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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sources of Water Surface water and groundwater are present throughout Kentucky's 39,486 square miles. Surface water occurs as rivers, streams, ponds, lakes, and wetlands. Ground- water occurs underlain by soluble carbonate rocks (for example, limestone). Water Supply � Approximately 49 inches

MacAdam, Keith

2

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) Surface Water and Groundwater Use and Protection (Mississippi) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Mississippi Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

3

Dating of Surface Water, Groundwater, and Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The notion of the age of water is rather ambiguous. The age of water is usually understood to be its residence time in the studied geological object. It is further assumed that either the isotopic composition ...

V. I. Ferronsky; V. A. Polyakov

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Interaction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge at a seasonally  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the behaviour of the hydrocarbon plume at the groundwater/surface water transition zone to be strongly B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Ground water; Surface water; Hydrocarbons; Discharge; TidesInteraction between shallow groundwater, saline surface water and contaminant discharge

Clement, Prabhakar

5

Water accounting for conjunctive groundwater/surface water management: case of the SingkarakOmbilin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water accounting for conjunctive groundwater/surface water management: case of the Singkarak University, 216 Riley-Robb Hall, Ithaca, NY 14853-5701, USA b International Water Management Institute, P 2003 Abstract Because water shortages limit development in many parts of the world, a systematic

Walter, M.Todd

6

Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 103 1980 Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence G. Acosta-Gonzalez D.L. Reddell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...TR- 103 1980 Optimal Use of Groundwater and Surface Water to Reduce Land Subsidence G. Acosta-Gonzalez D.L. Reddell Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Acosta-Gonzalez, G.; Reddell, D. L.

7

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling and Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2009 will be in accordance with DOE Order 540.1 requirements and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2009 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2009 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3; sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4; and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2010 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2010 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley, and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge, along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2010 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2010) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2011 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2011 will be in accordance with requirements of DOE Order 540.1A and the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring during CY 2011 will be performed primarily in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2011 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. All modifications to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as addenda to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2011 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2011) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater And Surface Water Sampling And Analysis Plan For Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan provides a description of the groundwater and surface water quality monitoring activities planned for calendar year (CY) 2012 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) that will be managed by the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Groundwater and surface water monitoring performed by the GWPP during CY 2012 is in accordance with the following goals: (1) to protect the worker, the public, and the environment; (2) to maintain surveillance of existing and potential groundwater contamination sources; (3) to provide for the early detection of groundwater contamination and determine the quality of groundwater and surface water where contaminants are most likely to migrate beyond the Oak Ridge Reservation property line; (4) to identify and characterize long-term trends in groundwater quality at Y-12; and (5) to provide data to support decisions concerning the management and protection of groundwater resources. Groundwater and surface water monitoring will be performed in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12: the Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime), the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime), and the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime). The Bear Creek and East Fork regimes are located in Bear Creek Valley and the Chestnut Ridge Regime is located south of Y-12 (Figure A.1). Additional surface water monitoring will be performed north of Pine Ridge along the boundary of the Oak Ridge Reservation. Modifications to the CY 2012 monitoring program may be necessary during implementation. Changes in programmatic requirements may alter the analytes specified for selected monitoring wells or may add or remove wells from the planned monitoring network. Each modification to the monitoring program will be approved by the Y-12 GWPP manager and documented as an addendum to this sampling and analysis plan. The following sections of this report provide details regarding the CY 2012 groundwater and surface water monitoring activities. Section 2 describes the monitoring locations in each regime and the processes used to select the sampling locations. A description of the field measurements and laboratory analytes is provided in Section 3. Sample collection methods and procedures are described in Section 4, and Section 5 lists the documents cited for more detailed operational and technical information. The narrative sections of the report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding a data summary table presented in Section 4) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Groundwater Monitoring Schedules (when issued throughout CY 2012) will be inserted in Appendix C, and addenda to this plan (if issued) will be inserted in Appendix D. Laboratory requirements (bottle lists, holding times, etc.) are provided in Appendix E, and an approved Waste Management Plan is provided in Appendix F.

Elvado Environmental, LLC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins Cretaceous aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins is currently being assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Williston basin is located in parts of North Dakota, South Dakota

Torgersen, Christian

12

Surface Water and Groundwater Relationships in Nebraska James Goeke, Research Hydrogeologist, School of Natural Resources/Conservation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Water and Groundwater Relationships in Nebraska James Goeke, Research Hydrogeologist between ground water and surface water has been poorly understood and as a result a contentious issue. The nature of the resources makes this understandable. Surface water is readily accessible to use, measure

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

13

Naturally-Occurring Radionuclides In Drinking Water From Surface And Groundwater Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactivity in water for human consumption is under closer scrutiny than ever before and many countries adopted guideline values based on total alpha and total beta activity measurements. Although most waters from surface circulation meet these guidelines, it is frequently found that groundwater exceed guideline values. Results of water analyses by alpha spectrometry clarified that the main radionuclides present are from the uranium decay series, such as uranium isotopes, radium ({sup 226}Ra), radon ({sup 222}Rn), and also {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po. Occasionally, groundwater displayed {sup 226}Ra concentrations higher than 1 Bq L{sup -1} and {sup 222}Rn concentrations above 1000 Bq L{sup -1}. Nevertheless, lack of conformity of these waters with guidelines adopted, generally, is not due to anthropogenic inputs.

Carvalho, F. P.; Madruga, M. J.; Oliveira, J. M.; Lopes, I.; Ferrador, G.; Sequeira, M. M. [Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety E.N. 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

May 2011 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 16-17, 2011, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Radiation&Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry, and for tritium using the conventional method. Tritium was not measured using the enrichment method because the EPA laboratory no longer offers that service. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

May 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 9-10, 2012, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location Johnson Artesian WL. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods. Results of this monitoring at the Rio Blanco site demonstrate that groundwater and surface water outside the site boundaries have not been affected by project-related contaminants.

None

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

None

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Prediction of postmine ground-water quality at a Texas surface lignite mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The prediction Of postmine ground-water quality is encumbered with many complications resulting from the complex hydrologic system found in mine spoils. Current analytical methods such as acid/base accounting have only had limited success...

Wise, Clifton Farrell

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Will heat from the pipeline affect groundwater and surface water? Response by Professor James Goeke The temperature of a pipeline buried 4 feet would  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Will heat from the pipeline affect groundwater and surface water? Response by Professor James Goeke ­ The temperature of a pipeline buried 4 feet would probably affect surface water. In some places the pipeline might be quite near the water table and in others it could be 50-100 feet

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

19

Ground-water hydrogeology and geochemistry of a reclaimed lignite surface mine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that generally parallels the Gulf Coast (Figure 1). Recent estimates place the total near-surface reserves at 11 billion short tons (Kaiser et al. , 1980). Energy companies are now developing lignite mines throughout the Texas lignite belt at a rapid... and accelerating rate. Surface mining of lignite could adversely affect another valuable Texas resource--ground water. Eighty percent of the near-surface lignite reserves are located within the Wilcox Group (Kaiser et al. , 1980), which is part of the Carrizo...

Pollock, Clifford Ralph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

20

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Recent Approaches to Modeling Transport of Mercury in Surface Water and Groundwater - Case Study in Upper East Fork Poplar Creek, Oak Ridge, TN - 13349  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this case study, groundwater/surface water modeling was used to determine efficacy of stabilization in place with hydrologic isolation for remediation of mercury contaminated areas in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) Watershed in Oak Ridge, TN. The modeling simulates the potential for mercury in soil to contaminate groundwater above industrial use risk standards and to contribute to surface water contamination. The modeling approach is unique in that it couples watershed hydrology with the total mercury transport and provides a tool for analysis of changes in mercury load related to daily precipitation, evaporation, and runoff from storms. The model also allows for simulation of colloidal transport of total mercury in surface water. Previous models for the watershed only simulated average yearly conditions and dissolved concentrations that are not sufficient for predicting mercury flux under variable flow conditions that control colloidal transport of mercury in the watershed. The transport of mercury from groundwater to surface water from mercury sources identified from information in the Oak Ridge Environmental Information System was simulated using a watershed scale model calibrated to match observed daily creek flow, total suspended solids and mercury fluxes. Mercury sources at the former Building 81-10 area, where mercury was previously retorted, were modeled using a telescopic refined mesh with boundary conditions extracted from the watershed model. Modeling on a watershed scale indicated that only source excavation for soils/sediment in the vicinity of UEFPC had any effect on mercury flux in surface water. The simulations showed that colloidal transport contributed 85 percent of the total mercury flux leaving the UEFPC watershed under high flow conditions. Simulation of dissolved mercury transport from liquid elemental mercury and adsorbed sources in soil at former Building 81-10 indicated that dissolved concentrations are orders of magnitude below a target industrial groundwater concentration beneath the source and would not influence concentrations in surface water at Station 17. This analysis addressed only shallow concentrations in soil and the shallow groundwater flow path in soil and unconsolidated sediments to UEFPC. Other mercury sources may occur in bedrock and transport though bedrock to UEFPC may contribute to the mercury flux at Station 17. Generally mercury in the source areas adjacent to the stream and in sediment that is eroding can contribute to the flux of mercury in surface water. Because colloidally adsorbed mercury can be transported in surface water, actions that trap colloids and or hydrologically isolate surface water runoff from source areas would reduce the flux of mercury in surface water. Mercury in soil is highly adsorbed and transport in the groundwater system is very limited under porous media conditions. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, Applied Research Center 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100 Miami Florida 33174 (United States); Malek-Mohammadi, Siamak [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)] [Bradley University, 413A Jobst Hall, Preoria, IL 61625 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

Torgersen, Christian

23

Assessing the efficiency of combined use of surface water and groundwater for process water supply to Kalininskaya NPP  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential improvement of the reliability of process water supply system is discussed for the case of an important power facility with the use of combined water intake systems. Hydrological simulation is us...

M. V. Bolgov; R. S. Shtengelov; A. A. Maslov; E. A. Filimonova

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Understanding what lies beneath: Groundwater critical to Texas water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of organizations and programs associated with groundwater in Texas: Aquifers: Geological formations that can store, transmit, and yield groundwater to a well or spring. Groundwater comes from nine major and 21 minor aquifers in Texas. Confined aquifer: Layer... of water that is held between two layers of clay. The recharge area is limited to land surface where the aquifer?s geologic material is exposed to the land surface. Unconfined aquifer: Layer of water that has a confining layer on bottom and a layer...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

GROUND-WATER CONTRIBUTION TO DOSE FROM PAST HANFORD OPERATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEOR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides originating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: 1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; 2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; 3) through wells that draw some or all of their water from the Columbia River (riparian wells); and 4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in the contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring. These four pathways make up the "ground-water pathway ," which is the subject of this study. The objective of the study was to assess the extent to which the groundwater pathway contributed to radiation doses that populations or individuals may have received from past operations at Hanford. The assessment presented in this report was performed by 1) reviewing the extensive ?literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and 2) performing simple calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations in ground water and the Columbia River resulting from ground-water discharge. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to this ground water and surface water were calculated. The study conclusion is that the ground-water pathways did not contribute significantly to dose. Compared with background radiation in the TriCities {300 mrem/yr), estimated doses are small: 0.02 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from discharge of contaminated ground water to the Columbia River; 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from Hanford Site wells; 11 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from riparian wells; and 1 mrem/yr effective dose equivalent from the watershed. Because the estimated doses are so small, the recommendation is that further work on the ground-water pathway be limited to tracking ongoing ground-water studies at the Hanford Site.

Freshley, M. D.; Thorne, P. D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

SciTech Connect: Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conjunctive Surface and...

27

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Author Government of Western Australia Organization Department of Mines and Petroleum Published N/A, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Citation Government of Western Australia (Department of Mines and Petroleum). 2002. Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling. N\A: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Guidelines_for_the_Protection_of_Surface_and_Groundwater_Resources_During_Exploration_Drilling&oldid=686528"

30

Groundwater and surface water inputs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Department of Earth Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts 02 115. Brian L. Howes ..... solar radiation recorded 5.3 km to the west, and dewpoint...

1999-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The extraction of uranium from groundwaters on iron surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...mechanisms for subsurface remediation. Environ. Sci. Technol...observation of uranium remediation from groundwater onto...barriers geochemistry ground water hydrochemistry ion probe...isotopes radioactive waste remediation sorption spectra transport...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards... for contact recreation use. Preliminary public comment plus input from the Surface Water Quality Standards Advisory Work Group have provided guidance on options available for revising the standards, said Jim Davenport, leader of the TCEQ Water Quality...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Economic Implications of Farmer Storage of Surface Irrigation Water in Federal Projects: El Paso County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This procedure produced a schedule of net farm revenues for alternative surface irrigation water allocations for use in conjunction with groundwater. The procedure was repeated with groundwater availability limited to zero. These two schedules of net farm...

Cornforth, G. C.; Lacewell, R. D.

36

Analysis of Ground-Water Remediation During a Pesticide Application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pesticides are widely used in the pest management. More than one hundred pesticides and their degradation products have been identified as potential ground-water contaminants (Miles, 1992) and many of these pe...

Richard Tykva

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Basics of pump-and-treat ground-water remediation technology. Special report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pump-and-treat process, whereby contaminated ground water is pumped to the surface for treatment, is one of the most common ground-water remediation technologies used at hazardous waste sites. However, recent research has identified complex chemical and physical interactions between contaminants and the subsurface media which may impose limitations on the extraction part of the process. The report was developed to summarize the basic considerations necessary to determine when, where, and how pump-and-treat technology can be used effectively to remediate ground-water contamination.

Mercer, J.W.; Skipp, D.C.; Giffin, D.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

Farid Marandi, Sayena

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unconventional fuel development will require scarce water resources. In an environment characterized by scarcity, and where most water resources are fully allocated, prospective development will require minimizing water use and seeking to use water resources in the most efficient manner. Conjunctive use of surface and groundwater provides just such an opportunity. Conjunctive use includes two main practices: First, integrating surface water diversions and groundwater withdrawals to maximize efficiency and minimize impacts on other resource users and ecological processes. Second, conjunctive use includes capturing surplus or unused surface water and injecting or infiltrating that water into groundwater aquifers in order to increase recharge rates. Conjunctive management holds promise as a means of addressing some of the West's most intractable problems. Conjunctive management can firm up water supplies by more effectively capturing spring runoff and surplus water, and by integrating its use with groundwater withdrawals; surface and groundwater use can be further integrated with managed aquifer recharge projects. Such integration can maximize water storage and availability, while simultaneously minimizing evaporative loss, reservoir sedimentation, and surface use impacts. Any of these impacts, if left unresolved, could derail commercial-scale unconventional fuel development. Unconventional fuel developers could therefore benefit from incorporating conjunctive use into their development plans. Despite its advantages, conjunctive use is not a panacea. Conjunctive use means using resources in harmony to maximize and stabilize long-term supplies ?? it does not mean maximizing the use of two separate but interrelated resources for unsustainable short-term gains ?? and it cannot resolve all problems or provide water where no unappropriated water exists. Moreover, conjunctive use may pose risks to ecological values forgone when water that would otherwise remain in a stream is diverted for aquifer recharge or other uses. To better understand the rapidly evolving field of conjunctive use, this Topical Report begins with a discussion of Utah water law, with an emphasis on conjunctive use issues. We contrast Utah??s approach with efforts undertaken in neighboring states and by the federal government. We then relate conjunctive use to the unconventional fuel industry and discuss how conjunctive use can help address pressing challenges. While conjunctive management cannot create water where none exists, it does hold promise to manage existing resources in a more efficient manner. Moreover, conjunctive management reflects an important trend in western water law that could provide benefit to those contemplating activities that require large-scale water development.

Robert Keiter; John Ruple; Heather Tanana; Rebecca Holt

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Selection of clc, cba, andfcb Chlorobenzoate-Catabolic Genotypes from Groundwater and Surface Waters Adjacent to the Hyde Park, Niagara Falls, Chemical Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Elements Dioxygenases Fresh Water microbiology Hydrolases...Restriction Fragment Length Water Microbiology georef...enrichment geochemistry ground water Hyde Park New York industrial...North America pollution remediation sediments transport United...

Michelle C. Peel; R. Campbell Wyndham

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of Murine Norovirus, Feline Calicivirus, Poliovirus, and MS2 as Surrogates for Human Norovirus in a Model of Viral Persistence in Surface Water and Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transcription-PCR assays for detection of bacteriophage MS2. Appl...PCR and plaque assay for detection and enumeration of coliphage in polluted marine waters. Appl. Environ...from water samples for the detection of enteroviruses, hepatitis...

Jinhee Bae; Kellogg J. Schwab

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

43

Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

44

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ground-water pathway,'' which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of faulting on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region, Nevada and California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study characterizes the hydrogeologic system of the Death Valley region, an area covering approximately 100,000 square kilometers. The study also characterizes the effects of faults on ground-water movement in the Death Valley region by synthesizing crustal stress, fracture mechanics,a nd structural geologic data. The geologic conditions are typical of the Basin and Range Province; a variety of sedimentary and igneous intrusive and extrusive rocks have been subjected to both compressional and extensional deformation. Faulting and associated fracturing is pervasive and greatly affects ground-water flow patterns. Faults may become preferred conduits or barriers to flow depending on whether they are in relative tension, compression, or shear and other factors such as the degree of dislocations of geologic units caused by faulting, the rock types involved, the fault zone materials, and the depth below the surface. The current crustal stress field was combined with fault orientations to predict potential effects of faults on the regional ground-water flow regime. Numerous examples of fault-controlled ground-water flow exist within the study area. Hydrologic data provided an independent method for checking some of the assumptions concerning preferential flow paths. 97 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

Faunt, C.C.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Radionuclide concentrations and dose assessment of cistern water and groundwater at the Marshall Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A radiological survey was conducted from September through November of 1978 to determine the concentrations of radionuclides in the terrestrial and marine environments of 11 atolls and 2 islands in the Northern Marshall Islands. More than 70 cistern and groundwater samples were collected at the atolls; the volume of each sample was between 55 and 100 l. The concentration of /sup 90/Sr in cistern water at most atolls is that expected from world-wide fallout in wet deposition. Except for Bikini and Rongelap, /sup 137/Cs concentrations in cistern water are in agreement with the average predicted concentrations from wet deposition. The /sup 239 +240/Pu concentrations are everywhere less than the predicted fallout concentrations except at Rongelap, Ailinginae, and Bikini where the measured and predicted concentrations are in general agreement. During the period sampled, most groundwater concentrations of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs were everywhere higher than the concentrations in cistern water. Concentrations of the transurancies in filtered groundwater solution were everywhere comparable to or less than the concentrations in cistern water. It is concluded that the concentrations of radionuclides detected during any single period may not necessarily reflect the long-term average concentrations or the concentrations that might be observed if a lined well were extended above the surface. In any case, at all atolls the /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs concentrations in groundwater are below the concentration guidelines for drinking water recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency. The maximum annual dose rates and the 30- and 50-y integral doses are calculated for the intake of both cistern water and groundwater for each of the atolls.

Noshkin, V.E.; Eagle, R.J.; Wong, K.M.; Jokela, T.A.; Robison, W.L.

1981-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A radiocarbon method and multi-tracer approach to quantifying groundwater discharge to coastal waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater discharge into estuaries and the coastal ocean is an important mechanism for the transport of dissolved chemical species to coastal waters. Because many dissolved species are present in groundwater in concentrations ...

Gramling, Carolyn M

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ground-water resources of Lanfair and Fenner Valleys and vicinity, San Bernardino County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lanfair and Fenner Valleys and vicinity cover about 1300 square miles in eastern San Bernardino County, California. Average annual precipitation ranges from 3 to 10 inches over the area. Ground water is utilized primarily for stock and domestic purposes, and occurs in the unconsolidated deposits as well as in the highly fractured consolidated rocks. Ground-water levels in wells range from 5 to 600 feet below land surface, and well yields range from 3 to 1200 gallons per minute throughout the study area. Records indicate that water levels are at or near their predevelopment levels. Springs occur along faults and formational contacts and generally discharge less than 5 gallons per minute. Measured ground-water outflow from Lanfair Valley at Piute Spring ranged from 100 to 630 acre-feet per year. Outflow from Fenner Valley was estimated to be 270 acre-feet per year. Most of the water is of good quality for domestic and stock use. However, water from two wells indicates a concentration of sulfate that exceeds the recommended limit for drinking water. Water supplies are adequate for present needs. However, large-scale pumping would result in the lowering of the water table and a reduction of the ground water in storage. 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Freiwald, D.A.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of the important hydrologic characteristics is a steep gradient on the ground-water table...

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

The impact of groundwater-land surface interactions on hydrologic persistence in macroscale Elizabeth A. Clark and Dennis P. Lettenmaier  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= layer depth z = depth to water table Commonalities: 1)Forcings: Precipitation, Tmax, Tmin, Wind 2)Sub-grid9.08 The impact of groundwater-land surface interactions on hydrologic persistence in macroscale and Energy Fluxes for GSMs, J. Geophys. Res., 99(D7), 14,415-14,428. Niu, G.-Y., Z.-L. Yang, R.E. Dickinson

Washington at Seattle, University of

53

Water resources data for Florida, water year 1992. Volume 1A. Northeast florida surface water. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for 1992 water year for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 10 streams, miscellaneous discharge for 14 streams, continuous or daily stage for 32 streams, continuous or daily tide stage for 3 sites, periodic stage for 23 streams, peak discharge for 3 stream, and peak stage for 11 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 36 lakes, periodic elevations for 47 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 75 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 123 wells, and miscellaneous water-level measurements for 864 wells; quality-of-water data for 38 surface-water sites and 66 wells.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Petroleum contaminated ground-water: Remediation using activated carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ground-water contamination resulting from the leakage of crude oil and refined petroleum products during extraction and processing operations is a serious and a growing environmental problem in Nigeria. Consequently, a study of the use of activated carbon (AC) in the clean up was undertaken with the aim of reducing the water contamination to a more acceptable level. In the experiments described, crude-oil contamination of ground water was simulated under laboratory conditions using ground-water samples collected from existing hand-dug wells at Eagle Island, Port Harcourt, Nigeria. Different masses of the absorbent (i.e., activated carbon) were then added to the samples of ground water. The so treated water samples were left to equilibrate for 7 days, after which the total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) contents of the samples were measured. Adsorption isotherms were derived for the two forms of activated carbon used, namely granular activated-carbon (GAC) and powdered activated-carbon (PAC). Results of the TPH analyses showed that activated carbon is an excellent means for the stripping-off of the contaminant: there were decreases in contaminant concentration from an initial concentration of 9304.70mg/l to average final concentrations of 361.00 and 12.37mg/l, that is, 96% and 99.9% resulting from the same amounts of GAC and PAC applications respectively. The results of this study revealed that the powdered form of AC would be very effective in the remediation of petroleum-hydrocarbon contaminated ground water and its use is therefore recommended.

M.J. Ayotamuno; R.B. Kogbara; S.O.T. Ogaji; S.D. Probert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Verification of Active and Passive Ground-Water Contamination Remediation Efforts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The verification of ground-water contamination remediation efforts requires thorough documentation of subsurface conditions ... comprehensive approach to the design and operation of remediation efforts with an em...

M. J. Barcelona

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Water Footprint | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Footprint Blue water represents water withdrawn from surface water and groundwater for feedstock irrigation and refinery processing. Blue water represents water withdrawn from...

57

Sustaining dry surfaces under water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rough surfaces immersed under water remain practically dry if the liquid-solid contact is on roughness peaks, while the roughness valleys are filled with gas. Mechanisms that prevent water from invading the valleys are well studied. However, to remain practically dry under water, additional mechanisms need consideration. This is because trapped gas (e.g. air) in the roughness valleys can dissolve into the water pool, leading to invasion. Additionally, water vapor can also occupy the roughness valleys of immersed surfaces. If water vapor condenses, that too leads to invasion. These effects have not been investigated, and are critically important to maintain surfaces dry under water. In this work, we identify the critical roughness scale below which it is possible to sustain the vapor phase of water and/or trapped gases in roughness valleys - thus keeping the immersed surface dry. Theoretical predictions are consistent with molecular dynamics simulations and experiments.

Paul R. Jones; Xiuqing Hao; Eduardo R. Cruz-Chu; Konrad Rykaczewski; Krishanu Nandy; Thomas M. Schutzius; Kripa K. Varanasi; Constantine M. Megaridis; Jens H. Walther; Petros Koumoutsakos; Horacio D. Espinosa; Neelesh A. Patankar

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

Texas Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Texas Surface Water Quality Standards 30 TAC Chapter 307 Lori Hamilton Water Quality Standards of the water quality standards for a water body will be conducted Types of UAAs Aquatic Life Use (ALU) UAAs 2 procedures in conjunction with Standards revision Before Conducting a UAA Coordinate with your TCEQ project

59

EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill 5: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming EA-1155: Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Spook, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's ground-water standards set forth in 40 CFR 192 at the Spook, Wyoming Uranium Mill Tailings Site by using the selected alternative stated in the Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Ground Water Project. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD March 1, 1997 EA-1155: Final Environmental Assessment Ground-water Compliance Activities at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site,

60

Quasi-three dimensional ground-water modeling of the hydrologic influence of paleozoic rocks on the ground-water table at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The proposed high-level radioactive waste repository site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, has created a need to understand the, ground-water system at the site. One of (more)

Lee, Si-Yong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a research project designed to study methods of minimizing ground-water contamination from in situ leach uranium mining. Fieldwork and laboratory experiments were conducted to identify excursion indicators for monitoring purposes during mining, and to evaluate effective aquifer restoration techniques following mining. Many of the solution constituents were found to be too reactive with the aquifer sediments to reliably indicate excursion of leaching solution from the ore zone; however, in many cases, the concentrations of chloride and sulfate and the total dissolved solids level of the solution were found to be good excursion indicators. Aquifer restoration by ground-water sweeping consumed large quantities of ground water and was not effective for the redox-sensitive contaminants often present in the ore zone. Surface treatment methods such as reverse osmosis and electrodialysis were effective in reducing the amount of water used, but also had the potential for creating conditions in the aquifer under which the redox-sensitive contaminants would be mobile. In situ restoration by chemical reduction, in which a reducing agent is added to the solution recirculated through the ore zone during restoration, can restore the ore-zone sediment as well as the ground water. This method could lead to a stable chemical condition in the aquifer similar to conditions before mining. 41 figures.

