEA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. Each year, more than 1,500 wells are accessed for a variety of reasons.

Connell, Carl W. Jr. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Carr, Jennifer S. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Hildebrand, R. Douglas [Department of Energy - Richland Operations Office, Richland, WA (United States); Schatz, Aaron L. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Conley, S. F. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Brown, W. L. [Lockheed Martin Systems Information, Richland, WA (United States)

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study  

SciTech Connect

This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Closure Plan - Plutonium Finishing Plant Treatment Unit Glovebox HA-20MB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This closure plan describes the planned activities and performance standards for closing the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) glovebox HA-20MB that housed an interim status ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' (RCRA) of 1976 treatment unit. This closure plan is certified and submitted to Ecology for incorporation into the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit (HF RCRA Permit) in accordance with Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement; TPA) Milestone M-83-30 requiring submittal of a certified closure plan for ''glovebox HA-20MB'' by July 31, 2003. Glovebox HA-20MB is located within the 231-5Z Building in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Facility. Currently glovebox HA-20MB is being used for non-RCRA analytical purposes. The schedule of closure activities under this plan supports completion of TPA Milestone M-83-44 to deactivate and prepare for dismantlement the above grade portions of the 234-5Z and ZA, 243-Z, and 291-Z and 291-Z-1 stack buildings by September 30, 2015. Under this closure plan, glovebox HA-20MB will undergo clean closure to the performance standards of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 with respect to all dangerous waste contamination from glovebox HA-20MB RCRA operations. Because the intention is to clean close the PFP treatment unit, postclosure activities are not applicable to this closure plan. To clean close the unit, it will be demonstrated that dangerous waste has not been left at levels above the closure performance standard for removal and decontamination. If it is determined that clean closure is not possible or is environmentally impractical, the closure plan will be modified to address required postclosure activities. Because dangerous waste does not include source, special nuclear, and by-product material components of mixed waste, radionuclides are not within the scope of this documentation. Any information on radionuclides is provided only for general knowledge. Clearance form only sent to RHA.

PRIGNANO, A.L.

2003-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

123

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory?s research to date in characterizing energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities for wastewater treatment facilities in California. The report describes the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy use and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and energy efficiency and automated demand response opportunities. In addition, several energy efficiency and load management case studies are provided for wastewater treatment facilities.This study shows that wastewater treatment facilities can be excellent candidates for open automated demand response and that facilities which have implemented energy efficiency measures and have centralized control systems are well-suited to shift or shed electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. Control technologies installed for energy efficiency and load management purposes can often be adapted for automated demand response at little additional cost. These improved controls may prepare facilities to be more receptive to open automated demand response due to both increased confidence in the opportunities for controlling energy cost/use and access to the real-time data.

Lekov, Alex; Thompson, Lisa; McKane, Aimee; Song, Katherine; Piette, Mary Ann

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of the suitability of DOE facilities for treatment of commercial low-level radioactive mixed waste  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates the capabilities of the United States Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) existing and proposed facilities to treat 52 commercially generated low-level radioactive mixed (LLMW) waste streams that were previously identified as being difficult-to-treat using commercial treatment capabilities. The evaluation was performed by comparing the waste matrix and hazardous waste codes for the commercial LLMW streams with the waste acceptance criteria of the treatment facilities, as identified in the following DOE databases: Mixed Waste Inventory Report, Site Treatment Plan, and Waste Stream and Technology Data System. DOE facility personnel also reviewed the list of 52 commercially generated LLMW streams and provided their opinion on whether the wastes were technically acceptable at their facilities, setting aside possible administrative barriers. The evaluation tentatively concludes that the DOE is likely to have at least one treatment facility (either existing or planned) that is technically compatible for most of these difficult-to-treat commercially generated LLMW streams. This conclusion is tempered, however, by the limited amount of data available on the commercially generated LLMW streams, by the preliminary stage of planning for some of the proposed DOE treatment facilities, and by the need to comply with environmental statutes such as the Clean Air Act.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Groundwater Protection, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundwater Groundwater placeholder DOE, BNL, elected officials, and community leaders mark the opening of the first off-site groundwater treatment system. From the outset, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered the protection of human health to be the most important goal of the cleanup program. Because exposure to groundwater contamination had the greatest potential to impact human health, the focus was to ensure that local drinking water supplies were clean and safe. Early efforts concentrated on determining the locations of the contamination, installing treatment systems to clean up the groundwater, and remediating sources of contamination like landfills and underground tanks. DOE and the Lab are committed to protecting Long Island's sole-source aquifer, a vital natural resource.

126

PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT (PFP) 241-Z LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DEMOLITION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) is proud to submit the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) 241-Z liquid Waste Treatment Facility Deactivation and Demolition (D&D) Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2008. The decommissioning of the 241-Z Facility presented numerous challenges, many of which were unique with in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. The majority of the project budget and schedule was allocated for cleaning out five below-grade tank vaults. These highly contaminated, confined spaces also presented significant industrial safety hazards that presented some of the most hazardous work environments on the Hanford Site. The 241-Z D&D Project encompassed diverse tasks: cleaning out and stabilizing five below-grade tank vaults (also called cells), manually size-reducing and removing over three tons of process piping from the vaults, permanently isolating service utilities, removing a large contaminated chemical supply tank, stabilizing and removing plutonium-contaminated ventilation ducts, demolishing three structures to grade, and installing an environmental barrier on the demolition site . All of this work was performed safely, on schedule, and under budget. During the deactivation phase of the project between November 2005 and February 2007, workers entered the highly contaminated confined-space tank vaults 428 times. Each entry (or 'dive') involved an average of three workers, thus equaling approximately 1,300 individual confined -space entries. Over the course of the entire deactivation and demolition period, there were no recordable injuries and only one minor reportable skin contamination. The 241-Z D&D Project was decommissioned under the provisions of the 'Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order' (the Tri-Party Agreement or TPA), the 'Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976' (RCRA), and the 'Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980' (CERCLA). The project completed TPA Milestone M-083-032 to 'Complete those activities required by the 241-Z Treatment and Storage Unit's RCRA Closure Plan' four years and seven months ahead of this legally enforceable milestone. In addition, the project completed TPA Milestone M-083-042 to 'Complete transition and dismantlement of the 241-2 Waste Treatment Facility' four years and four months ahead of schedule. The project used an innovative approach in developing the project-specific RCRA closure plan to assure clear integration between the 241-Z RCRA closure activities and ongoing and future CERCLA actions at PFP. This approach provided a regulatory mechanism within the RCRA closure plan to place segments of the closure that were not practical to address at this time into future actions under CERCLA. Lessons learned from th is approach can be applied to other closure projects within the DOE Complex to control scope creep and mitigate risk. A paper on this topic, entitled 'Integration of the 241-Z Building D and D Under CERCLA with RCRA Closure at the PFP', was presented at the 2007 Waste Management Conference in Tucson, Arizona. In addition, techniques developed by the 241-Z D&D Project to control airborne contamination, clean the interior of the waste tanks, don and doff protective equipment, size-reduce plutonium-contaminated process piping, and mitigate thermal stress for the workers can be applied to other cleanup activities. The project-management team developed a strategy utilizing early characterization, targeted cleanup, and close coordination with PFP Criticality Engineering to significantly streamline the waste- handling costs associated with the project . The project schedule was structured to support an early transition to a criticality 'incredible' status for the 241-Z Facility. The cleanup work was sequenced and coordinated with project-specific criticality analysis to allow the fissile material waste being generated to be managed in a bulk fashion, instead of individual waste packages. This approach negated the need for real-time assay of individ

JOHNSTON GA

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Recycle of the treated effluent from the Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility: Engineering study  

SciTech Connect

During normal N Reactor operation there will be low-level radioactive liquid effluent flows discharged to the planned Liquid Effluent Treatment Facility (LETF). The LETF will filter and treat these flows to decrease the radioactive prior to discharging the effluent to the Liquid Waste Disposal Facility (LWDF) soil column. This report examines the feasibility and economics of recycling the treated effluent to the N Reactor for reuse thus eliminating or reducing discharges to the soil. The study concluded that recycling LETF effluent for reuse in the primary coolant system and in the fuel storage basin is technically feasible. However, the high cost to provide recycle water meeting the minimum N reactor chemical requirements and radiological concerns may not be justified due to the limited reactor operating life. The study concluded that inexpensive piping modifications to the Building 107N recirculation system would provide additional flow to alleviate the fuel basin clarity problem during refueling. This change would avoid the disposal of 62.2 million gal of treated water per year to the soil column. 21 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

Shearer, E.A.; Janke, D.S.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Treatment Facility D P.W. Krauter J.E. Harrar  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

129050 129050 Effect of C02-Air Mixtures on the pH of Air-Stripped Water at Treatment Facility D P.W. Krauter J.E. Harrar S .P. Orloff January1998 or may not be those of the Laboratory. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405ENG-48. DISCLAIMER This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agencv of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor the University of California nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific

129

SECONDARY WASTE/ETF (EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY) PRELIMINARY PRE-CONCEPTUAL ENGINEERING STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This pre-conceptual engineering study is intended to assist in supporting the critical decision (CD) 0 milestone by providing a basis for the justification of mission need (JMN) for the handling and disposal of liquid effluents. The ETF baseline strategy, to accommodate (WTP) requirements, calls for a solidification treatment unit (STU) to be added to the ETF to provide the needed additional processing capability. This STU is to process the ETF evaporator concentrate into a cement-based waste form. The cementitious waste will be cast into blocks for curing, storage, and disposal. Tis pre-conceptual engineering study explores this baseline strategy, in addition to other potential alternatives, for meeting the ETF future mission needs. Within each reviewed case study, a technical and facility description is outlined, along with a preliminary cost analysis and the associated risks and benefits.

MAY TH; GEHNER PD; STEGEN GARY; HYMAS JAY; PAJUNEN AL; SEXTON RICH; RAMSEY AMY

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

130

Resource Conservation and Recovery Act ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford Facilities: Progress report for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989 - Volume 1 - Text  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Volume 1 of a two-volume document that describes the progress of 14 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects for the period July 1 to September 30, 1989. This volume discusses the projects; Volume 2 provides as-built diagrams, completion/inspection reports, drilling logs, and geophysical logs for wells drilled, completed, or logged during this period. Volume 2 can be found on microfiche in the back pocket of Volume 1. The work described in this document is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the management of Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy. Concentrations of ground-water constituents are compared to federal drinking water standards throughout this document for reference purposes. All drinking water supplied from the sampled aquifer meets regulatory standards for drinking water quality.

Smith, R.M.; Bates, D.J.; Lundgren, R.E.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Groundwater Age-Dating for Water Resource Characterization  

The LLNL Groundwater Noble Gas Mass Spectrometry Facility and Capability offers: Less model-dependent than tritium age dating: Traditional tritium age ...

132

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site integration of functional components or glove boxes, with the attendant integrated control system and undertaking continuous, non-stop, operational effectiveness proof tests. This paper describes the process, plant and technology used within the AMWTP and provides an outline of the associated design, procurement, fabrication, testing and construction.

Harrop, G.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

Operational characteristics of anaerobic digesters at selected municipal wastewater treatment facilities in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale and pilot plant studies at PNL have shown that powdered activated carbon is effective in improving volatile solids destruction and gas production in anaerobic digesters that are operating at less than normally expected levels of efficiency. To evaluate the applicability of this technology to digesters in the United States, digester operating characteristics at 60 facilities were surveyed and the number of stressed digesters estimated. The results show that although median values of the operating parameters conformed with those of a well-operated digester, 30% of the digesters surveyed were stressed with regard to at least one important parameter. Of the 30 largest treatment plants in the U.S., 7 fell into this category. Digester gas production and usage were then examined to determine the importance of methane off-gas as an energy source. A conservative estimate is that the gas produced nationally represents a heating value of about 2.36 x 10/sup 13/ Btu/year with a present value of $40 million. Of this amount, an estimated 75% is used either onsite or sold. Onsite uses include heating digesters and buildings, incinerating sludge, operating equipment, and generating electricity. The other 25% is flared and the energy value lost. The present value of the flared gas is about $10 million/year. Natural gas prices are projected to increase 150% over the next 7 years. If the present utilization ratio continues, the flared gas will be worth approximately $27 million in 1985. Presently, digester gas is mainly used for process heating and operating equipment. The technical and economic feasibility of recovering digester gas for electrical power generation, onsite equipment operation, and sales to other consumers (utilities, private companies) should be thoroughly investigated. If fuel gas recovery and utilization are found to be desirable, consideration should be given to expanding and upgrading anaerobic digester facilities in the U.S.

Spencer, R.R.; Wong, A.L.; Coates, J.A.; Ahlstrom, S.B.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

136

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

137

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY OBJECTIVE CS.1 Facility safety documentation that describes the "safety envelope" for the AR Project II activities is in place and has been implemented and administrative and engineering controls to prevent and mitigate hazards associated with commencing the AR Project II activities are tailored to the work being performed and the associated hazards to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: CS. 1.1 Criticality safety requirements are current, approved, and properly controlled. CS. 1.2 Facility safety and criticality requirements have been incorporated into applicable procedures and documents. REVIEW APPROACH: Document Reviews: * Review applicable CSEs for identification of facility hazards and development

138

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

139

LITERATURE REVIEW ON IMPACT OF GLYCOLATE ON THE 2H EVAPORATOR AND THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Glycolic acid (GA) is being studied as an alternate reductant in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed preparation process. It will either be a total or partial replacement for the formic acid that is currently used. A literature review has been conducted on the impact of glycolate on two post-DWPF downstream systems - the 2H Evaporator system and the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). The DWPF recycle stream serves as a portion of the feed to the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate enters the evaporator system from the glycolate in the recycle stream. The overhead (i.e., condensed phase) from the 2H Evaporator serves as a portion of the feed to the ETF. The literature search revealed that virtually no impact is anticipated for the 2H Evaporator. Glycolate may help reduce scale formation in the evaporator due to its high complexing ability. The drawback of the solubilizing ability is the potential impact on the criticality analysis of the 2H Evaporator system. It is recommended that at least a theoretical evaluation to confirm the finding that no self-propagating violent reactions with nitrate/nitrites will occur should be performed. Similarly, identification of sources of ignition relevant to glycolate and/or update of the composite flammability analysis to reflect the effects from the glycolate additions for the 2H Evaporator system are in order. An evaluation of the 2H Evaporator criticality analysis is also needed. A determination of the amount or fraction of the glycolate in the evaporator overhead is critical to more accurately assess its impact on the ETF. Hence, use of predictive models like OLI Environmental Simulation Package Software (OLI/ESP) and/or testing are recommended for the determination of the glycolate concentration in the overhead. The impact on the ETF depends on the concentration of glycolate in the ETF feed. The impact is classified as minor for feed glycolate concentrations {le} 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM. The ETF unit operations that will have minor/major impacts are chlorination, pH adjustment, 1st mercury removal, organics removal, 2nd mercury removal, and ion exchange. For minor impacts, the general approach is to use historical process operations data/modeling software like OLI/ESP and/or monitoring/compiled process operations data to resolve any uncertainties with testing as a last resort. For major impacts (i.e., glycolate concentrations > 33 mg/L or 0.44 mM), testing is recommended. No impact is envisaged for the following ETF unit operations regardless of the glycolate concentration - filtration, reverse osmosis, ion exchange resin regeneration, and evaporation.

Adu-Wusu, K.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Pilot studies to achieve waste minimization and enhance radioactive liquid waste treatment at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Radioactive and Industrial Wastewater Science Group manages and operates the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The RLWTF treats low-level radioactive liquid waste generated by research and analytical facilities at approximately 35 technical areas throughout the 43-square-mile site. The RLWTF treats an average of 5.8 million gallons (21.8-million liters) of liquid waste annually. Clarifloculation and filtration is the primary treatment technology used by the RLWTF. This technology has been used since the RLWTF became operable in 1963. Last year the RLWTF achieved an average of 99.7% removal of gross alpha activity in the waste stream. The treatment process requires the addition of chemicals for the flocculation and subsequent precipitation of radionuclides. The resultant sludge generated during this process is solidified in drums and stored or disposed of at LANL.

Freer, J.; Freer, E.; Bond, A. [and others

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Supplemental Power for the town of Browning Waste-Water Treatment Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report is issued for the "Supplemental power for the Town of Browning waste-water treatment facility" under the Field Verification Program for Small Wind Turbines Grant. The grant application was submitted on April 16, 1999 wherein the full description of this project is outlined. The project was initially designed to test the Bergy small wind turbines, 10 kW, applicability to residential and commercial applications. The objectives of the project were the following: 1. To verify the performance of the BWC Excel-S/E model wind turbine in an operational application in the fierce winds and severe weather conditions of the Class V winds of the Blackfeet Indian Reservation of Northern Montana. 2. To open up the Blackfeet reservation and northern Montana, to government sponsored, regionally distributed wind generation programs. 3. To examine the natural partnership of wind/electric with water pumping and water purification applications whose requirements parallel the variably available nature of energy produced by wind. 4. To provide data and hands-on experience to citizens, scientists, political leaders, utility operators and Tribal planners with regard to the potential uses of small-capacity, distributed-array wind turbines on the Blackfeet Reservation and in other areas of northern Montana. This project has not been without a few, which were worked out and at the time of this report continue to be worked on with the installation of two new Trace Technologies invertors and a rebuilt one with new technology inside. For the most part when the system has worked it produced power that was used within the wastewater system as was the purpose of this project.

William Morris; Dennis Fitzpatrick

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Interim Control Strategy for the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond - Two-year Update  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Cleanup Project has prepared this interim control strategy for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office pursuant to DOE Order 5400.5, Chapter 11.3e (1) to support continued discharges to the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility Sewage Treatment Facility Disposal Pond. In compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, a 2-year review of the Interim Control Strategy document has been completed. This submittal documents the required review of the April 2005 Interim Control Strategy. The Idaho Cleanup Project's recommendation is unchanged from the original recommendation. The Interim Control Strategy evaluates three alternatives: (1) re-route the discharge outlet to an uncontaminated area of the TSF-07; (2) construct a new discharge pond; or (3) no action based on justification for continued use. Evaluation of Alternatives 1 and 2 are based on the estimated cost and implementation timeframe weighed against either alternative's minimal increase in protection of workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of Alternative 3, continued use of the TSF-07 Disposal Pond under current effluent controls, is based on an analysis of four points: - Record of Decision controls will protect workers and the public - Risk of increased contamination is low - Discharge water will be eliminated in the foreseeable future - Risk of contamination spread is acceptable. The Idaho Cleanup Project recommends Alternative 3, no action other than continued implementation of existing controls and continued deactivation, decontamination, and dismantlement efforts at the Test Area North/Technical Support Facility.