Deutsch, W.J.; Martin, W.J.; Eary, L.E.; Serne, R.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

63

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells Ground-Water Table and Chemical Changes in an Alluvial Aquifer During Sustained Pumping at the Monticello, Utah, Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells More Documents & Publications Performance Assessment and Recommendations for Rejuvenation of a Permeable Reactive Barrier: Cotter Corporation's Cañon City, Colorado, Uranium

64

Groundwater responses to controlled water releases in the limitrophe region of the Colorado River: Implications for management and restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Flow regulation and water diversion for irrigation have considerably affected the exchange of surface water between the Colorado River and its floodplains. However, the way in which both have impacted groundwatersurface water interactions is not completely understood. The objective of this study was to conduct a hydrologic analysis of the 20092010 winter flows released into the limitrophe region of the Colorado River in order to characterize the surface flows along this dry reach and, for the first time, study the impact of winter flows on the groundwater conditions in the area. The study used existing data on groundwater levels that was collected from regional piezometers on both sides of the limitrophe every five years from 1980 to 2005. Regional flow direction from NE to SW was observed in all years. A groundwater depression cone in the southwest part of the limitrophe was identified from 1980 to 1995. A general rise of groundwater levels was observed from 2000 to 2005 on both sides of the limitrophe, but during the same time period, a depression cone formed along the border between Arizona and Sonora, in the Mesa Arenosa on the Mexican side of the border. In order to identify the water table evolution within the limitrophe riparian zone, nine sets of piezometers were constructed in an arrangement perpendicular to the main river channel. Water table levels were measured automatically every 30min and were also manually measured periodically. Nine geohydrological cross sections were constructed using the topographic relief from LIDAR elevation points and depth to groundwater measurements during water discharges in the Colorado River channel at Morelos dam. Groundwater seepage from irrigation canals, irrigation returns, and river discharge flows were identified and the depth to groundwater and its influence on riparian vegetation was analyzed. A strong correlation between flow discharge (up to 60.49hm3 from November 2009 to April 2010) and groundwater elevation (average elevation change of 1.62m on January 22, 2010) in time and space was found. The percentage of water retained in the main river channel decreased from 100% in the first discharge event (December 1213, 2009) to 36% after the last discharge event (April 917, 2010), due to remaining moisture in the unsaturated soil. The total volume of water retained, infiltrated, and evaporated, was 60% (36.6נ106m3) of the total water discharged. The delay time of the groundwater front during a discharge event was on average 6:30, 20:06, and 28:53h from section 1 to section 2, 13, and 14 respectively. This historical study provides insight into how floods affect the groundwater system, which is the foundation for aquatic and riparian biodiversity. This issue is of increasing relevance given growing international interest in rehabilitating the riparian and aquatic ecosystems of the Colorado River delta through intentional flood releases.

Jorge Ramrez-Hernndez; Osvel Hinojosa-Huerta; Mauricio Peregrina-Llanes; Alejandra Calvo-Fonseca; Edgar Carrera-Villa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Drought resilience of the California Central Valley surface-groundwater-conveyance system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of drought simulations were performed for the California Central Valley using computer applications developed by the California Department of Water Resources and historical datasets representing a range of droughts from mild to severe for time periods lasting up to 60 years. Land use, agricultural cropping patterns, and water demand were held fixed at the 2003 level and water supply was decreased by amounts ranging between 25 and 50%, representing light to severe drought types. Impacts were examined for four hydrologic subbasins, the Sacramento Basin, the San Joaquin Basin, the Tulare Basin, and the Eastside Drainage. Results suggest the greatest impacts are in the San Joaquin and Tulare Basins, regions that are heavily irrigated and are presently overdrafted in most years. Regional surface water diversions decrease by as much as 70%. Stream-to-aquifer flows and aquifer storage declines were proportional to drought severity. Most significant was the decline in ground water head for the severe drought cases, where results suggest that under these scenarios the water table is unlikely to recover within the 30-year model-simulated future. However, the overall response to such droughts is not as severe as anticipated and the Sacramento Basin may act as ground-water insurance to sustain California during extended dry periods.

Miller, N.L.; Dale, L.L.; Brush, C.; Vicuna, S.; Kadir, T.N.; Dogrul, E.C.; Chung, F.I.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Chlorofluorocarbons as tracers of landfill leachate in surface and groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...considerably lower concentrations in landfill gas. CFCs and CCl4 in leachate may...all groundwater, leachate and landfill gas samples were taken on 6 April 2004...at the central site facility. Landfill gas was sampled by attaching a thick...

A. E. Foley; T. C. Atkinson; Y. Zhao

67

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

68

Surface Water Development in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an annual yield of ground water for all Texas river basins of 4.3 million acre-feet per year. By comparison, the Board shows annual use of ground water for irrigation alone to exceed 10.0 million acre-feet per year. Other uses increase the annual defi... purposes, with small allocations used almost entirely for petroleum production. Water for fu- ture mining needs will largely be met by local surface and ground water resources. A small amount of power is produced by hydro- electric plants in Texas...

McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington state regulations required that solid waste landfill facilities have ground-water monitoring programs in place by May 27, 1987. This document describes the well locations, installation, characterization studies and sampling and analysis plan to be followed in implementing the ground-water monitoring program at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). It is based on Washington Administrative Code WAC 173-304-490. 11 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A new technique to monitor ground-water quality at municipal solid waste landfills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A NEW TECHNIQUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER EQUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1989 Major Subject: Geology A NEW TECHNIIIUE TO MONITOR GROUND-WATER IIUALITY AT MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS A Thesis by STEVEN CHARLES HART Approved as to style and content by: Christo her C. Mathewson (Chair...

Hart, Steven Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling Surface Water Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Water Sampling Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids Thermal: Water temperature Dictionary.png Surface Water Sampling: Water sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction Surface water sampling of hot and cold spring discharges has traditionally

72

Evaluation of Calendar Year 1997 Groundwater and Surface Water Quality Data For The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime At The U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1 1.0 INTRODUCTION This report presents an evaluation of the groundwater quality monitoring data reported in: Calendar Year 1997 Annual Groundwatw Monitoring Report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologtc Rep-meat the US. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (AJA Technical Services, Inc. 1998), which is hereafter referenced as the Annual Monitoring Report. Section 2.0 presents background information for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) that is relevant to data evaluation, including brief descriptions of the geology, the groundwater flow system, the contaminant source areas, and the extent of groundwater contamination in the regime. Section 3.0 provides an overview of the groundwater sampling and analysis activities petiormed during calendar year (CY) 1997, including monitoring well locations, sampling frequency and methods, and laboratory analyses. Evaluation and interpretation of the monitoring da% described in Section 4.0, is generally focused on an overview of data quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC), long-term concentration trends for selected inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants, and consistency with applicable site-specific conceptual contaminant transport models described in: Report on the Remedial Investigation of the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Characterization Area at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (U.S. Department of Energy 1998), which is referenced hereafter as the Remedial Investigation @I) Report. Findings of the data evaluations are summarized :in Section 5.0 and a list of technical reports and regulatory documents cited for more detailed irdormation (Section 6.0) concludes the report. All of the illustrations (maps and trend graphs) and data summary tables referenced in the text are presented in Appendm A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C provides a summary of the analytical results that meet applicable data quality objectives (DQOS) of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program.

Jones, S.B.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Groundwater Treatment at the Fernald Preserve: Status and Path Forward for the Water Treatment Facility - 12320  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operating a water treatment facility at the Fernald Preserve in Cincinnati, Ohio-to support groundwater remediation and other wastewater treatment needs-has become increasingly unnecessary. The Fernald Preserve became a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (LM) site in November 2006, once most of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act environmental remediation and site restoration had been completed. Groundwater remediation is anticipated to continue beyond 2020. A portion of the wastewater treatment facility that operated during the CERCLA cleanup continued to operate after the site was transferred to LM, to support the remaining groundwater remediation effort. The treatment facility handles the site's remaining water treatment needs (for groundwater, storm water, and wastewater) as necessary, to ensure that uranium discharge limits specified in the Operable Unit 5 Record of Decision are met. As anticipated, the need to treat groundwater to meet uranium discharge limits has greatly diminished over the last several years. Data indicate that the groundwater treatment facility is no longer needed to support the ongoing aquifer remediation effort. (authors)

Powel, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Hertel, B.; Glassmeyer, C.; Broberg, K. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Regional ground-water mixing and the origin of saline fluids: Midcontinent, United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ground waters in three adjacent regional flow systems in the midcontinent exhibit extreme chemical and isotopic variations that delineate large-scale fluid flow and mixing processes and two distinct mechanisms for the generation of saline fluids. Systematic spatial variations of major ion concentrations, H, O, and Sr isotopic compositions, and ground-water migration pathways indicate that each flow system contains water of markedly different origin. Mixing of the three separate ground waters exerts a fundamental control on ground-water composition. The three ground waters are: (i) dilute meteoric water recharged in southern Missouri; (ii) saline Na-Ca-Cl water in southeastern Kansas of far-traveled meteoric origin that acquired its salinity by halite dissolution; and (iii) Na-Ca-Cl brines in north-central Oklahoma that may have originated as Paleozoic seawater. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Musgrove, M.; Banner, J.L. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

Sandia National Laboratories: Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basins, surface andor groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water-management agency, alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its...

76

Micro level study on groundwater contaminant transport modeling of industrial pollution and hydro remediation;.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water pollution is a serious problem world over, as a growing percentage of surface water resources and groundwater reserves are being contaminated due to uncontrolled (more)

Hemamalini C G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Novel Remediation Schemes for Groundwater and Urban Runoff.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Anthropogenic environmental contamination is having a profound effect on ground and surface water bodies. Contaminants, such as, chlorinated solvents in groundwater and heavy metals (more)

Olson, Pamela Renee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

40 CFR 265 interim-status ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines a ground-water monitoring plan for the 2101-M pond, located in the southwestern part of the 200-East Area on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It has been determined that hazardous materials may have been discharged to the pond. Installation of an interim-status ground-water monitoring system is required under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act to determine if hazardous chemicals are moving out of the pond. This plan describes the location of new wells for the monitoring system, how the wells are to be completed, the data to be collected, and how those data can be used to determine the source and extent of any ground-water contamination from the 2101-M pond. Four new wells are planned, one upgradient and three downgradient. 35 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

Chamness, M.A.; Luttrell, S.P.; Dudziak, S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Category:Surface Water Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling page? For detailed information on Surface Water Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Surface Water Sampling Add.png Add a new Surface...

80

Surface altered zeolites as permeable barriers for in situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors characterized surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) for its ability to sorb organic and inorganic contaminants from water. The ultimate objective is to use SMZ as a permeable barrier to prevent migration of contaminants in groundwater. This report summarizes results under Phase 1 of a three-phase project leading to a full-scale field demonstration of SMZ permeable- barrier technology.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ground-water hydrology of the Panther Junction area of Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Geology GROUND-WATER HYDROLOGY OF THE PANTHER JUNCTION AREA OF BIG BEND NATIONAL PARK, TEXAS A Thesis by JOHN LAWRENCE GIBSON Approved as to style and content by: Melv'n C. Schroeder (Chairman...

Gibson, John Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-152 1991 Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport G. Culkin D. Lawler Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ... TR-152 1991 Particles in Surface Waters: Coagulation and Transport G. Culkin D. Lawler Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A&M University ...

Culkin, Gerald W.; Lawler, Desmond F.

83

Ground-water contribution to dose from past Hanford Operations. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is being conducted to estimate radiation doses that populations and individuals could have received from Hanford Site operations from 1944 to the present. Four possible pathways by which radionuclides migrating in ground water on the Hanford Site could have reached the public have been identified: (1) through contaminated ground water migrating to the Columbia River; (2) through wells on or adjacent to the Hanford Site; (3) through wells next to the Columbia River downstream of Hanford that draw some or all of their water from the river (riparian wells); and (4) through atmospheric deposition resulting in contamination of a small watershed that, in turn, results in contamination of a shallow well or spring by transport in the ground water. These four pathways make up the ``ground-water pathway,`` which is the subject of this study. Assessment of the ground-water pathway was performed by (1) reviewing the existing extensive literature on ground water and ground-water monitoring at Hanford and (2) performing calculations to estimate radionuclide concentrations where no monitoring data were collected. Radiation doses that would result from exposure to these radionuclides were calculated.

Freshley, M.D.; Thorne, P.D.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Economical Analysis of a Groundwater Source Heat Pump with Water Thermal Storage System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper is based on a chilled and heat source for the building which has a total area of 140000m2 in the suburb of Beijing. By comparing the groundwater source heat pump of water thermal storage (GHPWTS) with a conventional chilled and heat source...

Zhou, Z.; Xu, W.; Li, J.; Zhao, J.; Niu, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) Regulations Establishing Water Quality Standards for Surface Water of the State of Arkansas (Arkansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Arkansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting

86

Reducing Herbicide Entry into Surface Waters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

these herbicides may move from the application site into surface waters. Unfortunately , minute quantities of a few herbi- cides have been detected in T exas ground and surface waters. The potential risks associated with the contamination of surface waters... accomplish thr ee major goals: ? Reduce herbicides in runo#31;; ? Reduce water and sediment runo#31;, and; ? Safely clean sprayers and dispose of containers. Reduce Herbicides in Runo#31; Apply Herbicides Accurately Pr operly calibrated sprayers ar e...

Baumann, Paul A.; Bean, Brent W.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Borehole summary report for five ground-water monitoring wells constructed in the 1100 Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the data collected during the installation and initial sampling of five ground-water monitoring wells between the 1100 Area and Richland City water supply wells. The five wells were installed to provide for early detection of contaminants and to provide data that may be used in making decisions on the management of the North Richland Well Field and recharge basins. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Bryce, R.W.; Goodwin, S.M.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Management and Storage of Surface Waters (Florida)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the use and storage of surface waters in the state. A permit from either the Department or the local Water Management District is required for...

90

Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surface Water (Indiana) Surface Water (Indiana) Water Rights: Surface Water (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Construction Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Indiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Indiana Department of Natural Resources The Indiana Department of Natural Resources regulates the use and diversion of surface waters. An entity that creates additional stream volumes by releases from impoundments built and financed by the entity for the entity's purpose may use the increased flowage at all times. Any entity may be required to report the volume of water used. Diversion of water out of

91

Analysis of 129I in Groundwater Samples: Direct and Quantitative Results below the Drinking Water Standard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to its long half-life (15.7 million years) and relatively unencumbered migration in subsurface environments, 129I has been recognized as a contaminant of concern at numerous federal, private, and international facilities. In order to understand the long-term risk associated with 129I at these locations, quantitative analysis of groundwater samples must be performed. However, the ability to quantitatively assess the 129I content in groundwater samples requires specialized extraction and sophisticated analytical techniques, which are complicated and not always available to the general scientific community. This paper highlights an analytical method capable of directly quantifying 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the MCL without the need for sample pre-concentration. Samples were analyzed on a Perkin Elmer ELAN DRC II ICP-MS after minimal dilution using O2 as the reaction gas. Analysis of continuing calibration verification standards indicated that the DRC mode could be used for quantitative analysis of 129I in samples below the drinking water standard (0.0057 ng/ml or 1 pCi/L). The low analytical detection limit of 129I analysis in the DRC mode coupled with minimal sample dilution (1.02x) resulted in a final sample limit of quantification of 0.0051 ng/ml. Subsequent analysis of three groundwater samples containing 129I resulted in fully quantitative results in the DRC mode, and spike recovery analyses performed on all three samples confirmed that the groundwater matrix did not adversely impact the analysis of 129I in the DRC mode. This analytical approach has been proven to be a cost-effective, high-throughput technique for the direct, quantitative analysis of 129I in groundwater samples at concentrations below the current MCL.

Brown, Christopher F.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2007-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taming water waves Case study: Surface Water Waves Few things in nature are as dramatic, and potentially dangerous, as ocean waves. The impact they have on our daily lives extends from shipping to the role they play in driving the global climate. From a theoretical viewpoint water waves pose rich

93

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Report Attachment 2-Data Presentation Groundwater Quality Data Surface Water Quality Data Natural Gas Analysis Data Equipment Blank Data Time-Concentration Graphs Attachment...

94

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site September 2014 LMSGUPS00414 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

95

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

4 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites December 2014 LMSSRWSRES00914 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy...

96

Revised ground-water monitoring compliance plan for the 300 area process trenches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains ground-water monitoring plans for process-water disposal trenches located on the Hanford Site. These trenches, designated the 300 Area Process Trenches, have been used since 1973 for disposal of water that contains small quantities of both chemicals and radionuclides. The ground-water monitoring plans contained herein represent revision and expansion of an effort initiated in June 1985. At that time, a facility-specific monitoring program was implemented at the 300 Area Process Trenches as part of a regulatory compliance effort for hazardous chemicals being conducted on the Hanford Site. This monitoring program was based on the ground-water monitoring requirements for interim-status facilities, which are those facilities that do not yet have final permits, but are authorized to continue interim operations while engaged in the permitting process. The applicable monitoring requirements are described in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 40 CFR 265.90 of the federal regulations, and in WAC 173-303-400 of Washington State's regulations (Washington State Department of Ecology 1986). The program implemented for the process trenches was designed to be an alternate program, which is required instead of the standard detection program when a facility is known or suspected to have contaminated the ground water in the uppermost aquifer. The plans for the program, contained in a document prepared by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) in 1985, called for monthly sampling of 14 of the 37 existing monitoring wells at the 300 Area plus the installation and sampling of 2 new wells. 27 refs., 25 figs., 15 tabs.

Schalla, R.; Aaberg, R.L.; Bates, D.J.; Carlile, J.V.M.; Freshley, M.D.; Liikala, T.L.; Mitchell, P.J.; Olsen, K.B.; Rieger, J.T.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ground-water levels and tritium concentrations at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, June 1984 to April 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maxey Flats disposal site, Kentucky encompasses about 280 acres near the edge of a flat-topped ridge. The ridge is underlain by fractured shale and sandstone beds of the Nancy Member and the Farmers Member of the Borden Formation of Mississippian age. Groundwater flow in the strata beneath the site occurs through fractures, and flow patterns are difficult to delineate. The potentiometric surface also is difficult to delineate because several saturated and unsaturated zones are present in the rocks. Generally, ground-water levels in wells intersecting permeable fractures fluctuated seasonally and were lowest from December through June and highest from July through November. Water levels in the disposal trenches fluctuations less than those in wells, and for most trenches the fluctuations were less than 0.5 foot. From June 1984 to April 1989, tritium concentrations in groundwater ranged from 0 to 2,402,200 picocuries/ml. The greatest and most variable tritium concentrations were in wells along the northwest side of the site. The major conduit of groundwater flow from the trenches in the northwestern part of the site is a fractured sandstone bed that forms the base of most trenches. Elsewhere along the site perimeter, elevated levels of tritium were not detected in wells, and mean tritium were not detected in wells, and mean tritium concentrations showed little change between 1986 and 1988.

Wilson, K.S.; Lyons, B.E. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Stable isotopes of hydrogen and oxygen in surface water and ground water at selected sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Relative stable isotopic ratios for hydrogen and oxygen compared to standard mean ocean water are presented for water from 4 surface-water sites and 38 ground-water sites on or near the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The surface-water samples were collected monthly from March 1991 through April 1992 and after a storm event on June 18, 1992. The ground-water samples either were collected during 1991 or 1992. These data were collected as part of the US Geological Survey`s continuing hydrogeological investigations at the INEL. The relative isotopic ratios of hydrogen and oxygen are reported as delta {sup 2}H ({delta}{sup 2}H) and as delta {sup 18}O ({delta}{sup 18}O), respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the four surface-water sites ranged from -143.0 to -122 and from -18.75 to -15.55, respectively. The values of {delta}{sup 2}H and {delta}{sup 18}O in water from the 38 ground-water sites ranged from -141.0 to -120.0 and from -18.55 to -14.95, respectively.

Ott, D.S.; Cecil, L.D.; Knobel, L.L.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Brackish groundwater as an alternative source of cooling water for nuclear power plants in Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of a high population density in the coastal plain, any future nuclear power plants will be located in the sparsely ... no surface water, the only alternatives to cooling water are piped-in Mediterranean. ...

A. Arad; A. Olshina

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

State Surface Water Discharge Permits (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Rules apply to the discharge of all pollutants from a point source to surface waters of the state. The rule does not apply to facilities that require both a state discharge permit and a federal...

102

Economic costs of conventional surface-water treatment: A case study of the Mcallen northwest facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplies.2 2 The majority of the groundwater in the Valley is brackish; therefore, the groundwater is not considered3 potable unless it is treated with a desalination process. In order to determine if water is brackish, the salinity of the water must....e., supply) include: groundwater wells, wastewater reuse, desalination of seawater and/or brackish groundwater, and rainwater harvesting. Efficiency-in-use improvements being applied in the Valley3 include on-farm and municipal water-conservation measures...

Rogers, Callie Sue

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

104

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil.

Friday, G. P.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geohydrology and ground-water geochemistry at a sub-Arctic Landfill, Fairbanks, Alaska. Water resources investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fairbanks-North Star Borough landfill is located on silt, sand, and gravel deposits of the Tanana River flood plain, about 3 miles south of the city of Fairbanks water-supply wells. The landfill has been in operation for about 25 years in this sub-arctic region of discontinuous permafrost. The cold climate limits biological activity within the landfill with corresponding low gas and leachate production. Chloride concentrations, specific conductance, water temperatures, and earth conductivity measurements indicate a small plume of leachate flowing to the northwest from the landfill. The leachate remains near the water table as it flows northwestward toward a drainage ditch. Results of computer modeling of this local hydrologic system indicate that some of the leachate may be discharging to the ditch. Chemical data show that higher-than-background concentrations of several ions are present in the plume. However, the concentrations appear to be reduced to background levels within a short distance along the path of ground-water flow from the landfill, and thus the leachate is not expected to affect the water-supply wells.

Downey, J.S.; Sinton, P.O.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

MFR PAPER 1170 Water Surface Area Within  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in hectares for each subsubarea within each subarea. Conversion factor Central latllude Stallstlcal hectares the Gulf coa t. especiall y tho e concerning im- pact of energy-related development. METHODS Water surface.-Converslon factors (hectares per planimeter unit) used to convert average planimeter units to area

107

Removing High Explosives from Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratorys Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

108

RCRA (Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) ground-water monitoring projects for Hanford facilities: Annual Progress Report for 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the progress during 1989 of 16 Hanford Site ground-water monitoring projects covering 25 hazardous waste facilities and 1 nonhazardous waste facility. Each of the projects is being conducted according to federal regulations based on the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 and the State of Washington Administrative Code. 40 refs., 75 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, R.M.; Gorst, W.R. (eds.)

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chasing water: Diverging farmers' strategies to cope with the groundwater crisis in the coastal Chaouia region in Morocco  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

policies, whose efficiency will depend on farmers' strategies. The different strategies adopted by farmers1 Chasing water: Diverging farmers' strategies to cope with the groundwater crisis in the coastal, Meknes, France 4 National School for Agronomic Education (ENFA), Rural Dynamics Research Unit, Toulouse

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

110

Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

waves can be used to estimate soil water content � Short pulses of High frequency EM energy � Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

Rubin, Yoram

111

Appendix D Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Surface Water and Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots, Stream Discharge Measurements, Ground Water Level Data, and Ground Water Well Hydrographs This page intentionally left blank Contents Section .................................................................................. Surface Water Time-Concentration Plots D1.O ............................................................................................... Stream Discharge Measurements D2.0 ............................................................. Ground Water Time-Concentration Plots for Uranium D3.0 .......................................................................................................... Ground Water Level Data D4.0 ..............................................................................................

112

Surface Science Letters Structures of adsorbed water layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Science Letters Structures of adsorbed water layers on MgO: an ab initio study R.M. Lynden; Single crystal surfaces 1. Introduction The structure of adsorbed ®lms of water on a perfect surface. Experimentally, water is found to adsorb reversibly on a ¯at MgO surface to form a monolayer at temperatures

Alavi, Ali

113

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

2014 Groundwater, Surface Water, Produced Water, and Natural Gas Sampling at the Gasbuggy, New Mexico, Site October 2014 LMSGSBS00614 Available for sale to the public from: U.S....

114

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

GRR/Section 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and Tributary Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-e - New Water Right Process for Surface Water and Tributary Ground Water 19COENewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndTributaryGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COENewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndTributaryGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Developers seeking a new water right to appropriate surface water and

116

GRR/Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-b - New Water Right Process For Surface Water and Ground Water 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Texas Water Development Board Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXBNewWaterRightProcessForSurfaceWaterAndGroundWater.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range.

117

Ground-water levels and tritium concentrations at the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive-waste-disposal site near Morehead, Kentucky, June 1984 to April 1989. Water - resources investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report, one in a series of reports by the USGS, summarizes ground-water level and tritium data that were collected by the USGS from June 1984 through April 1989. The report also describes the occurrence and distribution of tritium in water from selected wells. Data for ground-water levels in wells and disposal tranches and the concentrations of tritium in water from monitoring wells at the site are presented. Precipitation data were collected in conjunction with the water-level data to relate precipitation to ground-water recharge. Specific conductance data, routinely determined for ground-water samples, also were collected to compare changes in specific conductance to changes in tritium concentrations. All data are stored locally on the U.S. Geological Survey's National Water Information System (NWIS).

Wilson, K.S.; Lyons, B.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Free energy surface of supercooled water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a detailed analysis of the free energy surface of a well characterized rigid model for water in supercooled states. We propose a functional form for the liquid free energy, supported by recent theoretical predictions [Y. Rosenfeld and P. Tarazona, Mol. Phys. 95, 141 (1998)], and use it to locate the position of a liquid-liquid critical point at TC?=1305 K, PC?=29030 MPa, and ?C?=1.100.03 g/cm3. The observation of the critical point strengthens the possibility that the extended simple point charge model of water may undergo a liquid-liquid phase transition. Finally, we discuss the possibility that the approach to the liquid-liquid critical point could be pre-empted by the glass transition.

A. Scala; F. W. Starr; E. La Nave; H. E. Stanley; F. Sciortino

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Water and acrylamide monomer transfer rates from a settling basin to groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, published in "Environmental Science and Pollution Research Accepted manuscript (2014) 11 p." DOI : 10.1007/s found in groundwater. The environmental routes by which these compounds enter groundwaters (PAM)-based flocculants. These flocculants are used by quarries to improve the separation of suspended

Boyer, Edmond

120

Water Rock Interaction [WRI 14] Groundwater salinization in a coastal multilayer aquifer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

social and environmental changes. This paper focuses on the groundwater geochemistry in a costal the last decades. These evolutions gave rise to numerous environmental consequences, such as a dramatic decline of the piezometric levels, groundwater salinization and contamination. This degradation of natural

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The importance of conservation 7 What is Groundwater? The Hydrologic Cycle 8 Groundwater flow patterns 9 Saturated and unsaturated zones 9 Aquifers 10 Sole source aquifers 10 Water wells 12 Groundwater Quality Contamination and pollution, measuring... The High Plains Aquifer 22 Population served by groundwater 23 Competing uses for a limited resource 23 Groundwater declines 24 Contamination and Health Issues Water Testing 26 Regulatory Standards, Treatment Options 27 Table of Contents 3 Public...