L. V. Street

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Appendix A, Environmental and regulatory planning and documentation: Draft  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report, Appendix A, Environmental & Regulatory Planning & Documentation, identifies the regulatory requirements that would be imposed on the operation or construction of a facility designed to process the INEL`s waste streams. These requirements are contained in five reports that discuss the following topics: (1) an environmental compliance plan and schedule, (2) National Environmental Policy Act requirements, (3) preliminary siting requirements, (4) regulatory justification for the project, and (5) health and safety criteria.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

New Pump and Treat Facility Remedial Action Work Plan For Test Area North Final Groundwater Remediation, Operable Unit 1-07B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This remedial action work plan identifies the approach and requirements for implementing the medial zone remedial action for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B, at the Idaho National Laboratory. This plan details the management approach for the construction and operation of the New Pump and Treat Facility (NPTF). As identified in the remediatial design/remedial action scope of work, a separate remedial design/remedial action work plan will be prepared for each remedial component of the Operable Unit 1-07B remedial action.

Nelson, L. O.

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes S. L. Ansley M. Leecaster

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effect of distance to radiation treatment facility on use of radiation therapy after mastectomy in elderly women  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: We sought to study the effect of distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility on the use of postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) in elderly women. Methods and Materials: Using data from the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare (SEER-Medicare) database, we analyzed 19,787 women with Stage I or II breast cancer who received mastectomy as definitive surgery during 1991 to 1999. Multivariable logistic regression was used to investigate the association of distance with receipt of PMRT after adjusting for clinical and sociodemographic factors. Results: Overall 2,075 patients (10.5%) treated with mastectomy received PMRT. In addition to cancer and patient characteristics, in our primary analysis, increasing distance to the nearest radiation treatment facility was independently associated with a decreased likelihood of receiving PMRT (OR 0.996 per additional mile, p = 0.01). Secondary analyses revealed that the decline in PMRT use appeared at distances of more than 25 miles and was statistically significant for those patients living more than 75 miles from the nearest radiation facility (odds of receiving PMRT of 0.58 [95% CI 0.34-0.99] vs. living within 25 miles of such a facility). The effect of distance on PMRT appeared to be more pronounced with increasing patient age (>75 years). Variation in the effect of distance on radiation use between regions of the country and nodal status was also identified. Conclusions: Oncologists must be cognizant of the potential barrier to quality care that is posed by travel distance, especially for elderly patients; and policy makers should consider this fact in resource allocation decisions about radiation treatment centers.

Punglia, Rinaa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: rpunglia@lroc.harvard.edu; Weeks, Jane C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Neville, Bridget A. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Earle, Craig C. [Division of Medical Oncology, Center for Outcomes and Policy Research, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are "preventive maintenance"

149

from Isotope Production Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium - 2 - 2:32 Isotope cancer...

150

Assessment of Air Emissions at the U S Liquids Exploration and Production Land Treatment Facility  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to make the first set of measurements documenting the potential for emissions of pollutants from exploration and production (E&P) waste disposal facilities at Bourg, Louisiana and Bateman Island, Louisiana. The objective of the project was to quantify the emissions and to determine whether the measured emissions were potentially harmful to human health of workers and the adjacent community. The study, funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) is designed to complement additional studies funded by Louisiana Department of Natural Resources (LADNR) and the American Petroleum Institute. The distinguishing feature of this study is that actual, independent field measurements of emissions were used to assess the potential problems of this disposal technology. Initial measurements were made at the Bourg, LA facility, adjacent to the community of Grand Bois in late 1998-early 1999. Emission measurements were performed using aluminum chambers placed over the surface of the landfarm cells. Air was pulled through the chambers and the concentration of the contaminants in the air exiting the chambers was measured. The contaminants of interest were the ''BTEX'' compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylene), commonly found in E&P wastes and hydrogen sulfide, a noxious gas present naturally in many E&P wastes and crude oils. Measurements indicated that emissions were measurable using the techniques developed for the study. However, when the air concentrations of these contaminants that developed above the landfarm cells were compared with standards for workers from the Occupational and Safety and Health Association (''OSHA'') and for communities (Louisiana's ambient air standards), levels were not of concern. Since amounts of wastes being processed by the Bourg facility were considerably lower than normal, a decision was made to continue the study at the Bateman Island facility near Morgan City, LA. This facility was receiving more normal loadings of E&P wastes. Additional emission measurements were made at the Bateman Island facility within cells over a range of ''ages'', from those most recently loaded with E&P wastes to cells that have not received wastes for 9 months or more. As expected the greatest chance for emissions when the cell is most recently loaded. Again, measured fluxes did not produce air concentrations that were of concern. As expected, the highest fluxes were observed in the cells that had recently received wastes and older cells had very low emissions. Measurements of emissions of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) were also conducted at these two facilities. Levels of emissions were similar to the xange observed in the literature for natural salt marshes that surround these facilities. Production of sulfide within the cells was also measured by the most sensitive techniques available and measured sulfide production rates were low in the samples tested. The only potential concern at the facility with regards to sulfide was the levels of sulfide emitted from the sumps. The facility logbook at Bourg was analyzed to determine a time sequence of activities over 1998-1999. The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality conducted a time-series of air concentrations for hazardous air pollutants during this period at the fenceline of the Bourg facility. These data were characterized by periods of static concentrations interspersed with peaks. A series of peaks were analyzed and compared with logbook records for the activities occurring at the time. In reverse fashion, a set of activities documented by the logbook was examined and the concentrations of benzene that developed from these activities were documented. No direct correlation could be made with the observed peaks and any activities suggesting that concentrations of benzene at the fenceline may be the result of a complex suite of activities including onsite activities not documented in the logbook (loading of the cells by truck haulers) and offsite activities (automobile traffic). Based on these results several recomme

John H. Pardue; K.T. Valsaraj

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations (OP) Conduct of Operations (OP) OBJECTIVE OP.1 Resources are effectively allocated to address environmental, safety, health, and quality (ESH&Q), programmatic, and operational considerations required for commencing AR Project II activities to meet the following criteria: CRITERIA: OP.1.1. There are sufficient numbers of trained/qualified operations personnel to conduct and support the activity. OP. 1.2 There are adequate facilities and equipment available to ensure operational support is adequate for the activity. (Such support services include operations, training, maintenance, waste management, environmental protection, industrial safety and hygiene, radiological protection and health physics, emergency preparedness, fire protection, quality assurance, criticality safety, and

152

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to receive KOP material, enhances heat conduction, and functions as a heat source and sink during drying operations. This use of the copper insert represents a significant change to the thermal model compared to that used for the fuel calculations. A number of cases were run representing a spectrum of normal and upset conditions for the drying process. Dozens of cases have been run on cold vacuum drying of fuel MCOs. Analysis of these previous calculations identified four cases that provide a solid basis for judgments on the behavior of MCO in drying operations. These four cases are: (1) Normal Process; (2) Degraded vacuum pumping; (3) Open MCO with loss of annulus water; and (4) Cool down after vacuum drying. The four cases were run for two sets of input parameters for KOP MCOs: (1) a set of parameters drawn from safety basis values from the technical data book and (2) a sensitivity set using parameters selected to evaluate the impact of lower void volume and smaller particle size on MCO behavior. Results of the calculations for the drying phase cases are shown in Table ES-2. Cases using data book safety basis values showed dry out in 9.7 hours and heat rejection sufficient to hold temperature rise to less than 25 C. Sensitivity cases which included unrealistically small particle sizes and corresponding high reactive surface area showed higher temperature increases that were limited by water consumption. In this document and in the attachment (Apthorpe, R. and M.G. Plys, 2010) cases using Technical Databook safety basis values are referred to as nominal cases. In future calculations such cases will be called safety basis cases. Also in these documents cases using parameters that are less favorable to acceptable performance than databook safety values are referred to as safety cases. In future calculations such cases will be called sensitivity cases or sensitivity evaluations Calculations to be performed in support of the detailed design and formal safety basis documentation will expand the calculations presented in this document to include: additional features of th

SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

153

Compendium of ordinances for groundwater protection  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is an extremely important resource in the Tennessee Valley. Nearly two-thirds of the Tennessee Valley's residents rely, at least in part, on groundwater supplies for drinking water. In rural areas, approximately ninety-five percent of residents rely on groundwater for domestic supplies. Population growth and economic development increase the volume and kinds of wastes requiring disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal which can lead to groundwater contamination. In addition to disposal problems associated with increases in conventional wastewater and solid waste, technological advancements in recent decades have resulted in new chemicals and increased usage in agriculture, industry, and the home. Unfortunately, there has not been comparable progress in identifying the potential long-term effects of these chemicals, in managing them to prevent contamination of groundwater, or in developing treatment technologies for removing them from water once contamination has occurred. The challenge facing residence of the Tennessee Valley is to manage growth and economic and technological development in ways that will avoid polluting the groundwater resource. Once groundwater has been contaminated, cleanup is almost always very costly and is sometimes impractical or technically infeasible. Therefore, prevention of contamination -- not remedial treatment--is the key to continued availability of usable groundwater. This document discusses regulations to aid in this prevention.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Ecological survey for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of field ecological surveys conducted by the Center for Integrated Environmental Technologies (CIET) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) at four candidate locations for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of these surveys was to comply with all Federal laws and Executive Orders to identify and evaluate any potential environmental impacts because of the project. The boundaries of the candidate location were marked with blaze-orange lath survey marker stakes by the project management. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the marker stakes were made, and input to the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS). Field surveys were conducted to assess any potential impact to any important species, important habitats, and to any environmental study areas. The GIS location data was overlayed onto the INEL vegetation map and an analysis of vegetation classes on the locations was done. Results of the field surveys indicate use of Candidate Location {number_sign}1 by pygmy rabbits (Sylvilagus idahoensis) and expected use by them of Candidate Locations {number_sign}3 and {number_sign}9. Pygmy rabbits are categorized as a C2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Two other C2 species, the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) and the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) would also be expected to frequent the candidate locations. Candidate Location {number_sign}5 at the north end of the INEL is in the winter range of a large number of pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana).

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) CONDUCT OF OPERATIONS (OP) Objective: OP.1 Adequate and correct procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting treatment activities. (CR1, CR-10) Criteria: a. All required procedures, AMOWs, PTWs, and work orders have been prepared, validated, and approved for all routine treatment and support activities. b. Procedures include actions for anticipated abnormal or emergency conditions. c. Workers have demonstrated their familiarity and knowledge of the procedures during interviews and mockup operations. Objective: OP.2 Routine drills have been prepared and conducted for the DTF drum treatment activities. (CR11) Criteria; a. Drills have been prepared that address the anticipated abnormal and

156

F/H seepage basin groundwater influent, effluent, precipitated sludge characterization task technical plan  

SciTech Connect

A treatability study to support the development of a remediation system which would reduce the contaminant levels in groundwater removed from the aquifers in the vicinity of the F/H seepage basins and southwest of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River facility was conducted. Proposed changes in the remediation system require an additional study to determine whether precipitated sludge generated from the proposed remediation system will be hazardous as defined by RCRA. Several contaminants, such as lead and mercury, are above the groundwater protection standards. The presence of radionuclides and other contaminants in the sludge does not present a problem provided that the sludge can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The study has been developed in such a manner as to cover the possible range of treatment options that may be used.

Siler, J.L.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 1, Waste streams and treatment technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Readiness Assessment for MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility - Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project … 5-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) RADIATION PROTECTION (RP) Objective: RP.1 Adequate and correct contamination control procedures and safety limits are in place for operating the DTF ventilation system and conducting drum treatment operations in the DTF. (CR1, CR10) a. A thorough hazard analysis addressing contamination control and radiation protection has been completed for drum treatment activities in the DTF. b. The design of the DTF and ventilation system is adequate to prevent the spread of contamination. The adequacy has been demonstrated by testing and mockup operations. c. Appropriate limits, contamination control methods, and radiation protection practices have been identified and included in the applicable AMOW, PTW and procedures. d. Adequate radiation monitoring instruments are installed and properly located

159

Report on the Best Available Technology (BAT) for the treatment of the INEL Central Laundry and Respirator Facility (CFA-617)  

SciTech Connect

The Central Laundry and Respirator Facility (CLRF) designated by the building number of CFA-617 has been addressed as a potential source of contamination to the Central Facilities Area (CFA) subsurface drainage field which also receives waste water from the current CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (STP). Currently, discharges from the CLRF have been below set guidelines, DCG. A new STP has been proposed for the CFA. Since the CLRF has been designated as a potential source of contamination, a Best Available Technology (BAT) assessment was requested to determine what action should be taken in respect to the aqueous discharges from the CLRF. The BAT assessment involved source definition, technology evaluation, BAT matrix development, BAT selection, and BAT documentation. The BAT for the Central laundry and Respirator Facility selected the treatment which would impact the CLRF and the new STP the least in all aspects considered and was the system of filtration and a lined pond for natural evaporation of the water. The system will provide an isolation of this waste stream from all other CFA waste water which will be treated at the new STP. Waste minimization possibilities exist within the laundry process and are considered. These minimization actions will reduce the amount of waste water being released, but will result in raising the contaminate's concentrations (the total mass will remain the same). The second option was the use of ion exchange to remove the contaminates and recycle the water back to the wash and rinse cycles in the laundry. 3 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Miyasaki, D.H.; Heiser, D.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2009  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the findings of the groundwater and leachate monitoring and sampling at the Environmental restoration Disposal Facility for calendar year 2009. The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence, D.W. Woolery

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Determination of Baselines for Evaluation and Promotion of Energy Efficiency in Wastewater Treatment Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment plants are one of the largest energy consumers managed by the public sector. As plants expand in the future to accommodate population growth, energy requirements will substantially increase. Thus, implementation of energy efficient technologies is crucial in reducing national energy consumption. A detailed understanding of the current industry standards (baselines) is needed to estimate the energy savings potential for advanced state-of-the-art technologies and to provide incentives for application of the new technologies in retrofit and new construction projects. This paper summarizes the process BASE Energy, Inc. (BASE) went through to establish baselines to compare the energy performance of potential energy efficient technologies in the wastewater treatment industry that can be applied to energy efficiency programs available for wastewater treatment plants.

Chow, S. A.; Ganji, A. R.; Fok, S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Mixed and Low-Level Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files, Part 1, Mixed waste streams  

SciTech Connect

This appendix contains the mixed and low-level waste engineering design files (EDFS) documenting each low-level and mixed waste stream investigated during preengineering studies for Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. The EDFs provide background information on mixed and low-level waste generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. They identify, characterize, and provide treatment strategies for the waste streams. Mixed waste is waste containing both radioactive and hazardous components as defined by the Atomic Energy Act and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, respectively. Low-level waste is waste that contains radioactivity and is not classified as high-level waste, transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel, or 11e(2) byproduct material as defined by DOE 5820.2A. Test specimens of fissionable material irradiated for research and development only, and not for the production of power or plutonium, may be classified as low-level waste, provided the concentration of transuranic is less than 100 nCi/g. This appendix is a tool that clarifies presentation format for the EDFS. The EDFs contain waste stream characterization data and potential treatment strategies that will facilitate system tradeoff studies and conceptual design development. A total of 43 mixed waste and 55 low-level waste EDFs are provided.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Summary of treatment, storage, and disposal facility usage data collected from U.S. Department of Energy sites  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the level and extent of treatment, storage, and disposal facility (TSDF) assessment duplication. Commercial TSDFs are used as an integral part of the hazardous waste management process for those DOE sites that generate hazardous waste. Data regarding the DOE sites` usage have been extracted from three sets of data and analyzed in this report. The data are presented both qualitatively and quantitatively, as appropriate. This information provides the basis for further analysis of assessment duplication to be documented in issue papers as appropriate. Once the issues have been identified and adequately defined, corrective measures will be proposed and subsequently implemented.

Jacobs, A.; Oswald, K. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Trump, C. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Golden, CO (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Ecological surveys of the proposed high explosives wastewater treatment facility region  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) proposes to improve its treatment of wastewater from high explosives (HE) research and development activities. The proposed project would focus on a concerted waste minimization effort to greatly reduce the amount of wastewater needing treatment. The result would be a 99% decrease in the HE wastewater volume, from the current level of 6,760,000 L/mo (1,786,000 gal./mo) to 41,200 L/mo (11,000 gal./mo). This reduction would entail closure of HE wastewater outfalls, affecting some wetland areas that depend on HE wastewater effluents. The outfalls also provide drinking water for many wildlife species. Terminating the flow of effluents at outfalls would represent an improvement in water quality in the LANL region but locally could have a negative effect on some wetlands and wildlife species. None of the affected species are protected by any state or federal endangered species laws. The purpose of this report is to briefly discuss the different biological studies that have been done in the region of the project area. This report is written to give biological information and baseline data and the biota of the project area.

Haarmann, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Groundwater monitoring in china  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Groundwater accounts for 1/3 of the water resources in China and is indispensable for water supply and ecological support in many areas, especially in North China. But unreasonable groundwater development has caused some serious geo-environment problems ...

Qingcheng He; Cai Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Documentation assessment, Project C-018H, 200-E area effluent treatment facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Project C-018H is one of the fourteen subprojects to the Hanford Environmental Compliance (HEC) Project. Project C-018H provides treatment and disposal for the 242-A Evaporator and PUREX plant process condensate waste streams. This project used the Integrated Management Team (IMT) approach proposed by RL. The IMT approach included all affected organizations on the project team to coordinate and execute all required project tasks, while striving to integrate and satisfy all technical, operational, functional, and organizational objectives. The HEC Projects were initiated in 1989. Project C-018H began in early 1990, with completion of construction currently targeted for mid-1995. This assessment was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of the management control on design documents and quality assurance records developed and submitted for processing, use, and retention for the Project. The assessment focused primarily on the overall adequacy and quality of the design documentation currently being submitted to the project document control function.

Peres, M.W.; Connor, M.D.; Mertelendy, J.I.

1994-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless Portsmouth Site Feeds Bacteria to Render Hazardous Groundwater Waste Harmless April 2, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns hazardous waste into harmless end-products. Neil Smith puts a trained eye on the pressure and flow of a food-grade com¬pound being injected into an under¬ground plume of hazardous waste near the X-720 Maintenance Facility at the DOE Piketon Site. The sodium lactate compound promotes bacterial growth in the groundwater that turns

169

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

DEMONSTRATION OF SIMULATED WASTE TRANSFERS FROM TANK AY-102 TO THE HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

In support of Hanford's AY-102 Tank waste certification and delivery of the waste to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked by the Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate the effectiveness of mixing and transferring the waste in the Double Shell Tank (DST) to the WTP Receipt Tank. This work is a follow-on to the previous 'Demonstration of Internal Structures Impacts on Double Shell Tank Mixing Effectiveness' task conducted at SRNL 1. The objective of these transfers was to qualitatively demonstrate how well waste can be transferred out of a mixed DST tank and to provide insights into the consistency between the batches being transferred. Twelve (12) different transfer demonstrations were performed, varying one parameter at a time, in the Batch Transfer Demonstration System. The work focused on visual comparisons of the results from transferring six batches of slurry from a 1/22nd scale (geometric by diameter) Mixing Demonstration Tank (MDT) to six Receipt Tanks, where the consistency of solids in each batch could be compared. The simulant used in this demonstration was composed of simulated Hanford Tank AZ-101 supernate, gibbsite particles, and silicon carbide particles, the same simulant/solid particles used in the previous mixing demonstration. Changing a test parameter may have had a small impact on total solids transferred from the MDT on a given test, but the data indicates that there is essentially no impact on the consistency of solids transferred batch to batch. Of the multiple parameters varied during testing, it was found that changing the nozzle velocity of the Mixer Jet Pumps (MJPs) had the biggest impact on the amount of solids transferred. When the MJPs were operating at 8.0 gpm (22.4 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D=0.504 ft{sup 2}/s), the solid particles were more effectively suspended, thus producing a higher volume of solids transferred. When the MJP flow rate was reduced to 5 gpm (14 ft/s nozzle velocity, U{sub o}D = 0.315 ft{sup 2}/s) to each pump, dead zones formed in the tank, resulting in fewer solids being transferred in each batch to the Receipt Tanks. The larger, denser particles were displaced (preferentially to the smaller particles) to one of the two dead zones and not re-suspended for the duration of the test. As the liquid level dropped in the MDT, re-suspending the particles became less effective (6th batch). The poor consistency of the solids transferred in the 6th batch was due to low liquid level in the MDT, thus poor mixing by the MJPs. Of the twelve tests conducted the best transfer of solids occurred during Test 6 and 8 where the MJP rotation was reduced to 1.0 rpm.