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...fractured shale aquifers . Ground Water 50 ( 6 ): 826 828...2011) Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion...poses a threat to surface waters. Front Ecol Environ...Acid mine drainage remediation options: A review...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Application of a modified denitrifying bacteria method for analyzing groundwater and vadose zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zone pore water nitrate at the Hanford Site, WA, USA. Woods,and Conrad, Mark The Hanford Site in southern WashingtonL have been reported for Hanford groundwaters, where nitrate

Woods, Katharine N.; Singleton, Michael J.; Conrad, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the authors vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Immobilization of U(VI) from Oxic Groundwater by Hanford 300 Area Sediments and Effects of Columbia River Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Regions within the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford 300 Area (300 A) site experience periodic hydrologic influences from the nearby Columbia River as a result of changing river stage, which causes changes in groundwater elevation, flow direction and water chemistry. An important question is the extent to which the mixing of Columbia River water and groundwater impacts the speciation and mobility of uranium (U). In this study, we designed experiments to mimic interactions among U, oxic groundwater or Columbia River water, and 300 A sediments in the subsurface environment of Hanford 300 A. The goals were to investigate mechanisms of: 1) U immobilization in 300 A sediments under bulk oxic conditions and 2) U remobilization from U-immobilized 300 A sediments exposed to oxic Columbia River water. Initially, 300 A sediments in column reactors were fed with U(VI)-containing oxic 1) synthetic groundwater (SGW), 2) organic-amended SGW (OA-SGW), and 3) de-ionized (DI) water to investigate U immobilization processes. After that, the sediments were exposed to oxic Columbia River water for U remobilization studies. The results reveal that U was immobilized by 300 A sediments predominantly through reduction (80-85%) when the column reactor was fed with oxic OA-SGW. However, U was immobilized by 300 A sediments through adsorption (100%) when the column reactors were fed with oxic SGW or DI water. The reduced U in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW was relatively resistant to remobilization by oxic Columbia River water. Oxic Columbia River water resulted in U remobilization (?7%) through desorption, and most of the U that remained in the 300 A sediments fed with OA-SGW (?93%) was in the form of uraninite nanoparticles. These results reveal that: 1) the reductive immobilization of U through OA-SGW stimulation of indigenous 300 A sediment microorganisms may be viable in the relatively oxic Hanford 300 A subsurface environments and 2) with the intrusion of Columbia River water, desorption may be the primary process resulting in U remobilization from OA-SGW-stimulated 300 A sediments at the subsurface of the Hanford 300 A site.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

126

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. [Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Water Resources Policy & Economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Policy & Economics FOR 4984 Selected Course Topics · Appropriative and riparian water institutions · Incentives for conservation · Water rights for in-stream environmental use · Surface water-groundwater management · Water quality regulations · Water markets · Economic and policy

Buehrer, R. Michael

129

Assessing recovery from acidification of European surface waters in the year 2010:An evaluation of projections made with the MAGIC model in 1995  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1999 we used the MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater In Catchments) model to project acidification of acid-sensitive European surface waters in the year 2010, given implementation of the Gothenburg Protocol to the Convention on Long-Range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP). ...

Rachel Clare Helliwell; Richard F. Wright; Leah A. Jackson-Blake; Robert C. Ferrier; Julian Aherne; Bernard Jack Cosby; Christopher D. Evans; Martin Forsius; Jakub Hruska; Alan Jenkins; Pavel Krm; Jiri Kopacek; Vladimir Majer; Filip Moldan; Maximilian Posch; Jacqueline Potts; Michela Rogora; Wolfgang Schoepp

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

130

Presence of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Surface Waters Used for the Production of Drinking Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two methods widely applied for isolating PAH from surface water have been compared: solvent extraction using cyclohexane and solid surface extraction. Higher recoveires were obtained through solvent extraction...

F. Van Hoof; S. Aerts

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Evaluation of instantaneous surface water discharge techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To obtain accurate discharge data in any surface water monitoring program, the selection of an appropriate technique is essential. This paper examines five instantaneous discharge techniques most commonly used throughout the Appalachian coal fields. The techniques evaluated in this paper include: (1) dye-dilution; (2) cross-sectional area-velocity; (3) weir; (4) Manning's equation; and (5) direct discharge. Each of the instantaneous discharge techniques was evaluated in terms of: (1) initial equipment investment cost per discharge determination; (2) the advantages and disadvantages of each technique; and (3) the appropriate application of each technique. From this evaluation, it was apparent that a combination of several techniques are needed to determine a variety of discharges depending on the characteristics of the discharge point.

Buckles, J.D.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The influence of fracture properties on ground-water flow at the Bunker Hill Mine, Kellogg, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bunker Hill Mine in northern Idaho is a large underground lead-zinc mine located in Precambrian metaquartzite rocks with virtually no primary porosity. Ground-water flow through these types of rocks is largely dependent upon the properties of fractures such as joints, faults and relict bedding planes. Ground water that flows into the mine via the fractures is contaminated by heavy metals and by the production of acid water, which results in a severe acid mine drainage problem. A more complete understanding of how the fractures influence the ground-water flow system is a prerequisite to the evaluation of reclamation alternatives to reduce acid drainage from the mine. Fracture mapping techniques were used to obtain detailed information on the fracture properties observed in the New East Reed drift of the Bunker Hill Mine. The data obtained include: (a) fracture type, (b) orientation, (c) trace length, (d) the number of visible terminations, (e) roughness (small-scale asperities), (f) waviness (larger-scale undulations), (g) infilling material, and (h) a qualitative measure of the amount of water flowing through each fracture.

Lachmar, T.E. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

134

The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting The Metropolitan Surface Water Management Act aims to protect, preserve,

135

Effects of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge on soil, streambed sediment, and ground- and surface-water quality at a site near Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report describes the effects of burial and land application of municipal sewage sludge on soil and streambed sediment and water quality in the underlying aquifers and surface water within and around the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. The existing ground-water observation-well network at the disposal area was expanded for the study. Surface-water-sampling sites were selected so that runoff could be sampled from intense rainstorms or snowmelt. The sampling frequency for ground-water and surface-water runoff was changed from yearly to quarterly, and soil samples were collected. Four years of data were collected from 1984 to 1987 during the expanded monitoring program at the Lowry sewage-sludge-disposal area. These data, in addition to the data collected by the U.S. Geological Survey from 1981 to 1983, were used to determine effects of sewage-sludge-disposal on soil and streambed sediment and surface- and ground-water quality at the disposal area.

Gaggiani, N.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Derivation of a viscous Boussinesq system for surface water waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Derivation of a viscous Boussinesq system for surface water waves Hervé Le Meur 26 mai 2013 Abstract. In this article, we derive a viscous Boussinesq system for surface water waves from Navier equation from our viscous Boussinesq system. We also extend the system to the 3-D case. Key words: water

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

138

Adsorption structure of water molecules on the Be(0001) surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By using density functional theory calculations, we systematically investigate the adsorption of water molecules at different coverages on the Be(0001) surface. The coverage dependence of the prototype water structures and energetics for water adlayer growth are systematically studied. The structures, energetics, and electronic properties are calculated and compared with other available studies. Through our systematic investigations, we find that water molecules form clusters or chains on the Be(0001) surface at low coverages. When increasing the water coverage, water molecules tend to form a 2??2 hexagonal network on the Be(0001) surface.

Yang, Yu; Li, Yanfang [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Wang, Shuangxi [College of Science, China University of Petroleum, Beijing 102249 (China); Zhang, Ping, E-mail: zhang-ping@iapcm.ac.cn [LCP, Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, P.O. Box 8009, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

Summary of hydrogeologic controls on ground-water flow at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The underground testing of nuclear devices has generated substantial volumes of radioactive and other chemical contaminants below ground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Many of the more radioactive contaminants are highly toxic and are known to persist in the environment for thousands of years. In response to concerns about potential health hazards, the US Department of Energy, under its Environmental Restoration Program, has made NTS the subject of a long-term investigation. Efforts will assess whether byproducts of underground testing pose a potential hazard to the health and safety of the public and, if necessary, will evaluate and implement steps to remediate any of the identified dangers. Ground-water flow is the primary mechanism by which contaminants can be transported significant distances away from the initial point of injection. Flow paths between contaminant sources and potential receptors are separated by remote areas that span tens of miles. The diversity and structural complexity of the rocks along these flow paths complicates the hydrology of the region. Although the hydrology has been studied in some detail, much still remains uncertain about flow rates and directions through the fractured-rock aquifers that transmit water great distances across this arid region. Unique to the hydrology of NTS are the effects of underground testing, which severely alter local rock characteristics and affect hydrologic conditions throughout the region. This report summarizes what is known and inferred about ground-water flow throughout the NTS region. The report identifies and updates what is known about some of the major controls on ground-water flow, highlights some of the uncertainties in the current understanding, and prioritizes some of the technical needs as related to the Environmental Restoration Program. 113 refs.

Laczniak, R.J.; Cole, J.C.; Sawyer, D.A.; Trudeau, D.A.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study explored the relationship between increased proportions of imperviousness in a watershed on surface water quality and examined the effectiveness of using remote sensing to systematically and accurately determine impervious surfaces. A...

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New Mexico Surface Water Quality Bureau Federal Dredge and Fill Permits webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: New Mexico Surface...

144

Best Management Practices for Surface Water Protection | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wastewater treatment facilities constructed, and a plant-wide project to remove sinks, tanks, and drains with ties to the creek. Best Management Practices for Surface Water...

145

Impoundment of Surface Waters (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impoundment of Surface Waters (Virginia) Impoundment of Surface Waters (Virginia) Impoundment of Surface Waters (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Virginia Department of Environmental Quality Many water withdrawal projects involve planning and engineering long before

146

Buying, Selling and Exporting Groundwater: Implications for Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Sales/ Lease Agreement, by Sandra Burns. Regulation of Exportation of Underground Water, by Doug Caroom. Roberts County Transportation Permits, by C.E. Williams. Export Fees: A Groundwater District Limits and Uses, by Jace Houston. The report also... in Texas, by Ronald Kaiser. Groundwater Transactions: Buyers Perspective, by Russell Johnson. Purchasing Groundwater for Export: The Kinney County Proposal, by Lynn Sherman. Model Lease of Groundwater Rights, by Ned Meister. Protecting Your Land and Water...

Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce A.; Silvey, Valeen

147

Water Sustainability Program Challenges to Sustainable Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Drought, Climate Change · Growth and the need for additional supplies · Water and Energy · Water the Southwest, nation, semi-arid and arid regions, and the world. · Today's program provides just a glimpse to and utilization of renewable supplies · Transboundary water issues · The surface water/groundwater interface

Cushing, Jim. M.

148

Economies of size in municipal water treatment technologies: Texas lower Rio Grande Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advancements have improved the economic viability of reverse-osmosis (RO) desalination of brackish-groundwater as a potable water source. Brackish-groundwater may be an alternative water source that provides municipalities an opportunity to hedge against... droughts, political shortfalls, and protection from potential surface-water contamination. This research specifically focuses on investigating economies of size for conventional surface-water treatment and brackish-groundwater desalination by using results...

Boyer, Christopher Neil

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Resource Management Services: Water Regulation, Parts 595-599: Hazardous Substances (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations aim to prevent the release of hazardous substances into surface water and groundwater resources. They contain guidance for facilities which store and process hazardous substances,...

150

Waste not Discharged to Surface Waters (North Carolina) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Waste not Discharged to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Waste not Discharged to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Waste not Discharged to Surface Waters (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting The rules in this Subchapter apply to all persons proposing to construct, alter, extend, or operate any sewer system, treatment works, disposal system, contaminates soil treatment system, animal waste management system, stormwater management system or residual disposal/utilization system which does not discharge to surface waters of the state, including systems which discharge waste onto or below land surface.

151

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) Ground and Surface Water Protection (New Mexico) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State New Mexico Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Provider New Mexico Environment Department This regulation implements the New Mexico Water Quality Act. Any person intending to make a new water contaminant discharge or to alter the character or location of an existing water contaminant discharge, unless the discharge is being made or will be made into a community sewer system

153

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio) Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio) Surface Water Monitoring and Assessment (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Utility Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Transportation Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This law establishes criteria for three levels of credible data for a surface water quality monitoring and assessment program and establishes the necessary training and experience for persons to submit credible data, thereby increasing the information base upon which to enhance, improve and

155

Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) Point Source Discharges to Surface Waters (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources This rule requires permits for control of sources of water pollution by providing the requirements and procedures for application and issuance of state National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for a discharge from an outlet, point source, or disposal system discharging to the surface waters of the state, and for the construction, entering a contract for construction, and operation of treatment works with such a

156

Valuing Groundwater Services and Water Portfolio in Irrigated Agriculture with a Hedonic Pricing Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

163175. United States v. State Water Res. Control Bd. , 182An Overview. California State Water Resources Control BoardCentral Valley Salinity, State Water Resources Control Board

Mukherjee, Monobina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus LossStory by Raul L. Garcia The Texas State Soil and Water ConservationBoard (TSSWCB) in collaboration with the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M University, Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE), Texas Water Resources... Institute (TWRI), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), have developed a field validation of the Texas Phosphorus Index. This project, located near Bosque and Leon Rivers, began June 1, 2002, and ended...

Garcia, Raul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Fermilab | Tritium at Fermilab | Tritium in Surface Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Surface Water Surface Water Fermilab map Fermilab has conducted an environmental monitoring program on site for roughly 40 years. In November of 2005, for the first time, we detected low levels of tritium in Indian Creek, one of three creeks that travel through the Fermilab site. Low but measurable levels of tritium continue to be detected in Indian Creek. All tritium levels found on site are well below any federal health and environmental standards. The Department of Energy standard for surface water is 1,900 picocuries per milliliter, and our readings to date have remained in the single digits. The levels of tritium detected in Indian Creek are extremely low compared to what is safe for a lifetime of continuous exposure to tritium in surface water. The low levels of tritium in Indian Creek stem from particle beams produced

160

EA-1093: Surface Water Drainage System, Golden, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Hawaii Application for Surface Water Use Permit for Proposed...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Permit for Proposed New Use in a Designated Surface Water Management Area (DLNR Form SWUPA-N) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Hawaii...

162

SWOT: The Surface Water & Ocean Topography Satellite Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWOT: The Surface Water & Ocean Topography Satellite Mission Doug Alsdorf Byrd Polar Research Turkey launched Southeastern Anatolia Project (GAP): 22 dams 19 hydroelectric power plants n Irrigation (rather than evaporation). At first, permafrost melting increases lake storage, but continued melting

163

Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) Surface Water Quality Standards (New Jersey) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New Jersey Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Bureau of Water Quality Standards and Assessment These standards establish the designated uses and antidegradation

164

Water Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) Water Management Plans for Surface Coal Mining Operations (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting A water management plan is required for all surface coal mining operations. This plan must be submitted to the State Engineer of the State Water Commission at the same time a surface mining permit is submitted to the

165

An Ontology Design Pattern for Surface Water Features  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface water is a primary concept of human experience but concepts are captured in cultures and languages in many different ways. Still, many commonalities can be found due to the physical basis of many of the properties and categories. An abstract ontology of surface water features based only on those physical properties of landscape features has the best potential for serving as a foundational domain ontology. It can then be used to systematically incor-porate concepts that are specific to a culture, language, or scientific domain. The Surface Water ontology design pattern was developed both for domain knowledge distillation and to serve as a conceptual building-block for more complex surface water ontologies. A fundamental distinction is made in this on-tology between landscape features that act as containers (e.g., stream channels, basins) and the bodies of water (e.g., rivers, lakes) that occupy those containers. Concave (container) landforms semantics are specified in a Dry module and the semantics of contained bodies of water in a Wet module. The pattern is imple-mented in OWL, but Description Logic axioms and a detailed explanation is provided. The OWL ontology will be an important contribution to Semantic Web vocabulary for annotating surface water feature datasets. A discussion about why there is a need to complement the pattern with other ontologies, es-pecially the previously developed Surface Network pattern is also provided. Fi-nally, the practical value of the pattern in semantic querying of surface water datasets is illustrated through a few queries and annotated geospatial datasets.

Sinha, Gaurav [Ohio University, Athens; Mark, David [University at Buffalo, NY; Kolas, Dave [Raytheon BBN Technologies; Varanka, Dalia [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Romero, Boleslo E [University of California, Santa Barbara; Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Usery, Lynn [U.S. Geological Survey, Rolla, MO; Liebermann, Joshua [Tumbling Walls, LLC; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alternative Water Supply Options for Nitrate Contamination in California's Tulare and Salinas Groundwater Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fresno Council of Governments Paul Collins CDPH Division of Drinking Water and Environmental Management Water and Environmental Management Leslie Cotham Golden Living Center ­ Country View Jeannie Darby UCD County Department of Environmental Health ­ Water Program Anthony Chavarria City of Firebaugh Kathy Chung

Lund, Jay R.

167

Pilot demonstration of concentrated solar-powered desalination of subsurface agricultural drainage water and other brackish groundwater sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energywater nexus is addressed with the experimental demonstration of a solar-powered desalination process system. This system was designed for high-recovery treatment of subsurface agricultural drainage water as a reuse strategy as well as other brackish groundwater sources. These water sources may exhibit wide fluctuations in salinity and makeup and pose a high risk for operational troubles due to high scaling potential. A first-of-its-kind open-cycle vapor-absorption heat pump is coupled with a multiple-effect distillation train and a large parabolic trough solar thermal concentrator. Without the heat pump, the distillation operation showed a minimum thermal energy consumption of 261.87kWhth/m3. With the heat pump, the thermal energy consumption was reduced by more than 49% to 133.2kWhth/m3. This reduction in thermal energy requirement directly translates into a 49% reduction in solar array area required to power a process with the same freshwater production rate as a system without an integrated heat pump. An optimized design was modeled and the thermal energy performance of a commercial system is projected at 34.9kWhth/m3 using a 10-effect MED operating at 85% recovery.

Matthew D. Stuber; Christopher Sullivan; Spencer A. Kirk; Jennifer A. Farrand; Philip V. Schillaci; Brian D. Fojtasek; Aaron H. Mandell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Oxidation of graphite surface: the role of water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on density functional calculations, we demonstrate a significant difference in oxidation patterns between graphene and graphite and the formation of defects after oxidation. Step-by-step modeling demonstrates that oxidation of 80% of the graphite surface is favorable. Oxidation above half of the graphite surface significantly decreases the energy costs of vacancy formation with CO2 production. The presence of water is crucial in the transformation of epoxy groups to hydroxyl, the intercalation with further bundle and exfoliation. In water-rich conditions, water intercalates graphite at the initial stages of oxidation and oxidation, which is similar to the oxidation process of free-standing graphene; in contrast, in water-free conditions, large molecules intercalate graphite only after oxidation occurs on more than half of the surface.

Boukhvalov, D W

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ignition and combustion drive by powerful laser radiation acting on a water surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The ignition and combustion effects in water vapor generated...2-laser radiation on a water surface are investigated...

G. I. Kozlov; V. A. Kuznetsov

170

Ground-water characterization field activities for 1995--1996 Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research, University of California, Davis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents ground-water characterization field activities completed from August to December 1995 and in January 1996 at the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR) in Davis, California. The ground water at LEHR is one of several operable units under investigation by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the US Department of Energy. The purpose of this work was to further characterize the hydrogeology beneath the LEHR site, with the primary focus on ground water. The objectives were to estimate hydraulic properties for the two uppermost saturated hydrogeologic units (i.e., HSU-1 and HSU-2), and to determine distributions of contaminants of concern in these units. Activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives include well installation, geophysical logging, well development, ground-water sampling, slug testing, Westbay ground-water monitoring system installation, continuous water-level monitoring, Hydropunch installation, and surveying. Ground-water samples were collected from 61 Hydropunch locations. Analytical results from these locations and the wells indicate high chloroform concentrations trending from west/southwest to east/northeast in the lower portion of HSU-1 and in the upper and middle portions of HSU-2. The chloroform appears to originate near Landfill 2. Tritium was not found above the MCL in any of the well or Hydropunch samples. Hexavalent chromium was found at four locations with concentrations above the MCL in HSU-1 and at one location in HSU-2. One well in HSU-1 had a total chromium concentration above the MCL. Nitrate-nitrogen above the MCL was found at several Hydropunch locations in both HSU-1 and HSU-2.

Liikala, T.L.; Lanigan, D.C.; Last, G.V. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Origin of subdiffusion of water molecules on cell membrane surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water molecules play an important role in providing unique environments for biological reactions on cell membranes. It is widely believed that water molecules form bridges that connect lipid molecules and stabilize cell membranes. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we show that translational and rotational diffusion of water molecules on lipid membrane surfaces exhibit subdiffusion. Moreover, we provide evidence that both divergent mean trapping time (continuous-time random walk) and long-correlated noise (fractional Brownian motion) contribute to this subdiffusion. These results suggest that subdiffusion on cell membranes causes the water retardation, an enhancement of cell membrane stability, and a higher reaction efficiency.

Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasui, Masato; Yasuoka, Kenji

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Estimating surface water risk at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Effects of site conditions on modeling results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multiple source term and groundwater modeling runs were executed to estimate surface water {sup 90}Sr concentrations resulting from leaching of sludges in five 180,000 gallon Gunite{trademark} tanks at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Four release scenarios were analyzed: (1) leaching of unstabilized sludge with immediate tank failure; (2) leaching of unstabilized sludge with delayed tank failure due to chemical degradation; (3) leaching of stabilized sludge with immediate tank failure; and (4) leaching of residual contamination out of the shells of empty tanks. Source terms and concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in the stream directly downgradient of the tanks were calculated under these release scenarios. The following conclusions were drawn from the results of the modeling: (1) small changes in soil path length resulted in relatively large changes in the modeled {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the stream; (2) there was a linear relationship between the amount of sludge remaining in a tank and the peak concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; (3) there was a linear relationship between the cumulative {sup 90}Sr release from a tank and the peak concentration of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; (4) sludge stabilization resulted in significantly reduced peak concentrations of {sup 90}Sr in the stream; and (5) although radioactive decay of {sup 90}Sr during the period of tank degradation resulted in incrementally lower peak {sup 90}Sr concentrations in surface water than under the immediate tank failure scenarios these concentrations were equivalent under the two scenarios after about 90 years.

Curtis, A.H. III

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS: HYDROLOGY, GROUNDWATER OPERATING RULE affect California's SWP (State Water Project) and CVP (Central Valley Project) water supply deliveries-operation of groundwater storage, both north and south of the Delta, can increase long-term average project deliveries

Lund, Jay R.

174

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

175

Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) Surface Water and Wetland Standards (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources These rules state the standards for classification of water supply. Each stream in North Carolina has a classification based upon its designated uses. These rules provide the Environmental Management Commission a method of setting standards. The rules also establish the physical, chemical, and biological standards required to protect each stream class. Each stream in

176

Surface water data at Los Alamos National Laboratory: 2008 water year  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal investigators collected and computed surface water discharge data from 69 stream-gage stations that cover most of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one at Bandelier National Monument. Also included are discharge data from three springs two that flow into Caon de Valle and one that flows into Water Canyon.

Ortiz, David; Cata, Betsy; Kuyumjian, Gregory

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Anion Adsorption on Oxide Surfaces: Inclusion of the Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of toxic species in the environment, but predicting the surface speciation as a function of environmental of desorption of water dipoles in treating anion adsorption by ligand exchange. Taking this effect into account of surfacecomplexationmodelsinapredictivemodetofacilitate analysis of the migration of nuclear and other toxic wastes in the environment (15, 16

Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

178

Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic "Fracking": Are Surface Water Impacts An Ecological Concern? G. Allen Burton JrSchool of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA z industrial processes, the higher the risk of that ecosystem being impacted by the operation. The associated

179

Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Groundwater Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Database Groundwater Database Groundwater Database DOE has one of the largest ground water contamination problems and subsequent cleanup responsibilities for a single entity in the world, in terms of the sheer volume of affected groundwater, number of plumes, range of hydrogeologic settings, and diversity of contaminant types. The Groundwater Database was developed to provide a centralized location for information relating to groundwater flow, contamination, and remedial approaches across the DOE complex. The database provides DOE management and other interested parties with an easily accessible, high level understanding of the type of contamination, magnitude of contamination, and dynamics of groundwater systems at DOE sites. It also identifies remedial approaches, exit strategies, long-term stewardship requirements, regulatory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Landscape Planning for Sustainable Water Usage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Land use is the parameter by which society controls the landscape water balance [3]. It controls not only parameters such as evaporation, surface runoff, or groundwater recharge in catchments, but also soil ero...

Dr. Martin Volk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Ground-water flow and transport modeling of the NRC-licensed waste disposal facility, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a simulation study of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport from disposal at the NRC licensed waste disposal facility in West Valley, New York. A transient, precipitation driven, flow model of the near-surface fractured till layer and underlying unweathered till was developed and calibrated against observed inflow data into a recently constructed interceptor trench for the period March--May 1990. The results suggest that lateral flow through the upper, fractured till layer may be more significant than indicated by previous, steady state flow modeling studies. A conclusive assessment of the actual magnitude of lateral flow through the fractured till could however not be made. A primary factor contributing to this uncertainty is the unknown contribution of vertical infiltration through the interceptor trench cap to the total trench inflow. The second part of the investigation involved simulation of the migration of Sr-90, Cs-137 and Pu-239 from the one of the fuel hull disposal pits. A first-order radionuclide leach rate with rate coefficient of 10{sup {minus}6}/day was assumed to describe radionuclide release into the disposal pit. The simulations indicated that for wastes buried below the fractured till zone, no significant migration would occur. However, under the assumed conditions, significant lateral migration could occur for radionuclides present in the upper, fractured till zone. 23 refs., 68 figs., 12 tabs.

Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Water resources data for New Jersey, water year 1992. Volume 1. Surface-water data. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for New Jersey consists of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage, contents, and water quality of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground water. The volume of the report contains discharge records for 99 gaging stations; tide summaries for 2 stations; stage and contents for 37 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 95 surface-water sites. Also included are data for 65 crest-stage partial-record stations, 13 tidal crest-stage gages, and 94 low-flow partial-record stations.

Bauersfeld, W.R.; Moshinsky, E.W.; Gurney, C.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Theoretical and experimental study on surface tension and dynamic surface tension of aqueous lithium bromide and water with additive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The surface tensions of water and aqueous lithium bromide (LiBr) with 2-ethyl-1- ... that surface tension varies linearly with the surface excess concentration is advanced, which could overcome the...

Wenlong Cheng; Zeshao Chen; Atsushi Akisawa

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Mississippi Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; to assist state agencies in the development and maintenance of a state water management plan; and to facilitate and stimulate planning and management that: deals with water policy issues, supports state water include: water quality, surface and groundwater management, water quality management and water resources

186

Observation of dynamic water microadsorption on Au surface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental and theoretical research on water wettability, adsorption, and condensation on solid surfaces has been ongoing for many decades because of the availability of new materials, new detection and measurement techniques, novel applications, and different scales of dimensions. Au is a metal of special interest because it is chemically inert, has a high surface energy, is highly conductive, and has a relatively high melting point. It has wide applications in semiconductor integrated circuitry, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, biochips, jewelry, coinage, and even dental restoration. Therefore, its surface condition, wettability, wear resistance, lubrication, and friction attract a lot of attention from both scientists and engineers. In this paper, the authors experimentally investigated Au{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth, wettability, roughness, and adsorption utilizing atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, reflectance spectrometry, and contact angle measurement. Samples were made using a GaAs substrate. Utilizing a super-hydrophilic Au surface and the proper surface conditions of the surrounding GaAs, dynamic microadsorption of water on the Au surface was observed in a clean room environment. The Au surface area can be as small as 12??m{sup 2}. The adsorbed water was collected by the GaAs groove structure and then redistributed around the structure. A model was developed to qualitatively describe the dynamic microadsorption process. The effective adsorption rate was estimated by modeling and experimental data. Devices for moisture collection and a liquid channel can be made by properly arranging the wettabilities or contact angles of different materials. These novel devices will be very useful in microfluid applications or biochips.

Huang, Xiaokang, E-mail: xiaokang.huang@tqs.com; Gupta, Gaurav; Gao, Weixiang; Tran, Van; Nguyen, Bang; McCormick, Eric; Cui, Yongjie; Yang, Yinbao; Hall, Craig; Isom, Harold [TriQuint Semiconductor, Inc., 500 W Renner Road, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site, June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site, June 1993 is an update of the series of reports that document the configuration of the uppermost unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site. This report series presents the semiannual water level measurements taken at site groundwater monitoring wells each June and December and the groundwater maps derived from these measurements. These reports document the changes in the groundwater level at Hanford as the site has transitioned from nuclear material production to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data to support the various site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs currently in progress on the Hanford Site. Groundwater Maps of the Hanford Site are prepared for the US Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, by the Hanford Site Operations and Engineering Contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). This document fulfills reporting requirements specified in WHC (1993), Section 8.0 {open_quotes}Water Quality{close_quotes} and also described in the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Site (DOE-RL 1991). Maps depicting the water table beneath the Hanford Site south of the Columbia River are presented in this report. Appendix A lists the well identification number, depth to water, casing elevating and the water level elevation for each well measured during June 1993. A summary discussion of the data is included with a well index map, the depth to water map and the contoured map of the water table surface for the Hanford Site and each of the three operational areas (the 100, 200, and 300-1100 Areas).

Kasza, G.L.; Hartman, M.J.; Jordan, W.A.; Weekes, D.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska) Nebraska) Surface Water Quality Standards (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality,

189

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better tha...

Moldabayev, Daulet; Dutykh, Denys

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

The Whitham Equation as a Model for Surface Water Waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Whitham equation was proposed as an alternate model equation for the simplified description of uni-directional wave motion at the surface of an inviscid fluid. As the Whitham equation incorporates the full linear dispersion relation of the water wave problem, it is thought to provide a more faithful description of shorter waves of small amplitude than traditional long wave models such as the KdV equation. In this work, we identify a scaling regime in which the Whitham equation can be derived from the Hamiltonian theory of surface water waves. The Whitham equation is integrated numerically, and it is shown that the equation gives a close approximation of inviscid free surface dynamics as described by the Euler equations. The performance of the Whitham equation as a model for free surface dynamics is also compared to two standard free surface models: the KdV and the BBM equation. It is found that in a wide parameter range of amplitudes and wavelengths, the Whitham equation performs on par with or better than both the KdV and BBM equations.

Daulet Moldabayev; Henrik Kalisch; Denys Dutykh

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Dynamics of microdroplets over the surface of hot water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When drinking a cup of coffee under the morning sunshine, you may notice white membranes of steam floating on the surface of the hot water. They stay notably close to the surface and appear to almost stick to it. Although the membranes whiffle because of the air flow of rising steam, peculiarly fast splitting events occasionally occur. They resemble cracking to open slits approximately 1 mm wide in the membranes, and leave curious patterns. We studied this phenomenon using a microscope with a high-speed video camera and found intriguing details: i) the white membranes consist of fairly monodispersed small droplets of the order of 10 $\\mu\\,{\\rm m}$; ii) they levitate above the water surface by 10$\\sim$100 $\\mu{\\rm m}$; iii) the splitting events are a collective disappearance of the droplets, which propagates as a wave front of the surface wave with a speed of 1$\\sim$2 m/s; and iv) these events are triggered by a surface disturbance, which results from the disappearance of a single droplet.

Takahiro Umeki; Masahiko Ohata; Hiizu Nakanishi; Masatoshi Ichikawa

2015-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

192

Goniometric measurement of power scattered from wind driven water surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A recently constructed 11?ft 3?axis semiautomatic underwater goniometer has made possible precision measurement of acoustic power scattered from the statistically stationary wind driven water surface at Yale. Measurements have been made over 180 of azimuth and at several grazing angles. These measurements have been corrected for beam patterns and pulse shape to give a scattering cross section for the surfaces and geometries studied. The results of these measurements indicate that current mathematical models of the scattering process are not able to predict spatial distribution of scattered power in all cases.

J. G. Zornig

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Contamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-west France. 98 samples were analysed from 63 stations (surface water and drinking water produced from surfaceContamination levels of human pharmaceutical compounds in French surface and drinking water S therapeutic classes was analysed from resource and drinking water in two catchment basins located in north

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

194

Surface characterization of polymethylmetacrylate bombarded by charged water droplets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrospray droplet impact (EDI), in which the charged electrospray water droplets are introduced in vacuum, accelerated, and allowed to impact the sample, is applied to polymethylmetacrylate (PMMA). The secondary ions generated were measured by an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer. In EDI mass spectra for PMMA, fragment ions originating from PMMA could not be detected. This is due to the fact that the proton affinities of fragments formed from PMMA are smaller than those from acetic acid contained in the charged droplet. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of PMMA irradiated by water droplets did not change with prolonged cluster irradiation, i.e., EDI is capable of shallow surface etching for PMMA with a little damage of the sample underneath the surface.

Hiraoka, Kenzo; Takaishi, Riou; Asakawa, Daiki; Sakai, Yuji; Iijima, Yoshitoki [Clean Energy Research Center, University of Yamanashi, Takeda-4, Kofu 400-8511 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Electron Optics Sales Division, JEOL Ltd., 2-8-3 Akebono, Tachikawa, Tokyo 190-0012 (Japan)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Superfund record of decison (EPA Region 1): Fort Devens South Post impact area and area of contamination 41 groundwater and areas of contamination 25, 26, and 27, MA, July 5, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Record of Decision (ROD) addresses AOCs 25 (Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Range), 26 (Zulu Ranges), an 27 (Hotel Range) and AOC 41 groundwater and a subset of the groundwater within the South Post Impact Area (SPIA). `No action` is the selected remedy for SPIA monitored-area groundwater, AOC 41 groundwater, and the surface water, sediment, and soils at the EOD, Zulu, and Hotel Ranges. Under this alternative, no formal remedial action will be taken and the site will be left `as is,` with no additional institutional controls, containment, removal, treatment, or other mitigating measures. Long-term groundwater monitoring will be conducted at the site under this `no action` ROD.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conditioning of aggressive water in Suriname:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In Suriname groundwater is mostly used for drinking water production. Depending on the ground layers from which groundwater is extracted, groundwater is characterized as aggressive (more)

Salmin, A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

April 2012 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling and analysis were conducted on April 16-19, 2012, as specified in the Sampling and Analysis Plan for U.S. Department of Energy Office Of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PLN/S04351, continually updated). Duplicate samples were collected from locations SA1-1-H, HMH-5R, SA3-4-H, SA1-2-H, Pond W of GZ, and SA5-4-4. One trip blank was collected during this sampling event.

None

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Groundwater Surface Water Interactions in a Gold-mined Floodplain of the Merced River  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1901 and 1967 to provide flood protection (McSwain, 1977).dikes were built to flood specific areas and reroute waterthickness of the channel and flood plain deposits typically

Sullivan, Lynn Sager

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

202

Effect of oil pollution on fresh groundwater in Kuwait  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Massive oil fires in Kuwait were the aftermath of the Gulf War. This resulted in the pollution of air, water, and soil, the magnitude of which is unparalleled in the history of mankind. Oil fires damaged several oil well heads, resulting in the flow of oil, forming large oil lakes. Products of combustion from oil well fires deposited over large areas. Infiltrating rainwater, leaching out contaminants from oil lakes and products of combustion at ground surface, can reach the water table and contaminate the groundwater. Field investigations, supported by laboratory studies and mathematical models, show that infiltration of oil from oil lakes will be limited to a depth of about 2 m from ground surface. Preliminary mathematical models showed that contaminated rainwater can infiltrate and reach the water table within a period of three to four days, particularly at the Raudhatain and Umm Al-Aish regions. These are the only regions in Kuwait where fresh groundwater exists. After reaching the water table, the lateral movement of contaminants is expected to be very slow under prevailing hydraulic gradients. Groundwater monitoring at the above regions during 1992 showed minor levels of vanadium, nickel, and total hydrocarbons at certain wells. Since average annual rainfall in the region is only 120 mm/yr, groundwater contamination due to the infiltration of contaminated rainwater is expected to be a long-term one. 13 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Al-Sulaimi, J.; Viswanathan, M.N.; Szekely, F. [Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research, Safat (Kuwait)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

204

Managing Texas Groundwater Resources through Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication gives an overview of Texas water law and the regulations governing groundwater conservation districts. The powers and responsibilities of districts are summarized. Color maps show the coverage of existing conservation and special...

Fipps, Guy

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Optimal water quality management in surface water systems and energy recovery in water distribution networks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Two of the most important environmental challenges in the 21st century are to protect the quality of fresh water resources and to utilize renewable energy (more)

Telci, Ilker Tonguc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Novel Americium Treatment Process for Surface Water and Dust Suppression Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), a former nuclear weapons production plant, has been remediated under CERCLA and decommissioned to become a National Wildlife Refuge. The site conducted this cleanup effort under the Rocky Flats Cleanup Agreement (RFCA) that established limits for the discharge of surface and process waters from the site. At the end of 2004, while a number of process buildings were undergoing decommissioning, routine monitoring of a discharge pond (Pond A-4) containing approximately 28 million gallons of water was discovered to have been contaminated with a trace amount of Americium-241 (Am-241). While the amount of Am-241 in the pond waters was very low (0.5 - 0.7 pCi/l), it was above the established Colorado stream standard of 0.15 pCi/l for release to off site drainage waters. The rapid successful treatment of these waters to the regulatory limit was important to the site for two reasons. The first was that the pond was approaching its hold-up limit. Without rapid treatment and release of the Pond A-4 water, typical spring run-off would require water management actions to other drainages onsite or a mass shuttling of water for disposal. The second reason was that this type of contaminated water had not been treated to the stringent stream standard at Rocky Flats before. Technical challenges in treatment could translate to impacts on water and secondary waste management, and ultimately, cost impacts. All of the technical challenges and specific site criteria led to the conclusion that a different approach to the treatment of this problem was necessary and a crash treatability program to identify applicable treatment techniques was undertaken. The goal of this program was to develop treatment options that could be implemented very quickly and would result in the generation of no high volume secondary waste that would be costly to dispose. A novel chemical treatment system was developed and implemented at the RFETS to treat Am-241 contaminated pond water, surface run-off and D and D dust suppression water during the later stages of the D and D effort at Rocky Flats. This novel chemical treatment system allowed for highly efficient, high-volume treatment of all contaminated waste waters to the very low stream standard of 0.15 pCi/1 with strict compliance to the RFCA discharge criteria for release to off-site surface waters. The rapid development and implementation of the treatment system avoided water management issues that would have had to be addressed if contaminated water had remained in Pond A-4 into the Spring of 2005. Implementation of this treatment system for the Pond A-4 waters and the D and D waters from Buildings 776 and 371 enabled the site to achieve cost-effective treatment that minimized secondary waste generation, avoiding the need for expensive off-site water disposal. Water treatment was conducted for a cost of less than $0.20/gal which included all development costs, capital costs and operational costs. This innovative and rapid response effort saved the RFETS cleanup program well in excess of $30 million for the potential cost of off-site transportation and treatment of radioactive liquid waste. (authors)

Tiepel, E.W.; Pigeon, P. [Golder Associates (United States); Nesta, S. [Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC (United States); Anderson, J. [Rocky Flats Closure Site Services - RFCSS (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is based on EPA National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. The progress of groundwater remediation is reported each year in the SER. Operation metrics indicate that, although...

209

Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand for water is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected. The Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas are carrying out a number of successful programs in the areas of education and public awareness, technical assistance...

Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

210

Urban water supply planning and management in Nigeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gap between water need and supply has widened steadily in Nigeria's urban centres despite continuous efforts made to develop the nation's vast surface and groundwater resources. Less than 0.5% of the total...

L. Oyebande Dr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Boiling during high-velocity impact of water droplets on a hot stainless steel surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rho, V and p 0 are water density, impact velocity and atmospheric pressure, respectively. Assuming water vapour is a perfect...droplet-on-demand generator. Exp. Fluids. 34...of hot surfaces with water sprays. J. Heat Treating...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Experiments on adding a surfactant to water drops boiling on a hot surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photographs of droplets of water impacting on a hot surface...to film boiling for water and hydrocarbons. Baumeister & Simon...predicting TLeid for hydrocarbons and cryogens, but failed...surfactant to boiling water drops 685 Figure 8...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radio-Ecological Conditions of Groundwater in the Area of Uranium Mining and Milling Facility - 13525  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manmade chemical and radioactive contamination of groundwater is one of damaging effects of the uranium mining and milling facilities. Groundwater contamination is of special importance for the area of Priargun Production Mining and Chemical Association, JSC 'PPMCA', because groundwater is the only source of drinking water. The paper describes natural conditions of the site, provides information on changes of near-surface area since the beginning of the company, illustrates the main trends of contaminators migration and assesses manmade impact on the quality and mode of near-surface and ground waters. The paper also provides the results of chemical and radioactive measurements in groundwater at various distances from the sources of manmade contamination to the drinking water supply areas. We show that development of deposits, mine water discharge, leakages from tailing dams and cinder storage facility changed general hydro-chemical balance of the area, contributed to new (overlaid) aureoles and flows of scattering paragenetic uranium elements, which are much smaller in comparison with natural ones. However, increasing flow of groundwater stream at the mouth of Sukhoi Urulyungui due to technological water infiltration, mixing of natural water with filtration streams from industrial reservoirs and sites, containing elevated (relative to natural background) levels of sulfate-, hydro-carbonate and carbonate- ions, led to the development and moving of the uranium contamination aureole from the undeveloped field 'Polevoye' to the water inlet area. The aureole front crossed the southern border of water inlet of drinking purpose. The qualitative composition of groundwater, especially in the southern part of water inlet, steadily changes for the worse. The current Russian intervention levels of gross alpha activity and of some natural radionuclides including {sup 222}Rn are in excess in drinking water; regulations for fluorine and manganese concentrations are also in excess. Possible ways to improve the situation are considered. (authors)

Titov, A.V.; Semenova, M.P.; Seregin, V.A.; Isaev, D.V.; Metlyaev, E.G. [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [FSBU SRC A.I.Burnasyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center of FMBA of Russia, Zhivopisnaya Street, 46, Moscow (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Klimova, T.I.; Sevtinova, E.B. [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation)] [FSESP 'Hydrospecgeologiya' (Russian Federation); Zolotukhina, S.B.; Zhuravleva, L.A. [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)] [FSHE 'Centre of Hygiene and Epidemiology no. 107' under FMBA of Russia (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

GRR/Section 19-TX-c - Surface Water Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-TX-c - Surface Water Permit 19-TX-c - Surface Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-c - Surface Water Permit 19TXCSurfaceWaterPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 30 TAC 295 30 TAC 297 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXCSurfaceWaterPermit.pdf 19TXCSurfaceWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Texas, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) issues surface water permits. Under, Tex. Water Code § 11, surface water permits

215

United: How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Story by Leslie Lee Summer 2013 tx H2O 3 Photo by Kathleen Phillips, Texas A&M AgriLife UNITED How one computer model makes Texas surface water management possible Managing surface water supplies in Texas is complex, to say the least. Multiple... of conditions. W#15;P enables surface water managers throughout Texas to allocate water resources, plan for the future and ensure there is enough water for environmental as well as human needs. A statewide surface water permitting system is born Prior...

Lee, Leslie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

217

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-affected groundwater areas Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flow and contaminant transport in this area. The groundwater flow model... -SCALE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOWA-DANUBE - PART A: THE GROUNDWATER MODEL...

218

Probabilistic estimation and prediction of groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying and characterizing groundwater recharge are critical for water resources management. Unfortunately, low recharge rates are difficult to resolve in dry environments, where groundwater is often most important. ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Water resources data for Florida, water year 1992. Volume 1B. Northeast Florida ground water. Water-data report (Annual) October 1, 1991-September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1992 for northeast Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 140 streams, periodic discharge for 10 streams, miscellaneous discharge for 14 streams, continuous or daily stage for 32 streams, continuous or daily tide stage for 3 sites, periodic stage for 23 streams, peak discharge for 3 streams, and peak stage for 11 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 36 lakes, periodic elevations for 47 lakes; continuous ground-water levels for 75 wells, periodic ground-water levels for 123 wells, and miscellaneous water-level measurements for 864 wells; and quality-of-water data for 38 surface-water sites and 66 wells.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The East Fork Regime encompasses several confirmed and suspected sources of groundwater contamination within industrialized areas of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant in Bear Creek Valley (BCV) southeast of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Groundwater and surface water monitoring in the East Fork Regime are performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) post-closure permit for the East Fork Regime issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) on August 30, 1996. The post-closure permit addresses post-closure monitoring requirements for two closed RCRA-regulated surface impoundments: the S-3 Ponds and New Hope Pond.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Groundwater Protection, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Groundwater placeholder DOE, BNL, elected officials, and community leaders mark the opening of the first off-site groundwater treatment system. From the outset, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered the protection of human health to be the most important goal of the cleanup program. Because exposure to groundwater contamination had the greatest potential to impact human health, the focus was to ensure that local drinking water supplies were clean and safe. Early efforts concentrated on determining the locations of the contamination, installing treatment systems to clean up the groundwater, and remediating sources of contamination like landfills and underground tanks. DOE and the Lab are committed to protecting Long Island's sole-source aquifer, a vital natural resource.

223

Viral Pollution of Surface Waters Due to Chlorinated Primary Effluents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gerous wastes into the water environment is likely...logical approach to better water conservation as well as minimizing...combinations ofantiserum pools. Application to typing...Health factors and reused waters. J. Am. Water Works...

Syed A. Sattar; J. C. N. Westwood

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Biological stability of groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional (e.g., coagulation, flocculation, and filtration) or membrane filtration treatment trains were used to remove organic compounds from groundwater. For the conventional train with sand-anthracite columns, the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) of the groundwater was reduced from 349 {+-} 127 {micro}g/L C to 54 {+-} 51 {micro}g/L C. For the membrane filtration train, there was no statistical difference between the AOC of the raw water influent (388 {+-} 126 {micro}g C) and that of the membrane permeate (334 {+-} 156 {micro}g/L C), suggesting that this treatment produced biologically unstable water. Similar results were obtained using the heterotrophic growth response (HGR) method. Comparison of the biostability methods showed that HGR was positively correlated with AOC (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001; n = 156), indicating that AOC only partially explains the ability of heterotrophic bacteria to grow in water samples.

Noble, P.A. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology; Clark, D.L. [Irvine Ranch Water District, CA (United States); Olson, B.H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). School of Social Ecology, Environmental Analysis, and Design

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

120 Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation 32, no. 1/ Winter 2012/pages 120­130 NGWA.org Ground Water Monitoring & Remediation © 2011, National Ground Water Association. Published 2011. This article known as emerging contaminants (ECs) to surrounding groundwater and surface water. ECs consist

226

Flow and Storage in Groundwater Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...Herrera, Eds., Seawater Intrusion in Coastal...conductivity, specific storage, and thickness...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...

William M. Alley; Richard W. Healy; James W. LaBaugh; Thomas E. Reilly

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast Vibrational  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water at the Surfaces of Aligned Phospholipid Multibilayer Model Membranes Probed with Ultrafast@stanford.edu Abstract: The dynamics of water at the surface of artificial membranes composed of aligned multibilayers pump-probe spectroscopy. The experiments are performed at various hydration levels, x ) 2 - 16 water

Fayer, Michael D.

228

Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

>From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Enrichment and Association of Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water R. W. Harvey L. Y. Young Environmental...Bacteria and Particulates in Salt Marsh Surface Water R. W. HARVEY AND L. Y. YOUNG...surface. (A) Sippewissett marsh, n = 23, r = 0.91. (B) Palo Alto marsh...

R. W. Harvey; L. Y. Young

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Water Research 38 (2004) 33313339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Research 38 (2004) 3331­3339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting out associated with transferring solutes from water to a salt solution to the difference in surface tensions likely reflects the inability of the simple surface tension model to account for all interactions among

Herbert, Bruce

231

Surface excess properties from energy transport measurements during water evaporation Fei Duan and C. A. Ward*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface excess properties from energy transport measurements during water evaporation Fei Duan condi- tions, accounts for as little as 50% of the energy required to evaporate water at the measured moles per unit surface area , surface in- ternal energy uLV excess energy per excess mole , and spe

Ward, Charles A.

232

GRR/Section 19-TX-d - Transfer of Surface Water Right | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

19-TX-d - Transfer of Surface Water Right 19-TX-d - Transfer of Surface Water Right < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-d - Transfer of Surface Water Right 19TXDTransferOfWaterRight.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11 30 TAC 297.81 30 TAC 297.82 30 TAC 297.83 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19TXDTransferOfWaterRight.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Texas water law allows surface water rights to be transferred from one party to another. (Tex. Water Code § 11)

233

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

234

Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program Volume 58 (2012) Volunteer Ground-Water Monitoring Coming to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Management Districts (WMDs) or the Florida Department of Environmental1 Dedicated to Sharing Information About Water Management and the Florida LAKEWATCH Program being monitored for water levels by the state's water management districts

Florida, University of

235

Calendar Year 2009 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2009 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2009 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12. The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2009 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2009 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2009 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP. Narrative sections of this report reference several appendices. Figures (maps and diagrams) and tables (excluding data summary tables presented in the narrative sections) are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. Appendix C contains construction details for the wells in each regime that were sampled during CY 2009 by either the Y-1

Elvado Environmental LLC

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Calendar Year 2010 Groundwater Monitoring Report, U.S. Department Of Energy Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the groundwater and surface water monitoring data that were obtained during calendar year (CY) 2010 at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (hereafter referenced as Y-12) on the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The CY 2010 monitoring data were obtained from wells, springs, and surface water sampling locations in three hydrogeologic regimes at Y-12 (Figure A.1). The Bear Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (Bear Creek Regime) encompasses a section of Bear Creek Valley (BCV) between the west end of Y-12 and the west end of the Bear Creek Watershed (directions are in reference to the Y-12 grid system). The Upper East Fork Poplar Creek Hydrogeologic Regime (East Fork Regime) encompasses the Y-12 industrial facilities and support structures in BCV. The Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge directly south of Y-12. Section 2 of this report provides background information pertinent to groundwater and surface water quality monitoring in each hydrogeologic regime, including the topography and bedrock geology, surface water drainage, groundwater system, and extent of groundwater contamination. The CY 2010 groundwater and surface water monitoring data in this report were obtained from sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) managed by Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC (B&W Y-12) and from sampling and analysis activities implemented under several monitoring programs managed by Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). Cooperative implementation of the monitoring programs directed by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC (i.e., coordinating sample collection and sharing data) ensures that the CY 2010 monitoring results fulfill requirements of all the applicable monitoring drivers with no duplication of sampling and analysis efforts. Section 3 of this report contains a summary of information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities implemented under the Y-12 GWPP including sampling locations and frequency; quality assurance (QA)/quality control (QC) sampling; sample collection and handling; field measurements and laboratory analytes; data management and data quality objective (DQO) evaluation; and groundwater elevation monitoring. However, this report does not include equivalent QA/QC or DQO evaluation information regarding the groundwater and surface water sampling and analysis activities associated with the monitoring programs implemented by BJC. Such details are deferred to the respective programmatic plans and reports issued by BJC (see Section 3.0). Collectively, the groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained during CY 2010 by the Y-12 GWPP and BJC address DOE Order 450.1A (Environmental Protection Program) requirements for monitoring groundwater and surface water quality in areas: (1) which are, or could be, affected by operations at Y-12 (surveillance monitoring); and (2) where contaminants from Y-12 are most likely to migrate beyond the boundaries of the ORR (exit pathway/perimeter monitoring). Section 4 of this report presents a summary evaluation of the monitoring data with regard to the respective objectives of surveillance monitoring and exit pathway/perimeter monitoring, based on the analytical results for the principal groundwater contaminants at Y-12: nitrate, uranium, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), gross alpha activity, and gross beta activity. Section 5 of this report summarizes the most pertinent findings regarding the principal contaminants, along with recommendations proposed for ongoing groundwater and surface water quality monitoring performed under the Y-12 GWPP.

Elvado Environmental LLC

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Site characterization plan for groundwater in Waste Area Grouping 1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, is undergoing a site characterization to identify environmental contamination that may be present. This document, Site Characterization Report for Groundwater in Waste Area Grouping I at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identifies areas of concern with respect to WAG 1 groundwater and presents the rationale, justification, and objectives for conducting this continuing site characterization. This report summarizes the operations that have taken place at each of the areas of concern in WAG 1, summarizes previous characterization studies that have been performed, presents interpretations of previously collected data and information, identifies contaminants of concern, and presents an action plan for further site investigations and early actions that will lead to identification of contaminant sources, their major groundwater pathways, and reduced off-site migration of contaminated groundwater to surface water. Site characterization Activities performed to date at WAG I have indicated that groundwater contamination, principally radiological contamination, is widespread. An extensive network of underground pipelines and utilities have contributed to the dispersal of contaminants to an unknown extent. The general absence of radiological contamination in surface water at the perimeter of WAG 1 is attributed to the presence of pipelines and underground waste storage tank sumps and dry wells distributed throughout WAG 1 which remove more than about 40 million gal of contaminated groundwater per year.

Lee, R.R.; Curtis, A.H.; Houlberg, L.M.; Purucker, S.T.; Singer, M.L.; Tardiff, M.F.; Wolf, D.A.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Phyto remediation groundwater trends at the DOE portsmouth gaseous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the progress of a phyto-remediation action being performed at the Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) X-740 Waste Oil Handling Facility to remediate contaminated groundwater under a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure action. This action was effected by an Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OEPA) decision to use phyto-remediation as the preferred remedy for the X-740 groundwater contamination. This remedy was recognized as a cost-effective, low-maintenance, and promising method to remediate groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily trichloroethylene (TCE). During 1999, prior to the tree installation at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in the area were collected from 10 monitoring wells completed in the Gallia Formation. The Gallia is the uppermost water-bearing zone and contains most of the groundwater contamination at PORTS. During the tree installation which took place during the summer of 1999, four new Gallia monitoring wells were installed at the X-740 Area in addition to the 10 Gallia wells which had been installed in the same area during the early 1990's. Manual water level measurements were collected quarterly from these 14 Gallia monitoring wells between 1998 and 2001. These manual water level measurements were collected to monitor the combined impact of the trees on the groundwater prior to root development. Beginning in 2001, water level measurements were collected monthly during the growing season (April-September) and quarterly during the dormant season (October-March). A total of eight water level measurements were collected annually to monitor the phyto-remediation system's effect on the groundwater in the X- 740 Area. The primary function of the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area is to hydraulically prevent further spreading of the TCE plume. This process utilizes deep-rooted plants, such as poplar trees, to extract large quantities of water from the saturated zone. The focus of any phyto-remediation system is to develop a cone of depression under the entire plantation area. This cone of depression can halt migration of the contaminant plume and can create a hydraulic barrier, thereby maintaining plume capture. While a cone of depression is not yet evident at the X-740 Phyto-remediation Area, water level measurements in 2004 and 2005 differed from measurements taken in previous years, indicating that the now mature trees are influencing groundwater flow direction and gradient at the site. Water level measurements taken from 2003 through 2005 indicate a trend whereby groundwater elevations steadily decreased in the X-740 Phyto-remediation System. During this time, an average groundwater table drop of 0.30 feet was observed. Although the time for the phyto-remediation system to mature had been estimated at two to three years, these monitoring data indicate a period of four to five years for the trees to reach maturity. Although, these trends are not apparent from analysis of the potentiometric surface contours, it does appear that the head gradient across the site is higher during the spring and lower during the fall. It is not clear, however, whether this trend was initiated by the installation of the phyto-remediation system. This paper will present the groundwater data collected to date to illustrate the effects of the trees on the groundwater table. (authors)

Lewis, A.C.; Baird, D.R. [CDM, Piketon, OH (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Dealing with parameter uncertainty in the calculation of water surface profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Frequency Curve at River Mile 7. 739. . . . . . . 69 . . . . . 70 . . . 70 . . . . . 71 . . . . . . . 72 . . . . 73 . . . . 74 . . . . 77 . . . . 77 . . . . 78 FIGURE Page 20 Water Surface Profiles for 100-yr Recurrence Interval Flows and for Randomly... Chosen Roughness Coefficients From a Normal Distribution (99 plans) . . 21 Water Surface Profiles for 10-yr Recurrence Interval Flows and for Randomly Chosen Roughness Coefficients From a Normal Distribution (99 plans) . . 22 100-yr Water Surface...