Adamson, D.; Poirier, M.; Steeper, T.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Environmental Sciences Division Groundwater Program Office. Annual report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This first edition of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems GWPO for fiscal year (FY) 1993. This introductory section describes the GWPO`s staffing, organization, and funding sources. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater program at the three Oak Ridge facilities [ORNL, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], and the PGDP and PORTS, respectively. Several years ago, Energy systems senior management recognized that the manner in which groundwater activities were conducted at the five facilities could result in unnecessary duplication of effort, inadequate technical input to decisions related to groundwater issues, and could create a perception within the regulatory agencies of a confusing and inconsistent approach to groundwater issues at the different facilities. Extensive interactions among management from Environmental Compliance, Environmental Restoration (ER), Environmental Sciences Division, Environmental Safety and Health, and the five facilities ultimately led to development of a net technical umbrella organization for groundwater. On April 25, 1991, the GWPO was authorized to be set up within ORNL thereby establishing a central coordinating office that would develop a consistent technical and administrative direction for the groundwater programs of all facilities and result in compliance with all relevant U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations such as RCRA and Comprehensive Environmental Restoration, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) as well as U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) regulations and orders. For example, DOE Order 5400.1, issued on November 9, 1988, called for each DOE facility to develop an environmental monitoring program for all media (e.g., air, surface water, and groundwater).

Not Available

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

173

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

174

Proposed Use of a Constructed Wetland for the Treatment of Metals in the S-04 Outfall of the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is part of an integrated waste treatment system at the SRS to treat wastes containing radioactive contaminants. In the early 1980s the DOE recognized that there would be significant safety and cost advantages associated with immobilizing the radioactive waste in a stable solid form. The Defense Waste Processing Facility was designed and constructed to accomplish this task.

Glover, T.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility project. Executive summary: Volume 1, Program summary information; Volume 2, Waste stream technical summary: Draft  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. The engineering studies, initiated in July 1991, identified 37 mixed waste streams, and 55 low-level waste streams. This report documents the waste stream information and potential treatment strategies, as well as the regulatory requirements for the Department of Energy-owned treatment facility option. The total report comprises three volumes and two appendices. This report consists of Volume 1, which explains the overall program mission, the guiding assumptions for the engineering studies, and summarizes the waste stream and regulatory information, and Volume 2, the Waste Stream Technical Summary which, encompasses the studies conducted to identify the INEL`s waste streams and their potential treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project July 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. This 2009 photo shows a trenching machine, which is capable of cutting a continuous trench up to 30 feet deep and 3 feet wide. The machine was used in a pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of zeolite placement as the trench was dug. This ensured a consistent depth and width for the zeolite placement along the entire length of the permeable treatment wall.

177

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

178

1997 Comprehensive TNX Area Annual Groundwater and Effectiveness Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

Shallow groundwater beneath the TNX Area at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) such as trichloroethylene (TCE) and carbon tetrachloride. In November 1994, an Interim Record of Decision (IROD) was agreed to and signed by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the South Carolina Department of Health {ampersand} Environmental Control (SCDHEC). The Interim Record of Decision requires the installation of a hybrid groundwater corrective action (HGCA) to stabilize the plume of groundwater contamination and remove CVOCs dissolved in the groundwater. The hybrid groundwater corrective action included a recovery well network, purge water management facility, air stripper, and an airlift recirculation well. The recirculation well was dropped pursuant to a test that indicated it to be ineffective at the TNX Area. Consequently, the groundwater corrective action was changed from a hybrid to a single action, pump-and-treat approach. The Interim Action (IA) T-1 air stripper system began operation on September 16, 1996. a comprehensive groundwater monitoring program was initiated to measure the effectiveness of the system. As of December 31, 1997, the system has treated 32 million gallons of contaminated groundwater removed 32 pounds of TCE. The recovery well network created a `capture zone` that stabilized the plume of contaminated groundwater.

Chase, J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Report of exploratory trenching for the Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three exploratory trenches, totaling about 1,300 ft in length were excavated and logged across the site of a proposed Decontamination and Waste Treatment Facility (DWTF), to assess whether or not active Greenville fault zone, located about 4100 ft to the northeast, pass through or within 200 ft of the site. The layout of the trenches (12-16 ft deep) was designed to provide continuous coverage across the DWTF site and an area within 200 ft northeast and southwest of the site. Deposits exposed in the trench walls are primarily of clay, and are typical of weakly cemented silty sand to sandy silt with the alluvial deposits in the area. Several stream channels were encountered that appear to have an approximated east-west orintation. The channel deposits consist of well-sorted, medium to coarse-grained sand and gravel. A well-developed surface soil is laterally continuous across all three trenches. The soil reportedly formed during late Pleistocene time (about 35,000 to 40,000 yr before present) based on soil stratigraphic analyses. A moderately to well-developed buried soil is laterally continuous in all three trenches, except locally where it has been removed by channelling. This buried soil apparently formed about 100,000 yr before present. At least one older, discontinuous soil is present below the 100,000-yr-old soil in some locations. The age of the older soil is unknown. At several locations, two discontinuous buried soils were observed between the surface soil and the 100,000-yr-old soil. Various overlapping stratigraphic units could be traced across the trenches providing a continuous datum of at least 100,000 yr to assess the presence or absence of faulting. The continuity of stratigraphic units in all the trenches demonstrated that no active faults pass through or within 200 ft of the proposed DWTF site.

Dresen, M.D.; Weiss, R.B.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The project area for the proposed Central Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility on the Savannah River Site includes a six-acre tract along Fourmile Branch and 18 mi of trunk line corridors. Archaeological investigations of the six-acre parcel resulted in the discovery of one small prehistoric site designated 38AK465. This cultural resource does not have the potential to add significantly to archaeological knowledge of human occupation in the region. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) therefore recommends that 38AK465 is not eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) and further recommends a determination of no effect. Archaeological survey along the trunk line corridors implicated previously recorded sites 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK415, 38AK417, 38AK419, and 38AK436. Past disturbance from construction had severely disturbed 38AK92 and no archaeological evidence of 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 was recovered during survey. Lacking further evidence for the existence of these sites, the SRARP recommends that 38AK92, 38AK145, 38AK419, and 38AK436 are not eligible for nomination to the NRHP and thus warrant a determination of no effect. Two of these sites, 38Ak415 and 38AK417, required further investigation to evaluate their archaeological significance. Both of the sites have the potential to yield significant data on the prehistoric period occupation of the Aiken Plateau and the SRARP recommends that they are eligible for nomination to the NRHP. The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program recommends that adverse effects to sites 38AK415 and 38AK417 from proposed construction can be mitigated through avoidance.

Stephenson, D.K.; Sassaman, K.E.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Part 2, Chemical constituents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains health and safety information relating to the chemicals that have been identified in the mixed waste streams at the Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Information is summarized in two summary sections--one for health considerations and one for safety considerations. Detailed health and safety information is presented in material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each chemical.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mixed and low-level waste treatment project: Appendix C, Health and safety criteria for the mixed and low-level waste treatment facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This report describes health and safety concerns associated with the Mixed and Low-level Waste Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Various hazards are described such as fire, electrical, explosions, reactivity, temperature, and radiation hazards, as well as the potential for accidental spills, exposure to toxic materials, and other general safety concerns.

Neupauer, R.M.; Thurmond, S.M.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

GROUNDWATER RADIOIODINE: PREVALENCE, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, AND POTENTIAL REMEDIAL APPROACHES  

SciTech Connect

Iodine-129 ({sup 129}I) has not received as much attention in basic and applied research as other contaminants associated with DOE plumes. These other contaminants, such as uranium, plutonium, strontium, and technetium are more widespread and exist at more DOE facilities. Yet, at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site {sup 129}I occurs in groundwater at concentrations significantly above the primary drinking water standard and there is no accepted method for treating it, other than pump-and-treat systems. With the potential arrival of a 'Nuclear Renaissance', new nuclear power facilities will be creating additional {sup 129}I waste at a rate of 1 Ci/gigawatts energy produced. If all 22 proposed nuclear power facilities in the U.S. get approved, they will produce more {sup 129}I waste in seven years than presently exists at the two facilities containing the largest {sup 129}I inventories, ({approx}146 Ci {sup 129}I at the Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site). Hence, there is an important need to fully understand {sup 129}I behavior in the environment to clean up existing plumes and to support the expected future expansion of nuclear power production. {sup 129}I is among the key risk drivers at all DOE nuclear disposal facilities where {sup 129}I is buried, because of its long half-life (16 million years), high toxicity (90% of the body's iodine accumulates in the thyroid), high inventory, and perceived high mobility in the subsurface environment. Another important reason that {sup 129}I is a key risk driver is that there is the uncertainty regarding its biogeochemical fate and transport in the environment. We typically can define {sup 129}I mass balance and flux at sites, but can not accurately predict its response to changes in the environment. This uncertainty is in part responsible for the low drinking water standard, 1 pCi/L {sup 129}I, and the low permissible inventory limits (Ci) at the Savannah River Site, Hanford Site, and the former Yucca Mountain disposal facilities. The objectives of this report are to: (1) compile the background information necessary to understand behavior of {sup 129}I in the environment, (2) discuss sustainable remediation approaches to {sup 129}I contaminated groundwater, and (3) identify areas of research that will facilitate remediation of {sup 129}I contaminated areas on DOE sites. Lines of scientific inquiry that would significantly advance the goals of basic and applied research programs for accelerating {sup 129}I environmental remediation and reducing uncertainty associated with disposal of {sup 129}I waste are: (1) Evaluation of amendments or other treatment systems that can sequester subsurface groundwater {sup 129}I. (2) Develop analytical techniques for measurement of total {sup 129}I that eliminate the necessity of collecting and shipping large samples of groundwater. (3) Develop and evaluate ways to manipulate areas with organic-rich soil, such as wetlands, to maximize {sup 129}I sorption, minimizing releases during anoxic conditions. (4) Develop analytical techniques that can identify the various {sup 129}I species in the subsurface aqueous and solid phases at ambient concentrations and under ambient conditions. (5) Identify the mechanisms and factors controlling iodine-natural organic matter interactions at appropriate environmental concentrations. (6) Understand the biological processes that transform iodine species throughout different compartments of subsurface waste sites and the role that these processes have on {sup 129}I flux.

Denham, M.; Kaplan, D.; Yeager, C.

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Management Plan is to define the function, organizational structure (including associated matrix organizations), interfaces, roles and responsibilities, authority, and relationship to the Department of Energy for the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO). GWPO is charged with the responsibility of coordinating all components of the groundwater program for Energy Systems. This mandate includes activities at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants.

Early, T.O.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

FINAL REPORT FOR THE REDUCTION OF CHROME (VI) TO CHROME (III) IN THE SECONDARY WASTE STREAM OF THE EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the laboratory results of RPP-PLAN-35958, Test Plan for the Effluent Treatment Facility to Reduce Chrome (VI) to Chrome (III) in the Secondary Waste Stream With the exception of the electrochemical corrosion scans, all work was carried out at the Center for Laboratory Science (CLS) located at the Columbia Basin College. This document summarizes the work carried out at CLS and includes the electrochemical scans and associated corrosion rates for 304 and 316L stainless steel.

DUNCAN JB; GUTHRIE MD

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

187

Final closure plan for the high-explosives open burn treatment facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document addresses the interim status closure of the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility, as detailed by Title 22, Division 4.5, Chapter 15, Article 7 of the Califonia Code of Regulations (CCR) and by Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, Subpart G, ``Closure and Post Closure.`` The Closure Plan (Chapter 1) and the Post- Closure Plan (Chapter 2) address the concept of long-term hazard elimination. The Closure Plan provides for capping and grading the HE Open Bum Treatment Facility and revegetating the immediate area in accordance with applicable requirements. The Closure Plan also reflects careful consideration of site location and topography, geologic and hydrologic factors, climate, cover characteristics, type and amount of wastes, and the potential for contaminant migration. The Post-Closure Plan is designed to allow LLNL to monitor the movement, if any, of pollutants from the treatment area. In addition, quarterly inspections will ensure that all surfaces of the closed facility, including the cover and diversion ditches, remain in good repair, thus precluding the potential for contaminant migration.

Mathews, S.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater April 17, 2013 - 1:26pm Addthis Subcontractor personnel install solar panels and other infrastructure on a 40-foot conex box that houses the batteries and control equipment for the 6 kilowatt photovoltaic system that powers the ETPTS groundwater treatment system. Subcontractor personnel install solar panels and other infrastructure on a 40-foot conex box that houses the batteries and control equipment for the 6 kilowatt photovoltaic system that powers the ETPTS groundwater treatment system. DOE was able to minimize impacts to the habitat of a federally protected mouse and provide the potential for relatively easy relocation by mounting the solar panels on the side of the conex box that houses the batteries and other system equipment.

189

Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater Rocky Flats Site Expands Solar Power for Treating Groundwater April 17, 2013 - 1:26pm Addthis Subcontractor personnel install solar panels and other infrastructure on a 40-foot conex box that houses the batteries and control equipment for the 6 kilowatt photovoltaic system that powers the ETPTS groundwater treatment system. Subcontractor personnel install solar panels and other infrastructure on a 40-foot conex box that houses the batteries and control equipment for the 6 kilowatt photovoltaic system that powers the ETPTS groundwater treatment system. DOE was able to minimize impacts to the habitat of a federally protected mouse and provide the potential for relatively easy relocation by mounting the solar panels on the side of the conex box that houses the batteries and other system equipment.

190

Optimal Conventional and Semi-Natural Treatments for the Upper Yakima Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Project; Treatment Definitions and Descriptions and Biological Specifications for Facility Design, 1995-1999 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Yakima Fisheries Project facilities (Cle Elum Hatchery and acclimation satellites) which provide the mechanism to conduct state-of-the-art research for addressing questions about spring chinook supplementation strategies. The definition, descriptions, and specifications for the Yakima spring chinook supplementation program permit evaluation of alternative fish culture techniques that should yield improved methods and procedures to produce wild-like fish with higher survival that can be used to rebuild depleted spring chinook stocks of the Columbia River Basin. The definition and description of three experimental treatments, Optimal Conventional (OCT), Semi-Natural (SNT), Limited Semi-Natural (LSNT), and the biological specifications for facilities have been completed for the upper Yakima spring chinook salmon stock of the Yakima Fisheries Project. The task was performed by the Biological Specifications Work Group (BSWG) represented by Yakama Indian Nation, Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, National Marine Fisheries Service, and Bonneville Power Administration. The control and experimental variables of the experimental treatments (OCT, SNT, and LSNT) are described in sufficient detail to assure that the fish culture facilities will be designed and operated as a production scale laboratory to produce and test supplemented upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Product specifications of the treatment groups are proposed to serve as the generic templates for developing greater specificity for measurements of product attributes. These product specifications will be used to monitor and evaluate treatment effects, with respect to the biological response variables (post release survival, long-term fitness, reproductive success and ecological interactions).

Hager, Robert C. (Hatchery Operations Consulting); Costello, Ronald J. (Mobrand Biometrics, Inc., Vashon Island, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Design considerations for pump-and-treat remediation based on characterization of industrial injection wells: Lessons learned from the groundwater interim action at the test area north of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a 2,305 km{sup 2} (890 mi{sup 2}) Federal Facility operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. The Test Area North (TAN) complex is located approximately 80 km (50 mi) northwest of Idaho Falls in the northern portion of the HSTEL and extends over an area of approximately 30 km{sup 2} (12 mi{sup 2}). The Technical Support Facility (TSF) is centrally located within TAN and consists of several experimental and support facilities for conducting research and development activities on nuclear reactor performance. Operations at TAN were initiated in the early 1950s to support the U.S. Air Force aircraft nuclear propulsion project and have continued over the years with various experimental and testing facilities. The TSF-05 Injection well was used from 1953 to 1972 to dispose of TAN liquid wastes in the fractured basalt of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was first identified as a groundwater contaminant in 1987 when it was found in the TAN drinking water above acceptable levels. The TAN Groundwater Interim Action at the INEL was intended to provide both interim containment and clean-up of contaminated groundwater resulting from the 40-year old injection well, TSF-05. The primary decontamination objective of the Groundwater Treatment Facility (GWTF) is to remove volatile organic compounds, primarily TCE. A pump-and-treat technology using air stripping, carbon adsorption, and resin ion exchange for strontium-90 ({sup 90}Sr) was selected in the Operable Unit 1-07A Groundwater Interim Action Record of Decision. Operations started on February 16, 1994 and activities were suspended on January 23, 1995 due to the inability to meet Remedial Action Objectives (RAOs).

Cotten, G.B.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of a pilot safety information document (PSID) for the replacement of radioactive liquid waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on recent decisions made by Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning the development of site-wide National Environmental Policy Act documents, an effort was undertaken to develop a Pilot Safety Information Document (PSID) for the replacement Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. The PSID documents risk analysis for the proposed facility and some of the alternatives, accident analysis, radioactive and hazardous material doses to off-site individuals, and the cumulative safety risk from adjacent facilities. In addition, this study also compared two methods for calculating the consequences of a radioactive spill. The methods compared were the Superfund model and the release fraction model. It was determined that the release fraction model gives a more realistic estimate of the doses incurred as the result of an accident, and that the Superfund model should be used for estimating the dose before and during the remediation effort. The cumulative safety risk was determined by calculating the exceedance probability if the individual dose from four geographically related facilities. The risk for cancer fatalities was determined to be within the DOE's Nuclear Safety Policy Goals.

Selvage, Ronald Derek

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project. Appendix B, Waste stream engineering files: Part 2, Low-level waste streams  

SciTech Connect

Mixed and low-level wastes generated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are required to be managed according to applicable State and Federal regulations, and Department of Energy Orders that provide for the protection of human health and the environment. The Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility Project was chartered in 1991, by the Department of Energy to provide treatment capability for these mixed and low-level waste streams. The first project task consisted of conducting engineering studies to identify the waste streams, their potential treatment strategies, and the requirements that would be imposed on the waste streams and the facilities used to process them. This report documents those studies so the project can continue with an evaluation of programmatic options, system tradeoff studies, and the conceptual design phase of the project. This report, appendix B, comprises the engineering design files for this project study. The engineering design files document each waste steam, its characteristics, and identified treatment strategies.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for in situ bioremediation of contaminated soil and groundwater. In particular, the invention relates to remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater by the injection of nutrients to stimulate growth of pollutant-degrading microorganisms. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Definition: Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater...

197

Inefficient remediation of ground-water pollution  

SciTech Connect

The problem of trying to remove ground-water pollution by pumping and treating are pointed out. Various Superfund sites are discussed briefly. It is pointed out that many chemicals have been discarded in an undocumented manner, and their place in the groundwater is not known. Results of a remedial program to remove perchloroethylene at a concentration of 6132 parts per billion from groundwater in a site in New Jersey showed that with an average extraction rate of 300 gallons per minute from 1978 to 1984 contamination level was lowered below 100 parts per billion. However, after shutdown of pumping the level rose to 12,588 parts per billion in 1988. These results lead the author to propose that the practical solutions for water supplies may be treatment at the time it enters the system for use.

Abelson, P.H.

1990-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

198

Investigation of groundwater recirculation for the removal of RDX from the Pantex Plant perched aquifer  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas, is a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Past and present operations at Pantex include the creation of chemical high explosives components for nuclear weapons and assembly and disassembly of nuclear weapons. The Pantex Plant is underlain by the Ogallala aquifer, which in this area, consists of the main water-bearing unit and a perched water zone. These are separated by a fine-grained zone of low permeability. Multiple contaminant plumes containing high explosive (HE) compounds have been detected in the perched aquifer beneath the plant. The occurrence of these contaminants is the result of past waste disposal practices at the facility. RDX is an HE compound, which has been detected in the groundwater of the perched aquifer at significant concentrations. A pilot-scale, dual-phase extraction treatment system has been installed at one location at the plant, east of Zone 12, to test the effectiveness of such a system on the removal of these contaminants from the subsurface. A tracer test using a conservative tracer, bromide (Br), was conducted at the treatment site in 1996. In addition to the bromide, RDX and water elevations in the aquifer were monitored. Using data from the tracer test and other relevant data from the investigations at Pantex, flow and contaminant transport in the perched aquifer were simulated with groundwater models. The flow was modeled using MODFLOW and the transport of contaminants in the aqueous phase was modeled using MT3D. Modeling the perched aquifer had been conducted to characterize the flow in the perched aquifer; estimate RDX retardation in the perched aquifer; and evaluate the use of groundwater re-circulation to enhance the extraction of RDX from the perched aquifer.

Woods, A.L. [ed.; Barnes, D.L. [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Boles, K.M.; Charbeneau, R.J. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Black, S.; Rainwater, K. [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States). Water Resources Center

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Opportunities for Energy Efficiency and Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California -- Phase I Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

state.aspx? id=124. California Energy Commission. (2000). "pubs/fuelcell.pdf. California Energy Commission (2003).Wastewater Treatment. California Energy Commission (2003).

Lekov, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

202

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

203

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

205

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

206

HUMAN MACHINE INTERFACE (HMI) EVALUATION OF ROOMS TA-50-1-60/60A AT THE RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE TREATMENT FACILITY (RLWTF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This effort addressed an evaluation of human machine interfaces (HMIs) in Room TA-50-1-60/60A of the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF). The evaluation was performed in accordance with guidance outlined in DOE-STD-3009, DOE Standard Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, 2006 [DOE 2006]. Specifically, Chapter 13 of DOE 2006 highlights the 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management, 2012, [CFR 2012] and DOE G 421.1-2 [DOE 2001a] requirements as they relate to the human factors process and, in this case, the safety of the RLWTF. The RLWTF is a Hazard Category 3 facility and, consequently, does not have safety-class (SSCs). However, safety-significant SSCs are identified. The transuranic (TRU) wastewater tanks and associated piping are the only safety-significant SSCs in Rooms TA-50-1-60/60A [LANL 2010]. Hence, the human factors evaluation described herein is only applicable to this particular assemblage of tanks and piping.

Gilmore, Walter E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stender, Kerith K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing...

208

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas) Electric generating or transmission facility: determination...

209

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds  

SciTech Connect

As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

3Q/4Q99 F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Corrective Action Report - Third and Fourth Quarter 1999, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) monitors groundwater quality at the F-Area Hazardous Waste management Facility (HWMF) and provides results of this monitoring to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) semiannually as required by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permit. SRS also performs monthly sampling of the Wastewater Treatment Unit (WTU) effluent in accordance with Section C of the Underground Injection Control (UIC) application.

Chase, J.

2000-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

211

Advanced Technology for Groundwater Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the evaluation of automatic and in situ groundwater monitoring technologies for application at nuclear power plant (NPP) sites. The project studies the state of technology of automatic and in situ groundwater monitoring technologies and assesses whether they can be used to enhance the current groundwater monitoring capabilities at NPPs. Technologies for automatically detecting tritium and technologies that monitor non-radiological groundwater characteristics were explored. The abili...

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Management plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study Groundwater Data Base  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Study (ORRHAGS) Groundwater Data Base has been compiled to consolidate groundwater data from the three US Department of Energy facilities located on the Oak Ridge Reservation: the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Each of these facilities maintains its own groundwater and well construction data bases. Data were extracted from the existing data bases, converted to a consistent format, and integrated into the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base structures. This data base management plan documents the development and maintenance of the ORRHAGS Groundwater Data Base and contains information on data base objectives; roles and responsibilities of the personnel involved; and flow, updating, and storage of the data.

Thompson, B.K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Site & Facility Restoration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Restoration Restoration Site & Facility Restoration Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) is the process of taking an active/excess/abandoned facility to a final disposition end state. Because of residual radioactivity, other hazardous constituents, and the physical condition of EM's facilities, D&D presents unique hazards that must be addressed from a safety, programmatic, environmental, and technological standpoint. Read more Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic

214

Groundwater Database | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Database Groundwater Database Groundwater Database DOE has one of the largest ground water contamination problems and subsequent cleanup responsibilities for a single entity in the world, in terms of the sheer volume of affected groundwater, number of plumes, range of hydrogeologic settings, and diversity of contaminant types. The Groundwater Database was developed to provide a centralized location for information relating to groundwater flow, contamination, and remedial approaches across the DOE complex. The database provides DOE management and other interested parties with an easily accessible, high level understanding of the type of contamination, magnitude of contamination, and dynamics of groundwater systems at DOE sites. It also identifies remedial approaches, exit strategies, long-term stewardship requirements, regulatory

215

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

216

In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from Solution in Groundwater down Gradient from Permeable Reactive Barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

Carpenter, Clay E.; Morrison, Stanley J.

1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

217

In-situ method to remove iron and other metals from solution in groundwater down gradient from permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for treating the flow of anaerobic groundwater through an aquifer with a primary treatment media, preferably iron, and then passing the treated groundwater through a second porous media though which an oxygenated gas is passed in order to oxygenate the dissolved primary treatment material and convert it into an insoluble material thereby removing the dissolved primary treatment material from the groundwater.

Carpenter, Clay E. (Grand Junction, CO); Morrison, Stanley J. (Grand Junction, CO)

2001-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

218

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

Evans, S. K.

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (LBL Facilities), April 23, 2013 (HSS CRAD 45-58, Rev. 0)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Department of U.S. Department of Energy Subject: Review of Documented Safety Analysis Development for the Hanford Site Waste Treatment and Immob ilization Plant (LBL Facilities) - C riteria and Review Approach D oc um~ HS: HSS CRAD 45-58 Rev: 0 Eff. Date: April 23, 2013 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Acting Di rec or, Office of Safety and Emergency Nltanagement Evaluations Date: Apri l 23 , 20 13 Criteria and Review Approach Document ~~ trd,James Low Date: April 23 , 20 13 1.0 PURPOSE Within the Office of H.ealth, Safety and Security (HSS), the Office of Enforcement and Overs ight, Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) miss io n is to assess the effectiveness of the environment, safety, health, and emergency management systems and practices used by line and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts  

SciTech Connect

Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Pilot Tests of In Situ Reactive Zone Groundwater Remediation for Arsenic Near a Coal Ash Pond  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In situ groundwater treatment is an alternative to groundwater extraction and above ground treatment. The applicability of this technology is being evaluated for the treatment of dissolved trace elements associated with ash impoundments and landfills. The objective of this work is to demonstrate practical in situ treatment through initial bench testing for technology selection followed by a field pilot test. Laboratory bench test results provided the basis for the field testing; ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

224

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

225

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

226

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

227

Groundwater Makes a Splash NNSS Groundwater Experts Meet at Devils...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

specialists have been examining the effects of contamination from historic underground nuclear testing on groundwater in and around the NNSS. These experts were on hand at the...

228

Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2007 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to DOE-LM on October 1, 2006. Requirements for CAU 447, as specified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 2005) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD), and the State of Nevada, includes groundwater monitoring in support of site closure. This is the first groundwater monitoring report prepared by DOE-LM for the PSA.

None

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

1.72 Groundwater Hydrology, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamentals of subsurface flow and transport, emphasizing the role of groundwater in the hydrologic cycle, the relation of groundwater flow to geologic structure, and the management of contaminated groundwater. Topics ...

Harvey, Charles

230

WHC-SD-W252-FHA-001, Rev. 0: Preliminary fire hazard analysis for Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Facility, Project W-252  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Fire Hazards Analysis was performed to assess the risk from fire and other related perils and the capability of the facility to withstand these hazards. This analysis will be used to support design of the facility.

Barilo, N.F.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project -...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(Treatment Alternatives For Process Wastewater at ORNL, ORNLCF-0603-R1, November 2007; HFIR and REDC Process Waste Drains and Waste Treatment Plant, ORNL Facilities Development...

232

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Groundwater Projects, Environmental Restoration Division, ERD...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OU I, IV, V, and VI also address groundwater contamination. The BNL Groundwater Status Report is an annual comprehensive summary of data collected from environmental restoration...

235

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater lies hidden beneath the soil, out of sight and largely out of mind. As a result, its poorly understood by most who depend on it for drinking water and other uses. Misconceptions about groundwater are common. In 1904, a Texas judge ruled that the existence, origin and movement of (ground) water...is so secret, occult and concealed...(that) any attempt to administer any set of legal rules in respect to it would be involved in hopeless uncertainty. In spite of increasing scientific knowledge, groundwater is still perceived in much the same way by the public today. Despite the lack of understanding, groundwater is the most significant water resource for most Americans. Roughly 75% of U.S. cities depend on groundwater for all or part of their water supplies. More than half of all Americans and 95% of all persons in rural areas rely on groundwater as their primary source of drinking water. Throughout the United States and the world, vital aquifers supply irrigation and drinking water for many regions More than 97% of the worlds usable freshwater supply an estimated 9 trillion acre feet is groundwater. Despite the seeming abundance of groundwater, there are concerns about how long its supplies will last, especially in areas where water use is high, and whether its quality is being threatened by natural and man-made contaminants.

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Quarterly report of RCRA groundwater monitoring data for period October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Hanford Site interim-status groundwater monitoring projects are conducted as either background, indicator parameter evaluation, or groundwater quality assessment monitoring programs as defined in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA); and Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities, as amended (40 CFR 265). Compliance with the 40 CFR 265 regulations is required by the Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303. Long-term laboratory contracts were approved on October 22, 1991. DataChem Laboratories of Salt Lake City, Utah, performs the hazardous chemicals analyses for the Hanford Site. Analyses for coliform bacteria are performed by Columbia/Biomedical Laboratories and for dioxin by TMS Analytical Services, Inc. International Technology Analytical Services Richland, Washington performs the radiochemical analyses. This quarterly report contains data that were received prior to March 8, 1993. This report may contain not only data from the October through December quarter but also data from earlier sampling events that were not previously reported.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Monitoring probe for groundwater flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

243

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

244

An innovative funnel and gate approach to groundwater remediation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, office of Science and Technology (EM-50) sponsored a demonstration project of the Barrier Member Containment Corporation`s patented EnviroWall{trademark} system at the Savannah River site. With this system, contaminated groundwater can be funneled into a treatment system without pumping the contaminated water to the surface. The EnviroWall{trademark} barrier and pass-through system, an innovative product of sic years of research and development, provides a means to enhance groundwater flow on the upgradient side of an impermeable wall and direct it to an in situ treatment system. The EnviroWall{trademark} system is adaptable to most site conditions. Remedial applications range form plume containment to more robust designs that incorporate groundwater manipulation coupled with in situ treatment. Several key innovations of the EnviroWall{trademark} system include the following: a method for guide box installation; a means for using interlocking seals at vertical seams; a down-hole video camera for inspecting seams and panels, installation of horizontal- and vertical-collection systems; installation of vertical monitoring wells and instrumentation on each side of the barrier; site-specific backfill design; and a pass-through system for funneling groundwater into a treatment system.

Johnson, D.O.; Wilkey, M.L.; Willis, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.; Breaux, L.; McKinsey, T. [Barrier Member Containment Corp., Belle Chasse, LA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Regional Groundwater Evapotranspiration in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of shallow unconfined aquifers in supplying water for evapotranspiration (i.e., groundwater evaporation) is investigated in this paper. Recent results from regional land surface modeling have indicated that in shallow water table areas, ...

Pat J-F. Yeh; J. S. Famiglietti

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Semiannual Correction Action Report, Vol. I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) at the Savannah River Site is routinely monitored for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

248

RCRA facility assessments  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (HSWA) broadened the authorities of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) by requiring corrective action for releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents at treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. The goal of the corrective action process is to ensure the remediation of hazardous waste and hazardous constituent releases associated with TSD facilities. Under Section 3004(u) of RCRA, operating permits issued to TSD facilities must address corrective actions for all releases of hazardous waste and hazardous constituents from any solid waste management unit (SWMU) regardless of when the waste was placed in such unit. Under RCRA Section 3008(h), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) may issue administrative orders to compel corrective action at facilities authorized to operate under RCRA Section 3005(e) (i.e., interim status facilities). The process of implementing the Corrective Action program involves the following, in order of implementation; (1) RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA); (2) RCRA Facility Investigation (RFI); (3) the Corrective Measures Study (CMS); and (4) Corrective Measures Implementation (CMI). The RFA serves to identify and evaluate SWMUs with respect to releases of hazardous wastes and hazardous constituents, and to eliminate from further consideration SWMUs that do not pose a threat to human health or the environment. This Information Brief will discuss issues concerning the RFA process.

NONE

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Summary - X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected catalyzed hydrogen peroxide without meeting the

250

Groundwater Model Validation  

SciTech Connect

Models have an inherent uncertainty. The difficulty in fully characterizing the subsurface environment makes uncertainty an integral component of groundwater flow and transport models, which dictates the need for continuous monitoring and improvement. Building and sustaining confidence in closure decisions and monitoring networks based on models of subsurface conditions require developing confidence in the models through an iterative process. The definition of model validation is postulated as a confidence building and long-term iterative process (Hassan, 2004a). Model validation should be viewed as a process not an end result. Following Hassan (2004b), an approach is proposed for the validation process of stochastic groundwater models. The approach is briefly summarized herein and detailed analyses of acceptance criteria for stochastic realizations and of using validation data to reduce input parameter uncertainty are presented and applied to two case studies. During the validation process for stochastic models, a question arises as to the sufficiency of the number of acceptable model realizations (in terms of conformity with validation data). Using a hierarchical approach to make this determination is proposed. This approach is based on computing five measures or metrics and following a decision tree to determine if a sufficient number of realizations attain satisfactory scores regarding how they represent the field data used for calibration (old) and used for validation (new). The first two of these measures are applied to hypothetical scenarios using the first case study and assuming field data consistent with the model or significantly different from the model results. In both cases it is shown how the two measures would lead to the appropriate decision about the model performance. Standard statistical tests are used to evaluate these measures with the results indicating they are appropriate measures for evaluating model realizations. The use of validation data to constrain model input parameters is shown for the second case study using a Bayesian approach known as Markov Chain Monte Carlo. The approach shows a great potential to be helpful in the validation process and in incorporating prior knowledge with new field data to derive posterior distributions for both model input and output.

Ahmed E. Hassan

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download X-701B Groundwater Remedy...

252

Groundwater Manual for the Electric Utility Industry, Second Edition, Volume 1: Groundwater Laws, Geologic Formations, and Groundwat er Aquifers: Volume 1: Groundwater Laws, Geologic Formations, and Groundwater Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive manual brings together hydrogeologic information on subsurface water resources, the fundamentals of aqueous geochemistry, and details on state and federal groundwater laws and regulations. Designed for utility personnel responsible for power plant construction, management, and operation, this manual discusses groundwater management and aquifer protection.

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

DOE/EA-1308; Environmental Assessment for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-Level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from the Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities (February 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

08 08 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE OFFSITE TRANSPORTATION OF CERTAIN LOW-LEVEL AND MIXED RADIOACTIVE WASTE FROM THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE FOR TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL AT COMMERCIAL AND GOVERNMENT FACILITIES FEBRUARY 2001 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SAVANNAH RIVER OPERATIONS OFFICE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE i ii This page is intentionally left blank iii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION 1 1.1 Background 1 1.2 Purpose and Need for Action 6 2.0 PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 6 2.1 Proposed Action 6 2.2 Alternatives to the Proposed Action 11 2.2.1 No Action, Continue to Store These Waste Forms at SRS 11 2.2.2 Construct and Operate Onsite Treatment and Disposal Facilities 11 3.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTION AND ALTERNATIVES 12 3.1 Onsite Loading Operations 12 3.2 Transportation Impacts

255

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

256

Groundwater impact assessment report for the 216-S-26 Crib, 200 West Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 216-S-26 Crib on groundwater quality. The 216-S-26 Crib, located in the southern 200 West Area, has been in use since 1984 to dispose of liquid effluents from the 222-S Laboratory Complex. The 222-S Laboratory Complex effluent stream includes wastewater from four sources: the 222-S Laboratory, the 219-S Waste Storage Facility, the 222-SA Chemical Standards Laboratory, and the 291-S Exhaust Fan Control House and Stack. Based on assessment of groundwater chemistry and flow data, contaminant transport predictions, and groundwater chemistry data, the 216-S-26 Crib has minimal influence on groundwater contamination in the southern 200 West Area.

Lindberg, J.W.; Evelo, S.D.; Alexander, D.J.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Supplemental analysis of accident sequences and source terms for waste treatment and storage operations and related facilities for the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect

This report presents supplemental information for the document Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities for Waste Generated by US Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. Additional technical support information is supplied concerning treatment of transuranic waste by incineration and considering the Alternative Organic Treatment option for low-level mixed waste. The latest respirable airborne release fraction values published by the US Department of Energy for use in accident analysis have been used and are included as Appendix D, where respirable airborne release fraction is defined as the fraction of material exposed to accident stresses that could become airborne as a result of the accident. A set of dominant waste treatment processes and accident scenarios was selected for a screening-process analysis. A subset of results (release source terms) from this analysis is presented.