Vargas-Cruz, Ruben F.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

240

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Districts (Texas) Conservation Districts (Texas) Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Groundwater Conservation Districts, as created following procedures described in Water Code 36, are designed to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater, and of groundwater reservoirs or their subdivisions, and to

242

Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This section gives metropolitan counties the authority to prepare and adopt groundwater plans, or to grant this responsibility to soil and water

243

Measurement of the variance of water surface slopes by a radar: Verification of algorithms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A full-scale experiment is carried out to study backscattering of a microwave radar signal by a rough water surface during flight over the Gorky water storage. A centimeter-wavelength Doppler radar with a knif...

V. Yu. Karaev; M. B. Kanevsky; E. M. Meshkov

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Partnering to Save Water  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Partnering Partnering to Save Water Phill Consiglio Southern California Edison What We Are Going to Discuss * A Little Bit About Water * The Energy Cost of Water * Water Technologies * What We Have Done * Where We Are Going A Little Bit About Water *The Earth Has A Finite Supply Of Fresh Water. - Water Is Stored In Aquifers, Surface Waters And The Atmosphere - Sometimes Oceans Are Mistaken For Available Water, But The Amount Of Energy Needed To Convert Saline Water To Potable Water Is Prohibitive Today *This Has Created A Water Crisis Due To: - Inadequate Access To Safe Drinking Water For About 884 Million People - Inadequate Access To Water For Sanitation And Waste Disposal For 2.5 Billion People - Groundwater Overdrafting (Excessive Use) Leading To Diminished Agricultural Yields

245

Effects of Degassing on the Long-Range Attractive Force between Hydrophobic Surfaces in Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the development of ultralow surface free energy materials and nonwetting surfaces, in controlling the stability) adhering to the surfaces coalesce to form a bubble-bridge that draws the surfaces into contact.11 The attractive force arises from the tension of the bridging bubble due to the unfavorable air-water interfacial

Attard, Phil

246

Triazine herbcides: Ecological risk assessment in North American surface waters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The triazine herbicides are some of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Some are found in surface waters in North America and risks to aquatic ecosystems are a possible concern. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive aquatic ecological risk assessment conducted using probabilistic risk assessment techniques. The assessment of exposure data concentrated on Midwestern us watersheds, the area of greatest triazine use in North America and showed that concentrations of some triazines rarely exceeded 20 {mu}g/L in rivers, streams, and reservoirs. The effects assessment showed that phytoplankton were the most sensitive organisms to triazines followed, in decreasing order of sensitivity, by macrophytes, benthic invertebrates, zooplankton and fish. Distribution analysis of sensitivity to atrazine showed 10th percentile of 37 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 5.4 {mu}g/L for LC50s in algae and plants. Simazine showed 10th percentiles of 188 {mu}g/L for LC50s in all organisms and 27 {mu}g/L for LC50s in aquatic plants. Comparisons of the exposure and effects distributions showed low probabilities of exceeding the 10th percentiles of the sensitivity distributions. These results will be discussed in relation to the mechanism of action of these substances and other stressors in the environment.

Solomon, K.R. [Univ. of Guelph (Canada)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

248

GRR/Section 19-TX-e - Temporary Surface Water Permit | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-TX-e - Temporary Surface Water Permit -TX-e - Temporary Surface Water Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-TX-e - Temporary Surface Water Permit 19-TX-e Temporary Surface Water Permit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Regulations & Policies Tex. Water Code § 11.138 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19-TX-e Temporary Surface Water Permit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative In Texas, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), or in certain instances regional TCEQ offices or local Watermasters, issue

249

Time dependence of forces between mica surfaces in water and its relation to the release of surface ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to 0 with a characteristic time r 11 2 min. This behavior is attributed to condensation essentially hydrated protons, H3O , and to ions leached from glassware.15 In conductivity water, most from the H3O ions condense into the surfaces to neutralize the surface charges. The general assumption

Klein, Jacob

250

Calcareous Nannoplankton Response to Surface-Water Acidification Around Oceanic Anoxic Event 1a  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...smooth CaCO 3 recovery after the...OAE1a, or condensation and hiatuses...system. The recovery phase is also...unsaturated surface waters at global...increased atmospheric CO 2 . Nature...induced by atmospheric CO2 may be...acidified surface waters. We observe...alkalinity recovery. Deepwater...

Elisabetta Erba; Cinzia Bottini; Helmut J. Weissert; Christina E. Keller

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Application Prospect Analysis of the Surface Water Source Heat-Pump in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface water resources in China are rather abundant and it can be use as the heat or cool source for heat pump. The winter surface water temperatures of 17 typical cities are investigated in December, and they are all distributed in the interval...

Zhang, C.; Zhuang, Z.; Huang, L.; Li, X.; Li, G.; Sun, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Influence of physisorbed water on the conductivity of hydrogen terminated silicon-on-insulator surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the water layer is displaced by inert gas purging, heating, or pumping. The observed conductivity changes active defects as the surface oxidizes. Surprisingly, physisorbed water via adsorption from ambient.1063/1.2822417 On semiconductor surfaces adsorption or reaction events which result in charge redistribution give rise to changes

253

Dynamics of photogenerated holes in surface modified ?-Fe2O3 photoanodes for solar water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...photogenerated holes in surface modified {alpha}-Fe2O3 photoanodes for solar water splitting 10...primarily to enhanced electron depletion in the Fe2O3 for a given applied bias. Efficient hydrogen generation...photogenerated holes in surface modified ?-Fe2O3 photoanodes for solar water splitting...

Monica Barroso; Camilo A. Mesa; Stephanie R. Pendlebury; Alexander J. Cowan; Takashi Hisatomi; Kevin Sivula; Michael Grtzel; David R. Klug; James R. Durrant

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Water Balance in the Amazon Basin from a Land Surface Model Ensemble  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in land surface modeling and remote sensing, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. This study aims to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface ...

Augusto C. V. Getirana; Emanuel Dutra; Matthieu Guimberteau; Jonghun Kam; Hong-Yi Li; Bertrand Decharme; Zhengqiu Zhang; Agnes Ducharne; Aaron Boone; Gianpaolo Balsamo; Matthew Rodell; Ally M. Toure; Yongkang Xue; Christa D. Peters-Lidard; Sujay V. Kumar; Kristi Arsenault; Guillaume Drapeau; L. Ruby Leung; Josyane Ronchail; Justin Sheffield

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Evaluation of Background Mercury Concentrations in the SRS Groundwater System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury analyses associated with the A-01 Outfall have highlighted the importance of developing an understanding of mercury in the Savannah River Site groundwater system and associated surface water streams. This activity is critical based upon the fact that the EPA Ambient Water Quality Criteria (AWQC) for this constituent is 0.012mg/L, a level that is well below conventional detection limits of 0.1 to 0.2 mg/L. A first step in this process is obtained by utilizing the existing investment in groundwater mercury concentrations (20,242 records) maintained in the SRS geographical information management system (GIMS) database. Careful use of these data provides a technically defensible initial estimate for total recoverable mercury in background and contaminated SRS wells.

Looney, B.B.

1999-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

257

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Research Institute of the University of North Carolina Annual Technical Report FY 2000 Introduction SUMMARY The North Carolina Water Resources Research Institute program for 2000-2001 (Federal Fiscal Year 2000) continued to focus on three broad areas of concern: surface waters, groundwater

258

Bikini Atoll groundwater development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work.

Peterson, F.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

260

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water adsorption on stepped ZnO surfaces from MD simulation David Raymand a , Adri C.T. van Duin b Keywords: Zinc oxide Water Solid­gas interfaces Construction and use of effective interatomic interactions force-field for use in molecular dynamics simulations of the ZnO­ water system. The force

Goddard III, William A.

262

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

263

Water Quality Surface and Ground | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ground Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaterQualitySurfaceandGround&oldid612197" Category: NEPA Resources...

264

Surface Wettability Impact on Water Management in PEM Fuel Cell.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Excessive water formation inside the polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells structures leads to the flooding of the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) and cathode (more)

Al Shakhshir, Saher

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural radioactivity in groundwater and estimates of committed effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......effective dose due to water ingestion in the state of Chihuahua (Mexico) L. Villalba 1 M. E. Montero-Cabrera...C. Miguel de Cervantes 120, Complejo Industrial Chihuahua, Chihuahua, C.P. 31109, Chih., Mexico 2 Departamento......

L. Villalba; M. E. Montero-Cabrera; G. Manjn-Collado; L. Colmenero-Sujo; M. Rentera-Villalobos; A. Cano-Jimnez; A. Rodrguez-Pineda; I. Dvila-Rangel; L. Quirino-Torres; E. F. Herrera-Peraza

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

267

Results of groundwater monitoring at Everest, Kansas, in April 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 7, 2005, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented a Scoping Memo (Argonne 2005) for preliminary consideration by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), suggesting possible remedial options for the carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater at Everest, Kansas. The suggested approaches were discussed by representatives of the KDHE, the CCC/USDA, and Argonne at the KDHE office in Topeka on September 8-9, 2005, along with other technical and logistic issues related to the Everest site. In response to these discussions, the KDHE recommended (KDHE 2005) evaluation of several remedial processes, either alone or in combination, as part of a Corrective Action Study (CAS) for Everest. The primary remedial processes suggested by the KDHE were the following: Hydraulic control by groundwater extraction with aboveground treatment; Air sparging (AS) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) in large-diameter boreholes (LDBs); and Phytoremediation. As a further outcome of the 2005 meeting and as a precursor to development of a possible CAS, the CCC/USDA completed the following supplemental investigations at Everest to address several specific technical concerns discussed with the KDHE: (1) Construction of interpretive cross sections at strategic locations selected by the KDHE along the main plume migration pathway, to depict the hydrogeologic characteristics affecting groundwater flow and contaminant movement (Argonne 2006a). (2) A field investigation in early 2006 (Argonne 2006b), as follows: (a) Installation and testing of a production well and associated observation points, at locations approved by the KDHE, to determine the response of the Everest aquifer to groundwater extraction near the Nigh property. (b) Groundwater sampling for the analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the installation of additional permanent monitoring points at locations selected by the KDHE, to further constrain the existing contaminant plume. (c) Resampling of all existing permanent monitoring points for VOCs and biodegradation parameter analyses, at the request of the KDHE. On the basis of these studies (Argonne 2006a,b) and the CCC/USDA's past investigations at Everest (Argonne 2006c), the CCC/USDA concluded that groundwater extraction is not an effective remedial option for the main body of the groundwater plume, and the KDHE concurred (KDHE 2006); the KDHE later noted, however (KDHE 2007a), that this and other technologies might represent viable remedial options in the event of further downgradient migration of the plume toward the intermittent creek. In February 2007, the CCC/USDA presented preliminary analyses of (1) the AS-SVE remedial alternative, incorporating the use of LDBs, and (2) the risks to human health and the environment posed by the observed carbon tetrachloride plume in groundwater (Argonne 2007a). The results of these analyses demonstrated the following: (1) Neither groundwater extraction nor AS-SVE in LDBs represents a practical approach for effective remediation of the groundwater contamination at Everest (near the Nigh property). (2) Periodic sampling and analyses for VOCs conducted by the CCC/USDA documented that the areal extent and range of carbon tetrachloride concentrations detected in the groundwater plume at Everest had changed relatively little from 2000 to 2006. (3) Estimates of groundwater flow and contaminant migration times, based on the hydrogeologic properties of the groundwater flow system identified at Everest (Argonne 2003, 2006b,c), indicated that, at minimum, approximately 4 years would be required for the carbon tetrachloride plume (in the subsurface) to reach the vicinity of the intermittent creek directly west of the Nigh property, and more than 20 years would be required for the contamination to reach the identified groundwater discharge area southwest of the Nigh property. (4) The existing (January-March 2006) plume posed no immediate danger of contamination to the surface waters of the intermittent creek. In lig

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

GRR/Section 19-HI-a - Surface Water Use Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 19-HI-a - Surface Water Use Permit GRR/Section 19-HI-a - Surface Water Use Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-HI-a - Surface Water Use Permit 19HIASurfaceWaterUsePermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Regulations & Policies Hawaii Revised Statutes 174C Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 13, Chapter 171 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19HIASurfaceWaterUsePermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative Under Hawaii Revised Statutes 174C and Hawaii Administrative Rules Title

269

Method of and device for detecting oil pollutions on water surfaces  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Detection of oil pollution on water surfaces includes providing echo signals obtained from optical radiation of a clean water area at two wavelengths, optically radiating an investigated water area at two wavelengths and obtaining echo signals from the optical radiation of the investigated water area at the two wavelengths, comparing the echo signals obtained from the radiation of the investigated area at two wavelengths with the echo signals obtained from the radiation of the clean water area, and based on the comparison, determining presence or absence of oil pollution in the investigated water area.

Belov, Michael Leonidovich (Moscow, RU); Gorodnichev, Victor Aleksandrovich (Moscow, RU); Kozintsev, Valentin Ivanovich (Moscow, RU); Smimova, Olga Alekseevna (Moscow, RU); Fedotov, Yurii Victorovich (Moscow, RU); Khroustaleva, Anastasiva Michailovnan (Moscow, RU)

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

270

Characterization of organic-rich colloids from surface and ground waters at the actinide-contaminated Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Colloids, i.e. nanoparticles and macromolecules, play an important role in the environmental dispersion of actinides. Thus, colloids (3kDa0.5?m) were collected and purified from three different environments, i.e. surface water, pond water and near-surface ground water at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado, where elevated actinide concentrations had previously been documented. Their chemical composition was determined in order to better understand their role in actinide migration. All three types of colloid samples were found to be similar in chemical composition, with a higher percentage of organic carbon, OC (518%), than any other measured component, and only small amounts of Si, Mn, Al, and Fe (1.5% or below). Analytically determined components account for 4056% of the colloidal matter, with water likely making up the difference. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of colloidal material from all three sample types indicate the presence of cellulose or chitin, likely from plant (terrestrial and/or aquatic) material. Other major components include humic acid type particles, with only small amounts (<5%) of mineral particles. Our findings of colloids high in organic and low in inorganic matter content agree with previously reported results on Pu(IV) associated with an acidic natural macromolecular organic compound that also contains small amounts of Fe. Pu/OC and Fe/OC ratios both showed a steady decrease from surface water to pond water to groundwater, with a more marked decrease in the Fe/OC ratio, but no significant change in overall colloidal organic carbon (COC) concentrations.

Kimberly A. Roberts; Peter H. Santschi; Gary G. Leppard; M.Marcia West

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Validation Analysis of the Shoal Groundwater Flow and Transport Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Environmental restoration at the Shoal underground nuclear test is following a process prescribed by a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Characterization of the site included two stages of well drilling and testing in 1996 and 1999, and development and revision of numerical models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport. Agreement on a contaminant boundary for the site and a corrective action plan was reached in 2006. Later that same year, three wells were installed for the purposes of model validation and site monitoring. The FFACO prescribes a five-year proof-of-concept period for demonstrating that the site groundwater model is capable of producing meaningful results with an acceptable level of uncertainty. The corrective action plan specifies a rigorous seven step validation process. The accepted groundwater model is evaluated using that process in light of the newly acquired data. The conceptual model of ground water flow for the Project Shoal Area considers groundwater flow through the fractured granite aquifer comprising the Sand Springs Range. Water enters the system by the infiltration of precipitation directly on the surface of the mountain range. Groundwater leaves the granite aquifer by flowing into alluvial deposits in the adjacent basins of Fourmile Flat and Fairview Valley. A groundwater divide is interpreted as coinciding with the western portion of the Sand Springs Range, west of the underground nuclear test, preventing flow from the test into Fourmile Flat. A very low conductivity shear zone east of the nuclear test roughly parallels the divide. The presence of these lateral boundaries, coupled with a regional discharge area to the northeast, is interpreted in the model as causing groundwater from the site to flow in a northeastward direction into Fairview Valley. Steady-state flow conditions are assumed given the absence of groundwater withdrawal activities in the area. The conceptual and numerical models were developed based upon regional hydrogeologic investigations conducted in the 1960s, site characterization investigations (including ten wells and various geophysical and geologic studies) at Shoal itself prior to and immediately after the test, and two site characterization campaigns in the 1990s for environmental restoration purposes (including eight wells and a year-long tracer test). The new wells are denoted MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3, and are located to the northnortheast of the nuclear test. The groundwater model was generally lacking data in the north-northeastern area; only HC-1 and the abandoned PM-2 wells existed in this area. The wells provide data on fracture orientation and frequency, water levels, hydraulic conductivity, and water chemistry for comparison with the groundwater model. A total of 12 real-number validation targets were available for the validation analysis, including five values of hydraulic head, three hydraulic conductivity measurements, three hydraulic gradient values, and one angle value for the lateral gradient in radians. In addition, the fracture dip and orientation data provide comparisons to the distributions used in the model and radiochemistry is available for comparison to model output. Goodness-of-fit analysis indicates that some of the model realizations correspond well with the newly acquired conductivity, head, and gradient data, while others do not. Other tests indicated that additional model realizations may be needed to test if the model input distributions need refinement to improve model performance. This approach (generating additional realizations) was not followed because it was realized that there was a temporal component to the data disconnect: the new head measurements are on the high side of the model distributions, but the heads at the original calibration locations themselves have also increased over time. This indicates that the steady-state assumption of the groundwater model is in error. To test the robustness of the model d

A. Hassan; J. Chapman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007; published 31 July 2007. [1] A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global., 2000; Keppler et al., 2000]. More relevant to this study area are reports in which bromide appears

273

Estimates of Tracer-Based Piston-Flow Ages of Groundwater From Selected Sites: National Water-Quality Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Quality Assessment Program, 1992­2005 By Stephen R. Hinkle, Stephanie D. Shapiro, L. Niel Plummer, Eurybiades Busenberg, Peggy K. Widman, Gerolamo C. Casile, and Julian E. Wayland National Water-Quality Assessment materials contained within this report. Suggested citation: Hinkle, S.R., Shapiro, S.D., Plummer, L

274

TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF THE INTERACTION OF GROUNDWATER WITH THE COLUMBIA RIVER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY HANFORD SITE 100-D AREA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater beneath much of Hanford's 100 Areas is contaminated with hexavalent chromium (Cr{sup +6}) as a consequence of treating reactor cooling water to prevent corrosion. Several treatment systems are in place to remove Cr{sup +6} from the groundwater; however, these systems currently do not reduce Cr{sup +6} to concentrations below aquatic standards. Of concern is the transport of Cr{sup +6} to areas within the channel of the river, as sensitive species inhabit the river and its associated transition zone. The aquatic standard for Cr{sup +6} is currently 11 ug/l under the Record of Decision (ROD) for Interim Action and Department of Energy (DOE) currently plans to pursue remediation of the groundwater to achieve the 11 ug/l standard. Because the compliance wells used to monitor the current remediation systems are located some distance from the river, they may not provide an accurate indication of Cr{sup +6} concentrations in the water that reaches the riverbed. In addition, because salmon spawning areas are considered a high priority for protection from Hanford contaminants, it would be advantageous to understand (1) to what extent Cr{sup +6} discharged to the near-shore or river ecosystems is diluted or attenuated and (2) mechanisms that could mitigate the exposure of the river ecosystems to the discharging Cr{sup +6}. The current concentration target for Cr{sup +6} at near-river groundwater monitoring locations is 20 {micro}g/L; it is assumed that this groundwater mixes with river water that contains virtually no chromium to meet Washington Department of Ecology's (Ecology) water quality standard of 10 {micro}g/L in the river environment. This dynamic mixing process is believed to be driven by daily and seasonal changes in river stage and groundwater remediation system operations, and has been validated using analytical data from numerous groundwater samples obtained adjacent to and within the banks of the river. Although the mean mixing factor of river water and site groundwater in this zone has been estimated to be equal parts of groundwater and river water, a wide range of mixing ratios likely occurs at various times of the day and year. The degree of mixing and dilution appears to be greatly influenced by the river stage and other groundwater/surface water interaction. The extent of mixing, thus, has implications for the design and operation of the groundwater remediation systems. Improved understanding of this 'dilution' mechanism is needed to design an optimum 'systems approach' to accelerate remediation of the near-shore contaminant plumes. More information on the pathway from near-river mapped plumes to riverbed receptor locations is also needed to develop a defensible proposed plan for a future ROD for final remedial action of contaminated groundwater. In April 2008, an expert panel of scientists was convened to review existing information and provide observations and suggestions to improve the current understanding of groundwater surface water interactions in the 100 Areas (primarily focusing on 100-D Area), and to identify what additional analyses or approaches may provide critical information needed to design and implement remediation systems that will minimize impacts to river aquatic systems. Specific objectives provided to the panel included: (1) comment on approaches and methods to improve the current understanding of groundwater-surface water interactions, specifically how contaminated groundwater enters the riverbed and how this relates to remediation of chromate in the groundwater in the 100 Areas; (2) evaluate past and current data collection methods, data analysis techniques, assumptions, and groundwater transport and mixing mechanisms; (3) evaluate the current monitoring network (monitoring wells, aquifer tubes, and shoreline/river monitoring); (4) evaluate the role played by modeling; and (5) suggest additional research to fill data gaps and perform modeling.

PETERSEN SW

2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - artifical groundwater recharge Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models. The conclusions summarize... : groundwater recharge and baseflow (or ground- water ... Source: Ecole Polytechnique, Centre de mathmatiques Collection: Mathematics 4...

276

South Carolina Surface Water Withdrawal, Permitting Use, and Reporting Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Surface water withdrawals exceeding three million gallons during any one month require a permit; a permit will only be granted if the Department of Health and Environmental Control determines that...

277

Acid precipitation and surface-water vulnerability on the western slope of the high colorado rockies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precipitation and surface waters in a high-elevation watershed on the western slope of the Colorado Rockies were studied over a three-year...?1 in the former and 100 to 900 ?eq L?1 in the latter.

John Harts; Greg P. Lockett; Richard A. Schneider

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Parameter estimation of coupled water and energy balance models based on stationary constraints of surface states  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] We use a conditional averaging approach to estimate the parameters of a land surface water and energy balance model and then use the estimated parameters to partition net radiation into latent, sensible, and ground ...

Sun, Jian

279

Surface Water and Energy Budgets for the Mississippi River Basin in Three NCEP Reanalyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface water and energy budgets from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-Department of Energy (NCEP-DOE) Global Reanalysis II (GR2), the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) and the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR)...

Rongqian Yang; Michael Ek; Jesse Meng

280

Trace metal cycling in the surface water of the South China Sea ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: We deployed floating traps in the surface waters of the South China Sea on four occasions at depths of 30 m, 100 m, and 160 m from 2006 to 2007...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Light hydrocarbons in the surface water of the mid-Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During a cruise of RV Polarstern over the Atlantic in September/October 1988, C2?C4 hydrocarbons were measured in surface sea water. The ship passed through three different ocean ... at 8 N and 3 S. Hydrocarbon

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Surface-Configuration Change of CF4 Plasma Treated Cellulose and Cellulose Acetate by Interaction of Water with Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Surface-configuration change due to the change of contacting medium from (dry) air to liquid water and also from (dry) air to a high relative humidity air was investigated for cellulose and cellulose acetate. CF4 plasma treatment was used to tag the ...

Takeshi Yasuda; Tsumuko Okuno; Kaori Tsuji; Hirotsugu Yasuda

1996-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nitrogen and chlorpyrifos in surface water runoff from a golf course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITROGEN AND CHLORPYRIFOS IN SURFACE WATER RUNOFF FROM A GOLF COURSE A Thesis by BRIAN BIRDWELL Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1995 Major Subject: Civil Engineering NITROGEN AND CHLORPYRIFOS IN SURFACE WATER RUNOFF FROM A GOLF COURSE A Thesis by BRIAN BIRDWELL Submitted to Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Birdwell, Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

284

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development , (2011) Plan to Study the Potential...Dissolved Solids Standard: A Guide to the...gas and solution mining regulatory program...legacy of coal mining in many Pennsylvania...description, using standard codes for brine...remediation options: A review. Sci Total...water quality standard for chloride in...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Water and Surface Energy Balance Modeling in Botswana  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From January-March 1989 an intensive field campaign was held in the eastern savanna of Botswana, Africa, to collect ground data to parameterize models which can be used to determine the physical status and water-balance terms of the earth's ...

A. A. Van de Griend; M. Owe; H. F. Vugts; S. D. Prince

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Study on Energy Efficiency Evaluation Method of Cooling Water System of Surface Water Source Heat Pump  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water source heat pump system is a green air-conditioning system which has high efficiency, energy saving, and environmental protection, but inappropriate design of the system type of water intake will impact on ...

Jibo Long; Siyi Huang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A new device for collecting time-integrated water samples from springs and surface water bodies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within...significant changes to the chemical composition of the samples. The water sample within...conjunction with discharge measurements. agrochemicals field studies geochemistry hydrochemistry...

S. V. Panno; I. G. Krapac; D. A. Keefer

288

Electrical Properties of Mineral Surfaces for Increasing Water Sorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the presence of O2.2,4,5 In addition to controlling Mn concentrations, the nanostructures sequester heavy-metal and the associated toxic metals can be remobilized. N the electrical properties of mineral surfaces and thereby affect reactions with charged species such as metal

289

Arizona has relatively limited water resources due to its arid climate and limited surface water.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for approximately 20% of non-agricultural water consumption in the United States. The numbers for AZ are slightly lower, with total industrial uses of water making up around 17% of non agricultural water consumption in attempting to characterize technologies is life cycle assessment (LCA). It can be used to attempt

Fay, Noah

290

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Worldwide Occurrences of Arsenic in Ground Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...decision-making process of water managers, remediation specialists, and...The geologic and ground-water conditions that promote...water managers, remediation specialists, and...The geologic and ground-water conditions that promote...