Folga, S.; Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Kohout, E.; Mishima, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

INDEPENDENT REVIEW OF THE X-701B GROUNDWATER REMEDY, PORTSMOUTH, OHIO: TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Portsmouth Paducah Project Office requested assistance from Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM-22) to provide independent technical experts to evaluate past and ongoing remedial activities at the Portsmouth facility that were completed to address TCE contamination associated with the X-701B groundwater plume and to make recommendations for future efforts. The Independent Technical Review team was provided with a detailed and specific charter. The charter requested that the technical team first review the past and current activities completed for the X-701B groundwater remedy for trichloroethene (TCE) in accordance with a Decision Document that was issued by Ohio EPA on December 8, 2003 and a Work Plan that was approved by Ohio EPA on September 22, 2006. The remedy for X-701B divides the activities into four phases: Phase I - Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II - Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III - Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV - Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase I of the remedy was completed during FY2006, and DOE has now completed six oxidant injection events within Phase II. The Independent Technical Review team was asked to evaluate Phase II activities, including soil and groundwater results, and to determine whether or not the criteria that were defined in the Work Plan for the Phase II end point had been met. The following criteria are defined in the Work Plan as an acceptable Phase II end point: (1) Groundwater samples from the identified source area monitoring wells have concentrations below the Preliminary Remediation Goal (PRG) for TCE in groundwater, or (2) The remedy is no longer effective in removing TCE mass from the source area. In addition, the charter specifies that if the Review Team determines that the Phase II endpoint has not been reached, then the team should address the following issues: (1) If additional injection events are recommended, the team should identify the type of injection and target soil horizon for these injections; (2) Consider the feasibility of declaring Technical Impracticability and proceeding with the RCRA Cap for the X-701B; and (3) Provide a summary of other cost-effective technologies that could be implemented (especially for the lower Gallia). The Independent Technical Review team focused its evaluation solely on the X-701B source zone and contaminant plume. It did not review current or planned remedial activities at other plumes, waste areas, or landfills at the Portsmouth site, nor did it attempt to integrate such activities into its recommendations for X-701B. However, the ultimate selection of a remedy for X-701B by site personnel and regulators should take into account potentially synergistic efforts at other waste areas. Assessment of remedial alternatives in the context of site-wide management practices may reveal opportunities for leveraging and savings that would not otherwise be identified. For example, the cost of source-zone excavation or construction of a permeable reactive barrier at X-701B might be substantially reduced if contaminated soil could be buried on site at an existing or planned landfill. This allowance would improve the feasibility and competitiveness of both remedies. A comprehensive examination of ongoing and future environmental activities across the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant is necessary to optimize the selection and timing of X-701B remediation with respect to cleanup efficiency, safety, and economics. A selected group of technical experts attended the technical workshop at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant from November 18 through 21, 2008. During the first day of the workshop, both contractor and DOE site personnel briefed the workshop participants and took them on a tour of the X-701B site. The initial briefing was attended by representatives of Ohio EPA who participated in the discussions. On subsequent days, the team reviewed baseline data and reports, were provided additional technical information from site personne

Looney, B.; Eddy-Dilek, C.; Costanza, J.; Rossabi, J.; Early, T.; Skubal, K.; Magnuson, C.

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

259

Interim measure conceptual design for remediation at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility at Centralia, Kansas : pilot test and remedy implementation.  

SciTech Connect

This document presents an Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for the short-term, field-scale pilot testing and subsequent implementation of a non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Centralia, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate both (1) localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and (2) present (and potentially future) carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the shallow groundwater beneath and in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Investigations conducted on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that groundwater at the Centralia site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at levels that exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. Groundwater sampling and analyses conducted by Argonne under a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) indicated that the carbon tetrachloride levels at several locations in the groundwater plume have increased since twice yearly monitoring of the site began in September 2005. The identified groundwater contamination currently poses no unacceptable health risks, in view of the absence of potential human receptors in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride contamination has also been identified at Centralia in subsurface soils at concentrations on the order of the Kansas Tier 2 RBSL of 200 {micro}g/kg in soil for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Soils contaminated at this level might pose some risk as a potential source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater. To mitigate the existing contaminant levels and decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil, the CCC/USDA recommends initial short-term, field-scale pilot testing of a remedial approach that employs in situ chemical reduction (ISCR), in the form of a commercially available material marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc., Freeport, Illinois (http://www.adventusgroup.com). If the pilot test is successful, it will be followed by a request for KDHE authorization of full implementation of the ISCR approach. In the recommended ISCR approach, the Adventus EHC{reg_sign} material--a proprietary mixture of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron--is introduced into the subsurface, where the components are released slowly into the formation. The compounds create highly reducing conditions in the saturated zone and the overlying vadose zone. These conditions foster chemical and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride. The anticipated effective lifetime of the EHC compounds following injection is 1-5 yr. Although ISCR is a relatively innovative remedial approach, the EHC technology has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater and has been employed at a carbon tetrachloride contamination site elsewhere in Kansas (Cargill Flour Mill and Elevator, Wellington, Kansas; KDHE Project Code C209670158), with the approval of the KDHE. At Centralia, the CCC/USDA recommends use of the ISCR approach initially in a short-term pilot test addressing the elevated carbon tetrachloride levels identified in one of three persistently highly contaminated areas ('hot-spot areas') in the groundwater plume. In this test, a three-dimensional grid pattern of direct-push injection points will be used to distribute the EHC material (in slurry or aqueous form) throughout the volume of the contaminated aquifer and (in selected locations) the vadose zone in the selected hot-spot area. Injection of the EHC material will be conducted by a licensed contractor, under the supervision of Adventus and Argonne technical personnel. The contractor will be identified upon acceptanc

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

260

In Situ Iron Oxide Emplacement for Groundwater Arsenic Remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iron oxide-bearing minerals have long been recognized as an effective reactive media for arsenic-contaminated groundwater remediation. This research aimed to develop a technique that could facilitate in situ oxidative precipitation of Fe3+ in a soil (sand) media for generating a subsurface iron oxide-based reactive barrier that could immobilize arsenic (As) and other dissolved metals in groundwater. A simple in situ arsenic treatment process was successfully developed for treating contaminated rural groundwater using iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS). Using imbibition flow, the system facilitated the dispersive transport of ferrous iron (Fe2+) and oxidant solutions in porous sand to generate an overlaying blanket where the Fe2+ was oxidized and precipitated onto the surface as ferric oxide. The iron oxide (FeOx) emplacement process was significantly affected by (1) the initial surface area and surface-bound iron content of the sand, (2) the pH and solubility of the coating reagents, (3) the stability of the oxidant solution, and (4) the chemical injection schedule. In contrast to conventional excavate-and-fill treatment technologies, this technique could be used to in situ replace a fresh iron oxide blanket on the sand and rejuvenate its treatment capacity for additional arsenic removal. Several bench-scale experiments revealed that the resultant IOCS could treat arsenic-laden groundwater for extended periods of time before approaching its effective life cycle. The adsorption capacity for As(III) and As(V) was influenced by (1) the amount of iron oxide accumulated on the sand surface, (2) the system pH, and (3) competition for adsorption sites from other groundwater constituents such as silicon (Si) and total dissolved solids (TDS). Although the IOCS could be replenished several times before exhaustion, the life cycle of the FeOx reactive barrier may be limited by the gradual loss of hydraulic conductivity induced by the imminent reduction of pore space over time.

Abia, Thomas Sunday

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

262

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory met the performance objective during the continuous operational testing. Effluent hexavalent chromium analyzed by the field laboratory met the performance goal in over 90 percent of the samples. All effluent hexavalent chromium samples during the batch testing with high influent hexavalent chromium concentrations ({approx}2000 {micro}g/L) met the performance objective. Although the EC system was able to meet the performance goal, it must be noted that it was not uncommon for the system to be operated in recycle mode to achieve the performance goal. The EC unit was sometimes, but not always, capable of a single pass treatment efficiency high enough to meet the performance goal, and recycling water for multiple treatment passes was effective. An operational objective was to determine the volume and composition of the waste streams to enable proper waste designation. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) concentrations, pH, and free liquids were determined for solid material from the EC electrodes (mechanically removed scale), the filter press, and the tank bottoms for the effluent and waste collector tanks. These data met all data quality requirements. All solid-phase secondary waste streams were found to be below the TCLP limits for the toxicity characteristic, and a pH value within the limits for the corrosivity characteristic. Out of three samples, two (one of scale from the EC unit and one from filter press solids) failed the free liquid (paint filter) test, which is one of the acceptability criteria for Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The solid-phase waste generation rate was about 0.65-gallon of solid waste per 100 gallons of water treated. It is concluded that the solid-phase secondary waste generated from this technology under the conditions at the test site will meet the toxicity and corrosivity criteria for disposal. It is also concluded that with engineering and/or operational improvements, a solid-phase secondary waste could be produced that would meet the free liquid disposal requirements. The second oper

PETERSEN SW

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Groundwater and geothermal: urban district heating applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes how several cities use groundwater and geothermal energy in district heating systems. It begins with groundwater, introducing the basic technology and techniques of development, and describing two case studies of cities with groundwater-based district heating systems. The second half of the report consists of three case studies of cities with district heating systems using higher temperature geothermal resources.

Mounts, R.; Frazier, A.; Wood, E.; Pyles, O.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Calendar year 1993 groundwater quality report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek hydrogeologic regime Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee: 1993 groundwater quality data interpretations and proposed program modifications  

SciTech Connect

This Groundwater Quality Report (GWQR) contains an evaluation of the groundwater quality data obtained during the 1993 calendar year (CY) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 Plant located on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure 1). The groundwater quality data are presented in Part 1 of the GWQR submitted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in February 1994 (HSW Environmental Consultants, Inc. 1994a). Groundwater quality data evaluated in this report were obtained at several hazardous and non-hazardous waste management facilities and underground storage tanks (USTS) located within the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime). The Environmental Management Department of the Y-12 Plant Health, Safety, Environment, and Accountability Organization manages the groundwater monitoring activities in each regime under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). The purpose of the GWPP is to characterize the hydrogeology and to monitor groundwater quality at the Y-12 Plant and surrounding area to provide for protection of groundwater resources consistent with federal, state, and local requirements and in accordance with DOE Orders and Energy Systems corporate policy. The annual GWQR for the East Fork Regime is completed in two parts. Part 1 consists primarily of data appendices and serves as a reference for the groundwater quality data obtained each CY under the lead of the Y-12 Plant GWPP. Part 2 (this report) contains an evaluation of the data with respect to regime-wide groundwater quality, presents the findings and status of ongoing hydrogeologic studies, describes changes in monitoring priorities, and presents planned modifications to the groundwater sampling and analysis program for the following calendar year.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Numerical Simulation of Groundwater Withdrawal within the Mercury Valley Administrative Groundwater Basin, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A detailed, transient, three-dimensional, finite-difference groundwater flow model was created for the Mercury Valley Administrative Groundwater Basin (MVB). The MVB is a distinct groundwater basin as defined by the State of Nevada and is located partially within the boundary of the Nevada Test Site. This basin is being studied as a potential location for new industrial facilities and therefore would be subject to Nevada water-use limitations. The MVB model was used to estimate the volume of water that could be withdrawn from Mercury Valley without inducing laterally or vertically extensive water-table effects. In each model simulation, water-table drawdown was limited to a maximum of 0.5 m at the boundary of the basin and held within the screened interval of the well. Water withdrawal from Nevada groundwater basins is also limited to the State-defined perennial yield for that area. The perennial yield for the MVB is 27,036 m{sup 3}/day. The one existing water-supply well in Mercury Valley is capable of sustaining significantly higher withdrawal rates than it currently produces. Simulations showed this single well could produce 50 percent of the basin?s perennial yield with limited water-table drawdown. Pumping from six hypothetical water-supply wells was also simulated. Each hypothetical well was placed in an area of high hydraulic conductivity and far from the basin's boundaries. Each of these wells was capable of producing at least 50 percent of the basin's perennial yield. One of the hypothetical wells could simulate 100 percent of the perennial yield while staying within drawdown limitations. Multi-well simulations where two or more water-supply wells were simultaneously pumping were also conducted. These simulations almost always resulted in very limited lateral and vertical drawdown and produced 100 percent of Mercury Valley's perennial yield. A water-budget analysis was also conducted for each of the various stress simulations. Each of the stress scenarios was compared to a baseline scenario where existing water-supply wells in the model domain were pumped at 2003-2004 average pumping rates. Water-budget analyses showed increased flow from the constant-head boundaries on the north, east, and west sides of the model. Flow to the southern, head-dependent boundary and to springs in the Ash Meadows area remained unchanged.

A.B. Gilliam; R.W.H. Carroll; G. Pohll; R.L. Hershey

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

268

Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Correction Action Report, Third and Fourth Quarter 1998, Volumes I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the F-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF), also known as the F-Area Seepage Basins, at the Savannah Site (SRS) is monitored periodically for selected hazardous and radioactive constituents. This report presents the results of the required groundwater monitoring program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design features for decontamination in new plutonium facilities  

SciTech Connect

Specific features for preventing, containing, controlling, and removing contamination in the Plutonium Recovery and Waste Treatment Facility are outlined. (LK)

Freiberg, K.J.; Haynes, C.G.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 3: Appendixes C-H  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the Appendices for the Analysis of Accident Sequences and Source Terms at Waste Treatment and Storage Facilities for Waste Generated by the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations. The main report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed as a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Inducing Mineral Precipitation in Groundwater by Addition of Phosphate  

SciTech Connect

Induced precipitation of phosphate minerals to scavenge trace metals and radionuclides from groundwater is a potential remediation approach for contaminated aquifers. Phosphate minerals can sequester trace elements by primary mineral formation, solid solution formation and/or adsorption, and they are poorly soluble under many environmental conditions, making them attractive for long-term sustainable remediation. The success of such engineered schemes will depend on the particular mineral phases generated, their rates of formation, and their long term stability. The purpose of this study was to examine the precipitation of calcium phosphate minerals under conditions representative of a natural groundwater. Because microorganisms are present in groundwater, and because some proposed schemes for induced phosphate mineral precipitation rely on the stimulation of native groundwater populations, we also tested the effect of bacterial cells (initial densities of 105 and 107 ml-1) within the precipitation medium. We also tested the effect of a trace mixture of propionic, isovaleric, formic and butyric acids (total concentration 0.035 mM). The experiments showed that the general progression of mineral precipitation was similar under all of the conditions, with initial formation of amorphous calcium carbonate, and transformation to poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) by the end of the week-long experiments. The presence of the bacterial cells appeared to delay precipitation, although by the end of 7 days the overall extent of precipitation was similar for all of the treatments. The stoichiometry of the final precipitates as well as results of Rietveld refinement of x-ray diffraction data indicated that the treatments including organic acids and bacterial cells resulted in increased distortion of the HAP crystal lattice, with the higher concentration of cells resulting in the greatest distortion. Uptake of Sr into the phosphate minerals was decreased in the treatments with cells and organic acids, compared to the control. The results of the experiments enable a greater understanding of the challenges associated with phosphate-based remediation schemes for contaminated environments.

Karen E. Wright; Yoshiko Fujita; Thomas Hartmann; Mark Conrad

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geochemistry of Delaware Basin groundwaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluids from various formations were sampled and analyzed in order to characterize groundwaters in the Delaware Basin. Waters were analyzed for solute content and/or stable isotope ratios (D/H and /sup 18/O//sup 16/O). Three lines of geochemical arguments are summarized, in order to present the natures and probable origins of analyzed fluids: solute chemistry, thermodynamic modelling of low-temperature aqueous species, and stable isotope ratios. (JGB)

Lambert, S.J.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

274

2009 EVALUATION OF TRITIUM REMOVAL AND MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1995, a state-approved land disposal site (SALDS) has received tritium contaminated effluents from the Hanford Site Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Tritium in this effluent is mitigated by storage in slow moving groundwater to allow extended time for decay before the water reaches the site boundary. By this method, tritium in the SALDS is isolated from the general environment and human contact until it has decayed to acceptable levels. This report contains the 2009 update evaluation of alternative tritium mitigation techniques to control tritium in liquid effluents and groundwater at the Hanford site. A thorough literature review was completed and updated information is provided on state-of-the-art technologies for control of tritium in wastewaters. This report was prepared to satisfy the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-026-07B (Ecology, EPA, and DOE 2007). Tritium separation and isolation technologies are evaluated periodically to determine their feasibility for implementation to control Hanford site liquid effluents and groundwaters to meet the Us. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40 CFR 141.16, drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) for tritium of 20,000 pOll and/or DOE Order 5400.5 as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) policy. Since the 2004 evaluation, there have been a number of developments related to tritium separation and control with potential application in mitigating tritium contaminated wastewater. These are primarily focused in the areas of: (1) tritium recycling at a commercial facility in Cardiff, UK using integrated tritium separation technologies (water distillation, palladium membrane reactor, liquid phase catalytic exchange, thermal diffusion), (2) development and demonstration of Combined Electrolysis Catalytic Exchange (CECE) using hydrogen/water exchange to separate tritium from water, (3) evaporation of tritium contaminated water for dispersion in the atmosphere, and (4) use of barriers to minimize the transport of tritium in groundwater. Continuing development efforts for tritium separations processes are primarily to support the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) program, the nuclear power industry, and the production of radiochemicals. While these applications are significantly different than the Hanford application, the technology could potentially be adapted for Hanford wastewater treatment. Separations based processes to reduce tritium levels below the drinking water MCL have not been demonstrated for the scale and conditions required for treating Hanford wastewater. In addition, available cost information indicates treatment costs for such processes will be substantially higher than for discharge to SALDS or other typical pump and treat projects at Hanford. Actual mitigation projects for groundwater with very low tritium contamination similar to that found at Hanford have focused mainly on controlling migration and on evaporation for dispersion in the atmosphere.

LUECK KJ; GENESSE DJ; STEGEN GE

2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

276

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2004 Facility News ARM Climate Research Facility Achieves User Milestone Three Months Ahead of Schedule Bookmark and Share Summary of the ARM Climate Research Facility User...

277

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

278

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

279

Groundwater Sampling and Analysis Sourcebook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides technical guidance and best practices for groundwater sampling and analysis at nuclear power plants. Robust sampling and analysis protocols are required to ensure accurate characterization of radionuclides in groundwater.BackgroundNuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to minimize contamination of on-site soil and groundwater, and to prevent the off-site migration of licensed material through groundwater ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

280

Proceedings: 2010 EPRI Groundwater Protection Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Groundwater Protection Workshop (in collaboration with the Nuclear Energy Institute [NEI]) was held in San Jose, California, on June 30-July 1, 2010. The workshop focused on nuclear plant leak prevention, groundwater monitoring and remediation techniques, and industry experience. This information will assist nuclear plant operators in the development and implementation of technically sound site groundwater protection programs (GPPs). This proceedings docu...

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Proceedings: 2011 EPRI Groundwater Protection Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Groundwater Protection Workshop (in collaboration with the Nuclear Energy Institute [NEI]) was held in Oakbridge (Chicago), Illinois, on June 2729, 2011. The workshop focused on nuclear plant leak prevention, groundwater monitoring and remediation techniques, and industry experience. This information will assist nuclear plant operators in the development and implementation of technically sound site groundwater protection programs (GPPs). This proceedings...

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

282

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

283

Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conservation Districts (Texas) Conservation Districts (Texas) Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Groundwater Conservation Districts, as created following procedures described in Water Code 36, are designed to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater, and of groundwater reservoirs or their subdivisions, and to

284

Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This section gives metropolitan counties the authority to prepare and adopt groundwater plans, or to grant this responsibility to soil and water

285

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount.

286

Groundwater Use and Reporting Act (South Carolina)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Health and Environmental Control has established a groundwater management program, requiring entities withdrawing in excess of three million gallons during any one month to obtain...

287

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025...

289

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Californium Neutron Irradiation Facility. Summary: ... Cf irradiation facility (Photograph by: Neutron Physics Group). Lead Organizational Unit: pml. Staff: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

290

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile Solar Tracker Facility. ... NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by all DOE Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations, additions, deletions) and any pertinent data that may improve this document should

293

Facility Type!  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ITY: ITY: --&L~ ----------- srct-r~ -----------~------~------- if yee, date contacted ------------- cl Facility Type! i I 0 Theoretical Studies Cl Sample 84 Analysis ] Production 1 Diepasal/Storage 'YPE OF CONTRACT .--------------- 1 Prime J Subcontract&- 1 Purchase Order rl i '1 ! Other information (i.e., ---------~---~--~-------- :ontrait/Pirchaee Order # , I C -qXlJ- --~-------~~-------~~~~~~ I I ~~~---~~~~~~~T~~~ FONTRACTING PERIODi IWNERSHIP: ,I 1 AECIMED AECMED GOVT GOUT &NTtiAC+OR GUN-I OWNED ----- LEEE!? M!s LE!Ps2 -LdJG?- ---L .ANDS ILJILDINGS X2UIPilENT IRE OR RAW HA-I-L :INAL PRODUCT IASTE Z. RESIDUE I I kility l pt I ,-- 7- ,+- &!d,, ' IN&"E~:EW AT SITE -' ---------------- , . Control 0 AEC/tlED managed operations

294

Facility Representatives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

063-2011 063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is approved for use by all DOE/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Components. 2. The revision to this DOE standard was developed by a working group consisting of headquarters and field participants. Beneficial comments (recommendations,

295

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

296

Facility automation for retail facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article will focus on retail chain stores with areas of 22,000 to 75,000 sq ft, but much of the article will apply to all retail stores independent of size. Typically, a store is serviced by 5 to 15 rooftop HVAC units with a total cooling capacity of 50 to 150 tons, depending on the floor area and geographic location. The interior lighting represents a load of 80 to 300 KW with three lighting levels--retail, stocking, and security or night. Most stores are located in strip centers, and therefore, the parking lot lighting is provided by the landlord, but each store does control and service its own sign lighting. Generally, the total load controlled by an FAS represents 130 to 450 KW with corresponding annual energy costs ranging from $65,000 to $200,000 (natural gas and electricity), depending on the size of the store and the local unit costs of energy. Historical utility data, electrical and mechanical drawings, site surveys, significant analyses of data, and most importantly, discussions with corporate facilities management personnel and store operations personnel provide the source for the development theory and sequence of operation of the design of the facility automation systems for retail stores. The three main goals of an FAS are: reduce utility operating costs, maintain comfort levels during occupied hours, reduce HVAC maintenance costs.

Ameduri, G. (Roth Bros., Inc., Youngstown, OH (United States). Facilities Automation Division)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. Revision  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work plan identifies the objectives, tasks, and schedule for conducting a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study for the 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area of the Hanford Site. The 200-UP-1 Groundwater Operable Unit addresses contamination identified in the aquifer soils and groundwater within its boundary, as determined in the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area Management Study Report (AAMSR) (DOE/RL 1992b). The objectives of this work plan are to develop a program to investigate groundwater contaminants in the southern portion of the 200 West Groundwater Aggregate Area that were designated for Limited Field Investigations (LFIs) and to implement Interim Remedial Measures (IRMs) recommended in the 200 West Groundwater AAMSR. The purpose of an LFI is to evaluate high priority groundwater contaminants where existing data are insufficient to determine whether an IRM is warranted and collect sufficient data to justify and implement an IRM, if needed. A Qualitative Risk Assessment (QRA) will be performed as part of the LFI. The purpose of an IRM is to develop and implement activities, such as contaminant source removal and groundwater treatment, that will ameliorate some of the more severe potential risks of groundwater contaminants prior to the RI and baseline Risk Assessment (RA) to be conducted under the Final Remedy Selection (FRS) at a later date. This work plan addresses needs of a Treatability Study to support the design and implementation of an interim remedial action for the Uranium-{sup 99}{Tc}-Nitrate multi-contaminant IRM plume identified beneath U Plant.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Superfund record of decison (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens South Post impact area and area of contamination 41 groundwater and areas of contamination 25, 26, and 27, MA, July 5, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Record of Decision (ROD) addresses AOCs 25 (Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range), 26 (Zulu Ranges), an 27 (Hotel Range) and AOC 41 groundwater and a subset of the groundwater within the South Post Impact Area (SPIA). `No action` is the selected remedy for SPIA monitored-area groundwater, AOC 41 groundwater, and the surface water, sediment, and soils at the EOD, Zulu, and Hotel Ranges. Under this alternative, no formal remedial action will be taken and the site will be left `as is,` with no additional institutional controls, containment, removal, treatment, or other mitigating measures. Long-term groundwater monitoring will be conducted at the site under this `no action` ROD.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

2000 Annual Interim Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes a discussion of the groundwater flow direction and rate, the groundwater analytical results, and the methane monitoring results.

Chase, J.A.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The...

303

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and Groundwater Investigation Many Devils Wash, Shiprock Site, New Mexico Geology and...

304

Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Program Office. Annual report for fiscal year 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This edition of the Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., (Energy Systems) Groundwater Program Annual Report summarizes the work carried out by the Energy Systems Groundwater Program Office (GWPO) for fiscal year (FY) 1994. The GWPO is responsible for coordination and oversight for all components of the groundwater programs at the three Oak Ridge facilities [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, and the Oak Ridge K-25 Site], as well as the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants (PGDP and PORTS, respectively.) This report describes the administrative framework of the GWPO including staffing, organization, and funding sources. In addition, summaries are provided of activities involving the Technical Support staff at the five facilities. Finally, the results of basic investigations designed to improve our understanding of the major processes governing groundwater flow and contaminant migration on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) are reported. These investigations are conducted as part of the Oak Ridge Reservation Hydrology and Geology Studies (ORRHAGS) program. The relevance of these studies to the overall remediation responsibilities of Energy Systems is discussed.

NONE

1994-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

Plutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineer Works (HEW) as the world's first Pu production facility constructed for the United StatesPlutonium in groundwater at the 100K-Area of the U.S. DOE Hanford Site Minhan Daia,b , Ken O.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. Total concentrations of Pu isotopes were extremely low (10?4 to 10

Buesseler, Ken

306

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has entered into a voluntary initiative to implement groundwater monitoring programs at all nuclear power plant sites. This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to nuclear power utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

Groundwater Protection Guidelines for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear power industry has undertaken a Groundwater Protection Initiative at the Direction of the NEI Nuclear Strategic Issues Advisory Committee (NSIAC). This EPRI guideline provides essential technical guidance to utilities on the necessary elements of a sound groundwater protection program.

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

308

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problem al. 1992 , Jonoski et al. 1997 ; and Willis and Yeh 1987 . However, the fact that the optimization

Neumaier, Arnold

309

Groundwater Monitoring Guidance for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experience has shown that the initial design of nuclear power plant groundwater characterization programs can have a significant impact upon the resources needed to demonstrate regulatory compliance. This document provides technical experience and lessons learned in designing an optimized groundwater investigation program.

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

310

Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-Level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities, DOE/EA-1308 (02/15/01)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Finding of No Significant Impact Finding of No Significant Impact for the Offsite Transportation of Certain Low-level and Mixed Radioactive Waste from the Savannah River Site for Treatment and Disposal at Commercial and Government Facilities Agency: U. S. Department of Energy Action: Finding of No Significant Impact Summary: The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1308) to analyze the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed offsite transportation of certain low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and mixed (i.e., hazardous and radioactive) low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) from the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. Based on the analyses in the EA, DOE has determined that the action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting

311

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Harrisburg Facility Biomass Facility Facility Harrisburg Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Dauphin County, Pennsylvania Coordinates 40.2734277°, -76.7336521° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.2734277,"lon":-76.7336521,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

312

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility Facility Brookhaven Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Suffolk County, New York Coordinates 40.9848784°, -72.6151169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.9848784,"lon":-72.6151169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

313

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

314

Assessment of groundwater management at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive review of the groundwater management and environmental monitoring programs at the Hanford reservation was initiated in 1973. A large number of recommendations made as a result of this review are summarized. The purpose of the Hanford Hydrology Program is to maintain a groundwater surveillance network to assess contamination of the natural water system. Potential groundwater contamination is primarily a function of waste management decisions. The review revealed that although the hydrology program would greatly benefit from additional improvements, it is adequate to predict levels of contaminants present in the groundwater system. Studies are presently underway to refine advanced mathematical models to use results of the hydrologic investigation in forecasting the response of the system to different long-term management decisions. No information was found which indicates that a hazard through the groundwater pathway presently exists as a result of waste operations at Hanford. (CH)

Deju, R.A.

1975-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

315

Data management implementation plan for the site characterization of the Waste Area Grouping 1 Groundwater Operable Unit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization. This project is not mandated by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); therefore, no formalized meetings for data quality objective (DQO) development were held. Internally, DQOs were generated by the project team based on the end uses of the data to be collected. The 150-acre WAG 1 is contained within the ORNL security area. It includes all of the former ORNL radioisotope research, production, and maintenance facilities; former waste management areas; and some former administrative facilities. The goal of the WAG 1 Groundwater Site Characterization is to provide the necessary data on the nature and extent of groundwater contamination with an acceptable level of uncertainty to support the selection of remedial alternatives and to identify additional data needs for future actions. Primary objectives for the site characterization are: (1) To identify and characterize contaminant migration pathways based on the collection of groundwater data; (2) to identify sources of groundwater contamination and evaluate remedial actions which could be implemented to control or eliminate these sources; and (3) To conduct groundwater monitoring in support of other OUs in WAG 1 and the ORNL Groundwater OU.

Ball, T.S.; Nickle, E.B.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Results of groundwater monitoring and vegetation sampling at Everest, Kansas, in 2009 .  

SciTech Connect

In April 2008, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) conducted groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the existing network of monitoring points at Everest, Kansas (Argonne 2008). The objective of the 2008 investigation was to monitor the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater previously identified in CCC/USDA site characterization and groundwater sampling studies at Everest in 2000-2006 (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The work at Everest is being undertaken on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The findings of the 2008 investigation were as follows: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually and through the use of automatic recorders demonstrated a consistent pattern of groundwater flow - and inferred contaminant migration - to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) The range of concentrations and the areal distribution of carbon tetrachloride identified in the groundwater at Everest in April 2008 were generally consistent with previous results. The results of the 2008 sampling (reflecting the period from 2006 to 2008) and the earlier investigations at Everest (representing the period from 2000 to 2006) show that no significant downgradient extension of the carbon tetrachloride plume occurred from 2000 to 2008. (3) The slow contaminant migration indicated by the monitoring data is qualitatively consistent with the low groundwater flow rates in the Everest aquifer unit estimated previously on the basis of site-specific hydraulic testing (Argonne 2006a,b). (4) The April 2008 and earlier sampling results demonstrate that the limits of the plume have been effectively, identified by the existing network of monitoring points and have not changed significantly during the CCC/USDA investigation program. The carbon tetrachloride distribution within the plume has continued to evolve, however, with relatively constant or apparently decreasing contaminant levels at most sampling locations. In response to these findings, the KDHE requested that the CCC/USDA develop a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water at Everest, to facilitate continued tracking of the carbon tetrachloride plume at this site (KDHE 2009a). A recommendation for annual sampling (for analyses of VOCs) of 16 existing groundwater monitoring points within and near the identified contaminant migration pathway and surface water sampling at 5 locations along the intermittent creek west (downgradient) of the identified plume was presented by the CCC/USDA (Appendix A) and approved by the KDHE (2009b) for implementation. The monitoring wells will be sampled according to the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities will be consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. This report summarizes the results of sampling and monitoring activities conducted at the Everest site since completion of the April 2008 groundwater sampling event (Argonne 2008). The investigations performed during the current review period (May 2008 to October 2009) were as follows: (1) With one exception, the KDHE-approved groundwater and surface water monitoring points were sampled on April 24-27, 2009. In this event, well PT1 was inadvertently sampled instead of the adjacent well MW04. This investigation represents the first groundwater and surface water sampling event performed under the current plan for annual monitoring approved by the KDHE. (2) Ongoing monitoring of the groundwater levels at Everest is performed with KDHE approval. The levels in selected monitoring wells are recorded continuously, by using downhole pre

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

317

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

319

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) has requested that sitewide monitoring continue at Centralia until a final remedy has been selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented for this site. In response to this request, twice-yearly sampling of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1) previously approved by the KDHE for monitoring of the groundwater at Centralia (KDHE 2005a,b) was continued in 2008. The sampling events under this extension of the two-year (2005-2007) monitoring program occurred in March and September 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009b). Additional piezometers specifically installed to evaluate the progress of the IM pilot test (PMP1-PMP9; Figure 1.2) were also sampled in 2008; the results of these analyses were reported and discussed separately (Argonne 2009a). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program to address both of the continuing monitoring objectives until a CAS for Centralia is developed (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve previously established (before the pilot test) monitoring points (locations identified in Figure 1.3) and the five outlying pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.4); and (2) Sampling twice yearly at the five pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.4). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), groundwater sampling for analyses of VOCs and selected other geochemical parameters was conducted at Centralia under the interim monitoring program outlined above in April and October 2009. This report documents the findings of the 2009 monitoring events.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with Organics and Radionuclides - An Innovative Approach Eases Traditional Hurdles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Traditional approaches to the remediation of contaminated groundwater, such as pump-and-treat, have been used for many years for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with various organics. However the treatment of groundwater contaminated with organics and radionuclides has been considerably more challenging. Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) was recently faced with these challenges while designing a remediation system for the remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater and soil at the RMI Extrusion Plant in Ashtabula, OH. Under contract with RMI Environmental Services (RMIES), SEC teamed with Regenesis, Inc. to design, implement, and execute a bioremediation system to remove TCE and associated organics from groundwater and soil that was also contaminated with uranium and technetium. The SEC-Regenesis system involved the injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC), a natural attenuation accelerant that has been patented, designed, and produced by Regenesis, to stimulate the reductive dechlorination and remediation of chlorinated organics in subsurface environments. The compound was injected using direct-push Geoprobe rods over a specially designed grid system through the zone of contaminated groundwater. The innovative approach eliminated the need to extract contaminated groundwater and bypassed the restrictive limitations listed above. The system has been in operation for roughly six months and has begun to show considerable success at dechlorinating and remediating the TCE plume and in reducing the radionuclides into insoluble precipitants. The paper will provide an overview of the design, installation, and initial operation phase of the project, focusing on how traditional design challenges of remediating radiologically contaminated groundwater were overcome. The following topics will be specifically covered: a description of the mechanics of the HRC technology; an assessment of the applicability of the HRC technology to contaminated groundwater plumes and other potential remediation opportunities; a discussion of how the implementation of the HRC technology eased permitting issues and other challenges of remediating groundwater contaminated with radionuclides and organics; an overview of the remedial design and installation of the design including the inputs required to design the remediation system; a summary of results achieved to date and a forecast of future results; and a discussion of future needs and lessons learned.

Scott, J.; Case, N.; Coltman, K.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Association Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning © 2009 | International Facility Management Association For additional information, contact: 1 e. Greenway Plaza, Suite 1100 houston, tX 77046-0104 USA P: + 1-713-623-4362 F: + 1-713-623-6124 www.ifma.org taBle OF cOntentS PreFace ......................................................... 2 executive Summary .................................... 3 Overview ....................................................... 4 DeFinitiOn OF Strategic Facility Planning within the Overall cOntext OF Facility Planning ................. 5 SPecializeD analySeS ................................ 9 OrganizatiOnal aPPrOacheS tO SFP ... 10 the SFP PrOceSS .......................................

322

Office of Nuclear Facility Basis & Facility Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design(HS-31) Reports to the Office of Nuclear Safety About Us The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety...

323

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

than any other quarter on record-961 The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report facility use by total visitor days and facility to track actual...

324

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project.

Walker, Thomas G.

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

325

AMEC GEOMATRIX/ARA GROUNDWATER REMEDIAITON TRIP REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

City of Rialto, Well No.3 Demonstration System Integration Project, and Baldwin Park Operable Unit, Baldwin Park, California. The groundwater remediation contractors are AMEC Geomatrix and ARA. The sites were visited on July 22, 2008. Fluor Hanford and the U.S. Department of Energy are currently looking at a variety of alternatives to capture carbon tetrachloride, nitrates, and other COCs from 200-ZP-l groundwater. A few of the more important objectives of our visits were to: (1) Evaluate the treatment systems being used by AMEC Geomatrix to address VOCs, perchlorate, NDMA, 1,4,-Dioxane, and 1,2,3 TCP in a drinking water source; (2) Evaluate how effective these treatment methods have been; (3) Determine the types of problems they have encountered with these treatment systems and how they addressed these problems; (4) Determine the types of secondary wastes being generated by the system; (5) Determine how clean of an operation these companies run; and (6) Determine if the site is worth being visited by DOE-RL at a later date.

SIMMONS SA

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to

327

Groundwater model calibration at Pantex using Data Fusion modeling  

SciTech Connect

The Pantex plant has operated as one of the Federal government`s key conventional and nuclear weapons facilities since the 1940`s. In recent years, the DOE has expended considerable effort to characterize the nature and extent of groundwater contamination associated with the site. That effort is still on-going with the ultimate aim of determining and implementing appropriate remedial measures. The goal of the study described in this report was to use Data Fusion modeling to calibrate a groundwater model near Zone 12 of Pantex, primarily to define the potential pathways to the Ogallala aquifer. Data Fusion is a new approach for combining different but interrelated types of information from multiple sources into a quantitative analysis of system characteristics and dynamic behavior. The Data Fusion Workstation (DFW) is a patented technique for carrying out Data Fusion analyses using specially developed computer based approaches. The technique results in the development of a calibrated model of a site consistent with the data, first principles, and geostatistical spatial continuity. A more explicit description of the Data Fusion concept and approach is presented.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energys Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF.