D. Kirk Nordstrom

2002-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

292

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters of the world's oceans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity and temperature in surface waters, R. A. Feely, and R. M. Key (2006), Global relationships of total alkalinity with salinity 35)2 + d (SST ? 20) + e (SST ? 20)2 fits surface total alkalinity (AT) data for each of five

293

Keywordscondensation tube, surface modification, waste heat and condensation water recovery system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

merge to form water thin film on tube condenser surface. The condensing mechanism will change from high efficiency dropwise condensation to low efficiency filmwise condensation. In this proposal, surface system is one of the most important facilities in power plants. High efficiency waste heat

Leu, Tzong-Shyng "Jeremy"

294

Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 25 Detecting Perched Water Bodies Using Surface-seismic Time-lapse Traveltime Tomography remediation. Previous near-surface geophysical time-lapse studies have focused on electrical or electromagnetic (EM) techniques (including ground-penetrating radar) or borehole methods. To evaluate the utility

Hubbard, Susan

295

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry­1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse

Amelung, Falk

296

Groundwater maps of the Hanford Site, December 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an update to the series of reports that document the configuration of the uppermost unconfined aquifer beneath the Hanford Site. This series presents the latest results of the semiannual water level measurement program and the water table maps generated from these measurements. The reports document the changes in the groundwater level at the Hanford Site during the transition from nuclear material production to environmental restoration and remediation. In addition, these reports provide water level data to support the various site characterization and groundwater monitoring programs currently in progress on the Hanford Site. The three major operations areas (the 100, 200 and 300/1100 Areas) where wastes were discharged to the soil are covered in this update. The water level measurements from the wells in these areas are portrayed on a set of maps to illustrate the hydrologic conditions and are also tabulated in an appendix. A summary discussion of the data is included with the well index map, the depth to water map, and the contoured map of the water table surface for each of the three areas.

Kasza, G.L.; Hartman, M.J.; Jordan, W.A.; Borghese, J.V.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Africa, groundwater is the major source of drinking water and its use for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially to combat growing food insecurity. Despite this, there is little quantitative information on groundwater resources in Africa, and groundwater storage is consequently omitted from assessments of freshwater availability. Here we present the first quantitative continent-wide maps of aquifer storage and potential borehole yields in Africa based on an extensive review of available maps, publications and data. We estimate total groundwater storage in Africa to be 0.66million km3 (0.361.75millionkm3). Not all of this groundwater storage is available for abstraction, but the estimated volume is more than 100 times estimates of annual renewable freshwater resources on Africa. Groundwater resources are unevenly distributed: the largest groundwater volumes are found in the large sedimentary aquifers in the North African countries Libya, Algeria, Egypt and Sudan. Nevertheless, for many African countries appropriately sited and constructed boreholes can support handpump abstraction (yields of 0.10.3ls?1), and contain sufficient storage to sustain abstraction through inter-annual variations in recharge. The maps show further that the potential for higher yielding boreholes (>5ls?1) is much more limited. Therefore, strategies for increasing irrigation or supplying water to rapidly urbanizing cities that are predicated on the widespread drilling of high yielding boreholes are likely to be unsuccessful. As groundwater is the largest and most widely distributed store of freshwater in Africa, the quantitative maps are intended to lead to more realistic assessments of water security and water stress, and to promote a more quantitative approach to mapping of groundwater resources at national and regional level.

A M MacDonald; H C Bonsor; B Dochartaigh; R G Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Modeling shallow?water propagation with an appropriate sea?surface roughness spectrum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predictions for shallow?water acoustic propagation are usually accomplished assuming a deep?water spectrum for the sea surface roughness. In addition the effect of surface roughness is normally included through a loss mechanism. However for waveguide propagation the surface roughness mainly causes a redistribution of energy and therefore the use of an accurate model to handle roughness is essential to obtaining accurate results. In order to properly model shallow?water surface roughness the parametric spectrum GONO [Sanders and Bruinsma Wave Dynamics and Radio Probing of the Ocean Surface edited by O. M. Phillips and K. Hassemann (Plenum New York 1986) pp. 615637] has been implemented. This spectrum is appropriate for wind?driven surfaces in waters ranging in depth from 15 to 100 m. To investigate the impact that different spectra has on the propagating field predictions using GONO and PiersonMoskowitz spectra are compared for different environments and at frequencies typical of active and passive sonars. An acoustic propagationmodel which includes a conformal mapping algorithm to properly handle sea surface roughness [Norton et al. J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 97 21732180 (1995)] is used to generate the numerical results. [Work supported by ONR.

Guy V. Norton; Jorge C. Novarini

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

air_water.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

12/2011 12/2011 Air Monitoring Groundwater Monitoring Surface Water Monitoring A continuously operating air monitoring network was in place from 1986 through 2000 for the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to measure levels of gamma radiation, radioactive dust particles, radon gas, and asbestos. With remediation of contaminated materials essentially complete and measurements indistinguishable from background, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) ceased perimeter and offsite air monitoring as of December 31, 2000. Groundwater has been routinely monitored at the site since 1986. Separate groundwater monitoring programs were established for the Chemical Plant and Quarry sites because of geographic separation and differences in the hydrogeologic features that influence

300

A Users Guide to the Comprehensive Water Quality Database for Groundwater in the Vicinity of the Nevada Test Site, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This water quality database (viz.GeochemXX.mdb) has been developed as part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program with the cooperation of several agencies actively participating in ongoing evaluation and characterization activities under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The database has been constructed to provide up-to-date, comprehensive, and quality controlled data in a uniform format for the support of current and future projects. This database provides a valuable tool for geochemical and hydrogeologic evaluations of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and surrounding region. Chemistry data have been compiled for groundwater within the NTS and the surrounding region. These data include major ions, organic compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, various field parameters, and environmental isotopes. Colloid data are also included in the database. The GeochemXX.mdb database is distributed on an annual basis. The extension ''XX'' within the database title is replaced by the last two digits of the release year (e.g., Geochem06 for the version released during the 2006 fiscal year). The database is distributed via compact disc (CD) and is also uploaded to the Common Data Repository (CDR) in order to make it available to all agencies with DOE intranet access. This report provides an explanation of the database configuration and summarizes the general content and utility of the individual data tables. In addition to describing the data, subsequent sections of this report provide the data user with an explanation of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) protocols for this database.

Farnham, Irene

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

302

Water Vapor Adsorption Effect on Silica Surface Electrostatic Patterning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even after a few centuries of research by distinguished authors, electrostatic charging of insulators is still poorly known, and it often goes out of control because the identity of charge carriers is not known, in nearly every case in the laboratory or in a practical situation. ... (16-22) Three different mechanisms for contact electrification were recently emphasized by McCarty and Whitesides: electron transfer for contact between metals or semiconductors, ion transfer for contact involving materials that contain mobile ions, and asymmetric partitioning of hydroxide ions between adsorbed layers of water for contact involving nonionic and insulating materials. ... (15, 48, 49) The apparatus was built using two aluminum concentric cylinders (electrically insulated from each other by using polyethylene foam) connected by a coaxial cable to a Keithley instrument model 610C electrometer that was used in the charge measurement mode. ...

Rubia F. Gouveia; Carlos A. R. Costa; Fernando Galembeck

2008-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

303

Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water Induced Surface Reconstruction of the Oxygen (2x1) covered Ru(0001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and density functional theory (DFT) were used to study the adsorption of water on a Ru(0001) surface covered with half monolayer of oxygen. The oxygen atoms occupy hcp sites in an ordered structure with (2x1) periodicity. DFT predicts that water is weakly bound to the unmodified surface, 86 meV compared to the ~;;200 meV water-water H-bond. Instead, we found that water adsorption causes a shift of half of the oxygen atoms from hcp sites to fcc sites, creating a honeycomb structure where water molecules bind strongly to the exposed Ru atoms. The energy cost of reconstructing the oxygen overlayer, around 230 meV per displaced oxygen atom, is more than compensated by the larger adsorption energy of water on the newly exposed Ru atoms. Water forms hydrogen bonds with the fcc O atoms in a (4x2) superstructure due to alternating orientations of the molecules. Heating to 185 K results in the complete desorption of the water layer, leaving behind the oxygen honeycomb structure, which is metastable relative to the original (2x1). This stable structure is not recovered until after heating to temperatures close to 260K.

Maier, Sabine; Cabrera-Sanfelix, Pepa; Stass, Ingeborg; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Arnau, Andres; Salmeron, Miquel

2010-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

306

Groundwater Protection 7 2007 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by cleaning up contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater monitoring wells during 2,289 individual sampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 198 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.2 billion gallons of treated water

307

Groundwater Protection 7 2006 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater protection issues and restoration efforts are working. Ground- water monitoring is focused on two general ar during 2,337 individual sampling events. Eleven groundwater remediation systems removed 372 pounds

308

Groundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) communicating with stakeholders on ground- water protection issues. BNL is committed to protecting groundwater remediation systems removed 652 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.5 billion gallons of treated water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. Since the beginning of active groundwater

309

Groundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater protection issues during 2,567 individual sampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 472 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.7 billion gallons of treated water to the Upper

310

A first principles potential energy surface for liquid water from VRT spectroscopy of water clusters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the many-body induction energy (Leforestier et al. 2005). This new potential was named VRT...ordinary water: substance. New York: Hafner. Dyke, T. R...mechanics and path integrals New York: McGraw- Hill. Frenkel...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From 1951 to 1992, the Unites States government conducted 828 underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site. About one-third of these tests occurred near, below or within the water table - the very top portion of the groundwater layer where rock and soil are completely saturated with water. As a result, some groundwater was contaminated. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began exploring the effects of groundwater contamination in the 1970s. Though contamination from underground testing has never been detected on public land, the DOE was committed to developing an advanced, reliable monitoring network that ensures the long-term protection of the public. An intensive groundwater investigation program was launched in 1989.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to

313

Hydrogeologic properties and ground-water chemistry of the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80 (DB-14) Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Offsite migration studies were conducted to characterize the hydraulic properties and groundwater chemistry of confined aquifer systems within the Hanford Site. These studies support the recommendations in ERDA-1538 to provide input for hydrologic modeling of groundwater flow within the Hanford Site, to afford information concerning possible contamination of underlying confined aquifer systems and to make the results available to the public. This report presents analytical results and aquifer test procedures used in characterizing the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed at well 699-25-80. The overall close association in groundwater chemistries and presence of elevated nitrate levels suggest that the Rattlesnake Ridge interbed may be locally in communication with the overlying unconfined aquifer system. Other physical evidence which indicates a potential local communication with the unconfined aquifer system includes: favorable stratigraphic position; absence of the confining Elephant Mountain basalt in surrounding areas; and intersection of a recharge boundary during aquifer tests of well 699-25-80.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Howland, M.D.; Strait, S.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

"Nanoengineered Surfaces for Efficiency Enhancements in Energy and Water",  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

October 24, 2012, 4:15pm October 24, 2012, 4:15pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium "Nanoengineered Surfaces for Efficiency Enhancements in Energy and Water", Professor Kripa Varansi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Thermal-fluid-surface interactions are ubiquitous in multiple industries including Energy, Water, Agriculture, Transportation, Electronics Cooling, Buildings, etc. Over the years, these systems have been designed for increasingly higher efficiency using incremental engineering approaches that utilize system-level design trade-offs. These system-level approaches are, however, bound by the fundamental constraint of the nature of the thermal-fluid-surface interactions, where the largest inefficiencies occur. In this talk, we show how surface/interface morphology and chemistry can be

315

The Hanford Story: Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

316

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Water resources and the urban environment--98  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains all the papers presented at the meeting. There are 25 sessions and one poster session in the document. The Sessions are: (1) Landfill gas/groundwater interactions; (2) Urban solids management; (3) Local issues; (4) Surface water quality studies 1; (5) Reductive treatment of hazardous wastes with zero-valent iron; (6) Water reuse 1; (7) Biosolids management; (8) GIS information systems 1; (9) Drinking water distribution; (10) Anaerobic treatment; (11) Water reuse 2; (12) Municipal wastewater treatment technology; (13) GIS information systems 2; (14) Drinking water treatment 1; (15) Risk-based site remediation; (16) Small urban watersheds; (17) Disinfection; (18) Air pollution control and risk assessment; (19) Drinking water treatment 2; (20) Biological wastewater treatment; (21) Wastewater treatment; (22) Decentralized small-scale alternative wastewater management systems; (23) General environmental issues; (24) Drinking water treatment 3; and (25) Groundwater remediation. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

Wilson, T.E. [ed.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Lakes, groundwater and palaeohydrology in the Sahel of NE Nigeria: evidence from hydrogeochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...contains significant renewable groundwater resources...improved management of the renewable waters in the shallow...International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna. Technical...Cooling of tropical Brazil (5C) during the last...contains significant renewable groundwater resources...

W. M. EDMUNDS; E. FELLMAN; I. B. GONI

319

Using Stable Water Isotopes to Evaluate Basin-Scale Simulations of Surface Water Budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two rare but naturally occurring isotopes of water, 1H218O and 1H2H16O, are becoming of practical use in diagnosis of climate and earth system model performance. Their value as tracers and validation tools in hydrological subsystems derives from ...

A. Henderson-Sellers; K. McGuffie; D. Noone; P. Irannejad

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area experienced hot winds and extreme fire hazards. ForestPDO downwelling-favorable winds. Extremes were consistentlyextremes. The Southern An- nular Mode (SAM), which affects the westerly wind

Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Groundwater Protection Group (GPG), Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EPD Home EPD Home Site Details GPG Home Groundwater Projects Surface Projects Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Administrative Record Contacts Reports Other Information Reactor Projects (HFBR & BGRR) Groundwater Protection Group The Groundwater Protection Group (formerly know as the Long Term Response Action (LTRA) Group) was formed in 2004 as part of the Environmental Protection Division. The GPG Group is responsible for the long-term surveillance, monitoring, maintenance, operating, reporting, and community involvement activities required to complete the CERCLA environmental cleanup activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Ongoing Projects: g-2 Record of Decision Groundwater Projects Surface Projects Land Use and Institutional Control Five Year Review

322

Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 [mu]m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride [open quote]accidental[close quotes] crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO[sub 4], Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46[degrees]C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3[degrees]C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

Benison, K.C. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Surface water paleotemperatures and chemical compositions from fluid inclusions in Permian Nippewalla Group halite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quantitative climatic data for the Permian have been determined from Nippewalla Group halite. The middle Permian Nippewalla Group of Kansas and Oklahoma consists of several hundred feet of bedded halite, anhydrite, and red beds. Study of core and surface samples suggest that this halite was deposited by ephemeral lakes. Fluid inclusions provide evidence for the geochemistry of these Permian saline lake waters, including temperatures, salinities, and chemical compositions. Primary fluid inclusions are well-preserved in the Nippewalla halite. They are 5 - 30 {mu}m cubic inclusions situated along chevron and cornet growth bands. Most are one phase aqueous inclusions, but some also contain anhydride {open_quote}accidental{close_quotes} crystals. Rare two phase liquid-vapor inclusions may have formed by subaqueous outgassing or trapping of air at the water surface. Fluid inclusion freezing-melting behavior and leachate analyses suggest that Nippewalla halite precipitated from Na-Cl-rich waters with lesser quantities of SO{sub 4}, Mg, K, Al, and Si. This composition may be a product of long-term weathering. Surface water paleotemperatures were determined from one phase aqueous fluid inclusions. Homogenization temperatures range from 32 to 46{degrees}C in primary fluid inclusions and are consistent (within 3{degrees}C) along individual chevrons and cornets. These homogenization temperatures are interpreted to represent maximum surface water temperatures. These fluid inclusion data are significant in addressing global change problems. Temperatures and chemistries in these Permian lake waters agree with some modern shallow saline lake waters and with Permian climate models. This study suggests that this Permian environment was relatively similar to its modern counterparts.

Benison, K.C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Seasonally Resolved Surface Water (delta)14C Variability in the Lombok Strait: A Coralline Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have explored surface water mixing in the Lombok Strait through a {approx}bimonthly resolved surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C time-series reconstructed from a coral in the Lombok Strait that spans 1937 through 1990. The prebomb surface water {Delta}{sup 14}C average is -60.5{per_thousand} and individual samples range from -72{per_thousand} to 134{per_thousand}. The annual average post-bomb maximum occurs in 1973 and is 122{per_thousand}. The timing of the post-bomb maximum is consistent with a primary subtropical source for the surface waters in the Indonesian Seas. During the post-bomb period the coral records regular seasonal cycles of 5-20{per_thousand}. Seasonal high {Delta}{sup 14}C occur during March-May (warm, low salinity), and low {Delta}{sup 14}C occur in September (cool, higher salinity). The {Delta}{sup 14}C seasonality is coherent and in phase with the seasonal {Delta}{sup 14}C cycle observed in Makassar Strait. We estimate the influence of high {Delta}{sup 14}C Makassar Strait (North Pacific) water flowing through the Lombok Strait using a two endmember mixing model and the seasonal extremes observed at the two sites. The percentage of Makassar Strait water varies between 16 and 70%, and between 1955 and 1990 it averages 40%. During La Nina events there is a higher percentage of Makassar Strait (high {Delta}{sup 14}C) water in the Lombok Strait.

Guilderson, T P; Fallon, S J; Moore, M D; Schrag, D P; Charles, C D

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Deterministic Smart Market Model for Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient management of water requires balancing environmental needs, externality considerations, and economic efficiency. Toward that end, this paper presents a deterministic linear program that could be used to operate a smart spot market for groundwater. ... Keywords: bidding/auctions, environment, games/group decisions, natural resources, water resources

John F. Raffensperger; Mark W. Milke; E. Grant Read

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Discussions on Disposal Forms of Auxiliary Heat Source in Surface Water Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents two common forms of auxiliary heat source in surface water heat pump system and puts forward the idea that the disposal forms affect operation cost. It deduces operation cost per hour of the two forms. With a project...

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.; Li, G.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Endocrine Active Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Wastewater- Treatment Plant Effluent, and Bed Sediment, and Biological Characteristics in Selected Streams Chemicals, Pharmaceuticals, and Other Chemicals of Concern in Surface Water, Wastewater- Treatment Plant, and Data, 2009 #12;Front cover. Industrial wastewater-treatment plant outflow in Worthington, Minnesota

329

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

330

Cost and environmental impact of nanofiltration in treating chemically pre-treated surface water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanofiltration is an effective technique in improving the organic matter removal from coagulated surface water, but the process should also be economically feasible and environmentally sustainable when applied. Cost and environmental impact of nanofiltration installed after conventional surface water treatment were calculated and evaluated at different operating parameters in this study. The installation of nanofiltration after conventional surface water treatment would increase the cost of treated water in a minimum by 0.11 /m3 in the studied case. The least cost was gained at the higher studied recovery (83%) at the driving pressure of 6 bar, where also the total environmental impact was well balanced. However, the installation of nanofiltration would increase the environmental impact of water treatment remarkably and improvements should be done to minimise these effects. The main ways to minimise the cost of nanofiltration were related to recovery of the process, energy consumption, membrane lifetime and membrane cleaning, whereas the environmental impact minimisation was mostly related to recovery of the process and energy consumption.

Riina Liikanen; Jukka Yli-Kuivila; Jyrki Tenhunen; Risto Laukkanen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications. Accurate quantification of the IWP is essential for characterizing the hydrological and radiation budget. For example, the reflection of shortwave radiation by ice clouds reduces the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. Ice clouds can also trap the longwave radiation

332

Mobility of D atoms on porous amorphous water ice surfaces under interstellar conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims. The mobility of H atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains at low temperature is still a matter of debate. In dense clouds, the hydrogenation of adsorbed species (i.e., CO), as well as the subsequent deuteration of the accreted molecules depend on the mobility of H atoms on water ice. Astrochemical models widely assume that H atoms are mobile on the surface of dust grains even if controversy still exists. We present here direct experimental evidence of the mobility of H atoms on porous water ice surfaces at 10 K. Methods. In a UHV chamber, O2 is deposited on a porous amorphous water ice substrate. Then D atoms are deposited onto the surface held at 10 K. Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) is used and desorptions of O2 and D2 are simultaneously monitored. Results. We find that the amount of O2 that desorb during the TPD diminishes if we increase the deposition time of D atoms. O2 is thus destroyed by D atoms even though these molecules have previously diffused inside the pores of thick water ice. Our results can be easily interpreted if D is mobile at 10 K on the water ice surface. A simple rate equation model fits our experimental data and best fit curves were obtained for a D atoms diffusion barrier of 22(+-)2 meV. Therefore hydrogenation can take place efficiently on interstellar dust grains. These experimental results are in line with most calculations and validate the hypothesis used in several models.

E. Matar; E. Congiu; F. Dulieu; A. Momeni; J. L. Lemaire

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

333

Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

334

Offshore fresh groundwater reserves as a global phenomenon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the salinity range used for the definition of brackish water in the area of water desalination. Brackish water is increasingly seen as a resource for water supply because the energy ... resource for water supply because the energy needs of reverse osmosis, and therefore costs of desalination, are decreasing. The widespread confirmation of the scale of offshore fresh and brackish groundwater ...

Vincent E.A. Post; Jacobus Groen; Henk Kooi; Mark Person; Shemin Ge; W. Mike Edmunds

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

335

Groundwater modeling of the proposed new production reactor site, Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report addresses groundwater modeling performed to support the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) that is being prepared by the Department of Energy (DOE). The EIS pertains to construction and operation of a new production reactor (NPR) that is under consideration for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Three primary issues are addressed by the modeling analysis: (1) groundwater availability, (2) changes in vertical hydraulic gradients as a result of groundwater pumpage, and (3) migration of potential contaminants from the NPR site. The modeling indicates that the maximum pumpage to be used, 1000 gpm, will induce only minor drawdown across SRS. Pumpage of this magnitude will have a limited effect on the upward gradient from the Cretaceous into the Tertiary near Upper Three Runs Creek. Potentiometric surface maps generated from modeled results indicate that horizontal flow in the water table is either towards Four Mile Creek to the north or to Pen Branch on the south. Particle tracking analysis indicates that the primary flow paths are vertical into the Lower Tertiary Zone, with very little lateral migration. Total travel times from the NPR site to the edge of the model (approximately 3 miles) is on the order of 50 years. The flow direction of water in the Lower Tertiary Zone is relatively well defined due to the regional extent of the flow system. The Pen Branch Fault does not influence contaminant migration for this particular site because it is in the opposite direction of Lower Tertiary Zone groundwater flow. 20 refs., 27 figs., 2 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Haselow, J.S.; Andersen, P.F.; Spalding, C.P.; Davis, D.H.

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

336

Characterization of the intragranular water regime within subsurface sediments: Pore volume, surface area, and mass transfer limitations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although 'intragranular' pore space within grain aggregates, grain fractures, and mineral 24 surface coatings may contain a relatively small fraction of the total porosity within a porous 25 medium, it often contains a significant fraction of the reactive surface area, and can thus strongly 26 affect the transport of sorbing solutes. In this work, we demonstrate a batch experiment 27 procedure using tritium and bromide as high-resolution diffusive tracers to characterize the 28 intragranular pore space. The method was tested using uranium-contaminated sediments from 29 the vadose and capillary fringe zones beneath the former 300A process ponds at the Hanford site 30 (Washington State, USA). Sediments were contacted with tracers in artificial groundwater, 31 followed by replacement of bulk solution with tracer-free groundwater and monitoring of tracer 32 release. From these data, intragranular pore volumes were calculated and mass transfer rates 33 were quantified using a multirate first-order mass transfer model. Tritium-hydrogen exchange 34 on surface hydroxyls was accounted for by conducting additional tracer experiments on sediment 35 that was vacuum dried after reaction. The complementary ('wet' and 'dry') techniques allowed 36 for the simultaneous determination of intragranular porosity and surface area using tritium. The 37 Hanford 300A samples exhibited intragranular pore volumes of {approx}1% of the solid volume and 38 intragranular surface areas of {approx}20-30% of the total surface area. Comparison with N2 gas 39 adsorption suggests that this pore space includes both 'micropores' (< 2 nm diameter) and 40 'mesopores' (> 2 nm). Intragranular porosity estimates obtained using bromide were 41 significantly smaller, likely due to anion exclusion of Br- from pores with negatively charged 42 surfaces.

Hay, Michael B.; Stoliker, Deborah L.; Davis, James A.; Zachara, John M.

2011-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

337

NETL: Water-Energy Interface - Power Plant Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use Photo of a Temperate Wetland. Photo of a Temperate Wetland Applied Ecological Services, Inc. (AES) will study the use of restored wetlands to help alleviate the increasing stress on surface and groundwater resources from thermoelectric power plant cooling requirements. The project will develop water conservation and cooling strategies using restored wetlands. Furthermore, the project aims to demonstrate the benefits of reduced water usage with added economic and ecological values at thermoelectric power plant sites, including: enhancing carbon sequestration in the corresponding wetlands; improving net heat rates from existing power generation units; avoiding limitations when low-surface

338

Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

Fay, Noah

339

The detection and modelling of surface thermal structures and ground water discharges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DETECTION AND MODELLING DF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND WATER DISCHARGES A Thesis by DOUGLAS YINCENT ROBERTS Subm1tted to the Graduate Col leqe of Texas A&M University in part1al fulf1llment of the requirements or the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August IgSS Major Subject: Geophys1cs THE DETECTION AND MODELLING OF SURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURES AND GROUND HATER DISCHARGES A Thesis DOUGLAS VINCENT ROBERTS Approved as to style and content by: Earl . oskins (Chair of Committee...

Roberts, Douglas Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

California Water and the Rhetoric of Crisis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planner specializing in water managment, and isinterested in California water policy and groundwaterBerkeley on conjunctive water management in the San Joaquin

Pollak, Josh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Case Study/ Effects of Groundwater Development on Uranium: Central Valley, California, USA Abstract Uranium (U) concentrations in groundwater in several parts of the eastern San Joaquin Valley products sold (U.S. Department of 1Corresponding author: U.S. Geological Survey, California Water Science

342

Raman spectroscopy of solutions and interfaces containing nitrogen dioxide, water, and 1,4 dioxane: Evidence for repulsion of surface water by NO{sub 2} gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction of water, 1,4 dioxane, and gaseous nitrogen dioxide, has been studied as a function of distance measured through the liquid-vapour interface by Raman spectroscopy with a narrow (<0.1 mm) laser beam directed parallel to the interface. The Raman spectra show that water is present at the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is absent, but is virtually absent from the surface of a dioxane-water mixture when gaseous NO{sub 2} is present. This is consistent with recent theoretical calculations that show NO{sub 2} to be mildly hydrophobic.

Murdachaew, Garold [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Varner, Mychel E.; Veer, Wytze E. van der [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Gerber, R. Benny [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel) [Institute of Chemistry and the Fritz Haber Research Center for Molecular Dynamics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Phillips, Leon F., E-mail: leon.phillips@canterbury.ac.nz [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

343

Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The purpose of the Georgia Groundwater Use Act is to establish procedures

344

A Study to Verify the Material Surface Concept of Water Table by Examining Analytical and Numerical Models.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This term defines the water table as having two simultaneous properties: 1) the pressure along the surface is atmospheric pressure, and 2) the water table is fixed to the material, i.e., a set of water particles. This article makes an attempt to explain...

Dadi, Sireesh Kumar

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

346

Surface Water Chemistry in White Oak Creek, North-East Texas: Effect of Land Use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

watersheds soils, leaches readily to surface waters. Manure can contribute a significant amount of phosphorus loading into adjacent streams from livestock agriculture (James et al. 2007). Contributions from dairy cattle in a watershed in southeastern... New York showed that in-stream fecal deposits from pastured cattle represented 10% of watershed phosphorus loadings (James et al. 2007). Additionally, it was found that livestock grazing along streams and riparian zones can also have adverse...