K. E. Archibald

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility News Data Collection from Mobile Facility on Gan Island Suspended Local weather balloon launch volunteers pose with the AMF team on Gan Island after completing their...

331

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

approximately 22,500 square kilometers, or the approximate area of a modern climate model grid cell. Centered around the SGP Central Facility, these extended facilities are...

332

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

333

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of the Facility Safeguardability Analysis (FSA) Process RA Bari SJ Johnson J Hockert R Wigeland EF Wonder MD Zentner August 2012 PNNL- 21698 Overview of the Facility...

334

Facility Safeguardability Assessment Report  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

facilities or research facilities that involve previously unused processes or technologies, comparison with previously required safeguard design features may not be...

335

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

336

User Facility Agreement Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. Which Argonne user facility will be hosting you? * Advanced Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne Tandem Linear...

337

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

338

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2008 Facility News National User Facility Organization Meets to Discuss Progress and Ideas In late April, the ARM Technical Director attended an annual meeting of the...

339

Oak Ridge Reservation Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

processed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site or other appropriate disposal facility. Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Facility The Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) operated...

340

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News ARM Mobile Facility Completes Field Campaign in Germany Researchers will study severe precipitation events that occurred in August and October...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Site maps and facilities listings  

SciTech Connect

In September 1989, a Memorandum of Agreement among DOE offices regarding the environmental management of DOE facilities was signed by appropriate Assistant Secretaries and Directors. This Memorandum of Agreement established the criteria for EM line responsibility. It stated that EM would be responsible for all DOE facilities, operations, or sites (1) that have been assigned to DOE for environmental restoration and serve or will serve no future production need; (2) that are used for the storage, treatment, or disposal of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed hazardous waste materials that have been properly characterized, packaged, and labelled, but are not used for production; (3) that have been formally transferred to EM by another DOE office for the purpose of environmental restoration and the eventual return to service as a DOE production facility; or (4) that are used exclusively for long-term storage of DOE waste material and are not actively used for production, with the exception of facilities, operations, or sites under the direction of the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. As part of the implementation of the Memorandum of Agreement, Field Offices within DOE submitted their listings of facilities, systems, operation, and sites for which EM would have line responsibility. It is intended that EM facility listings will be revised on a yearly basis so that managers at all levels will have a valid reference for the planning, programming, budgeting and execution of EM activities.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas in 2011.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Everest, Kansas, is a small rural community (population approximately 300) located in the southeast corner of Brown County, in the northeastern corner of Kansas. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform contamination in groundwater at Everest was initially identified in 1997 as a result of testing performed under the Commodity Credit Corporation/U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) private well sampling program conducted by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The KDHE collected samples from seven private wells in and near Everest. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were found in only one of the wells, the Donnie Nigh domestic well (owned at that time by Tim Gale), approximately 3/8 mi northwest of the former Everest CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride and chloroform were detected at 121 {mu}g/L and 4 {mu}g/L, respectively. Nitrate was found at 12.62 mg/L. The USDA subsequently connected the Nigh residence to the Everest public water supply system. The findings of the 2011 monitoring at Everest support the following conclusions: (1) Measurements of groundwater levels obtained manually during annual monitoring in 2009-2011 (and through the use of automatic recorders in 2002-2010) have consistently indicated an initial direction of groundwater flow from the former CCC/USDA facility to the north-northwest and toward the Nigh property, then west-southwest from the Nigh property toward the intermittent creek that lies west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property. (2) At most of the monitored locations, carbon tetrachloride concentrations decreased in April 2011 relative to 2010 results. Noteworthy decreases of > 50% occurred at locations MW4, MW60, and MW88, in the most concentrated part of the plume. (3) Comparison of accumulated data demonstrates that the area of the carbon tetrachloride plume with concentrations > 200 {mu}g/L has decreased markedly over time and suggests a generally decreasing trend in contaminant levels. (4) The trace increases in carbon tetrachloride concentrations observed in 2010 at locations SB63 and SB64 were notable because of the locations proximity to the downgradient intermittent creek. However, these increases were not confirmed in sampling in 2011. (5) The results of the April 2011 monitoring event continue to support the interpretation, made during the 9-yr observation period from 2001 to 2010, that the migration rate for contamination in groundwater toward the intermittent creek is very slow. (6) No carbon tetrachloride was detected in five samples of surface water collected from the intermittent creek west of the former CCC/USDA facility and the Nigh property, or in tree branch tissue samples collected at locations along the banks of the creek. These observations indicate that the carbon tetrachloride contamination identified at Everest has, to date, not impacted the surface waters of the intermittent creek.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

343

Facility Representative Program: 2003 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Facility Representative Workshop 3 Facility Representative Workshop May 13 - 15, 2003 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 13, 2003 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathleen Carlson Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Keynote Address Savannah River Site and Facility Reps - A Shared History and Common Future Jeffrey M. Allison Manager, Savannah River Operations Office 9:00 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

344

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

345

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 Facility Representative Workshop 0 Facility Representative Workshop May 16-18, 2000 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Tuesday, May 16, 2000 Theme for Day 1: Sustaining the Success of the Facility Representative Program 8:00 a.m. - Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:05 a.m. - Welcome - Kenneth Powers, Deputy Manager Nevada Operations Office 8:15 a.m. - Deputy Secretary Remarks - T. J. Glauthier, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Jerry Lyle, Assistant Manager for Environmental Management, Idaho Operations Office 9:00 a.m. - Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Departmental Representative 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Results and Goals - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager

346

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at waste treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Operations, Volume 1: Sections 1-9  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies are assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms are evaluated. A personal computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for calculation of human health risk impacts. The methodology is in compliance with the most recent guidance from DOE. It considers the spectrum of accident sequences that could occur in activities covered by the WM PEIS and uses a graded approach emphasizing the risk-dominant scenarios to facilitate discrimination among the various WM PEIS alternatives. Although it allows reasonable estimates of the risk impacts associated with each alternative, the main goal of the accident analysis methodology is to allow reliable estimates of the relative risks among the alternatives. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also provide discussion of specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

A sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

A Sitewide approach to the characterization and use of soil and groundwater background has been developed for use in environmental restoration activities on the Hanford Site. Sitewide background more accurately represents the range of background compositions that exist in soil and groundwater at the over 140 Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 facilities and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 operable units, and provides a more consistent, credible, integrated, and efficient basis for identifying and evaluating contamination in these media than using unit-specific backgrounds.

Hoover, J.D.; Ruck, F.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); LeGore, T. [Boeing Computer Services Co., Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, K.M. [USDOE Richland Operations Office, WA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishmen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

boxed in a container for on-site storage at Paducah. PADUCAH, Ky. - Work to remove two aging, inactive structures and clean up a leading source of groundwater contamination marked...

350

Groundwater: focusing on the real issue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most studies of the welfare economics of groundwater have focused mainly on the dichotomy between optimal control of groundwater use and no control at all. This article argues that, under circumstances that generally prevail in semiarid zones, assigning property rights to groundwater and permitting the market to determine the allocation of water use can lead to a second-best solution. An argument is made that if potential users would be allowed to Coasebargain with incumbent users on the issuance of new groundwater rights, the second-best solution is elevated to a Pareto-optimal solution. This article is also a tale of two states: water law and performance in New Mexico and Arizona. 12 references, 3 figures.

Gisser, M.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Arsenic Remediation Technologies for Groundwater and Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October 2003, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) released report 1008881, Arsenic Remediation Technologies for Soils and Groundwater. The report provides a review of available technologies for the remediation of arsenic in soils, groundwater, and surface water, primarily at substation sites. In most cases, the technologies reviewed are applicable to a much wider range of projects. In the six years since the publication of that report, the technologies for the remediation of arsenic have cont...

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

352

Accounting for surface-groundwater interactions and their uncertainty in river and groundwater models: A case study in the Namoi River, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface-groundwater (SW-GW) interactions constitute a critical proportion of the surface and groundwater balance especially during dry conditions. Conjunctive management of surface and groundwater requires an explicit account of the exchange flux between ... Keywords: Groundwater model, Groundwater pumping, Nonstationarity of low flows, River low flow, River model, Surface-groundwater interaction, Uncertainty analysis, eWater Source

David W. Rassam, Luk Peeters, Trevor Pickett, Ian Jolly, Linda Holz

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Overview on backfill materials and permeable reactive barriers for nuclear waste disposal facilities.  

SciTech Connect

A great deal of money and effort has been spent on environmental restoration during the past several decades. Significant progress has been made on improving air quality, cleaning up and preventing leaching from dumps and landfills, and improving surface water quality. However, significant challenges still exist in all of these areas. Among the more difficult and expensive environmental problems, and often the primary factor limiting closure of contaminated sites following surface restoration, is contamination of ground water. The most common technology used for remediating ground water is surface treatment where the water is pumped to the surface, treated and pumped back into the ground or released at a nearby river or lake. Although still useful for certain remediation scenarios, the limitations of pump-and-treat technologies have recently been recognized, along with the need for innovative solutions to ground-water contamination. Even with the current challenges we face there is a strong need to create geological repository systems for dispose of radioactive wastes containing long-lived radionuclides. The potential contamination of groundwater is a major factor in selection of a radioactive waste disposal site, design of the facility, future scenarios such as human intrusion into the repository and possible need for retrieving the radioactive material, and the use of backfills designed to keep the radionuclides immobile. One of the most promising technologies for remediation of contaminated sites and design of radioactive waste repositories is the use of permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). PRBs are constructed of reactive material(s) to intercept and remove the radionuclides from the water and decontaminate the plumes in situ. The concept of PRBs is relatively simple. The reactive material(s) is placed in the subsurface between the waste or contaminated area and the groundwater. Reactive materials used thus far in practice and research include zero valent iron, hydroxyapatite, magnesium oxide, and others. As the contaminant moves through the reactive material, the contaminant is either sorbed by the reactive material or chemically reacts with the material to form a less harmful substance. Because of the high risk associated with failure of a geological repository for nuclear waste, most nations favor a near-field multibarrier engineered system using backfill materials to prevent release of radionuclides into the surrounding groundwater.

Moore, Robert Charles; Hasan, Ahmed Ali Mohamed; Holt, Kathleen Caroline; Hasan, Mahmoud A. (Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt)

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB),  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Analytical Laboratory (LAB), Balance of Facilities (BOF) and Low-Activity Waste Vitrification Facilities (LAW) Summary - WTP Analytical Lab, BOF and LAW Waste Vitrification Facilities More Documents & Publications Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant HLW Waste Vitrification Facility Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility Compilation of TRA Summaries

355

Facilities/Staff Hydrogen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermophysical Properties of Hydrogen. FACILITIES and STAFF. The Thermophysical Properties Division is the Nation's ...

356

FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

Subhash Shah

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.  

SciTech Connect

In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) requested that sitewide monitoring continue until a final remedy is selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented. In response to this request, the established sampling across the site and additional sampling in the IM pilot test area continued in 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009a,b). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program for both the wider site and the IM pilot test area (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve monitoring points across the site (Figure 1.1) and five outlying IM pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.2); and (2) Twice yearly sampling of five IM pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.2). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), the initial groundwater sampling for VOCs and geochemical analyses under the interim monitoring plan outlined above was conducted in 2009 (Argonne 2010). The present report documents the findings of the 2010 monitoring events, conducted on April 5 and September 19-21, 2010.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Monitoring Optimization Plan For Groundwater Monitoring Wells At The U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the monitoring optimization plan for groundwater monitoring wells associated with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Figure A.1). The plan describes the technical approach that will be implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) to focus available resources on the monitoring wells at Y-12 that provide the most useful hydrologic and groundwater quality monitoring data. The technical approach is based on the GWPP status designation for each well (Section 2.0). Under this approach, wells granted 'active' status are used by the GWPP for hydrologic monitoring and/or groundwater quality sampling (Section 3.0), whereas wells granted 'inactive' status are not used for either purpose. The status designation also defines the frequency at which the GWPP will inspect applicable wells, the scope of these well inspections, and extent of any maintenance actions initiated by the GWPP (Section 3.0). Details regarding the ancillary activities associated with implementation of this plan (e.g., well inspection) are deferred to the referenced GWPP plans and procedures (Section 4.0). This plan applies to groundwater wells associated with Y-12 and related waste management areas and facilities located within three hydrogeologic regimes (Figure A.1): the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek Regime encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) immediately west of Y-12. The East Fork Regime encompasses most of the Y-12 process, operations, and support facilities in BCV and, for the purposes of this plan, includes a section of Union Valley east of the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) boundary along Scarboro Road. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12 that is bound on the west by a surface drainage feature (Dunaway Branch) and on the east by Scarboro Road. For this plan, the Chestnut Ridge Regime includes an area known as the South Campus Facility that is located west of Scarboro Road and south of Bethel Valley Road. The GWPP maintains an extensive database of construction details and related information for the monitoring wells in each hydrogeologic regime (including wells that have been destroyed or intentionally plugged and abandoned); the most recent hardcopy version of the database was issued in February 2003 (BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. [BWXT] 2003). As specified in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC [B&W Y-12] 2009a), this plan will be reviewed and updated every three years.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Facility Representative Program: 2001 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Facility Representative Workshop 1 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2001 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. - Logistics Announcements & Opening Remarks - Joe Arango, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. - Welcome - Debbie Monette, Assistant Manager for National Security, Nevada Operations Office 8:30 a.m. - Keynote Address - Ralph Erickson, National Nuclear Security Administration 9:00 a.m.- DOE Facility Representative of the Year Presentation - Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 9:30 a.m. - Break 9:50 a.m. - Program Summary - Joe Arango 10:10 a.m. - Management Panel/Questions and Answers

360

Facility Representative Program: 2010 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10 Facility Representative Workshop 10 Facility Representative Workshop May 12 - 13, 2010 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees | Summary Report Workshop Agenda and Presentations Day 1: Wednesday, May 12, 2010 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager Earl Hughes, Safety System Oversight Program Manager Office of Nuclear Safety Policy and Assistance Office of Health, Safety and Security 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office John Mallin, Deputy Assistant Manager for Site Operations Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Workshop Keynote Address Todd Lapointe Chief of Nuclear Safety Central Technical Authority Staff 9:15 a.m. Facility Representative and Safety System Oversight Award Ceremony James Heffner, Facility Representative Program Manager

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Facility Representative Program: 2007 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Facility Representative Workshop 7 Facility Representative Workshop May 15 - 17, 2007 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 15, 2007 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks Joanne Lorence, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from the Nevada Site Office Gerald Talbot, Manager, Nevada Site Office 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:45 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight Perspective and Expectations Glenn Podonsky, Chief Health, Safety and Security Officer, Office of Health, Safety and Security 9:10 a.m. Facility Representative of the Year Presentation Mark B. Whitaker, Jr., Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board,

362

No option would satisfy everyone. [Decision making for decontamination of groundwater  

SciTech Connect

In an address to registered sanitarians and restaurant inspectors, the Environmental Risk Coordinator for Oak Ridge National Laboratory discussed health risks and the cost of remediation for a typical site with contaminated groundwater. After consideration of each option it was clear that no option satisfied everyone in the group. Even though most members wanted aggressive treatment, they were frustrated to learn that aggressive and expensive treatments were no more effective than the no action option.

Krause, C. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) began its environmental investigations at Everest, Kansas, in 2000. The work at Everest is implemented on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, under the oversight of the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The results of the environmental investigations have been reported in detail (Argonne 2001, 2003, 2006a,b). The lateral extent of the carbon tetrachloride in groundwater over the years of investigation has been interpreted as shown in Figure 1.1 (2001-2002 data), Figure 1.2 (2006 data), Figure 1.3 (2008 data), and Figure 1.4 (2009 data). The pattern of groundwater flow and inferred contaminant migration has consistently been to the north-northwest from the former CCC/USDA facility toward the Nigh property, and then west-southwest from the Nigh property (e.g., Figure 1.5 [2008 data] and Figure 1.6 [2009 data]). Both the monitoring data for carbon tetrachloride and the low groundwater flow rates estimated for the Everest aquifer unit (Argonne 2003, 2006a,b, 2008) indicate slow contaminant migration. On the basis of the accumulated findings, in March 2009 the CCC/USDA developed a plan for annual monitoring of the groundwater and surface water. This current monitoring plan (Appendix A in the report of monitoring in 2009 [Argonne 2010]) was approved by the KDHE (2009a). Under this plan, the monitoring wells are sampled by the low-flow procedure, and sample preservation, shipping, and analysis activities are consistent with previous work at Everest. The annual sampling will continue until identified conditions at the site indicate a technical justification for a change. The first annual sampling event under the new monitoring plan took place in April 2009. The results of analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and water level measurements were consistent with previous observations (Figures 1.1-1.4). No carbon tetrachloride was detected in surface water of the intermittent creek or in tree branch samples collected at 18 locations along the creek banks. The complete results were reported previously (Argonne 2010). This report presents the results of the second annual sampling events, conducted in 2010. Included in the 2010 monitoring were the following: (1) Continued automatic and manual monitoring of groundwater levels. (2) Groundwater sampling on April 8-9, 2010. (3) Surface water sampling on April 8, 2010. (4) Vegetation sampling on July 28, 2010. (5) Indoor air sampling at selected residences on August 11-12, 2010. The activities are described in Section 2, and the results are discussed in Section 3. Conclusions and recommendations are presented in Section 4.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Facility Representative Program: 2008 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sherman Chao, LSO Conduct of Operations Improvements at K Basins Dennis Humphreys, RL Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) facility lessons learned Charlie Wright, ORO...

365

Facility Representative Program: 2005 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sharing of Good Practices and Lessons Learned (4) Inadvertent Startup of Electric Centrifuge at the Weapon Evaluation Test Lab Joyce Arviso-Benally, SSO Facility Rep...

366

Facility Representative Program: 2012 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

18, 2012 Las Vegas, NV Agenda | Presentations | SSO Annual Award | Pictures | Summary Report 2011 Facility Representative of the Year Award 2011 WINNER: Congratulations to Bradley...

367

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

368

Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application. The application allows users to access expert interpretation of groundwater conditions and trends for each of the Hanford site's 12 groundwater interest areas. Users can access the typical content of the paper-based report but can also explore all supporting data using an intuitive map-based interface. Groundwater monitoring is conducted to meet requirements of the DOE, U.S

369

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

370

National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site Groundwater Cleanup Progresses at Paducah Site October 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. Workers drill holes for installation of electrodes as part of a heating system to help clean up contamination. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. A crane lifts the carbon treatment system into place. This technology treats vapor pumped to the surface by the belowground heating system. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning Building. The belowground heating system operates in front of the C-400 Cleaning

372

Waste Treatment and Immobilation Plant Pretreatment Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

pressure and vacuum optimum range to minimize air entrainment. - Validation of the TEMPEST CFD model of the PJMs using the data generated in the small tank. A mixing time...

373

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's world-class research facilities provide the venue for innovative advances in photovoltaic technologies and applications. These facilities within the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) serve both multi-use and dedicated-use functions. We encourage our research colleagues in industry, universities, and other laboratories to pursue opportunities in working with our staff in these facilities. Dedicated-Use Facilities Photo of a red-hot coil glowing inside a round machine. Research within these facilities focuses on targeted areas of interest that require specific tools, techniques, or unique capabilities. Our two main dedicated-use facilities are the following: Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) OTF researchers study and evaluate advanced or emerging PV technologies

374

Facility Representative Program: Facility Representative Program Sponsors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Representative Program Sponsors Facility Representative Program Sponsors There are 29 Facility Representative Program Sponsors Office Name Title E-Mail Phone ASO Larry Pendexter ES&H Div Dir (Argonne) larry.pendexter@ch.doe.gov 630-252-1485 BHSO Bob Desmarais Operations Management Division Director desmarai@bnl.gov 631-344-5434 CBFO Glenn Gamlin Facility Representative Supervisor glenn.gamlin@wipp.ws 575-234-8136 CBFO Casey Gadbury Operations Manager casey.gadbury@wipp.ws 575-234-7372 FSO Mark Bollinger Deputy Manager Mark.Bollinger@ch.doe.gov 630-840-8130 FSO John Scott FR Team Lead john.scott@ch.doe.gov 630-840-2250 HS-30 James O'Brien Director, Office of Nuclear Safety James.O'Brien@hq.doe.gov 301-903-1408 HS-32 Earl Hughes Facility Representative Program Manager Earl.Hughes@hq.doe.gov 202-586-0065

375

DEVELOPMENT & TESTING OF A CEMENT BASED SOLID WASTE FORM USING SYNTHETIC UP-1 GROUNDWATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site is investigating the conversion of several liquid waste streams from evaporator operations into solid cement-based waste forms. The cement/waste mixture will be poured into plastic-lined mold boxes. After solidification the bags will be removed from the molds and sealed for land disposal at the Hanford Site. The RJ Lee Group, Inc. Center for Laboratory Sciences (CLS) at Columbia Basin College (CBC) was requested to develop and test a cementitious solids (CS) formulation to solidify evaporated groundwater brine, identified as UP-1, from Basin 43. Laboratory testing of cement/simulant mixtures is required to demonstrate the viability of cement formulations that reduce the overall cost, minimize bleed water and expansion, and provide suitable strength and cure temperature. Technical support provided mixing, testing, and reporting of values for a defined composite solid waste form. In this task, formulations utilizing Basin 43 simulant at varying wt% solids were explored. The initial mixing consisted of making small ({approx} 300 g) batches and casting into 500-mL Nalgene{reg_sign} jars. The mixes were cured under adiabatic conditions and checked for bleed water and consistency at recorded time intervals over a 1-week period. After the results from the preliminary mixing, four formulations were selected for further study. The testing documentation included workability, bleed water analysis (volume and pH) after 24 hours, expansivity/shrinkage, compressive strength, and selected Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) leach analytes of the resulting solid waste form.

COOKE, G.A.; LOCKREM, L.L.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

User Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USER PORTAL USER PORTAL BTRICBuilding Technologies Research Integration Center CNMSCenter for Nanophase Materials Sciences CSMBCenter for Structural Molecular Biology CFTFCarbon Fiber Technology Facility HFIRHigh Flux Isotope Reactor MDF Manufacturing Demonstration Facility NTRCNational Transportation Research Center OLCFOak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility SNSSpallation Neutron Source Keeping it fresh at the Spallation Neutron Source Nanophase material sciences' nanotech toolbox Home | User Facilities SHARE ORNL User Facilities ORNL is home to a number of highly sophisticated experimental user facilities that provide unmatched capabilities to the broader scientific community, including a growing user community from universities, industry, and other laboratories research institutions, as well as to ORNL

377

Groundwater quality sampling and analysis plan for environmental monitoring in Waste Area Grouping 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan addresses groundwater quality sampling and analysis activities that will be conducted in support of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 6. WAG 6 is a shallow-burial land disposal facility for low-level radioactive waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a research facility owned by the US Department of energy and managed by martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems). Groundwater sampling will be conducted by Energy Systems at 45 wells within WAG 6. The samples will be analyzed for various organic, inorganic, and radiological parameters. The information derived from the groundwater quality monitoring, sampling, and analysis will aid in evaluating relative risk associated with contaminants migrating off-WAG, and also will fulfill Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) interim permit monitoring requirements. The sampling steps described in this plan are consistent with the steps that have previously been followed by Energy Systems when conducting RCRA sampling.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Impact Impact \ DoE/Els-o120 Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina Volume 3 Q ~+ ~ FNT O&@+@ &v a w ~ k ~ ;%." $ +6 & ~+e $TiTES Of December 1987 United States Department of Energy TABLE OF CONTENTS ~pendix G ASSESSMENT OF ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES FOR STORAGE FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . G.1 No-Action Strategy . . . . . . . . G.1.l Sununarv and Objectives . . NEW DISPOSAL/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.2 Groundwater and Surface Water Effects G.1.3 Nonradioactive Atmospheric Releases . G.1.4 Ecological Effects . . . . . . . . . G.1.5 Radiological Releases . . . . . . . . G.1.6 Archaeological and Historic Resources G.1.7 SOciOecOnOmics . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.8 Dedication of Site . . . . . . . . . G.1.9 Institutional Impacts . . . . . . . . G.l.10 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2 Dedication Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2.1 G.2.2 G.2.3 G.2.4 G.2.5 G.2.6

379

2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended March 2010) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes the results from the groundwater monitoring program during fiscal year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

2008 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area, Corrective Action Unit 447  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the 2008 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Project Shoal Area (PSA) Subsurface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 located in Churchill County, Nevada. Responsibility for the environmental site restoration of the PSA was transferred from the DOE Office of Environmental Management to LM on October 1, 2006. The environmental restoration process and corrective action strategy for CAU 447 are conducted in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO 1996, as amended February 2008) entered into by DOE, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. The corrective action strategy for the site includes proof of concept monitoring in support of site closure. This report summarizes investigation activities associated with CAU 447 that were conducted at the site during 2008. This is the second groundwater monitoring report prepared by LM for the PSA

None

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Closure End States for Facilities, Waste Sites, and Subsurface Contamination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil cleanup effort in the world. DOEs Office of Environmental Management (EM) has made significant progress in its restoration efforts at sites such as Fernald and Rocky Flats. However, remaining sites, such as Savannah River Site, Oak Ridge Site, Hanford Site, Los Alamos, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and West Valley Demonstration Project possess the most complex challenges ever encountered by the technical community and represent a challenge that will face DOE for the next decade. Closure of the remaining 18 sites in the DOE EM Program requires remediation of 75 million cubic yards of contaminated soil and 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, deactivation & decommissioning (D&D) of over 3000 contaminated facilities and thousands of miles of contaminated piping, removal and disposition of millions of cubic yards of legacy materials, treatment of millions of gallons of high level tank waste and disposition of hundreds of contaminated tanks. The financial obligation required to remediate this volume of contaminated environment is estimated to cost more than 7% of the to-go life-cycle cost. Critical in meeting this goal within the current life-cycle cost projections is defining technically achievable end states that formally acknowledge that remedial goals will not be achieved for a long time and that residual contamination will be managed in the interim in ways that are protective of human health and environment. Formally acknowledging the long timeframe needed for remediation can be a basis for establishing common expectations for remedy performance, thereby minimizing the risk of re-evaluating the selected remedy at a later time. Once the expectations for long-term management are in place, remedial efforts can be directed towards near-term objectives (e.g., reducing the risk of exposure to residual contamination) instead of focusing on long-term cleanup requirements. An acknowledgement of the long timeframe for complete restoration and the need for long-term management can also help a site transition from the process of pilot testing different remedial strategies to selecting a final remedy and establishing a long-term management and monitoring approach. This approach has led to cost savings and the more efficient use of resources across the Department of Defense complex and at numerous industrial sites across the U.S. Defensible end states provide numerous benefits for the DOE environmental remediation programs including cost-effective, sustainable long-term monitoring strategies, remediation and site transition decision support, and long-term management of closure sites.

Gerdes, Kurt D.; Chamberlain, Grover S.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Marble, Justin

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

October 15, 2005 [Facility News] October 15, 2005 [Facility News] Room to Share-New Guest Facility Ready for Users at North Slope of Alaska Bookmark and Share In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. In September, installation was completed on the new Guest Instrument Facility in Barrow to provide additional space and ease crowded conditions. To alleviate crowded conditions at its research facilities on the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, ARM operations staff recently completed the installation of a new Guest Instrument Facility. Similar to the platform at the Atqasuk site, the facility consists of two insulated shipping containers mounted on pilings, with a mezzanine to accommodate

383

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

384

FACET User Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility AD SLACPortal > Accelerator Research Division > FACET User Facility Sign In Launch the Developer Dashboard SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE | Stanford | SLAC | SSRL | LCLS | AD | PPA | Photon Science | PULSE | SIMES FACET User Facility : FACET An Office of Science User Facility Search this site... Search Help (new window) Top Link Bar FACET User Facility FACET Home About FACET FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Users Research at FACET SAREC Expand SAREC FACET FAQs FACET User Facility Quick Launch FACET Users Home FACET Division ARD Home About FACET FACET News FACET Users FACET Experimental Facilities FACET Research Expand FACET Research FACET Images Expand FACET Images SAREC Expand SAREC FACET Project Site (restricted) FACET FAQs FACET Site TOC All Site Content

385

Government Facilities Segment Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal, state, and local governments own or lease an estimated 1.2 million buildings and facilities in the United States. These facilities are an important -- and often overlooked -- customer segment for all energy and energy service providers.

1998-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geothermal component test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the East Mesa geothermal facility and the services provided. The facility provides for testing various types of geothermal energy-conversion equipment and materials under field conditions using geothermal fluids from three existing wells. (LBS)

Not Available

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

388

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed about 1.5 million cubic feet, the volume of a football field roughly three stories tall. Demolition debris filled 28 rail cars and was shipped offsite for disposal. A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed

389

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

390

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Primary Systems Infrastructure High Performance Storage Supercomputing and Computation Home | Science & Discovery | Supercomputing and Computation | Facilities and Capabilities...

391

Idaho Site Nuclear Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Nuclear Facilities Idaho Idaho National Laboratorys (INL) Idaho Closure Project (ICP) This page was last updated on May 16...

392

MML Microscopy Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MML Electron Microscopy Facility consists of three transmission electron microscopes (TEM), three scanning electron microscopes (SEM), a ...

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

393

Photon Sciences | Navigation | Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities NSLS About NSLS Accelerator Activity Report Experimental Systems Machine Status & History Operations & Engineering Operating Schedules Ring Parameters NSLS Ops:...

394

Facilities and Instruments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The EL Facilities listed here are available for cooperative or independent research, typically on a cost reimbursable basis. ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

396

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Groundwater Protection Program Management Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) management plan for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12). The Y-12 GWPP functions as the primary point-of-contact for groundwater-related issues at Y-12, provides stewardship of the extensive network of groundwater monitoring wells at Y-12, and serves as a resource for technical expertise, support, and historical data for groundwater-related activities at Y-12. These organizational functions each serve the primary programmatic purpose of the GWPP, which is to ensure that groundwater monitoring activities within areas under Y-12 administrative control provide representative data in compliance with the multiple purposes of applicable state and federal regulations, DOE orders, and the corporate policies of BWXT Y-12, L.L.C. (hereafter referenced as BWXT), the Y-12 management and operations (M&O) contractor for DOE. This GWPP management plan addresses the requirements of DOE Order 450.1 (BWXT Y12 S/RID) regarding the implementation of a site-wide approach for groundwater protection at each DOE facility. Additionally, this plan is a ''living'' document that is reviewed annually, revised and reissued every three years, and is formatted to provide for updating individual sections independent of the rest of the document. Section 2 includes a short description of the groundwater system at Y-12, the history of groundwater monitoring at Y-12 and the corresponding evolution of the GWPP, and an overview of ongoing Y-12 groundwater monitoring activities. Section 3 describes the key elements of the GWPP management strategy. Organizational roles and responsibilities of GWPP personnel are outlined in Section 4. Section 5 presents an overview of the GWPP project plans for applicable programmatic elements. Section 6 lists the reports, plans, and documents that are referenced for technical and administrative details.

Elvado Environmental LLC; Environmental Compliance Department Environment, Safety, and Health Division Y-12 National Security Complex

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Facility Representative Program: 2004 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Facility Representative Workshop 4 Facility Representative Workshop May 18 - 20, 2004 Las Vegas, NV Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final Day 1: Tuesday, May 18, 2004 Theme: Program Successes and Challenges 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome Kathy Carlson, Nevada Site Office Manager 8:30 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary Kyle E. McSlarrow, Deputy Secretary of Energy Deputy Secretary's Remarks 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - NNSA Evaluation of Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report Brigadier General Ronald J. Haeckel, Principal Assistant Deputy Administrator for Military Applications, NNSA Other Information: NASA’S Columbia Accident Investigation Board Report

400

Facility Representative Program: 2006 Facility Representative Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 Facility Representative Workshop 6 Facility Representative Workshop May 16 - 19, 2006 Knoxville, Tennessee Facility Rep of the Year Award | Attendees list | Summary Report [PDF] WORKSHOP AGENDA Final To view Pictures, scroll the mouse over the Picture icon To view Presentations, Picture Slideshows and Video, click on the icon Day 1: Tuesday, May 16, 2006 8:00 a.m. Opening Remarks John Evans, Facility Representative Program Manager 8:15 a.m. Welcome from Oak Ridge Office Gerald Boyd, Manager, Oak Ridge Office 8:25 a.m. Welcome from Y-12 Site Office Theodore Sherry, Manager, Y-12 Site Office 8:35 a.m. Videotaped Remarks from the Deputy Secretary The Honorable Clay Sell, Deputy Secretary of Energy 8:40 a.m. Keynote Address - Safety Oversight at Environmental Management Activities Dr. Inés Triay, Chief Operating Officer, Office of Environmental Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater treatment facility" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Facility Representative Program: 2000 Facility Representative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Break 10:00 a.m. - Making Your Observations CountLeading Indicators - Mike Weis, Rocky Flats Field Office 10:45 a.m. - Facility Representative PanelQuestions and Answers (Ben...

402

Groundwater Quality at Power Plants in West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As states develop groundwater regulations, utilities are increasingly being required to examine the effects of all facets of power plant operations on groundwater quality. This report summarizes the results of a four-year study of groundwater quality at 12 power plants in West Virginia.

1999-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Groundwater Impacts of Radioactive Wastes and Associated Environmental Modeling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides a review of the major sources of radioactive wastes and their impacts on groundwater contamination. The review discusses the major biogeochemical processes that control the transport and fate of radionuclide contaminants in groundwater, and describe the evolution of mathematical models designed to simulate and assess the transport and transformation of radionuclides in groundwater.

Ma, Rui; Zheng, Chunmiao; Liu, Chongxuan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Progress report and technical evaluation of the ISCR pilot test conducted at the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology, employing the use of the EHC{reg_sign} treatment materials marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc. (Freeport, Illinois), was recommended. The EHC materials are proprietary mixtures of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron that are injected into the subsurface as a slurry (EHC) or in dissolved form (EHC-A) and subsequently released slowly into the formation. The materials are designed to create highly reducing geochemical conditions in the vadose and saturated zones that foster both thermodynamic and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

406

Hydrologic test plan for the Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect

Hydrologic tests are planned at seven wells that will be drilled at the proposed Environmental Remediation Disposal Facility (ERDF). These wells are supporting hydrologic, geologic, and hydrochemical characterization at this new facility. Hydrologic testing will consist of instantaneous slug tests, slug interference tests, step-drawdown tests, and constant rate discharge tests (generally single-well). These test results and later groundwater monitoring data will be used to determine groundwater flow directions, flow rates, and the chemical makeup of the groundwater below the proposed ERDF. The seven wells will be drilled in two phases. In Phase I four wells will be drilled and tested: Two to the top of the uppermost aquifer (water table) and two as characterization boreholes to the top of basalt. The Phase I wells are located in the northern portion of the proposed ERDF site (699-32-72, 699-SDF-6, -7 and -8) (Figure 1). If Phase II drilling proceeds, the remaining three wells will be installed and tested (two deep and one shallow). A phased approach to drilling is warranted because of current uncertainty in the land use requirements at the proposed ERDF.

Swanson, L.C.

1993-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana) Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)...

408

Facility Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus Coordinates D Metals D Metals D Metals Definition Small Scale Wind Valley City OH MW Northern Power Systems In Service AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Definition Commercial Scale Wind Coram Energy AB Energy Southern California Edison Co Tehachapi CA MW Vestas In Service AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines Definition Commercial Scale Wind AFCEE Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment Distributed generation net metered Camp Edwards Sandwich MA MW GE Energy In Service AG Land AG Land AG Land Definition Community Wind AG Land Energy LLC

409

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 22, 2007 [Facility News] March 22, 2007 [Facility News] GEWEX News Features Dust Data from ARM Mobile Facility Deployment Bookmark and Share Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. Data from the recent deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility are featured in the February issue of GEWEX News. The February 2007 issue (Vol. 17, No. 1) of GEWEX News features early results from special observing periods of the African Monsoon Mutidisciplinary Analysis, including data obtained by the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF). The AMF was stationed in the central Sahel from January through December 2006, with the primary facility at the Niamey airport, and an ancillary site in Banizoumbou. The AMF recorded a major dust storm that passed through the area in March, and combined with simultaneous satellite

410

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 16, 2005 [Facility News] February 16, 2005 [Facility News] Mobile Facility Arrives Safe and Sound in Point Reyes Bookmark and Share Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Image - The ARM Mobile Facility in Point Reyes, California Safe and sound at Point Reyes, the ARM Mobile Facility instrumentation is set up on the roof of a shelter until a fence is installed to keep out the curious local cattle. On February 9, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) withstood an accident on the way to its deployment location at Point Reyes, California. About an hour from its destination, the truck carrying the two AMF shelters packed with instrumentation and associated equipment swerved to avoid another vehicle and slid off the road and down a steep embankment. Emergency personnel soon

411

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

22, 2011 [Facility News] 22, 2011 [Facility News] Request for Proposals Now Open Bookmark and Share The ARM Climate Research Facility is now accepting applications for use of an ARM mobile facility (AMF), the ARM aerial facility (AAF), and fixed sites. Proposals are welcome from all members of the scientific community for conducting field campaigns and scientific research using the ARM Facility, with availability as follows: AMF2 available December 2013 AMF1 available March 2015 AAF available between June and October 2013 Fixed sites available FY2013 Priority will be given to proposals that make comprehensive use of the ARM facilities and focus on long-term goals of the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Successful proposals will be supplied all operational and logistical resources (provided at no cost to the principal

412

Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Groundwater level status report for 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2008 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 45 regional aquifer wells, 28 intermediate wells, 8 regional/intermediate wells, 106 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 166 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) Financial Assurance for In Situ Uranium Facilities (Texas) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility State/Provincial Govt Utility Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Owners or operators are required to provide financial assurance for in situ uranium sites. This money is required for: decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and waste disposal for buildings, structures, foundations, equipment, and utilities; surface re