Watson, Eliza

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

347

Selection of NF membrane to improve quality of chemically treated surface water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The requirement for higher quality drinking water necessitates the application of more efficient water treatment techniques. Nanofiltration is one promising option for enhanced water treatment, for example, in enhanced organic matter removal. The characteristics of different nanofiltration membranes vary remarkably, and the selection of a membrane has to be made according to the requirements of an application. In this study six nanofiltration membranes (NF70, NF255, NTR-7450, NTR-7410, Desal-5 and TFC-S) were evaluated in improving the quality of chemically pre-treated surface water in a pilot-scale process. The results indicate that the membrane with high organics removal and slightly reduced ion removal characteristics (NF255) performed best in terms of product water quality as well as membrane productivity and fouling. The most permeable membrane (NTR-7410) suffered intensive fouling and insufficient product water quality. An interesting finding was that the permeates of all the tested membranes possessed a significant potential for microbial growth, despite the low nutrient contents.

Riina Liikanen; Ilkka Miettinen; Risto Laukkanen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water-air interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of surface tension on the acoustic radiation pressure-induced motion of the water to be a function of the surface tension. The time of mound formation measurementsin cleanwaterat low.Our objectiveisto investigatetheeffectsof surface tension on mound formation. We usea boundaryintegralmethodto

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

349

Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell,*, and Saman Alavi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Tensions in NaCl-Water-Air Systems from MD Simulations Ranjit Bahadur, Lynn M. Russell, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6, Canada ReceiVed: July 9, 2007; In Final Form: July 30, 2007 Surface tensions to the surface tension, while the energy-integral and test area methods provide direct estimates. At 1 atm

Russell, Lynn

350

Calendar year 1996 annual groundwater monitoring report for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This annual monitoring report contains groundwater and surface water monitoring data obtained in the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (Chestnut Ridge Regime) during calendar year (CY) 1996. The Chestnut Ridge Regime encompasses a section of Chestnut Ridge west of Scarboro Road and east of an unnamed drainage feature southwest of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant (unless otherwise noted, directions are in reference to the Y-12 Plant administrative grid). The Chestnut Ridge Regime contains several sites used for management of hazardous and nonhazardous wastes associated with plant operations. Groundwater and surface water quality monitoring associated with these waste management sites is performed under the auspices of the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP). Included in this annual monitoring report are the groundwater monitoring data obtained in compliance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit for the Chestnut Ridge Regime (post-closure permit) issued by the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) in June 1996. Besides the signed certification statement and the RCRA facility information summarized below, condition II.C.6 of the post-closure permit requires annual reporting of groundwater monitoring activities, inclusive of the analytical data and results of applicable data evaluations, performed at three RCRA hazardous waste treatment, storage, or disposal (TSD) units: the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (Sediment Disposal Basin), the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (Security Pits), and Kerr Hollow Quarry.

NONE

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Water resource data for North Carolina, water year 1993. Volume 1. Surface-water records. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1992-30 September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1993 water year for North Carolina consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; and stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs. The report contains discharge records for 159 gaging stations and stage and contents for 56 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 54 gaging stations and 5 miscellaneous sites; and continuous daily tide stage for 10 sites. Additional water data were collected at 69 sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements in the report.

Barker, R.G.; George, E.D.; Rinehardt, J.F.; Eddins, W.H.

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading underground7-1 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. #12;7-22001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER

Homes, Christopher C.

353

Density-functional study of water adsorption on the PuO2(110) surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water adsorption on a PuO2(110) surface is studied using a periodic model with both the local-density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) of density-functional theory. The 60 core electrons of the Pu atom are represented by a relativistic effective core potential, and scalar relativistic effects have been incorporated into the valence orbitals. Both molecular and dissociative configurations of the adsorbate H2O are considered at one molecular layer coverage. For molecular water adsorption, LDA calculations indicate binding only at the top site, whereas the GGA indicates no binding for any site. Dissociative adsorption is found to be energetically more favorable than molecular adsorption, in agreement with experimental observations. The effects on the geometric and electronic structures influenced by water adsorption are investigated.

Xueyuan Wu and Asok K. Ray

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Numerical investigation of the components of calm-water resistance of a surface-effect ship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The elements of the calm-water resistance of an surface-effect ship are studied with two different numerical methods. A potential-flow-based method that satisfies linearized free-surface boundary conditions is used to predict the wave resistance of the sidehulls and air cushion. A RANS-based program that employs a single-phase level set method is used to simulate the flow around an SES of a nonlinear viscous fluid. Detailed comparison of the dynamic wetted surface, the free-surface elevation, and the wave, cushion, and frictional drag is made for a geometry that has experimental resistance data. It is shown that the linear free-surface boundary conditions of an inviscid fluid are accurate for prediction of wave drag. Disagreement is present between the two methods for the free-surface elevation behind the vessel, which might possibly be due to the transom-stern model that is used in the potential-flow method. The small difference between the numerically predicted resistance and the experimental measurement is attributed to the error in the seal and air drag models that are used in this study.

Kevin J. Maki; Riccardo Broglia; Lawrence J. Doctors; Andrea Di Mascio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mapping water availability, projected use and cost in the western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New demands for water can be satisfied through a variety of source options. In some basins surface and/or groundwater may be available through permitting with the state water management agency (termed unappropriated water), alternatively water might be purchased and transferred out of its current use to another (termed appropriated water), or non-traditional water sources can be captured and treated (e.g., wastewater). The relative availability and cost of each source are key factors in the development decision. Unfortunately, these measures are location dependent with no consistent or comparable set of data available for evaluating competing water sources. With the help of western water managers, water availability was mapped for over 1200 watersheds throughout the western US. Five water sources were individually examined, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped was projected change in consumptive water use from 2010 to 2030. Associated costs to acquire, convey and treat the water, as necessary, for each of the five sources were estimated. These metrics were developed to support regional water planning and policy analysis with initial application to electric transmission planning in the western US.

Vincent C. Tidwell; Barbara D. Moreland; Katie M. Zemlick; Barry L. Roberts; Howard D. Passell; Daniel Jensen; Christopher Forsgren; Gerald Sehlke; Margaret A. Cook; Carey W. King

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Water resources data for Florida, water year 1992. Volume 4. Northwest Florida. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1991-30 September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water resources data for the 1992 water year for northwest Florida include continuous or daily discharge for 44 streams, periodic discharge for 3 streams, miscellaneous discharge for 44 streams, continuous or daily sage for 11 streams, continuous daily tide stage for 2 sites, periodic stage for 0 streams, peak discharge for 2 streams, and peak stage for 2 streams; continuous or daily elevations for 2 lakes, periodic elevations for 1 lake; continuous ground water levels for 0 wells, periodic groundwater levels for 18 wells, and miscellaneous water-level measurements for 0 wells; quality-of-water data for 13 surface-water sites and 0 wells.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC) Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization Sector: Climate, Water Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications Website: unesdoc.unesco.org/images/0015/001507/150730e.pdf References: Groundwater Resources Assessment under the Pressures of Humanity and Climate Change (GRAPHIC)[1] "The GRAPHIC project seeks to improve our understanding of how groundwater contributes to the global water cycle and thus how it supports ecosystems

359

West Northwest, Vol. 16, No. 1, Winter 2010 Myths of California Water -Implications and Reality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's Water Rights Laws Impede Reform and Sustainable Management.........50 Myth: Groundwater is Separate from

Pasternack, Gregory B.

360

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

Torgersen, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water resources data for North Carolina, water year 1994. Volume 1. Surface-water records. Water-data report (Annual), 1 October 1993-30 September 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains discharge records for 167 gaging stations and stage and contents for 56 lakes and reservoirs; water quality for 56 gaging stations and 32 miscellaneous sites; and continuous daily tide stage for 1 site. Additional water data were collected at 78 sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements in this report.

Ragland, B.C.; Smith, D.G.; Barker, R.G.; Rinehardt, J.F.

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

August 22, 2012 (v. 5) Summary of Studies Related to Hydraulic Fracturing Conducted by USGS Water Science Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 22, 2012 (v. 5) Summary of Studies Related to Hydraulic Fracturing Conducted by USGS Water and hydraulic fracturing on groundwater and surface-water quantity and quality and ecosystems. "On ­ Maps related to oil and gas production and hydraulic fracturing are included in the USGS Fact Sheet

363

Microbiological groundwater quality and health indicators in Mexico City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater quality was evaluated in the southern and western zones of Mexico City, using bacterial indicators and pathogens. Water quality from 40 wells was related to rates of diarrheal disease with 995 indi...

Marisa Mazari-Hiriart; Enrique Cifuentes; Elia Velzquez; Juan J. Calva

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Institutional Arrangements for Effective Groundwater Management to Halt Land Subsidence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of groundwater use and development but political entities with adequate scope to deal with the problem were either unwilling or unable to engage in regional water management. Indeed, these political organizations and other institutions may have actually...

Brah, W. L.; Jones, L. L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Distribution of the catabolic transposon Tn5271 in a groundwater bioremediation system.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Toluene metabolism Water Microbiology georef...chemical waste ground water Hyde Park Site...pollutants pollution remediation sediments sludge...A GROUNDWATER REMEDIATION SYSTEM 89 b...gene sequences in ground- water and SBR samples...

R C Wyndham; C Nakatsu; M Peel; A Cashore; J Ng; F Szilagyi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluating the effect of surface modifications on Ni based electrodes for alkaline water electrolysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In an effort to improve the efficiency of alkaline water electrolysis for hydrogen production, surface modifications to Ni based electrodes were made by means of mechanical polishing using sandpapers of different sand grain sizes and chemical coating using electrochemical deposition of Ni and Co. The hydrogen evolution reaction was studied to reveal and compare the apparent and intrinsic activities of the electrodes, as indicated by the Tafel curves based on the geometric surface area and effective surface area, respectively. A relative roughness factor, which was estimated from the double layer capacitance in the impedance measurement, was introduced to characterise the effective surface area. The relative roughness factor of the six modified electrodes varied from 3.3 to 5.6. The electrode polished with the P400 sandpaper achieved the best apparent activity by possessing the lowest overpotential of 422mV at the current density of 750Am?2. For electrodes modified by the mechanical polishing, the Tafel curves collapsed into a narrow band when the current density was divided by the relative roughness factor, which validated the method of using the relative roughness factor for quantifying the effective surface area. The intrinsic activity of the hydrogen evolution reaction on Ni electrode can be expressed as ?=0.02+0.191Log(j?), where j? is the current density based on the effective surface area. For the electrodes modified by electrochemical depositions of Ni and Co, a variation in the intrinsic activity was observed for the different electrodes. This was attributed to their surface composition differences.

Kai Zeng; Dongke Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Single-Step Process for the Deposition of High Water Contact Angle and High Water Sliding Angle Surfaces by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-Step Process for the Deposition of High Water Contact Angle and High Water Sliding Angle Surfaces by Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge ... The process used a high voltage alternating current (10?000 or 22?500 Hz) with a constant dissipated power of 100 W (1.1 W cm2) generated by a Corona generator 7010R from SOFTAL electronic GmbH. ... high adhesion, presumably by generating large van der Waals' forces from the large surface area in very close contact with water. ...

Nicolas D. Boscher; David Duday; Stphane Verdier; Patrick Choquet

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Status of Metal Contamination in Surface Waters of the Coastal Ocean off Los Angeles, California since the Implementation of the Clean Water Act  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Status of Metal Contamination in Surface Waters of the Coastal Ocean off Los Angeles, California since the Implementation of the Clean Water Act ... (28) However, high concentrations of sewage-tracer dissolved Ag(29) (Figure 5) near the river locations might suggest that the ultimate source of these riverine metals are from upriver discharges from water reclamation plants, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems, power plants discharge, and/or storm drains. ... Pb concentrations had the largest difference between the two sampling months of all measured trace metals, potentially due to the strong association of this trace element with surface runoff, oceanic advection, and particle scavenging. ...

Emily A. Smail; Eric A. Webb; Robert P. Franks; Kenneth W. Bruland; Sergio A. Saudo-Wilhelmy

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Complexation of mercury by dissolved organic matter in surface waters of Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical speciation of dissolved mercury in surface waters of Galveston Bay was determined using the concentrations of mercury-complexing ligands and conditional stability constants of mercury-ligand complexes. Two classes of natural ligands associated with dissolved organic matter were determined by a competitive ligand exchange-solvent solvent extraction (CLE-SSE) method: a strong class (Ls), ranging from 19 to 93 pM with an average conditional stability constant (KHgLs) of 1028, and a weak class (Lw) ranging from 1.4 to 9.8 nM with an average \\{KHgLs\\} of 1023. The range of conditional stability constants between mercury and natural ligands suggested that sulfides and thiolates are important binding sites for dissolved mercury in estuarine waters. A positive correlation between the estuarine distribution of dissolved glutathione and that of mercury-complexing ligands supported this suggestion. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using stability constants for HgL, HgClx, Hg(OH)x, and HgCl(OH) and concentrations of each ligand demonstrated that almost all of the dissolved mercury (>99%) in Galveston Bay was complexed by natural ligands associated with dissolved organic matter. The importance of low concentrations of high-affinity ligands that may originate in the biological system (i.e., glutathione and phytochelatin) suggests that the greater portion of bulk dissolved organic matter may not be important for mercury complexation in estuarine surface waters.

Seunghee Han; Gary A. Gill; Ronald D. Lehman; Key-Young Choe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Groundwater depletion in the Middle East from GRACE with implications for transboundary water management in the Tigris-Euphrates-Western Iran region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Marand Plain, Northwest Iran, Iranian Int. J. Sci. , 6(2008), Land subsidence in Iran caused by wide- spread waterTigris-Euphrates-Western Iran region, Water Resour. Res. ,

Voss, Katalyn A; Famiglietti, James S; Lo, MinHui; de Linage, Caroline; Rodell, Matthew; Swenson, Sean C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Plan for Using Solar-Powered Jack Pumps to Sample Groundwater at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater is sampled from 39 monitoring wells on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as part of the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program. Many of these wells were not designed or constructed for long-term groundwater monitoring. Some have extensive completion zones and others have obstructions such as pumps and tubing. The high-volume submersible pumps in some wells are unsuitable for long-term monitoring and result in large volumes of water that may have to be contained and characterized before subsequent disposition. The configuration of most wells requires sampling stagnant well water with a wireline bailer. Although bailer sampling allows for the collection of depth-discrete samples, the collected samples may not be representative of local groundwater because no well purging is done. Low-maintenance, solar-powered jack pumps will be deployed in nine of these onsite monitoring wells to improve sample quality. These pumps provide the lift capacity to produce groundwater from the deep aquifers encountered in the arid environment of the NTS. The water depths in these wells range from 700 to 2,340 ft below ground surface. The considerable labor and electrical power requirements of electric submersible pumps are eliminated once these pumps are installed. Access tubing will be installed concurrent with the installation of the pump string to provide downhole access for water-level measurements or other wireline instruments. Micro-purge techniques with low pump rates will be used to minimize purge volumes and reduce hydraulic gradients. The set depths of the pumps will be determined by the borehole characteristics and screened interval.

David Hudson, Charles Lohrstorfer, Bruce Hurley

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

Complex formation and proton transfer between formic acid and water adsorbed on Au(111) surfaces under UHV conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coadsorption of formic acid and water on Au(111) surfaces has been investigated by means of vibrational and photoelectron spectroscopy (HREELS, XPS). Formic acid adsorbs at 90K molecularly with vibrationa...

M. Kazempoor; G. Pirug

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Glacial Cooling in the Tropics: Exploring the Roles of Tropospheric Water Vapor, Surface Wind Speed, and Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is a modeling study of possible roles for tropospheric water vapor, surface wind speed, and boundary layer processes in glacial cooling in the Tropics. The authors divide the Tropics into a region of persistent deep convection and a ...

Richard Seager; Amy C. Clement; Mark A. Cane

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

376

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

377

Develop a statewide, integrated extension education and applied research program related to surface and groundwater quality protection, with specific emphasis on nonpoint sources, onsite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

courses. Address education and research needs in wastewater treatment technologies, water capture) and other environmental issues of concern to rural communities, agricultural producers, agribusiness and reuse, and conservation technologies that address identified needs in both rural and urban sectors

378

Final Environmental Impact Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Impact Impact \ DoE/Els-o120 Statement Waste Management Activities for Groundwater Protection Savannah River Plant Aiken, South Carolina Volume 3 Q ~+ ~ FNT O&@+@ &v a w ~ k ~ ;%." $ +6 & ~+e $TiTES Of December 1987 United States Department of Energy TABLE OF CONTENTS ~pendix G ASSESSMENT OF ALTERNATIVE STRATEGIES FOR STORAGE FACILITIES . . . . . . . . . . . G.1 No-Action Strategy . . . . . . . . G.1.l Sununarv and Objectives . . NEW DISPOSAL/ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.2 Groundwater and Surface Water Effects G.1.3 Nonradioactive Atmospheric Releases . G.1.4 Ecological Effects . . . . . . . . . G.1.5 Radiological Releases . . . . . . . . G.1.6 Archaeological and Historic Resources G.1.7 SOciOecOnOmics . . . . . . . . . . . G.1.8 Dedication of Site . . . . . . . . . G.1.9 Institutional Impacts . . . . . . . . G.l.10 Noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2 Dedication Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . G.2.1 G.2.2 G.2.3 G.2.4 G.2.5 G.2.6

379

Influence of O2-induced surface roughening on the chemistry of water on TiO2(110)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of oxygen induced regrowth of TiO2 on the reduced rutile TiO2(110) surface has been studied using temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of adsorbed water multilayers. Pre-exposure of UHV annealed TiO2(110) surfaces to O2 at temperatures from 300 to 850 K induced changes in subsequent water TPDs that were interpreted in terms of the rougher surface morphologies resulting from the regrowth process. Water TPD from TiO2(110) previously oxidized at 300 K exhibited a new peak at *312 K due to reaction of water with O adatoms. These O adatoms were produced by dissociative adsorption of O2 at O-vacancy sites. Additionally, oxygen reacted (slowly) with surface Ti2O3 strands at RT. Water TPD from surfaces pre-oxidized at higher temperatures (P500 K) exhibited features reflective of desorption from rough surfaces, namely loss of peak resolution and eventual merger of the second layer and ice peaks, formation of a high temperature tail on the second layer peak, and broadening of the first layer TPD peak. The multiplicity of kinetically different adsorption sites on the roughened TiO2(110) surfaces contributed to the widening of the desorption features. Published by Elsevier B.V.

Zehr, Robert T.; Henderson, Michael A.

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, Water Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Water Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Chemical analysis of groundwater from Mokapu was severely restricted by the absence of drilled wells; the only groundwater sources present were five shallow, brackish ponds, Chemical data indicated that all of the ponds consisted of seawater diluted by varying amounts of fresh surface water; no thermal alteration was revealed by the water chemistry (Table 2). Available temperature and water chemistry data on the Koolau caldera area were also assessed as part of the Mokapu study. The results of this analysis (Table

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges and furrows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow on surfaces with ridges Abstract We introduce a new Shallow Water model for the numerical simulation of overland flow with furrow conservation (decreases soil thickness by erosion and causes nutrient loss), infrastruc- tures (flooding

d'Orléans, Université

382

Method Validation for the Simultaneous Determination of Fecal Sterols in Surface Waters by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......waters is estimated by gas chromatographic (GC...steroids and endogenous CHL production and metabolism, the sterol...Sterols in Surface Waters by Gas ChromatographyMass Spectrometry...ally quantitated by gas chromatography (GC...characterized. Because cost and time effectiveness......

Sndor Szucs; Attila Srvry; Terry Cain; Rza dny

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Countermeasures to Microbiofouling in Simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Heat Exchangers with Surface and Deep Ocean Waters in Hawaii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal energy from warm ocean waters. A small fraction...converted to electrical power and waste heat is rejected...water pumped from the ocean depth. Solar energy absorbed by the ocean surface provides the heat...Thermal losses, the power requirements to pump large...

Leslie Ralph Berger; Joyce A. Berger

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

385

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

386

Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

File:Rights to Surface Water in Texas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search File Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » File:Rights to Surface Water in Texas.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Rights to Surface Water in Texas.pdf Size of this preview: 388 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(825 × 1,275 pixels, file size: 910 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 24 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 12:14, 1 July 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 12:14, 1 July 2013 825 × 1,275, 24 pages (910 KB) Abergfel (Talk | contribs)

388

Surface water drainage system. Environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) is written pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The document identifies and evaluates the action proposed to correct deficiencies in, and then to maintain, the surface water drainage system serving the Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site), located north of Golden, Colorado. Many of the activities proposed would not normally be subject to this level of NEPA documentation. However, in many cases, maintenance of the system has been deferred to the point that wetlands vegetation has become established in some ditches and culverts, creating wetlands. The proposed activities would damage or remove some of these wetlands in order to return the drainage system to the point that it would be able to fully serve its intended function - stormwater control. The Department of Energy (DOE) regulations require that activities affecting environmentally sensitive areas like wetlands be the subject of an EA. Most portions of the surface water drainage system are presently inadequate to convey the runoff from a 100-year storm event. As a result, such an event would cause flooding across much of the Site and possibly threaten the integrity of the dams at the terminal ponds. Severe flooding would not only cause damage to facilities and equipment, but could also facilitate the transport of contaminants from individual hazardous substance sites (IHSSs). Uncontrolled flow through the A- and B-series ponds could cause contaminated sediments to become suspended and carried downstream. Additionally, high velocity flood flows significantly increase erosion losses.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Optimized groundwater containment using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to contain contaminant plumes. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield is to use a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when the objectives of the potential pumping scheme and the site hydrogeology are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. Calculations were conducted by using ModMan to link a calibrated MODFLOW flow model with LINDO, a linear programming package. Past activities at the site under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input water budget as groundwater discharge from the disposal area. The objective function of the optimization was to minimize the rate of groundwater extraction while preventing discharge to the marsh across a user-specified boundary. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates to produce a groundwater divide along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Durham, L.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Present concept on current water protection and remediation activities for the areas contaminated by the 1986 Chernobyl accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of radiation monitoring data and migration pathway analysis of water bodies within areas affected by the 1986 Chernobyl accident provide a unique opportunity for decision-makers working in other extensively contaminated regions to optimize their approaches to surface and groundwater protection. Most engineering measures within the Chernobyl 30-km exclusion zone were focused on preventing secondary contamination of surface and groundwater from entering the Pripyat River and the Kiev Reservoir. However, implementation of these measures required huge financial and human resources. Therefore, lessons about post-accidental water protection activities can be learned form the Chernobyl example. 9 refs., 9 figs.

Voitsekhovitch, O.; Prister, B.; Nasvit, O.; Los, I.; Berkovski, V.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Title Arsenic Removal from Groundwater Using Iron Electrocoagulation: Effect of Charge Dosage Rate Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6221E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Amrose, Susan, Ashok J. Gadgil, Venkat Srinivasan, Kristin Kowolik, Marc Muller, Jessica Huang, and Robert Kostecki Journal Joournal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering Volume 48 Issue 9 Pagination 1019-1030 Date Published 04/2013 Keywords arsenic, bangladesh, Cambodia, dosage rate, electrocoagulation, india, water treatment Abstract We demonstrate that electrocoagulation (EC) using iron electrodes can reduce arsenic below 10 μg/L in synthetic Bangladesh groundwater and in real groundwater from Bangladesh and Cambodia while investigating the effect of operating parameters that are often overlooked, such as charge dosage rate. We measure arsenic removal performance

392

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

394

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) Missouri Water Resource Law (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Missouri Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Missouri Department of Natural Resources The Department of Natural Resources is responsible for ensuring that the quality and quantity of the water resources of the state are maintained at the highest level practicable to support present and future beneficial uses. The Department maintains an ongoing statewide surface and groundwater monitoring program and is authorized to enact regulations and restrict uses

395

Drinking Water Problems: Nitrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Extension Specialist, Rebecca H. Melton, Extension Assistant, Michael F. Hare, Senior Natural Resources Specialist Pesticide Programs Division, Janie Hopkins, Manager Groundwater Monitoring Section, Texas Water Development Board, Bruce J. Lesikar, Professor... and Extension Specialist, Rebecca H. Melton, Extension Assistant, Michael F. Hare, Senior Natural Resources Specialist Pesticide Programs Division, Janie Hopkins, Manager Groundwater Monitoring Section, Texas Water Development Board, Bruce J. Lesikar, Professor...

Dozier, Monty; Melton, Rebecca; Hare, Michael; Hopkins, Janie; Lesikar, Bruce J.

2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Sanitary Landfill Groundwater Monitoring Report - Fourth Quarter 1998 and 1998 Summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A maximum of fifty-three wells of the LFW series monitor groundwater quality in the Steed Pond Aquifer (Water Table) beneath the Sanitary Landfill at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These wells are sampled quarterly to comply with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Domestic Water permit and as part of the SRS Groundwater Monitoring Program.

Chase, J.

1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

398

7-1 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT CHAPTER 7: GROUNDWATER PROTECTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ground- water Protection Management Program is to ensure that plans for groundwater protection of the environment by cleaning up contami- nated soil and ground- water, and (4) communicating with interested and one offsite groundwater remediation systems removed approximately 634 pounds of volatile organic

399

Case study of groundwater impact caused by underground mining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigative methodology is presented to assist mining and regulatory personnel in determining the effect underground mining can have on local aquifers in the Appalachian coal region. The impact of underground mining on groundwater may be more extensive than first realized by the mining industry and regulatory agencies. The primary reason for this possible under-assessment of deep mining's influence on groundwater is the methods used to calculate groundwater movement. Since groundwater calculations are based on primary hydraulic conductivity, i.e. the conductivity through solid rock measured from rock core samples, erroneous results may be expected. In many cases, groundwater flow times and the corresponding areas of influence are much greater than those assumed since water is rapidly moved through fractured zones that commonly occur throughout Appalachia. A case study illustrating this phenomenon is drawn from underground mining operations in Pike County. A survey of 144 wells was conducted to determine if any loss of water supply and/or quality was found. This was correlated to the extent and time progression of underground mining operations. Other parameters qualified are water level fluctuations, groundwater quality, precipitation, seasonal effects, geology, and mine dewatering. The analysis includes a comprehensive compilation of a well inventory of domestic water supplies. The case study draws conclusions regarding cause and effect relationships.

Sloan, P.; Warner, R.C.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

In situ photoelectron spectroscopy study of water adsorption on model biomaterial surfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

184024 184024 (7pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/20/18/184024 In situ photoelectron spectroscopy study of water adsorption on model biomaterial surfaces G Ketteler 1 , P Ashby 2 , B S Mun 3,4 , I Ratera 5 , H Bluhm 6 , B Kasemo 1 and M Salmeron 2,5 1 Chalmers University of Technology, Department of Applied Physics, 41296 Gothenburg, Sweden 2 Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 3 Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 4 Department of Applied Physics, Hanyang University, Ansan, Kyunggi-Do 426-791, Korea 5 Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA 6 Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Received 10 July 2007, in final form 13 September 2007 Published 17 April 2008 Online at stacks.iop.org/JPhysCM/20/184024

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Water Resources and Climate Change in Garden Park, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper examines whether groundwater can provide adequate water supplies for land use change and future development in Garden Park, Colorado. A climatic water budget model was used to determine the amount and adequacy of the groundwater supply...

Baffa, Thomas W.

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

A dimension-breaking phenomenon for water waves with weak surface tension  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that the water-wave problem with weak surface tension has small-amplitude line solitary-wave solutions which to leading order are described by the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation. The present paper contains an existence theory for three-dimensional periodically modulated solitary-wave solutions which have a solitary-wave profile in the direction of propagation and are periodic in the transverse direction; they emanate from the line solitary waves in a dimension-breaking bifurcation. In addition, it is shown that the line solitary waves are linearly unstable to long-wavelength transverse perturbations. The key to these results is a formulation of the water wave problem as an evolutionary system in which the transverse horizontal variable plays the role of time, a careful study of the purely imaginary spectrum of the operator obtained by linearising the evolutionary system at a line solitary wave, and an application of an infinite-dimensional version of the classical Lyapunov centre theorem.

Mark D. Groves; Shu-Ming Sun; Erik Wahln

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

403

Surface-coating montmorillonite nanoclay by water-soluble proteins extracted from hominy feed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Montmorillonite (MMT) nanoclay was surface-coated by water-soluble proteins precipitated from hominy feed extract at pH 6.0, 5.5, and 4.3 to modify its native structure. Surface-coating was performed at 60C, pH 2.010.0, and MMT:protein mass ratios from 49:1 to 2:1, followed by lyophilizing the triple-washed precipitate for characterization. Proteins precipitated at pH 5.5 were the most effective in creating intercalated and/or exfoliated MMT structures that were also impacted by the protein level and pH during coating. At pH 2.0, X-ray diffraction peaks of pristine MMT were no longer observed at an MMT:protein mass ratio of 4:1 or lower, while different degrees of intercalation were achieved at other pH conditions. The adsorption of proteins on MMT at all studied pH conditions was confirmed by FTIR, analysis of adsorbed proteins, and zeta-potential. These results suggest that interactions involved in coating MMT include coulombic and non-coulombic forces.

Minfeng Jin; Qixin Zhong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

2011 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and groundwater tracer test performed at the site. The State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. As for the subsurface, monitoring activities that include hydraulic head monitoring and groundwater sampling of the wells onsite are conducted as part of the annual site inspection. These activities were conducted on January 19, 2011. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were observed as being in good condition at the time of the site inspection. An evaluation of the hydraulic head data obtained from the site indicates that water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 appear to respond to the on/off cycling of the dedicated pump in well USGS-1 and that water levels in wells LRL-7 and DD-1 increased during this annual monitoring period. Analytical results obtained from the sampling indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events.

None

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01-1 · Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

406

Water quality Water quantity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Water quality · Water quantity · Remediation strategies MinE 422: Water Resources: Younger, Banwart and Hedin. 2002. Mine Water. Hydrology, Pollution, Remediation. Impacts of mining on water mining ­ Often the largest long term issue ­ Water quality affected, surface/ground water pollution

Boisvert, Jeff

407

Ecological Screening Values for Surface Water, Sediment, and Soil: 2005 Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the principal components of the environmental remediation program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is the assessment of ecological risk. Used to support CERCLA, RCRA, and DOE orders, the ecological risk assessment (ERA) can identify environmental hazards and evaluate remedial action alternatives. Ecological risk assessment is also an essential means for achieving DOE's risk based end state vision for the disposition of nuclear material and waste hazards, the decommissioning of facilities, and the remediation of inactive waste units at SRS. The complexity of an ERA ranges from a screening level ERA (SLERA) to a full baseline ERA. A screening level ecological risk assessments, although abbreviated from a baseline risk assessment, is nonetheless considered a complete risk assessment (EPA, 2001a). One of the initial tasks of any ERA is to identify constituents that potentially or adversely affect the environment. Typically, this is accomplished by comparing a constituent's maximum concentration in surface water, sediment, or soil with an ecological screening value (ESV). The screening process can eliminate many constituents from further consideration in the risk assessment, but it also identifies those that require additional evaluation. This document is an update of a previous compilation (Friday, 1998) and provides a comprehensive listing of ecological screening values for surface water, sediment, and soil. It describes how the screening values were derived and recommends benchmarks that can be used for ecological risk assessment. The sources of these updated benchmarks include the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the State of Florida, the Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME), the Dutch Ministry of the Environment (RIVM), and the scientific literature. It should be noted that ESV's are continuously revised by the various issuing agencies. The references in this report provide the citations of each source and, where applicable, the internet address where they can be accessed. Although radiological screening values are not included herein due to space limitations, these have been recently derived by a technical working committee sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE 2002, 2004). The recommended ecological screening values represent the most conservative concentrations of the cited sources, and are to be used for screening purposes only. They do not represent remedial action cleanup levels. Their use at locations other than SRS should take into account environmental variables such as water quality, soil chemistry, flora and fauna, and other ecological attributes specific to the ecosystem potentially at risk.

Friday, G. P.

2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Protection of Groundwaters Destined for Human Consumption in Karstic Aquifers. Advances Towards Safeguard Zones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbonate aquifers constitute a water reserve of critical importance as a source of drinking water. For this, it is necessary to establish suitable protection measures so that groundwater bodies can achieve good ...

A. Jimnez-Madrid; F. Carrasco; C. Martnez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A Critical Analysis of Technological Innovation and Economic Development in Southern California's Urban Water Reuse And Recycling Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Purification of Water with Systems (a NationalWater Recycling . 99 8. Groundwater Replenishment System Purification

Pilip-Florea, Shadrach Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Surfactant-assisted spreading of an oil-in-water emulsion on the surface of a liquid bath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This fluid dynamics video shows how an oil-in-water emulsion stabilized by an ionic surfactant spreads on the free surface of a layer of pure water. The spreading shows two intriguing features: a transparent area surrounding the source of oil droplets, and a fast retraction of the layer of oil droplets on itself once the source has emptied. We show that the dynamics of spreading are strongly connected to the interfacial/bulk properties of the surfactant.

Roche, Matthieu; Griffiths, Ian; Saint-Jalmes, Arnaud; Stone, Howard A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project 198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project EIS-0198: Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Groundwater Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses the potential programmatic impacts of conducting the Ground Water Project, provides a method for determining the site-specific ground water compliance strategies, and provides data and information that can be used to prepare site-specific environmental impacts analyses more efficiently. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 28, 1997 EIS-0198: Record of Decision Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project (April 1997) December 1, 1996 EIS-0198: Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Ground Water Project

413

Accumulation of a light non-aqueous phase liquid on a flat barrier baffling a descending groundwater flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Riesenkampf's scheme revisited. Water Resour. Res. 47, 11521...the characteristics of ground water movement. Final Report...Dane 1999 Movement and remediation of trichloroethylene...1962-1977 Theory of ground-water movement. Princeton...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gun. A: Rinse with acetone, IPA, distilled water and thenMicrolab). B: Rinse with IPA, distilled water and then dryC: Rinse with acetone, IPA, distilled water, dry o? with dry

Al-Beaini, Sara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

416

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

417

A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Chemisorption of Propane on Platinum Surfaces in the Presence of Pre-adsorbed Water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... adsorbed water. In order to study this question, we have investigated the chemisorption of propane on platinum in the presence of pre-adsorbed water.

G. SANDSTEDE; G. WALTER; G. WURZBACHER

1967-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Biomimicry using Nano-Engineered Enhanced Condensing Surfaces for Sustainable Fresh Water Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

renewable energy-powered technologies for fresh water supply to replace current energy-intensive water desalination techniques, especially for arid, developing countries.

Al-Beaini, Sara

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Phototransformation of Triclosan in Surface Waters:? A Relevant Elimination Process for This Widely Used BiocideLaboratory Studies, Field Measurements, and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phototransformation of Triclosan in Surface Waters:? A Relevant Elimination Process for This Widely Used BiocideLaboratory Studies, Field Measurements, and Modeling ... The phototransformation of the widely used biocide triclosan (5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol) was quantified for surface waters using artificial UV light and sunlight irradiation. ... The pH of surface waters, commonly ranging from 7 to 9, determines the speciation of triclosan (pKa = 8.1) and therefore its absorption of sunlight. ...

Cline Tixier; Heinz P. Singer; Silvio Canonica; Stephan R. Mller

2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Groundwater Consumption by Phreatophytes in Mid-Continent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater Consumption by Phreatophytes in Mid-Continent Stream-Aquifer Systems Gerard Kluitenberg. · Consumption of ground water by phreatophytes also a factor of potential importance. · Extensive control-water consumption by phreatophytes needed to: Introduction/Background · Clarify factors contributing to low

Hernes, Peter J.

422

Groundwater Protection 7 2008 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the soil and into ground- water), and administrative controls (e.g., reduc- ing the toxicity and volume,170individualsampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 220 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.5 billion gallons of treated water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. Since

423

Groundwater Protection 7 2009 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on ground- water protection issues. The Laboratory is committed of the soil and into ground- water), and administrative controls (e.g., reduc- ing the toxicity and volume during 1,800 individual sampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 229 pounds

424

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility’s ground wells. Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility's ground wells. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge’s EM program. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge's EM program.

425

New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge New EM Facility Treats Groundwater at Oak Ridge January 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility’s ground wells. Chromium Water Treatment System Facility Manager Matt Finley stands near one of the facility's ground wells. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge’s EM program. The Chromium Water Treatment System, located within the footprint of the older Central Neutralization Facility, serves a vital need by treating groundwater and achieving substantial savings for Oak Ridge's EM program.

426

Purge water management system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A purge water management system is described for effectively eliminating the production of purge water when obtaining a groundwater sample from a monitoring well. In its preferred embodiment, the purge water management system comprises an expandable container, a transportation system, and a return system. The purge water management system is connected to a wellhead sampling configuration, typically permanently installed at the well site. A pump, positioned with the monitoring well, pumps groundwater through the transportation system into the expandable container, which expands in direct proportion with volume of groundwater introduced, usually three or four well volumes, yet prevents the groundwater from coming into contact with the oxygen in the air. After this quantity of groundwater has been removed from the well, a sample is taken from a sampling port, after which the groundwater in the expandable container can be returned to the monitoring well through the return system. The purge water management system prevents the purge water from coming in contact with the outside environment, especially oxygen, which might cause the constituents of the groundwater to oxidize. Therefore, by introducing the purge water back into the monitoring well, the necessity of dealing with the purge water as a hazardous waste under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act is eliminated.

Cardoso-Neto, J.E.; Williams, D.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Effects of agrochemical use in agricultural activities on the drinking water quality of ground and surface water: a case study of Agogo in the Asanti-Akim North District.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effects of agrochemical use in agricultural activities on the quality of ground and surface water within Agogo, a prominent tomato growing area in the (more)

Adonadaga, Melvin-Guy

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Experiments on adding a surfactant to water drops boiling on a hot surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...surfactant to boiling water drops 675 done with three...0 ppm (i.e. pure water), 100 ppm and 1000...and ambient pressure (atmospheric). 2. Experimental...surfactant to 800 g of water. The water was distilled...solution in the droplet generator the syringe, needle...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Recovery from acidification in European surface waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 5(3), 283297 (2001) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Range Transboundary Air Pollution of the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UN-ECE). The first agreement) protocol, signed in 1999, incorporates additional air pollutants and is intended to bring a 63% reduction, the majority of surface waters (38 of 56) showed significant (p 0.05) decreasing trends in pollution

Boyer, Edmond

430

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability, geometry and orientation on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, part IV: Effects of channel surface wettability in the commercialization of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to its association with the performance, cost-phase flow in parallel gas channels of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are investigated. Ex situ

Kandlikar, Satish

431

Development and Optimization of a HPLC-DAD Method for the Determination of Diverse Pharmaceuticals in Estuarine Surface Waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......3). The wastewater treatment plants (WWTP...raphytandem mass spectrometry...Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Balance) (500 mg...chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry...water and wastewater. TrAC Trends...German sewage treatment plants and rivers...agents) in wastewater and surface...in sewage treatment plant. Talanta...ionisation tandem mass spectrometry......

Tnia Vieira Madureira; Maria Joo Rocha; Quezia Bezerra Cass; Maria Elizabeth Tiritan

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Changes in the water surface profile of the Colorado River in Grand Canyon, Arizona, between 1923 and 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mouths and deposit large boulders into the river [Cooley et al., 1977; Webb et al., 1989; Melis et al fans or boulder bars even further downstream. When viewed in profile, the water surface is stepped, of that material by main stem Colorado River floods [Kieffer, 1985; Webb et al., 1999a]. Reworking consists of both

433

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

434

Nevada Test Site 2000 Annual Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a compilation of the calendar year 2000 groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). Contamination indicator data are presented in control chart and tabular form with investigation levels (IL) indicated. Gross water chemistry data are presented in graphical and tabular form. Other information in the report includes, the Cumulative Chronology for Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program, a brief description of the site hydrogeology, and the groundwater sampling procedure.

Y. E.Townsend

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Resources Research Institute Annual Technical Report FY 2001 Introduction WATER PROBLEMS Rivers are major generators of electrical power and support a rapidly growing population and economy. Water resource management activities such as water rights adjudication, groundwater resources assessment

436

Economies of Size in Municipal Water-Treatment Technologies: A Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Brackish Groundwater Reverse-Osmosis Desalination. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 ES Classification by Cost Category, Type, and Item. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 ES Classification by Facility Segment.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Reported Cost of Supply and Treatment ($/1,000 gallons) for Surface-Water Treatment Facilities and RO Desalination Facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 3 Initial Construction Costs for a 2.0 mgd Facility...

Boyer, Christopher N.; Rister, M. Edward; Rogers, Callie S.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Browning, Charles Jr.; Elium III, James R.; Seawright, Emily K.

437

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE established the Groundwater Monitoring Program (GMP) (WP 02-1) to monitor groundwater resources at WIPP. In the past, the GMP was conducted to establish background data of existing conditions of groundwater quality and quantity in the WIPP vicinity, and to develop and maintain a water quality database as required by regulation. Today the GMP is conducted consistent with 204.1.500 NMAC (New MexicoAdministrative Code), "Adoption of 40 CFR [Code of Federal Regulations] Part 264,"specifically 40 CFR 264.90 through 264.101. These sections of 20.4.1 NMAC provide guidance for detection monitoring of groundwater that is, or could be, affected by waste management activities at WIPP. Detection monitoring at WIPP is designed to detect contaminants in the groundwater long before the general population is exposed. Early detection will allow cleanup efforts to be accomplished before any exposure to the general population can occur. Title 40 CFR Part 264, Subpart F, stipulates minimum requirements of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (42 United States Code [U.S.C.] 6901 et seq.) (RCRA) groundwater monitoring programs including the number and location of monitoring wells; sampling and reporting schedules; analytical methods and accuracy requirements; monitoring parameters; and statistical treatment of monitoring data. This document outlines how WIPP intends to protect and preserve groundwater within the WIPP Land Withdrawal Area (WLWA). Groundwater protection is just one aspect of the WIPP environmental protection effort. An overview of the entire environmental protection effort can be found in DOE/WIPP 99-2194, Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan. The WIPP GMP is designed to statistically determine if any changes are occurring in groundwater characteristics within and surrounding the WIPP facility. If a change is noted, the cause will then be determined and the appropriate corrective action(s) initiated.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Water quality in the vicinity of Fenton Hill: Progress report, 1983 and 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water quality data have been collected since 1974 from established surface and groundwater stations at and in the vicinity of Fenton Hill (Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Demonstration Site) located in the Jemez Mountains. This is part of a continued program of environmental studies. There has been a slight variation in chemical quality of water from the surface and groundwater stations; however, these variations are within normal seasonal fluctuations. Water supply at the site is pumped from the aquifer in the Abiquiu Tuff. Cumulative production from 1976 through 1984 has been 41.5 x 10/sup 6/ gal. The water level in the supply well declined from 365 ft in 1976 to 379 ft in 1984.

Purtymun, W.D.; Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Becker, N.M.; Williams, M.C.; Maes, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the collision dynamics of a water droplet containing an additive on a heated solid surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...faces (i.e. various hydrocarbons, emulsified hydrocarbons, surfactants), experimental...investigations that have employed water as the fluid are reviewed...considered a plethora of hydrocarbons in addition to water impact. Makino & Michiyoshi...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EM_GroundwaterSurveyRport_formatted.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

81006 81006 WILLOWSTICK TECHNOLOGIES LLC.: ELECTROMAGNETIC GROUNDWATER SURVEY: A demonstration of an Electromagnetic Groundwater Survey to Identify Flowpaths of Injected Water in the Shannon Sandstone, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the Period of July 26 - November 1, 2005 Date Completed: May 19, 2006 By Brian Black Prepared for the United States Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Work performed under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA 2005-060 This document may contain protected CRADA information produced under CRADA no. 2005-060 and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA

442

Electric resistance of water films on the surface of ice near the phase transition temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric resistance of the surface layer of a polycrystalline ... ice melting, a monotonic decrease in the resistance of the ice surface changes to growth, ... of melting. In the growth stage, the resistance ...

G. S. Bordonski?; S. D. Krylov

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Effects of Energy Prices on Groundwater Extraction in Agriculture in the High Plains Aquifer*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the High Plains Aquifer. Dumler et al. (2009) estimate that the energy cost of extracting irrigation water1 The Effects of Energy Prices on Groundwater Extraction in Agriculture in the High Plains-752-0824 Abstract In this article we examine the effects of energy prices on groundwater extraction using

Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

444

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Classification of groundwater at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater occurring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been classified according to the ``Guidelines for Ground-Water Classification Under the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Ground-Water Protection Strategy`` (June 1988). All of the groundwater units at the NTS are Class II, groundwater currently (IIA) or potentially (IIB) a source of drinking water. The Classification Review Area (CRA) for the NTS is defined as the standard two-mile distance from the facility boundary recommended by EPA. The possibility of expanding the CRA was evaluated, but the two-mile distance encompasses the area expected to be impacted by contaminant transport during a 10-year period (EPA,s suggested limit), should a release occur. The CRA is very large as a consequence of the large size of the NTS and the decision to classify the entire site, not individual areas of activity. Because most activities are located many miles hydraulically upgradient of the NTS boundary, the CRA generally provides much more than the usual two-mile buffer required by EPA. The CRA is considered sufficiently large to allow confident determination of the use and value of groundwater and identification of potentially affected users. The size and complex hydrogeology of the NTS are inconsistent with the EPA guideline assumption of a high degree of hydrologic interconnection throughout the review area. To more realistically depict the site hydrogeology, the CRA is subdivided into eight groundwater units. Two main aquifer systems are recognized: the lower carbonate aquifer system and the Cenozoic aquifer system (consisting of aquifers in Quaternary valley fill and Tertiary volcanics). These aquifer systems are further divided geographically based on the location of low permeability boundaries.

Chapman, J.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

groundwater | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany Contact NETL Key Staff Mission and Overview History Organization Awards & Recognition Education Site Enviromental Quality Visiting NETL Ground...

447

Experimental study of turbulent unconfined groundwater flow in a single fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental study of turbulent unconfined groundwater flow in a single fracture Jiazhong Qiana groundwater flow in a single fracture under the conditions of different surface roughness and apertures. We found that the gradient of the Reynolds number versus the average velocity in a single fracture

Zhan, Hongbin

448

Surface species formed by the adsorption and dissociation of water molecules on Ru(0001) surface containing a small coverage of carbon atoms studied by scanning tunneling microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The adsorption and dissociation of water on a Ru(0001) surface containing a small amount ({le} 3 %) of carbon impurities was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Various surface species are formed depending on the temperature. These include molecular H{sub 2}O, H{sub 2}O-C complexes, H, O, OH and CH. Clusters of either pure H{sub 2}O or mixed H{sub 2}O-OH species are also formed. Each of these species produces a characteristic contrast in the STM images and can be identified by experiment and by ab initio total energy calculations coupled with STM image simulations. Manipulation of individual species via excitation of vibrational modes with the tunneling electrons has been used as supporting evidence.

Dept of Materials Science and Engineering UCB; Dept of Applied Science and Technology, UCB; Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Madrid, Spain; Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yale University; Salmeron, Miquel; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Mugarza, Aitor; Cerda, Jorge I.; Heyde, Markus; Qi, Yabing; Schwarz, Udo D.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tubbs, and H. E. Gove, Thermonuclear 36 Cl pulse in naturalTubbs, and H. E. Gove, Thermonuclear 36 Cl pulse in naturalfrom above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing, similar to

Shaw, Glenn David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 Measured electrical conductivity vs. predicted electricalFigure 2.8: Measured electrical conductivity vs. predicted

Shaw, Glenn David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) are being created in many parts of Texas to allow local citizens to manage and protect their groundwater. This publication answers frequently asked questions about groundwater and GCDs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT RIVERTON PROCESSING SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated). A few of the key findings include: ? Physical removal of the tailings and associated materials reduced contaminant discharges to groundwater and reduced contaminant concentrations in the near-field plume. ? In the mid-field and far-field areas, residual contaminants are present in the vadose zone as a result of a variety of factors (e.g., evaporation/evapotranspiration from the capillary fringe and water table, higher water levels during tailings disposal, and geochemical processes). ? Vadose zone contaminants are widely distributed above the plume and are expected to be present as solid phase minerals that can serve as secondary sources to the underlying groundwater. The mineral sample collected at the site is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. ? Water table fluctuations, irrigation, infiltration and flooding will episodically solubilize some of the vadose zone secondary source materials and release contaminants to the groundwater for continued down gradient migration extending the overall timeframe for flushing. ? Vertical contaminant stratification in the vadose zone and surficial aquifer will vary from location to location. Soil and water sampling strategies and monitoring well construction details will influence characterization and monitoring data. ? Water flows from the Wind River, beneath the Riverton Processing Site and through the plume toward the Little Wind River. This base flow pattern is influenced by seasonal irrigation and other anthropogenic activities, and by natural perturbations (e.g., flooding). ? Erosion and reworking of the sediments adjacent to the Little Wind River results in high heterogeneity and complex flow and geochemistry. Water flowing into oxbow lakes (or through areas where oxbow lakes were present in the past) will be exposed to localized geochemical conditions that favor chemical reduction (i.e., naturally reduced zones) and other attenuation processes. This attenuation is not sufficient to fully stabilize the plume or to reduce contaminant concentrations in the groundwater to target levels. Consistent with these observations, the team recommended increased emphasis on collecting data in the zones where secondary source minerals are projected to accumulate (e.g., just above the water table) using low cost methods such as x-ray fluorescence. The team also suggested several low cost nontraditional sources of data that have the potential to provide supplemental data (e.g., multispectral satellite imagery) to inform and improve legacy management decisions. There are a range of strategies for management of the legacy contamination in the groundwater and vadose zone near the Riverton Processing Site. These range from the current strategy, natural flushing, to intrusive remedies such as plume scale excavation of the vadose zone and pump & treat. Each option relates to the site specific conditions, issues and opportunities in a unique way. Further, each option has advantages and disadvantages that need to be weighed. Scoping evaluation was performed for three major classes

Looney, B.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

Removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface by short pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The process of removal of a liquid paraffin film from a water surface irradiated by 40 - 270-{mu}s pulses from a CO{sub 2} laser is studied experimentally and theoretically. It is found for the first time that the mass of removed paraffin can exceed that of paraffin located in the region irradiated by the laser pulse. A theoretical model is proposed which explains the results obtained. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

Antonova, L I; Drobyazko, S V; Evdokimov, I A; Krasyukov, A G; Likhanskii, V V; Loboiko, A I; Senatorov, Yu M [State Research Center of Russian Federation 'Troitsk Institute for Innovation and Fusion Research', Troitsk, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

454

Surface water quality assessment of a proposed southwest Georgia lake site.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Clean and cheap freshwater is an increasingly limited resource and humans continue to engineer systems to utilize available water resources. In some instances, the construction (more)

Andrews, Chad Allen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

The distribution of biogenic thiols in surface waters of Galveston Bay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

along a salinity gradient in estuarine waters off of Galveston Bay, Texas. ... A major thiol peak was present in Lower Galveston Bay and a minor peak in Upper.

1910-00-90T23:59:59.000Z

456

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Groundwater Classification and Standards (North Carolina) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Classification and Standards (North Carolina) Classification and Standards (North Carolina) Groundwater Classification and Standards (North Carolina) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Construction Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environment and Natural Resources The rules established in this Subchapter 2L of North Carolina Administrative Code Title 15A are intended to maintain and preserve the quality of the groundwaters, prevent and abate pollution and contamination of the waters of the state, protect public health, and permit management of the groundwaters for their best usage by the citizens of North Carolina. It

458

3D Simulation of Missing Pellet Surface Defects in Light Water Reactor Fuel Rods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The cladding on light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods provides a stable enclosure for fuel pellets and serves as a first barrier against fission product release. Consequently, it is important to design fuel to prevent cladding failure due to mechanical interactions with fuel pellets. Cladding stresses can be effectively limited by controlling power increase rates. However, it has been shown that local geometric irregularities caused by manufacturing defects known as missing pellet surfaces (MPS) in fuel pellets can lead to elevated cladding stresses that are sufficiently high to cause cladding failure. Accurate modeling of these defects can help prevent these types of failures. Nuclear fuel performance codes commonly use a 1.5D (axisymmetric, axially-stacked, one-dimensional radial) or 2D axisymmetric representation of the fuel rod. To study the effects of MPS defects, results from 1.5D or 2D fuel performance analyses are typically mapped to thermo-mechanical models that consist of a 2D plane-strain slice or a full 3D representation of the geometry of the pellet and clad in the region of the defect. The BISON fuel performance code developed at Idaho National Laboratory employs either a 2D axisymmetric or 3D representation of the full fuel rod. This allows for a computational model of the full fuel rod to include local defects. A 3D thermo-mechanical model is used to simulate the global fuel rod behavior, and includes effects on the thermal and mechanical behavior of the fuel due to accumulation of fission products, fission gas production and release, and the effects of fission gas accumulation on thermal conductivity across the fuel-clad gap. Local defects can be modeled simply by including them in the 3D fuel rod model, without the need for mapping between two separate models. This allows for the complete set of physics used in a fuel performance analysis to be included naturally in the computational representation of the local defect, and for the effects of the local defect to be coupled with the global fuel rod model. This approach for modeling fuel with MPS defects is demonstrated and compared with alternative techniques. The effects of varying parameters of the MPS defect are studied using this technique and presented here.

B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; R.L. Williamson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

In situ photoelectron spectroscopy study of water adsorption on model biomaterial surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or solid-vacuum) interface in UHV conditions (UHV) with surface sensitivestudy. An ultra-high vacuum (UHV) chamber dedicated for

Ketteler, Guido

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Groundwater Discharge Permit and Registration (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Discharge Permitting and Registration Program seeks to protect groundwater quality by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for wastewater discharges. The program...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "groundwater surface water" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater containing legacy contaminants (pollutants that remain after their sources have been controlled) moves through aquifers in response to the hydraulic gradient. As the groundwater moves,...

462

Water strategies and potential of desalination in Jordan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jordan is considered one of the countries in the world with the scarcest of water resources. This has led to deterioration of the groundwater quality and a